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images (1)THE LABOUR PARTY, EUROPE AND CIVIC ENGAGEMENT: PEOPLE’S EMPOWERMENT OR MISPLACED IDEALISM?

Half-Day Workshop at THE University of East London

7 March 2015. Venue: UEL / Stratford Campus

Convenors: Centre for the Study of States, Markets & People (School of Business & Law, University of East London); Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence (King’s College London); and the School of Politics & International Relations (SPIRE, Keele University)

The Labour Party, Europe and Civic Engagement: People’s Empowerment or Misplaced Idealism?

Jeremy Corbyn’s ideas of “Peoples Quantitative Easing” (PQE), progressive taxation, a new welfare state in the UK and changing the European Union from a neo-liberal monetarist construction to a civilised, multi-cultural and pro-labour space for good governance are gaining traction amongst informed practitioners of finance, politicians, academics and beyond. But can wider communities and constituencies be engaged, and how? The theme of “civic engagement” would appear to empower people, engaging civil society and local communities with pro-growth and pro-welfare initiatives across Britain and Europe. The workshop aims at exploring the new ideas of the Labour Party examining their appeal and whether or not they further civic engagement empowering the citizen, or whether it is just another form of misplaced idealism with no possibilities to deliver.

Themes to explore include:

What is the relationship between Labour Party and the EU in both historical and contemporary perspectives? What’s the Labour Party stance on the EU today? What are the key ideas and policies of the Labour Party under Jeremy Corbyn and how do they engage with civil society and the key constituencies of the youth and middle classes? Are Labour Party’s new policies an alternative to austerity and how do they impact on current taxation regimes and inflation? Do Labour Party’s new policies augment the distance between Britain the EU? How do local communities can benefit from the Labour Party and vice versa? What would be the likely impact of Labour Party’s policies on education and the University sector from their possible im plementation in the future? Can PQE (People’s Quantitative Easing) lead to a re-industrialisation of Britain and how does it fit with the overall economic policy of the “New Labour” (abolition of tuition fees, re-nationalisation of railways, new taxation regime etc.)?

Contact and further information: Ejike Udeogu, Lecturer in Economics, School of Business & Law, University of East London, e.udeogu@uel.ac.uk

The convenors thank The Political Quarterly for its generous support

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/the-labour-party-europe-and-civic-engagement

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Rosa Luxemburg

Rosa Luxemburg

SOCIALISM IN ASIA AND EUROPE

International Rosa Luxemburg Conference 2015

Seoul, Korea
“Socialism in Asia and Europe”

27-28 November 2015
Venue: Pittsburgh Hall, Sungkonghoe University, Seoul, Korea

Organizing Committee:
International Rosa Luxemburg Society
Institute for East Asian Studies, Sungkonghoe University, Korea
Institute for Social Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Korea

Sponsor: National Research Foundation of Korea
Language: English/Korean Spontaneous interpretation

For more detailed information: http://ieas21.or.kr/rosa2015/

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/international-rosa-luxemburg-conference-2015-in-seoul-korea

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Policing Crises

Policing Crises

POLICING CRISES NOW!

Fourteenth Annual Meeting of the Cultural Studies Association (US)  

Villanova University, Villanova, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

2-5 June, 2016

Policing Crises Now!

SUBMIT TODAY!

The Cultural Studies Association (CSA) invites proposals from its current and future members for participation in its fourteenth annual meeting. Proposals on all topics of relevance to cultural studies are welcome, with priority given to proposals that critically and creatively engage this year’s highlighted theme.

The theme, Policing Crises Now, is prompted by and departs from the rich and diverse innovations and provocations of Policing the Crisis (1978), a groundbreaking work generated by a collective of scholars, including and facilitated by Stuart Hall. Those innovations and provocations include the collective nature of the research, the conjunctural/structural mode of analysis, the attention given to race, gender and sexuality in political-economic dynamics, as well as the analysis of intertwined statistical representations, media representations, legal proceedings and, of course, policing by police, as a response to a “crisis of hegemony.”

Taking up Policing Crises Now, in the current conjuncture, requires fresh theorization both of policing, in light, especially, of the potential elasticity of the metaphor, and of crisis in light of its diverse deployments in critical analysis, dominant political-economic practice, and popular culture. By pluralizing crises, we aim to open the scope of inquiry at this conference to include the full range of social, cultural, natural, political, and economic phenomena to which the term crisis has been attached. We also aim, under this rubric, to develop conversations engaged during our last conference about the structure of university work and employment, the ways knowledge production is constrained and enabled by austerity politics, neoliberal entrepreneurialism, the prominence of debt and risk, and the university as a site of policing of thought and political activism. It is o ur hope that this conference both builds from and enables collective knowledge production and research practices.

