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Books

Books

HOMELAND SECURITY, ITS LAW AND ITS STATE

By Christos Boukalas (Routledge 2014)

This book employs Marxist state theory (esp. Nicos Poulantzas and Bob Jessop) to assess US counterterrorism law and policy, and its impact on the US polity.

(More details: http://www.taylorandfrancis.com/books/details/9780415526319/)

This book assesses the impact of post-9/11 domestic counterterrorism policy on US political life. It examines political discourse, law, institutional architecture, and state-population relations, and shows that ‘homeland security’ is a project with wide-ranging implications for democratic institutions and culture. These implications are addressed through a novel approach that treats law and the state as social relations, and relates developments in law to those in the state and in social dynamics. On this basis, the book examines the new political representations in counterterrorism discourse, especially regarding the relation between the state and the population. It examines the form and content of counterterrorism law, the powers it provides, and the structure and functions it prescribes for the state.

By focusing on the new Department of Homeland Security and the restructuring of the intelligence apparatus, the book assesses the new, intelligence-led, policing model. Finally, it examines forms of popular support and resistance to homeland security, to discuss citizenship and state-population relations.

The author concludes that homeland security has turned the US into a hybrid polity; the legal and political institutions of democracy remain intact, but their content and practices become authoritarian and exclude the population from politics. These legal and political forms remain operative beyond counterterrorism, in the context of the present economic crisis. They are a permanent configuration of power.

 

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/new-from-routledge-homeland-security-its-law-and-its-state-by-christos-boukalas

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

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Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

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Russian Revolution

CONFERENCE ON WAR, REVOLUTION, CIVIL WAR: EASTERN EUROPE 1917-23

UCD CENTRE FOR WAR STUDIES

War, Revolution, Civil War: Eastern Europe 1917-23
25-26 March 2011

Venue: Clinton Institute, Seminar Room
University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
Friday, 25 March 2011

13:00 Registration
13:30  Welcome and Introduction

13:45 – 15:30   Panel 1: The War as Imperial Challenge – Russia
Chair: Nikolaus Katzer (German Historical Institute Moscow)

Semen Gol’din (Hebrew University Jerusalem): The Jewish Policy of Military and Civilian Authorities as a Case Study of the Systemic Crisis in the Russian Empire, 1914-1917

Alexander Semyonov (Smolny Institute St. Petersburg/ Ab Imperio) World War as the Civil War and Civil War as the World War: The Radicalization of Political Visions in the War Time Russian Empire

Boris Kolonicky (European University St. Petersburg) “Nicolas the 3rd”: Images of the Commander in Chief Grand Duke Nikolaj Nikolaevich (1914-1915)

15:030– 16:00   COFFEE BREAK

16:00 – 17:30 Panel 2:  Revolution and Civil War – Russia
Chair: Katja Bruisch (German Historical Institute Moscow)

Vladimir Shishkin (Institute of History, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk) WWI as a factor of Russian Revolution and Counterrevolution

Yulia Yurievna Khmelevskaya (Center for Cultural History Studies, South Ural State University, Chelyabinsk) A la Guerre com a la Guerre: the American Relief Administration and experience of the First World War in Fighting the famine in early Soviet Russia, 1921-1923

Dmitrij Simonov (Institute of History, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk) Russia’s Military Potential in 1918

19:30 DINNER

Saturday, 26 March 2011

09:30 – 11:00   Panel 3: The Baltics and Finland
Chair:  Tomas Balkelis (University College Dublin)

Juha Siltala (Helsinki University) Terror in the Finnish Civil War

Aldis Minins (University of Latvia) Manifestations of the Civil War in Latvia, 1918-1920

Taavi Minnik (Talinn University) Terror and Repressions in Estonia, 1918-1919

11:00– 11:30 TEA / COFFE BREAK

11:30 -13:00  Panel 4: Poland
Chair: Julia Eichenberg (University College Dublin)

Frank Golczewski (University of Hamburg): The Wars after the War. The Fight for the Polish Eastern Border 1918-1920

Jan Snopko (Białystok University): The influence of the Russian revolution on the policy of Joseph Pilsudski and the fate of the Polish Legions (1917-1918)

Rüdiger Ritter (Free University Berlin): Germans and Poles fighting against regional identity: The Confrontations in Upper Silesia after World War I from the perspectives of participants, the regional, national, and international public

13:00– 13:30 LUNCH BREAK

13:00 – 14:30  Panel 5:  The Balkans
Chair: John Paul Newman (University College Dublin)