 

Topics that might be addressed include but are not limited to:

  • Collective research methodologies
  • Securitization, as deployed in financial and international relations/military/police contexts, and the relation between those uses
  • Risk, as deployed vis-a-vis individualized responsibility for physical danger, “at risk” populations, and as a central component of economic praxis
  • The NAACP journal, The Crisis, and its editor W.E.B. DuBois, especially their role in broadening the struggle against racial injustices
  • Debt as policing practice and/or debtor as moralized subject position
  • Financial “crises” in the US, UK, Greece, Iceland, or other specific locations
  • Precarity, its locations and impacts, ranging from the minutiae of labor contracts to its impacts on social reproduction.
  • Policing of national borders against migration/refugees (in Europe now, but also many other times and locations)
  • Identity formation s within and among historical and contemporary migrants as modes of subjection and resistance
  • Policing as a context of imperial convergence through shared strategies of rule, policy/arms transfers (i.e. U.S.-Israel), shared contexts of training.
  • Anti-Black police violence in the US (and elsewhere)
  • Media (old, new, social) representations of anti-Black police violence
  • Relation between incarceration and debt — the revival of “debtor’s prison”
  • Activisms and rebellions against policing and prisons, recently in Ferguson, Baltimore, under the rubric of Black Lives Matter as well as or in relation to long standing efforts and organizations (especially local to Villanova or Philadelphia)
  • Representational strategies and strategic representations (by the state, by artists, by activists) of violence, debt, police.
  • Restructuring of universities for increased managerial control and insecuritization of faculty, etc .
  • Campuses as a historical context of policing politicization in the name of the public; the emerging context of campus privatization and securitization; new techniques, strategies, and rationales for campus policing.
  • Renewed campus regulation of sexuality, claims of sexual vulnerability, and sexual “securitization” of students.

 

We welcome proposals from scholars contributing to cultural studies who may be located in any discipline, inter-discipline, or scholarly field. CSA aims to provide multiple and diverse spaces for the cross-pollination of art, activism, pedagogy, design, and research by bringing together participants from a variety of positions inside and outside the university. Therefore, while we welcome traditional academic papers and panels, we also encourage contributions that experiment with alternative formats and challenge the traditional disciplinary formations and exclusionary conceptions and practices of the academic (see session format options listed below).

We are particularly interested in proposals for sessions designed to document and advance existing forms of collective action or catalyze new collaborations. We encourage submissions from individuals working beyond the boundaries of the university: artists, activists, independent scholars, professionals, community organizers, and community college educators. And we invite proposals that engage with the conference location/region and its many resources.

 

Important Dates:

October 15, 2015: Submission System Opens (Membership and Registration also open — You must be a member to submit!)

February 1, 2016: Submissions Due

March 15, 2016: Notifications Sent Out

April 15, 2016: Early Registration Ends and Late Registration Begins (Registration fees increase by $50 for all categories.)

May 1, 2016: Last day to register to participate in the conference – your name will be dropped from the program if you do not register by this date.

 

LOCATION

The 2016 conference will be held at Villanova University, Villanova, PA. The closest airport is Philadelphia International Airport. Lodging options will include on-campus accommodation, and accommodation in hotels in the surrounding Villanova locale and in Center City Philadelphia–a 20 minute train ride from Villanova.

SUBMISSION PROCESS AND TIMELINE

All proposals should be submitted through the CSA online system, available at Annual Conference. Submission of proposals is limited to current CSA members. See the benefits of membership and become a member: Membership Application.

INSTITUTIONAL MEMBERSHIPS include three complimentary conference registrations annually for students. Graduate students who wish to submit proposals are strongly encouraged to speak with their Department Chair or Program Director about institutional membership and where possible, make use of the complimentary registrations. Full benefits of institutional membership are described here: http://www.culturalstudiesassociation.org/institutions.

The submission system will be open by October 15, 2015. Please prepare all the materials required to propose your session according to the given directions before you begin electronic submission. All program information – names, presentation titles, and institutional affiliations – will be based on initial conference submissions.  Please avoid lengthy presentation and session titles, use normal capitalization, and include your name and affiliations as you would like them to appear on the conference program schedule.

REGISTRATION:

In order to participate in the conference and be listed in the program, all those accepted to participate must register before May 1, 2016Register here.

TRAVEL GRANTS

CSA offers a limited number of travel grants, for which graduate and advanced undergraduate students can apply. Only those who are individual members, have been accepted to participate, and have registered for the conferenceare eligible to apply for a travel grant. Other details and criteria are listed here: http://www.culturalstudiesassociation.org/travelgrants

Important Note about Technology Requests

Accepted participants should send their technology requests to Madeline Cauterucci at madeline.cauterucci@villanova.edu and Michelle Fehsenfeld at contact@culturalstudiesassociation.org. Technology requests must be made by May 1st.

CONFERENCE FORMATS

Note: While we accept individual paper proposals, we especially encourage submissions of pre-constituted sessions. Proposals with participants from multiple institutions will be given preference.

All sessions are 90 minutes long. All conference formats are intended to encourage the presentation and discussion of projects at different stages of development and to foster intellectual exchange and collaboration. Please feel free to adapt the suggested formats or propose others in order to suit your session’s goals. If you have any questions, please address them to Michelle Fehsenfeld at: contact@culturalstudiesassociation.org

PRE-CONSTITUTED PAPER PANELS: Pre-constituted panels allow 3-4 individuals to each offer 15-20 minute presentations, leaving 30-45 minutes of the session for questions and discussion. Panels should have a chair/moderator and may have a discussant. Proposals for pre-constituted panels must include: the title of the panel; the name, title, affiliation, and contact information of the panel organizer; the names, titles, affiliations, and email addresses of all panelists, and a chair and/or discussant; a description of the panel’s topic (<500 words); and abstracts for each presentation (<150 words). Pre-constituted panels are preferred to individual paper submissions.

INDIVIDUAL PAPERS: Individuals may submit a proposal to present a 15-20 minute paper. Selected papers will be combined into panels at the discretion of the Program Committee. Individual paper proposals must include: the title of the paper; the name, title, affiliation, and email address of the author; and an abstract of the (<500 words).

ROUNDTABLES: Roundtables allow a group of participants to convene with the goal of generating discussion around a shared concern. In contrast to panels, roundtables typically involve shorter position or dialogue statements (5-10 minutes) in response to questions distributed in advance by the organizer. The majority of roundtable sessions should be devoted to discussion. Roundtables are limited to no more than five participants, including the organizer. We encourage roundtables involving participants from different institutions, centers, and organizations. Proposals for roundtables must include: the title of the roundtable; the name, title, affiliation, and contact information of the roundtable organizer; the names, titles, affiliations, and email addresses of the proposed roundtable participants; and a description of the position statements, questions, or debates that will be under discussion (<500 words).

PRAXIS SESSIONS: Praxis sessions allow a facilitator or facilitating team to set an agenda, pose opening questions, and/or organize hands-on participant activities, collaborations, or skill-shares. Successful praxis sessions will be organized around a specific objective, productively engage a cultural studies audience, and orient itself towards participants with minimal knowledge of the subject matter. Sessions organized around the development of ongoing creative, artistic, and activist projects are highly encouraged. The facilitator or team is responsible for framing the session, gathering responses and results from participants, helping everyone digest them, and (where applicable) suggesting possible fora for extending the discussion. Proposals for praxis sessions must include: the title of the session; the name, title, affiliation, and contact information the facilitators; a brief statement explaining the session’s connection to the conference theme and describing the activities to be undertaken (<500 words) and a short description of the session (<150 words) to appear in the conference program. Please direct any questions about praxis sessions to Michelle Fehsenfeld at contact@culturalstudiesassociation.org

SEMINARS: Seminars are small-group (maximum 15 individuals) discussion sessions for which participants prepare in advance of the conference. In previous years, preparation has involved shared readings, pre-circulated ”position papers” by seminar leaders and/or participants, and other forms of pre-conference collaboration. We particularly invite proposals for seminars designed to advance emerging lines of inquiry and research/teaching initiatives within cultural studies broadly construed. We also invite seminars designed to generate future collaborations among conference attendees, particularly through the formation of working groups. A limited number of seminars will be selected. Once the seminars are chosen, a call for participants in those seminars will be announced on the CSA webpage and listserv. Those who wish to participate in a particular seminar must apply the s eminar leader(s) directly by March 31, 2016. Seminar leader(s) will be responsible for providing the program committee with a confirmed list of participants (names, affiliations, and email addresses required) for inclusion in the conference program no later than May 1, 2016. Seminars will be marked in the conference programs as either closed to non-participants or open to all conference attendees. Proposals for seminars should include: the title of the seminar; the name, title, affiliation, and contact information of the seminar leader(s); and a description of the issues and questions that will be raised in discussion and an overview of the work to be completed by participants in advance of the seminar (<500 words). Individuals interested in participating in (rather than leading) a seminar should consult the list of seminars and the instructions for signing up for them, to be available on the conference website by March 1st.

Please direct questions about seminars seminars@culturalstudiesassociation.org. Please note that for them to run at the conference, seminars accepted for inclusion by the program committee must garner a minimum of 8 participants, including the seminar leader(s).

WORKING GROUP SESSIONS: CSA has a number of ongoing working groups. Working groups are encouraged to organize two sessions each. Those working groups organizing their sessions through an open call will post those call for proposals on the CSA website. If you are interested in participating in the conference through a working group, you should contact that working group directly. More information is available at: http://www.culturalstudiesassociation.org/workinggroups.

AUTHOR MEETS CRITIC SESSIONS: Author Meets Critic Sessions are designed to bring authors of recent books deemed to be important contributions to the field of cultural studies together with discussants selected to provide different viewpoints. Books published one to three years before the conference (for example, for the 2013 conference, only books published between 2010-2012 can be nominated) are eligible for nomination. Only CSA members may submit nominations.  Self-nominations are not accepted.