Mark Biondich (Carleton University) Preliminary title: The Balkans Revolution, War, and Political Violence

Alexander Korb (University of Leicester) “Terrorists interned” Ustasha nationalists, revisionist powers and the breakup of Yugoslavia

Uğur Ümit Üngör (University of Utrecht) A Ten-year War? Post-war Violence in the Ottoman-Russian Borderlands

Dmitar Tasic (Institute for Strategic Research, Department of Military History) Some Common Attributes of Political Violence in Albania, Yugoslavia, and Bulgaria

14:30 COFFEE / TEA BREAK

15:00 – 16:00  Rountable Discussion
Chair: Robert Gerwarth (University College Dublin)

For information about attendance, contact: christina.griessler@ucd.ie

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

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Global Capitalism

EXAMINING THE RELEVANCE OF MARX AND MARXISM TO CONTEMPORARY GLOBAL SOCIETY

 

Please Circulate around your lists:

2nd Call for Papers
Examining the Relevance of Marx and Marxism to Contemporary Global Society
Newcastle University, 29th and 30th of January 2011

Rationale, Outline and Aims
The 21st century has so far seen US-led military interventions, global financial crises, identity conflicts, terrorism on a grand scale, environmental disasters and fraught industrial/labour relations. These dramatic events have challenged the notion of an ‘end to history’ and the widespread belief that the collapse of the Soviet Union has made Marx and Marxism irrelevant. With growing instability in the social, political and economic functioning of human societies, we wish to examine the relevance of Marx to contemporary global society.

In order to do this, Global Discourse (http://global-discourse.com) is organising a two-day conference at Newcastle University on Saturday 29th and Sunday 30th of January 2011.

The aims of the event are:
* To examine the relevance and application of Marxian, Marxist, Neo-Marxist and Post-Marxist thought to contemporary issues.
* To reassess scriptural and doctrinal commitments within various ‘Marxisms’.
* To facilitate interdisciplinary, inter-paradigmatic discourse on a range of contemporary issues.

Papers from this event will form the basis of a special issue of Global Discourse to be released in February 2011.

Keynote Papers
The keynote talks will be given by Professor Norman Geras, author of Marx and Human Nature, whose paper will relate to the general theme, ‘What does it mean to be Marxist?’, and Professor Stuart Sim, author of Post-Marxism: An Intellectual History, who will be examining the achievements of Post-Marxism.

Topics, Deadlines and Publishing Process
We are currently soliciting papers addressing the two topics covered by the keynote speakers, namely: ‘What does it mean to be Marxist?’ and ‘Post-Marxism and its discontents’.

We invite the submission of abstracts on these topics by November 15th.
Authors whose abstracts are accepted will then be invited to submit full papers by December 17th. This will enable refereeing priori to publication of the special issue of Global Discourse in February 2011.

We aim, subsequently, to publish a collected edition in print based on these papers.

Please submit all abstracts, papers and panel proposals to the editors at editor@global-discourse.com.

Costs
There will be no conference fee.

A lunch buffet and refreshments will be provided free of charge.

An optional evening conference meal on Saturday 29th of January will be held at a nearby restaurant. We will seek to organise a special rate for the meal and will circulate details in due course. Participants shall bear the cost of their meal.

Places
There will be space for 40 paper-givers and 20 non-paper-giving participants.

Please address all queries and submit all papers to Matthew Johnson and Mark Edward at editor@global-discourse.com.

Global Discourse: http://global-discourse.com/

Global Economic Crisis

With best wishes
Matthew Johnson

 

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Utopia?

DYSTOPIA: WHAT IS TO BE DONE?

Dystopia: What is to be done? is an hour long documentary film available for free viewing and/or download and showing for educational purposes on the website: www.DystopiaFilm.com.  

It analyses a compendium of crises facing humanity – peak oil, climate change, pollution, disease. poverty, terrorism, war etc. – in terms of their complex causal inter-linkages and common framing and exacerbation within the global world economy.

The long time Marxist message that humanity faces a choice between (eco)socialism and barbarism is given a renewed urgency. The website in addition to the film contains a one minute trailer, a resources page and information about the book of the same title and it author.

Dr. Garry Potter

Director of Graduate Studies

Department of Sociology

Wilfird Laurier University

Waterloo, Ontario

Canada  N2L 3C5

gpotter@wlu.ca or garrypotter34@aol.com

END

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com
Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

What lies in the shadow of the statue?