MAKE(R) SPACE: The Make(r) Space is a space for the collaborative and praxis driven portions of Cultural Studies – making space for art, making space for political activism, making space for new modes of knowledge exchange. It is our goal that this space will be created for those that have been historically and systemically left out of these conversations: artists, activists, poets, and other cultural critics and makers. We want to create a space that helps the CSA fulfill some of the implicit praxis portion of its goals to “create and promote an effective community of cultural studies practitioners and scholars.” Building on the poets, dancers, painters, and activists already interested in the space, we welcome proposals for exhibits, performances, workshops, skill shares, story telling, and other ways of meaning-making and art-making in the world. We especially encourage Make(r) Space submissions from i ndividuals working beyond the boundaries of the university: artists, activists, independent scholars, professionals, community organizers, contingent faculty, and community college educators. In the spirit of this year’s theme, Policing Crises Now, and building on the work done at last year’s CSA conference we will be utilizing a portion of the Make(r)Space to make space for a visual representation and discussion of debt and risk. Please email Make(r)Space submissions by February 1, 2016 to: makerspace@culturalstudiesassociation.org (Notification and registration deadlines are the same as for all conference participants.)

PANEL CHAIRS: We are always in need of people to serve as panel chairs. To volunteer to do so please submit your name, title, affiliation, and email address, as well as a brief list of your research interests through the conference website.

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/fourteenth-annual-meeting-of-the-cultural-studies-association-us-villanova-university-villanova-philadelphia-pennsylvania-2-5-june-2016

images (3)

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

download (4)CONTRADICTIONS: A JOURNAL FOR CRITICAL THOUGHT

Call for Papers
A New Journal
Kontradikce /Contradictions: A Journal for Critical Thought

We are seeking submissions of scholarly articles and theoretical essays that skirt the disciplinary boundaries of political philosophy, social theory, and cultural critique. This peer-reviewed journal, based in Prague, aims to critically revive and update Central and Eastern European traditions of radical thought, bringing them to bear on the historical present and bringing them into international discussions of the theoretical problems involved in emancipatory social change.

The journal is therefore especially interested in 1) articles that delve into the often overlooked or forgotten history of radical left thought in our part of the world and assess this legacy’s contemporary significance; 2) articles that describe and develop related and parallel traditions of thought originating in other regions, bringing these traditions into conversation with the traditions of Central and Eastern Europe; 3) articles that analyze Soviet-type societies and their troubled relationship to historical and contemporary movements for social emancipation; and 4) articles that critically engage with the ideological assumptions and social conditions of “post-communism,” that is, of the discursive association of the communist project with Soviet-type societies and, thus, with a “failed” and irretrievable past.

With these thematic problems in mind, we ask what specific contributions to critical social theory can arise out of the post-Communist experience—that is, out of the historical conflation of communism (the idea and project) with Communism (the party and party-run states) and the subsequent de-legitimation of the former along with the latter. Our focus is thus both geographically specific and global, as we aim to bring together the specific intellectual legacy of those parts of Europe formerly under Communist Party rule with w orldwide reflections of the “fall” of communism as a leading political and intellectual force. Out of this situation, we ask what new visions can emerge.

The journal will be published once a year as a double issue in multilingual format, with one part in English and one part in Czech and Slovak. Submissions are welcome in any of these three languages (English, Czech, or Slovak).

The first issue, with a submission deadline of October 31, 2015, will focus thematically on assessing the current moment and the state of critical social—and in particular Marxist—thought a quarter century after the fall of governments in Central and Eastern Europe that officially sanctioned Marxism while also constraining its development as a tradition of social critique. Submissions are encouraged, but not required, to take this focus into account.

Articles are welcome in the following categories:

· “Studies” and “essays”: These may be articles of a more or less traditional academic character, but with an emphasis on the social significance of the material presented and on original and provocative argumentation. But we also welcome more essayistic contributions that break with some of the conventions of scholarly form. We are interested in rigorously theoretical essays, works of high scholarly value but which might not find a place in other scholarly journals. In this kind of writing, insightful generalization and shrewd observation will be given more weight than an exhaustive accounting for “existing literature” or a detailed description of research methodology. In other words, we have in mind essays that continue in the genre of most classic works in the modern history of ideas, from Rousseau’s Discourses through Benjamin’s “Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction” and Karel Kosík’s Dialectics of the Concrete. More traditionally scholarly articles should be about 4000-9000 words long. Essays can range from 3000 to 10,000 words.

· “Translations” and “materials”: Here we include important contributions to Central/Eastern European social thought that can be brought to international attention in English translation; internationally important works in new Czech or Slovak translations; and previously unpublished or long-unavailable “materials,” accompanied by annotation that presents the materials’ significance to contemporary readers (these may be submitted in English, Czech, or Slovak). 3000-10,000 words.

· “Reviews” of recent publications in critical social thought. Reviews may be brief (500-2000 words) or may constitute longer “review studies” (2000-5000 words).

Send all submissions to jgrimfeinberg@gmail.com.
Further information available on www.facebook.com/kontradikce.
First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/new-journal-contradictions

images

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Fat Cat Food

Fat Cat Food

LESSONS FROM GREECE: CRISIS OF THE ECONOMY AND THE LEFT RESPONSE

SUNDAY, AUGUST 23, 2015

6:30-9:30 PM

Westside Peace Center

3916 Sepulveda Blvd., near Venice Blvd. (free parking in rear)

Suite 101-102, press #22 at door to get into building

Culver City (LA area)

 

SPEAKERS:

Ali Kiani, Iranian Marxist activist and translator

With a comment by Hamid A., environmental and anti-racist activist

 

Having experienced the harshest type of capitalist austerity, which has featured depression level unemployment, the Greek people voted first for the anti-austerity leftist Syriza Party, which includes several Marxists among its leaders.  Then, in July, they voted overwhelmingly in a referendum to support Syriza in its determination not to bow to further austerity measures from the country’s international creditors.  In response, the creditors, led by Germany, seemed to want to make an example of this small country that had dared to challenge austerity from the left.  The creditor nations doubled down, threatening Greece with banishment from the Eurozone and even worse economic privation.  In response to these threats, which even the US seemed to consider excessive, Syriza’s leadership agreed to the very austerity measures the referendum vote had opposed a few days before. Syriza is splitting, but its majority has now voted to support austerity. What is the meaning of these events for Greece, for global capitalism, for the struggle to abolish it, and for the left?

Suggested readings (all from IMHO site):

“Two Strands in Syriza, the Euro, and the Dictatorship Of Capital” — by Karel Ludenhoff

“Syriza’s Stormy Greek Spring” — by David Black

“Further Reflections on Yanis Varoufakis’s ‘Erratic Marxism'” — by Karel Ludenhoff

“From the Economic Crisis to the Transcendence of Capital” — by Peter Hudis

 

Sponsored by the West Coast Chapter, International Marxist-Humanist Organization

More information: arise@internationalmarxisthumanist.org and http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/

Here is URL for meeting for Facebook, Twitter, etc.: http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/events/los-angeles-lessons-from-greece-crisis-of-the-economy-and-the-left-response

Join our Facebook page: “International Marxist-Humanist Organization” https://www.facebook.com/groups/imhorg/

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Labour History

Labour History

EUROPEAN LABOUR HISTORY NETWORK CONFERENCE

First ELHN Conference – Turin, 14-16 December 2015

“Factory Level Analysis: A Methodological Exploration”

ELHN website: http://socialhistory.org/en/news/european-labour-history-network

Although among different types of work, industrial work has received the utmost attention by labour historians, studies focusing on a single factory are very few. Factory as a site of both industrial production and social relations of production is often taken as given and treated as the backdrop for the real action. The ELHN Factory History Working Group (FHWG) calls for a reconsideration of this particular workplace as the site of one of the most important relationships in society that between worker and employer with the insights gained from the new social history.

This reconsideration could be carried out on a number of lines some of which are as follows. To begin with, the study of a single factory is based on a complex weave of history, economics, culture, labour, industry, production, and ideology. As such, the history of a single factory lies at the intersection of different disciplines, sub-disciplines and methodological approaches: social history, economic history, business history, urban history, Marxist social theory, sociological inquiry, discourse analysis and micro-level analysis. A complete study of factory history would have to look at a number of social phenomena related to its actual physical existence (such as its relation to urban space, to ecology etc.), as well as its economic, political and social functions. Thus, factory level analysis could put labour history in a dialogue with other historical fields of study resulting in a rich array of details on the experience of industrial work.

The study of the relations in production at the factory level allows the historian to depict the connections between the labour process and the changes in workers’ consciousness and their individual and collective political behaviour could be depicted. Also, factory level analysis makes the divisions within the labour force most visible. Documenting this heterogeneity could also be helpful in understanding different types and levels of militancy, shop loyalty, alienation, and competition among workers. Moreover, a systematic study of factory files could bring the hidden, and isolated instances of resistance to surface. Focusing our attention on the level of factory not only enriches the historical details of that process, it also allows the historian to depict the dense and non-deterministic web of interrelationships at the point of production. Studying a single factory requires that the management is also given special attention. The analysis of the shaping and reshaping of the form and content of the managerial practices in relation to workers’ resistance practices paves the way for a more dynamic depiction of the relations between management ideologies and practices and workers’ reactions to these. Similarly, analysing the changes in the ownership patterns could shed light on their effects on labour relations.

The FHWG invites scholars to explore the methodological possibilities of factory level analysis. Both individual paper proposals and session proposals are welcome.

Please send your proposal (200 words max. for single papers, 8000 words in total max. for sessions) to both coordinators until June 30th 2015.

Görkem Akgöz, Hacettepe University, gorkemakgoz@yahoo.com

Nicola Pizzolato, Middlesex University, N.Pizzolato@mdx.ac.uk

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/european-labour-history-conference-factory-history-cfp

download (1)

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

Money, money, money

Money, money, money

POSTGRADUATE RESEARCH GRANTS ON EUROPEAN PUBLIC FINANCES

Researchers with an interest in EU public finances are welcome to apply for a €5,000 grant to undertake a research visit to the Historical Archives of the European Union in Florence, Italy.  Two grants are available.

The grant programme is organised by the European Court of Auditors, in collaboration with the Historical Archives of the EU, on the campus of the European University Institute.