INSECURE TIMES, EMERGENCY MEASURES: STATE(S) OF EXCEPTION?

One Day Workshop: Thursday 22nd July 2010

Institute of Advanced Studies, Lancaster University,
Room A010, 9.00 a.m. – 6.30 p.m.

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS:

Conor Gearty, Law, LSE;

Bob Jessop, Sociology, Lancaster;

Costas Lapavitsas, Economics, SOAS;

Martin Loughlin Law, LSE.

OTHER PARTICIPANTS INCLUDE:

Christos Boukalas, Politics, Lancaster

Michael Dillon, Politics, Lancaster

Michael Kratke, Sociology, Lancaster

Mark Lacey, Politics, Lancaster

Christopher May, Politics, Lancaster

David Seymour, Law, Lancaster

David Sugarman, Law, Lancaster

The Centre of Law and Society at Lancaster University has organised a one-day Workshop on the subject of the ‘state of exception’ from researchers and scholars across the spectrum of the human sciences, lawyers, activists, and NGO’s.

The response of western states to the attacks on the World Trade Centre in late 2001 led to major shifts in state organisation and operating modes and in social practices and perceptions. It thus significantly affects the nexus of socio-political relations, as expressed in such spheres as law, political action, economy, popular ideology and culture, war, policing, work, international relations, and ultimately, the texture of everyday life.

Academic reflection on these developments seems, whatever its entry point or primary area of concern, to converge on the conclusion that we are dealing with some kind of “state of emergency”: whether as a derailment from the rule of law, unilateralism in international affairs, recurrence of a Schmittian ‘Political’ informing state power – and so on. It can be argued that the concept “state of emergency” not only re-appears, but claims predominance within social science in the early 21st century. Significantly, it seems to be the social-science concept that most resonates in society, as it is used by a variety of actors, in a variety of contexts.

In any case, the specific post-9/11 version of counterterrorism policy has by now developed and acquired its own history. Democrat dominance in the US political stage may imply that further changes lie ahead, while the ‘emergency’ mode of power seems to be migrating (again?) from security to economic policy.

Given its centrality in social theory, the importance of its referents, the range of areas in which it is now employed, the polyvalence of the term, and the indeterminacy characterising the present conjuncture, it is time to (re)assess the character of state power and its effects on the practices and meanings of early 21st century social life. To this end, it would be good to start by assessing the concept that has been the analytical lynchpin for current developments.

Accordingly, the Centre of Law and Society is organising a one-day Workshop on the “state of exception”.

The Workshop will bring together academics, lawyers, activists and NGO staff in an attempt to clarify the term’s meaning and connotations and to investigate its relevance and adequacy as a conceptual and analytical framework for contemporary socio-political phenomena.

For further information and registration, please contact:
Dr. Christos Boukalas,
Department of Politics and International Relations,
Lancaster University,
Lancaster LA1 4YD,
United Kingdom.
Email: c.boukalas@lancaster.ac.uk

Co-organisers
Christos Boukalas (Politics, Lancaster University) and
David Sugarman (Law, Lancaster University)

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Globalisation

TRANSNATIONAL MILITANCY IN THE 21st CENTURY

A roundtable discussion for the launch of issue 2 of the Journal of Critical Globalisation Studies

http://www.criticalglobalisation.com

Faisal Devji, Saul Newman, Kevin McDonald & Nathan Coombs

February 25th 2010, 6PM, Goldsmiths College

The second issue of the Journal of Critical Globalisation Studies will be launched with a special event at Goldsmiths College in London – a roundtable on ‘Transnational Militancy in the 21st Century’ based on a discussion conducted, and to be published in the forthcoming issue. The participants will be Faisal Devji (author: The Terrorist in Search of Humanity),Kevin McDonald (Global Movements: Action and Culture), Saul Newman (Politics Most Unusual: Violence, Sovereignty and Democracy in the War on Terror) & Nathan Coombs (editor-in-chief for issue 2 of the JCGS).

Amongst the themes explored will be: the relationship of transnational politics to the possibility of militancy; what/who is a militant subject? what are militant demands today (none, some, infinitely many?); and what developments might we see throughout the rest of the 21st century?

The event is free and unticketed. It is scheduled for 25th February 2010, 6-8PMat Goldsmiths College, room Ben Pimlott Lecture Theatre (BPB LT).

For a campus map of Goldsmiths College: http://www.gold.ac.uk/media/campus-map.pdf

***

Nathan Coombs

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