The European Court of Auditors has entrusted its own historical archives, and the archives of the Audit Board (1958-1977), to the Historical Archives of the EU in Florence.

Applications from economists, historians, lawyers and public-finance specialists are very welcome.

The deadline for applications is 15 June 2015.

Full details are on this web page: http://www.eui.eu/Research/HistoricalArchivesOfEU/PostgraduateResearchGrants.aspx

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

North Atlantic Oscillation

North Atlantic Oscillation

BEYOND THE EUROCENTRISM DEBATE

Max-Planck-Institut für ethnologische Forschung

Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

Call for Papers

Workshop “Beyond the Eurocentrism Debate”

28-29 September 2015

Organiser: Matthijs Krul, Department ‘Resilience and Transformation in Eurasia’

Venue: MPI for Social Anthropology, Halle/S.

 

One of the crucial contributions to the rise of ‘global history’ in recent decades is the debate on Eurocentrism in historical explanations of European dominance. An ‘anti-Eurocentric’ literature or school of thought has emerged across the social sciences, causing many scholars to reconsider previous assumptions about the causes and periodization of European ascendancy. A tentative consensus in this literature finds the various civilizations of Eurasia locked in long-term patterns of mutual influence, alternation, and exchange (e.g. Pomeranz 2000).

Despite these developments, however, the scholars involved are by no means agreed on the relevant explanatory models. For some, the central theoretical divide is between ‘diffusionist’ models of core and periphery and their opponents (Blaut 1993); for others, between models of continuity and of transformation in world systems (Chase-Dunn and Hall 1997). Goody (2010) speaks of a Eurasian continuity across the landmass since the Bronze Age; others of a 5000 year world-system (Frank and Gills 1994). But critics contest the privileging of Eurasia over Africa, or indeed the concept of Eurasian continuity itself. Finally, in the anti-Eurocentric literature causal explanations for the eventual ‘rise’ of Europe are often underexplored compared to refutations of claims to European specificity. Bryant (2006) in turn questions its reliance on contingency as an explanatory category.

The aim of this workshop, to be held on the 28th and 29th of September 2015, is to address these conflicting theoretical and methodological perspectives in order to move the debate on Eurocentrism beyond the current deadlocks.

 

We invite papers from across social and historical disciplines to help clarify these issues. For instance:

  • Given the divisions outlined, can we detect sufficient consistency in types of causal explanation within the ‘anti-Eurocentric’ literature and so develop new models of long-term economic change?
  • If the anti-Eurocentric argument in global history is convincing, is it still fruitful to contrast Europe with (east) Asia, or should a ‘Eurasian’ perspective be preferred? And what of Africa and the Americas?
  • What is the causal role of contingency within models of continuity and alternation? What is its explanatory value in historical terms?
  • What kinds of economic and political influence have Asian and other civilizations had on European historical development, and how do these affect the periodization of the rise of European power?
  • What is the role and scope of geographical arguments, such as varieties of climate or agricultural practices, in the debate?
  • What role should be accorded to differences between civilizations in their views on nature, knowledge, and technology in the debate, and how can such explanations avoid circularity?
  • Should social institutions be seen as cause or effect in the arguments about European specificity?

 

Please send an abstract and title to Matthijs Krul (krul@eth.mpg.de) by March 31st 2015.

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/call-for-papers-workshop-beyond-the-eurocentrism-debate

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Zizek

Zizek

ŽIŽEK, MIGRATION, EXCLUSION

A WORKSHOP

Thursday 19th February 2015, 3-5pm, Lecture Room 213, Brunel University, London

Irregular immigration is at the forefront of global struggles for economic opportunity, for political rights and for security. Pressed by the increasing influence of both global governing institutions and transnational corporations, along with rising cultural diversity, anxiety about the coherence of the imagined national community within Western nations has increased. This anxiety, along with the global economic downturn and concurrent rises in unemployment, is contributing to the sharpening of ideological policing of national borders, with new legislation targeting irregular immigrants and sympathy for the predicament of those immigrants falling. In turn, the plight of those driven by poverty, environmental insecurity and concerns over security to attempt to gain entry into Western nations outside of official channels has become increasingly fraught, with an estimated 2,500 migrants having drowned in the Mediterranean so far this year (as of October 2014).

For Slavoj Žižek these flows of irregular migrants exemplify a shifting of the borders of political and economic exclusion. Having identified the troubling presence of ‘new forms of apartheid’ most prominently found in the slums, sweatshops and construction projects of ‘the developing world’, this surplus of humanity is increasingly apparent on the borders of the Western world.  Arguing that this surplus is not an aberration in the development of global capitalism, but represents its ‘universal singular’ moment, Žižek suggests that as the ‘part with no part’ of the nation political community, irregular immigrants hold a uniquely disruptive presence.

This workshop brings together prominent Žižekian theorists to discuss the trauma, difficulties and radical political potential of the disruptive presence of irregular immigration and the ‘new forms of apartheid’ of the 21st century.

Speakers

Mark Devenney, University of Brighton

Heiko Feldner, University of Cardiff

Chris McMillan, Brunel University

Fabio Vighi, University of Cardiff

 

Organised by Chris McMillan. For more information, contact Chris.McMillan@brunel.ac.uk

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Neoliberalism

Neoliberalism

TTIP SEMINARS

TTIP Information Network – Workshops on Saturday 11th October
Find out about the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) on the European Day of Action on Saturday next – 11th October .

Organised by TTIP Information Network In the offices of Unite the union, 55-56 Middle Abbey Street, Dublin 1.

Seminars will be held on the following TTIP – related subjects:

Workshops Details: 11.00am to 12.30pm:

Workshop 1: Food & Agriculture and Global South:
Oliver Moore, EU Correspondent with ARC 2020
Michael O’Brien, Comhlámh Trade Justice Group

Workshop 2: Climate Change & Fracking:
Oisín Coughlan, Director of Friends of the Earth (Ireland)
Barry Finnegan, researcher with ATTAC Ireland; lecturer media faculty Griffith College
Speaker TBC, No Fracking Dublin

Workshop 3: ISDS, Privatisation and Workers’ Rights
Dr. John Reynolds, Lecturer International Law, NUI Maynooth
Dr. Paul O’Connell, Reader in Law, School of Law, SOAS, University of London
Brendan Ogle, Education & Development Organiser UNITE trade union; Right2Water campaign

1.00 to 2.00pm: Launch of European Citizens’ Initiative Petition Against TTIP

The seminars are being organised by a coalition of civil society groups who’ve come together to share information and stimulate greater awareness of the undemocratic TTIP negotiations. They include the Peoples Movement, ATTAC
Ireland, An Taisce, Centre for Global Education, Ceartas – Irish Lawyers for Human Right, Comhlámh Trade Justice Group, Debt and Development Coalition Ireland, Environmental Pillar, Euro-Toques, Fracking Free Ireland, No
Fracking Dublin, Presentation Justice Network, Trade Union Left Forum, We’re Not Leaving, Young Friends of the Earth and others organised at the initiative of Comhlamh.

See: https://www.facebook.com/TTIPInformationNetwork

http://www.politics.ie/forum/events/230613-ttip-information-network-workshops-saturday-11th-october.html

http://www.irishleftreview.org/2014/10/06/ttip-trade-deal-bad-democracy/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

EUROPEAN HIGHER EDUCATION: EXPLORING EFFECTIVE STRATEGIES FOR TURBULENT TIMES

Society for Research into Higher Education

University of Porto, Portugal

Date – Monday, 01 September 2014: 13.30 – 18.30

Venue – University of Porto, Portugal

Network – Joint ECER/SRHE

This pre-Seminar to the ECER 2014 Conference (http://www.eera-ecer.de/ecer2014), is co-organised by EERA Network 22: Research in Higher Education and the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), in cooperation with Centre for Research and Intervention in Education (CIIE) from FPCE – University of Porto

Venue: Faculty of Psychology and Education Sciences, University of Porto
Rua Alfredo Allen 4200-135, Porto, Portugal

Over the past years, in many European countries, higher education has been in turmoil as, for example, budget cuts have impacted significantly on the lives of  academics and students in higher education institutions. Higher education institutions are still expected to be one of the driving forces of nation states by creating new knowledge and educating a future workforce.

The aim of this seminar is to:

  • Bring together colleagues from various European countries to discuss how higher education can cope with turbulent times and how to move forward.
  • Bring insights into and examples from various European countries on current developments in higher education.
  • Provide a meeting point for emerging researchers to discuss current issues and network with established researchers in the field of higher education.

In order to promote lively discussions and a possibility to network and share opinions the second half of the seminar will be interactive workshops. There will be four parallel sessions each of which has moderators to promote lively discussions. The results of these interactive sessions will be reported on and disseminated.

 

Chair: Jani Ursin, Link-Convenor of EERA Network22: Research in Higher Education

11.30–12.30            Registration and networking

12.30–13.30            Lunch

13.30–14.00            Welcome
Helena Costa Araujo, Director of CIIE
Helen Perkins,  Director of Society for Research into Higher Education

14.00–15.00            Keynote:
‘What is the nature of the relationship between changes in European higher education and social science research on higher education and how can it be strengthened?’
Professor Rosemary Deem (Royal Holloway, University of London, UK)

15.00–15.30           Instructions for parallel sessions

15.30–17.00           Parallel sessions:

Session 1:

Future prospects in HE for Early Career researchers
Presenters/Facilitators: Mr Patrick Baughan, Department of Learning and Development, City University London, UK
University-Professor Dr Liudvika Leisyte, TU University Dortmund, Germany
(see: http://www.eera-ecer.de/ecer2014/emerging-researchers-conference/network-workshops/nw-22/#c215201)

Session 2:

Sustaining high quality teaching and learning in higher education
Presenters/Facilitators:   Dr Paul Ashwin, Lancaster University
Dr Mari Karm, University of Tartu, Estonia
In this workshop we will explore the challenges of using the available research evidence to sustain high quality teaching and learning in higher education. We will focus on two key and related issues in supporting high quality teaching and learning: the engagement of students in their learning and how we can use knowledge of this engagement to inform the professional development of academic staff. Through short presentations, as well as small group and plenary discussions, we will explore the following questions:
• What tensions are there in the research evidence in these two areas?
• What implications do these tensions have when we attempt to use this evidence to inform teaching and learning practices in higher education?
• How can we make use of our institutional experiences to further develop the research evidence?
• How can we make the research evidence useable in our institutional  contexts?
Session 3:

Developing as a researcher in turbulent times: becoming and being an ‘extended’ professional’
A presentation by Professor Linda Evans University of Leeds
Facilitator: Dr Christine Teelken, VU University Amsterdam, Netherlands

‘In this lecture Professor Evans will draw upon her own work on researcher development, to analyse what it takes to be an ‘extended’ researcher in the precarious and changing 21st century European Research Area (ERA). Adapting Eric Hoyle’s work on ‘extended’ and ‘restricted’ models of professionality, characteristics of the ‘restricted’ and ‘extended’ European researcher will be proposed. Of particular relevance to early career academics and researchers, the lecture will address  issues related to how they may develop their research skills and raise their profiles.’

Session 4:

Higher education and employment: building the connections
Presenters/Facilitators:  Dr Camille Kandiko Howson, King’s Learning Institute, King’s College London, UK
Auxiliary Professor Mariana Alves, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Portugal

Employability has always been a key feature of higher education, from the earliest days of the University of Bologna, to the vocational training of clerics, doctors and lawyers and the myriad professional, vocational and higher learning of today. This workshop brings together notion of “learning for learning’s sake” and “students’, institutions’ and governments’ needs for an educated workforce”. This workshop draws on research projects exploring employability from a variety of contexts. Three main themes discussed are:

– graduates’ employability – relevance  for students options and perspectives
– graduates’ employability – relevance for educational policies (either at national and/or institutional levels)
– graduates’ employability – current trends concerning educational and professional trajectories

Employability will be considered in individual, institutional, national and regional contexts. The workshop will draw on research but will have an interactive basis, encouraging participants to reflect on how employability is conceptualised. Key issues include the impact of employability on students and graduates, particularly in relation to student fees; the role and relevance of educational policies; and future trajectories.

 

Workshop participants are asked to reflect on these issues, and to think about the following questions:

1. How do you frame ‘graduates’ employability’? What resources do you draw on for this? For example research, reports, websites…
2. How is ‘graduates’ employability’ framed in higher education research? What fields does this cover? What disciplinary approaches?
3. What research, data and information will be needed in the future to enhance, assure and research graduates’ employability?

Participants are encouraged to read Chapter 3 of the report linked below (Final Report):

http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/learningteaching/kli/research/student-experience/student-expectations-perceptions-HE.aspx

17.15–18.30     Summing up the workshops and the seminar

18.30–20.30     Reception (sponsored by SRHE)

 

Reserve a place: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/

Society for Research into Higher Education: http://www.srhe.ac.uk

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Information

Information

TRANSVERSAL TEXTS

Launch of a new multilingual platform: Transversal Texts

Transversal Texts is an abstract machine and text machine at once, territory and stream of publication, production site and platform – the middle of a becoming that never wants to become a publishing company.
http://transversal.at/
http://transversal.at/transversal/0614/eipcp/en

Transversal Texts consists of an experimental site for publishing books and e-books in multiple languages, the multilingual web journal transversal, and a blog on current news from the middle of translation, social movements, art practices and political theory.

+ books
Beginning in October 2014 we will start experimenting with the publication of affordable books and e-books for free downloading, multilingual as far as possible, including texts by Félix Guattari & Antonio Negri, Precarias a la deriva, Gin Müller, Rubia Salgado, Monika Mokre, Brigitta Kuster, Ulf Wuggenig, Birgit Mennel, Stefan Nowotny and Gerald Raunig. The program can be found here: http://transversal.at/books

+ journal
The most recent issue of our web journal is an in-depth discussion of the general starting point for the project transversal texts. Under the title “The Insurrection of the Published” the journal provides specific insights into the “Death Throes of the Publication Industry” and the potentials of an empancipatory concatenation of writing, translating, and publicly negotiating publications. Authors: eipcp, Isabell Lorey / Otto Penz / Gerald Raunig / Birgit Sauer / Ruth Sonderegger, Stevphen Shukaitis, Felix Stalder, Traficantes de Sueños, An Anonymous Iranian Collective.
In cooperation with the new journal Kamion.
http://transversal.at/transversal/0614

+ blog
In the transversal texts blog a translocal network of authors conjoins current political texts with announcements about events, publications, actions, manifestations, and campaigns.
http://transversal.at/blog

Please forward to other interested people.


transversal texts
eipcp – european institute for progressive cultural policies
a-1060 vienna, gumpendorfer strasse 63b
a-4040 linz, harruckerstrasse 7
contact@eipcp.net
http://eipcp.net

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk