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Philosophy

Philosophy

PHILOSOPHY IN EDUCATION

CALL FOR PAPERS

PhaenEx: Journal of Existential and Phenomenological Theory and Culture

PhaenEx:   http://phaenex.uwindsor.ca/ojs/leddy/index.php/phaenex/index

Special Topics Section: Philosophy in Education (2015)

Lead Editors: Marc Lamontagne & Éric Martin

This issue will focus on the way philosophy operates within educational practice. A guiding question is: can we conceive of education as the very manifestation of philosophy insofar as both relate to culture? Recent criticisms of educational practice have underlined the hijacking of education by utilitarian priorities. These denunciations, albeit necessary, often create an impasse in the debate between those in favor of such transformations and those against. We thus invite authors to go beyond the limited framework of negative critique so that the question of the status and role of philosophy in education can be explicitly and positively addressed. This issue of PhænEx seeks contributions that go beyond simply noting how educational institutions are currently adrift: we encourage articles that could make a case for the rehabilitation of the place of philosophy in all branches of knowledge, and especially in the field of social sciences. Authors can tackle such issues as these: Can philosophy really see itself as part of the general curriculum while behaving as a specific discipline? What is the relation between philosophy, education, and culture? Are not philosophy, education, and culture synonyms for the way humans are constituted into a common world? What is a proper philosophical pedagogy?

Submission Deadline: Dec. 1st, 2014. For more information contact the Lead Editors: Marc Lamontagne (marc.lamontagne@cegepmontpetit.ca) or Éric Martin (eric.martin@cegepmontpetit.ca).

 
*GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR AUTHORS*

*French style guidelines are available here.

1. Submissions should represent original work not previously published.

2. It is the author’s responsibility to obtain appropriate written copyright permissions for the reproduction of any copyrighted material, including images.

3. Authors should adhere to gender-inclusive language in their manuscripts.

4. Generally, PhaenEx will not consider publication of the same author’s work in two consecutive Open issues, although authors may submit their work to consecutive Open and Special Topics issues.

5. Generally, scholarly articles are between 6000-9000 words in length, although exceptions can be made. Submissions that are clearly unrevised conference presentations, or which are excessively long without clear reason, will not be sent out for peer review. Authors should contact the Lead Editor(s) in advance of submission if they have questions or concerns about this requirement.

Authors are asked to comply fully with these requirements, as well as with the style requirements outlined below, and to follow the generally accepted norms of academic writing, including the provision of complete and accurate references. Failure to do so may constitute grounds for the rejection of a submission at any time during the editorial process. (PhaenEx recognizes the creative and other needs of its authors. Please write directly to the Lead Editor for permission to exceed these guidelines or the below style sheet.)

*STYLE REQUIREMENTS*

[voir lien ci- dessous pour les règles de mise en forme des textes en français]
Texts are to be saved in MS Word (.doc) or Rich Text Format (.rft).

The style requirements of PhaenEx are modeled on: Gibaldi, Joseph. MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing. 2nd ed. New York: The Modern Language Association of America, 1998.

*Format:

1) Use font Times New Roman size 12 throughout, including all entries in both Notes (to come at the end of the text, not at the bottom of the page) and Works Cited (to come after Notes).

2) Full justification, both left and right.

3) Double-space the main text.

4) Indent the first line of each new paragraph. (Do not leave a blank space between paragraphs.)

5) Use one space (not two) after sentence punctuation.

6) Single-space notes, but place a single blank line between each separate note.

7) Single-space all items in Works Cited, but place a single blank line between each separate entry.

8) To indicate emphasis, titles, and terms in a foreign language use italics (not underlining).

*Basic Layout:

1) The title should appear at the top of the first page, centred and boldface, and be followed by one blank double-spaced line.

2) If numbered, each section heading should use Roman numerals. Whether numbered or not, each section heading should be preceded by two blank double- spaced lines, centred, and boldface.

3) If numbered, each subheading should use lower case Arabic letters enclosed in parentheses, left-justified, boldface and italicized. Leave one double-spaced return between Section heading and sub-heading, and the same between sub-heading and text (i.e. please do not leave any
extra blank lines between heading and subheading, or between subheading and text).

4) Notes should be assembled at the end of the text (not the bottom of each page). They should be headed by the unnumbered section heading
“Notes,” which should be centred, boldface, set off from the preceding paragraph by one blank double-spaced line (i.e. two strokes of the “return” key should follow the punctuation of the final paragraph).

5) A list of works cited in the text should come after the final note. It should be headed by the unnumbered section heading “Works Cited,” which should be centred, boldface, set off from the last line of the last note by one blank double-spaced line (i.e. two strokes of the “return” key should follow the punctuation of the final note).

6) If using an epigraph, each line of the epigraph text should be indented to one tab, left-justified and italicized. Attribution of the epigraph should follow standard MLA parenthetical citation.

*Quotations:

1) Quotations longer than three lines should appear without quotation marks, be single- spaced, and be block- indented once from the left margin. Enter one blank double- spaced line immediately before and after the block-indented quotation (i.e. block- indented quotations should use standard double-spacing to separate the quote from the main text.)

2) Indicate all interpolations with square brackets.

3) All ellipses should be indicated with a group of three immediately consecutive dots, preceded and followed by a single space. Ellipses indicating excluded text should not be placed in brackets.

*Quotation marks and punctuation:

1) Use double quotation marks for first order quotations of less than three lines and integrate them in the text. Use single quotation marks for quotations within quotations.

2) Final punctuation goes inside quotation marks except when followed by a parenthetical citation. Exception: Block quotations should be punctuated as if they were normal sentences and parenthetical citation should follow one space after the punctuation.

3) When quotation marks are followed by a parenthetical citation, final punctuation is placed after the parentheses. Exception: when the quoted text ends with a question or exclamation mark, place the question or exclamation mark inside the quotation marks and place a period after the closing parenthesis.

4) Semicolons, exclamation marks, and question marks that are not part of the quoted material should be placed outside quotation marks.

5) “Scare quotes” should be avoided if possible, although may be appropriate to denote contested terminology. When used, please use double quote marks (unless they appear within quotations as second-order quotes, where single quote marks should then be used.)

6) In text em-dashes should be long, with no space between the dashes and the words on either side. (Most word processors automatically convert to this format if you type a word followed immediately by two dashes followed immediately by the next word and then a space.)

7) Please use serial commas (e.g. “peace, order, and good governance”).

8) Leave one space (not two) following punctuation between sentences.

*Use of foreign language words and quotations:

1) Quotations should be, where possible, translated into the language of the article using an official translation (and thus appropriately cited). Where no official translation is available, the author’s translation should be followed by a parenthetical note: (author’s trans.). This should be accompanied by an endnote that presents the translated text in its original language.

2) Where, for good reason, the original language of the quotation or word is kept in the main body of the article, single words or phrases should be italicized. Sentences and quotes should use format and punctuation guidelines of the article’s main language, rather than those of the foreign language.

*Parenthetical Citations:

1) MLA style uses in-text, parenthetical citations together with a Works Cited list at the end. The goal of parenthetical citation is (a) to provide immediate citation upon reading each specific passage in need of citation, (b) to indicate precisely the relevant item in Works Cited, and (c) to be as brief as possible.

2) When only one of the works of a particular author needs to be cited, citation appears as (last name page number), with no comma between the name and the page number. If more than one of the works of a particular author needs to be cited, citation appears as (last name, shortened book title in italics page number) OR (last name, “shortened article title within quotation marks” page number), with a comma between name and shortened title only. However, if (a) the author’s name and/or specific work is mentioned explicitly in leading sentences such that it is clear which text is being referred to in Works Cited, or if (b) it is clearly understood that the citation is the same as the immediately preceding citation, then the citation should be reduced to (page number). This replaces the need for ibid., an abbreviation which should not be used.

3) Parenthetical citations may also be used for merely supporting material, e.g., (see Smith). Full references are to be provided in Works Cited.

*Notes:

1) Notes appear in the body of the text in superscript and as consecutive, Arabic numerals.

2) Numbers appear in the Notes section also in superscript.

3) In the body of the text, superscript notes appear:
(a) outside punctuation, when no quotation marks or parenthetical citations are used, e.g., … lovers seek solitude.
(b) outside closing quotation marks, when no parenthetical citation appears, e.g., “… lovers seek solitude.”
(c) outside punctuation that follows the parenthetical citation, e.g., “… lovers seek solitude” (Sartre 273).

4) Follow MLA, parenthetical citation style for all quotations and references in the notes themselves. Full citations should appear only in the Works Cited list. For example: For a further discussion of this point, see Detmer (21-22).

*Works Cited:

1) Book paradigm:
Sartre, Jean-Paul. Being and Nothingness: A Phenomenological Essay on Ontology. Trans. Hazel Barnes. New York: Washington Square Press, 1956.

2) Article paradigm:
Simons, Margaret. “Two Interviews with Simone de Beauvoir.” Hypatia 3, no. 3 (1989): 11-27.

3) Chapter/Article in Book paradigm:
Gyllenhammer, Paul. “The Question of (In)Tolerance in Heidegger’s Notion of World- Disclosure.” Issues in Interpretation Theory. Ed. Pol Vandevelde. Milwaukee: Marquette University Press, 2006. 167-198.

4) Film paradigm:
Macbeth. Dir. Roman Polanski. Perf. Jon Finch, Francesca Annis, and Nicholas Selby. 1971. Columbia, 2002. DVD.

Please note: (a) When more than one work is used by the same author, subsequent references in Works Cited should include three combined dashes (an “em-dash”), followed by a period, in place of the name. (b) Inclusive page numbers must follow journal and chapter entries in the Works Cited list.

*Citing Online Sources (adapted from www.dianahacker.com):

1) MLA does not require a Web address (URL) in citations for online sources.

2) In general, citations should end by indicating the medium (i.e. Web) and the date the material was accessed (date Month year)

3) MLA style calls for a publisher or sponsor for most online sources. If a source has no publisher, use the abbreviation “N.p.” (no publisher). If there is no date of publication or update, use the abbreviation “N.d” (for no date), after the publisher/sponsor position. For an article in an online scholarly journal or an article from a database, give page numbers if they are available; if they are not, use the abbreviation “n. pag.”

4) If an author or editor is unknown, begin the citation with the title.

Examples and Paradigms:

(a) Entire Website with author or editor:
Peterson, Susan Lynn. The Life of Martin Luther. Susan Lynn Peterson, 2005. Web. 24 Jan. 2009.
Halsall, Paul, ed. Internet Modern History Sourcebook. Fordham U, 22 Sept. 2001. Web. 19 Jan. 2009.

(b) Entire Website with corporate (group) author:
United States. Environmental Protection Agency. Drinking Water Standards. EPA, 8 July 2004. Web. 24 Jan. 2005.

(c) Entire Website with unknown author:
Margaret Sanger Papers Project. History Dept., New York U, 18 Oct. 2000. Web. 6 Jan. 2009.

(d) Entire Website with no title:
Yoon, Mina. Home page. Oak Ridge Natl. Laboratory, 28 Dec. 2006. Web. 12 Jan. 2009.

(e) Short works from websites including articles, poems, and other documents that are not book length or that appear as internal pages on a Website: Shiva, Vandana. “Bioethics: A Third World Issue.” NativeWeb. NativeWeb, n.d. Web. 15 Sept. 2004.

(f) Online Book:
Milton, John. Paradise Lost: Book I. Poetryfoundation.org. Poetry Foundation, 2008. Web. 14 Dec. 2008.

(g) Article in an on-line journal:
Belau, Linda. “Trauma and the Material Signifier.” Postmodern Culture 11.2 (2001): n. pag. Web. 20 Feb. 2009.

(h) Article in an Online magazine or newspaper:
Paulson, Steve. “Buddha on the Brain.” Salon.com. Salon Media Group, 27 Nov. 2006. Web. 18 Jan. 2009.

(i) E-mail. Begin with the writer’s name and the subject line, followed by “Message to” and name of the recipient. End with the date of the message and the medium.
Wilde, Lisa. “Review Questions.” Message to the author. 15 Mar. 2009. E-mail. &am p;nb sp;

For all other examples see www.dianahacker.com.

*Standardized Spelling Guidelines:

Please standardize spelling to the Oxford Canadian English dictionary. Please note the following preferred spellings and guidelines:- post-structuralism, post-humanism, postmodernism, postcolonial- the Far East, the West (not west), Western[e.g. media, thought, intellectuals, culture, etc.], but western [Canada, parts of the city, etc.].- insofar>- naturally-ordered, largest-ever, etc.- avoid “&” in favour of “and”- towards rather than toward- farther denotes physical advancement in distance while further denotes advancement to greater degree, as in time<*On all other matters of style, please consult the MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing (2nd edition).
To Submit: Register or log-in if already registered.
Select author and then follow the step-by-step instructions.

 

http://phaenex.uwindsor.ca/ojs/leddy/index.php/phaenex/about/submissions/callforpapers

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Education

Education

FORUM FOR PROMOTING 3-19 COMPREHENSIVE EDUCATION: VOLUME 55 NUMBER 1 (2013)

Just published online at: www.wwwords.co.uk/forum/content/pdfs/55/issue55_1.asp

[Printed copies will be posted mid-April]

FORUM: for promoting 3-19 comprehensive education
Volume 55 Number 1  2013     ISSN 0963-8253

SPECIAL ISSUE
THIS WAY OUT: teachers and pupils escaping from fixed-ability thinking and practice
Guest Editors: MARY JANE DRUMMOND & PATRICK YARKER

CONTENTS:

Mary Jane Drummond & Patrick Yarker. Editorial. The Enduring Problem of Fixed Ability: but is a new conversation beginning? OPEN ACCESS

Michael Armstrong. The Brian Simon Memorial Lecture 2012. Education as Reconstruction: another way of looking at primary education OPEN ACCESS

Rachel Marks. ‘The Blue Table Means You Don’t Have a Clue’: the persistence of fixed-ability thinking and practices in primary mathematics in English schools

Julian Stern. Surprise in Schools: Martin Buber and dialogic schooling

Terry Wrigley. Beyond ‘Ability’: some European alternatives

Gwen Tressider & Anne Watson. The Possibilities and Difficulties of Teaching Secondary Mathematics in All-attainment Groups

Holly Linklater. Teaching and the Individuality of Everybody

Lani Florian. Preparing Teachers to Work with Everybody: a curricular approach to the reform of teacher education

John Cornwall. What Makes an Inclusive Teacher? Can Fish Climb Trees? Mapping the European Agency Profile of Inclusive Teachers to the English System

Annabelle Dixon. Differentiation, Resistance and Courage: at work in the infant school

Mary Jane Drummond & Susan Hart, with Mandy Swann. An Alternative Approach to School Development: the children are the evidence, pages 121-132

Sally Tomlinson. From Defective Loafers to Ignorant Yobs: low attainers in a global knowledge economy

Jo Boaler. Ability and Mathematics: the mindset revolution that is reshaping education

Patrick Yarker. ‘Can I have me on here?’: ‘ability’ and the language of pupil-progress

Amy Milik & Mark Boylan. Valuing Choice as an Alternative to Fixed-ability Thinking and Teaching in Primary Mathematics

 

BOOK REVIEWS
Index for Inclusion: developing learning and participation in schools (Tony Booth & Mel Ainscow), and Education, Education, Education: reforming England’s schools (Andrew Adonis), reviewed by Clyde Chitty

PERSONAL SUBSCRIPTION Subscription to the three printed 2013 issues (including online access to all available past issues) is available to private individuals at a cost of US$70.00 (approximately £46.00). If you wish to subscribe you may do so immediately at www.wwwords.co.uk/subscribeFORUM.asp

LIBRARY SUBSCRIPTION (campus-wide access) If you are working within an institution that maintains a library, please urge your Librarian to take out a Library subscription so we can provide full access throughout your institution. Detailed information for libraries can be found at www.symposium-books.co.uk/downloads/SYM-BOOKS-Rate-List-2012.pdf

For all editorial matters, including articles offered for publication, please contact the Editor, Professor Clyde Chitty, 19 Beaconsfield Road, Bickley, Bromley BR1 2BL, United Kingdom (clydechitty379@btinternet.com).

 

In the event of problems concerning a subscription, or difficulty in gaining access to the journal articles on the website, please contact the publishers at info@symposium-books.co.uk
 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Black Rock

The Black Rock

JOURNEYS ACROSS MEDIA

Journeys Across Media (JAM)

The Body and The Digital

Friday 19th April 2013, University of Reading

2013 will mark the 11th anniversary of the annual Journeys Across Media (JAM) Conference for postgraduate students, organised by postgraduates working in the Department of Film, Theatre & Television at the University of Reading. JAM 2013 seeks to focus on and foster current research relating to the Body and the Digital, as today they are interactive and interdependent facets in the media of film, theatre and television; and more widely, in the areas of performance and art. It is a relationship which continues to develop and redefine cinematic, televisual and theatrical practices.

French phenomenologist Maurice Merleau-Ponty once stated: “The body is our general medium for having a world.” Today, the world of live and screened performance are perceived and received differently, due to the body’s relationship with the digital. Approaches and practices of phenomenology, embodiment, the haptic and the experiential are being re-examined as they continue to encounter digital culture in new ways. Representations and experiences of embodiment are often integral dynamics of theatre, television, film and television, and are preoccupations that can be explored through diverse media or digital influences.

This is a call for postgraduates engaging in contemporary discourses and practices relating to the Body and the Digital, to submit papers or practice-based research for the JAM 2013 Conference. Topics may include, but are not restricted to:

-Interactivity between Digital languages and the Body

-Sonic Representations of the Body in Digital Performance

-The Digitized Body in Performance

-The Role of the Body in Digital Games and Virtual Performance

-Post-Colonial Bodies in the Contemporary Moment

-Preparing the Body for Performance

-Notions of Embodiment (i.e. Violent, Disabled, Explicit)

-Traditions of Corporeally focused Film, Theatre and Television

-Embodied Spectatorship or Audiences, and Physicality

-Phenomenology of the Lived, Performed and Screened Body

-The Haunted Body

-Politics of the Body

-Unconventional and Other Bodies

The body, its presence, perceptions and experience, are becoming increasingly underpinned and influenced by the digital age. JAM 2013 will endeavour to open a dialogue about the relationship between the body and digital in contemporary scholarship and practice, posing many questions including: How does the body encounter digital media and how do digital media frames position the body – both in mainstream iterations, social media contexts and in art/installation/performance contexts? Furthermore, it will also be worth considering how digital technology has affected the way that humans approach unfamiliar body movement traditions, beyond regional and national borders?  

JAM 2013 will provide a discussion forum for current and developing research in film, theatre, television and new media. Previous delegates have welcomed this opportunity to gain experience of presenting their work at different stages of their development, while having the opportunity to meet and form contacts with fellow postgraduate students. Furthermore, participants at JAM 2013 have the possibility of being published in the Journal of Media Practice.

Non-Presenting delegates are also very welcome to attend this conference.

CALL FOR PAPERS deadline: 1st February 2013

Please send a 250-word abstract for a fifteen minute paper and a 50-word biographical note to Johnmichael Rossi, Gary Cassidy, Edina Husanovic, Shelly Quirk, Matthew McFrederick at jam2013@pgr.reading.ac.uk .

 

CALL FOR PRACTICE-BASED WORK deadline: 1st February 2013

Continuing from the success of last year’s JAM 2012 Conference: Time Tells, which experimented with conference structure to include live performances, film screenings and installations taking place throughout the day, we invite artists working in various mediums to propose presentations of their work, relevant to the conference theme.

Please send a 250-word outline describing the piece you are proposing to present, as well as duration and any specific technical/space requirements, and a 50-word biographical note. Relevant images and links to your work would also be helpful. As outlined above please e-mail the Conference organisers at jam2013@pgr.reading.ac.uk.

 

We would appreciate the distribution of this call for papers and wider promotion of this conference through your networks. Journeys Across Media is supported by the Department of Film, Theatre & Television at Reading and the Standing Conference of University Drama Departments.

 

**END**

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Ruth Rikowski

RUTH RIKOWSKI ON ‘CONSCIOUSNESS AND REVOLT’ – BY R.C. SMITH

On her Serendipitous Moments blog, Ruth Rikowski reviews and analyses Consciousness and Revolt by R.C. Smith.

 

Ruth notes that:

“Robert Smith’s basic position is that we need to abandon searches for the absolute and for objectivity, and not follow any particular ideology or idol. People’s desire for the absolute arises from their need for security, argues Smith, but he says that this is a false sense of security. Also, that it is a form of self-deception, evasion and distortion. Instead, we need to focus on experiential life – and that this is what is meaningful and the way in which we should make sense of the world” (Rikowski, 2012, p.2).

 

Ruth Rikowski on ‘Consciousness and Revolt’: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/2012/10/consciousness-and-revolt-and.html

 

Details on the book:

Author: R. C. Smith
ISBN: 9780957096103
Publication Date: 01-12-2011
Pages: 424
Format: Soft Cover
Click for a 10 Page Preview

Price: £14.99

Heathwood Press is proud to announce the release of its inaugural publication, Consciousness and Revolt: An Exploration toward Reconciliation.

 

**END**

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

J-P Sartre

UK SARTRE SOCIETY ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2012

Friday 14 September
Institut Francais, Queensbury Place, London SW7 2DT
10.00-6.00

Ethics in Practice: the Dialectic of Authenticity and Consequentialism
Alfred Betschart (independent)

Sartre and Negativist Ethics
Patrick Engel (Basel)

Catastrophe, Proximity, Adherence: Sartre on Cinema in Les Mots
Patrick ffrench (KCL)

Sartre on Hegel’s Dialectic of Mastery and Servitude
Daniel Herbert (Sheffield)

A Legacy of Shame: Occupation, Ambiguity, and Abortion in Beauvoir and Sartre
Ruth Kitchen (Leeds)

Ethics Between Liberty and Alterity: Sartre’s Point of View
Annalisa Marinelli (SSiS Puglia)

Shame as Fellow Feeling
Christian Skirke (UvA)

The Opening Pages of Sartre’s Notebooks for an Ethics
Paul Wallace (independent)

Papers have been listed in alphabetical order of author.
A second announcement will be made when the schedule is finalised.
At that point, the abstracts will also be available.

 

Originally at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/uk-sartre-society-annual-conference-2012-london-14-september  

**END**

 

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aesthetics

KOSMOPROLET ISSUE 3

Kosmoprolet #3  is now available in print. 

The Editorial can be found in English here: http://www.kosmoprolet.org/english

Contents:

  • Editorial
  • Arabischer Frühling im Herbst des Kapitals
  • Jenseits der Agrarrevolution
  • Schranken proletarischer Emanzipation. Zur Kritik der Gewerkschaften
  • Fragebogen zur Leiharbeit
  • Der Existenzialismus als Zerfallsprodukt revolutionärer Theorie
  • Zwischen Arbeiterautonomie und Kommunisierung.
  • Eine Kritik an den “28 Thesen zur Klassengesellschaft”
  • Über die Kommunisierung und ihre Theoretiker
  • Proletarische Bewegung und Produktivkraftkritik

 

Addendum, 13.50 GMT, 28th December 2011: There is a translation app on this journal’s site which allows you to read the content in English. It works really well. … Glenn

**END**

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

No Future

NO FUTURE

NO FUTURE: AN INTER-DISCIPLINARY INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE
Durham University, UK
25-27 March 2011

First Call for Papers

From biblical apocalypse to the nihilism of the late nineteenth century, from the Enlightenment invention of progress to the counter-cultures of the late twentieth century, from technological utopianism to contemporary anticipations of environmental catastrophe, western civilization has been consistently transfixed by the figurative potential of the future. ‘No Future’ seeks to connect and inter-animate these disparate ways of thinking about the future, while at the same time questioning the basis of the various discourses of futurity they have produced, and which have proliferated in recent years. ‘No Future’ thus also implicitly questions what it is – other than the preoccupations of the present – that is invoked when we talk about the future.

The conference aims to stage a series of inter-disciplinary encounters around these different senses of ‘No Future’, and to examine the value and implications of adopting a ‘futurist’ position across and between a range of disciplines in the Humanities and Social Sciences. Contributions may take retrospective form, re-assessing significant moments in past discourses of futurity such as apocalypticism, Enlightenment ideas of progress, the persistence of the apparent dialectical unity of utopia/dystopia, the constructions of Modernism and the Historical Avantgarde, the symbolic projections of psychoanalytic theory. Others might examine the disciplinary shifts that have displaced or dispersed avantgardism in postmodernity, opening out onto such themes as transhumanism, post-postmodern reinflections of the dialectic, and various forms of contemporary utopianism. All of these are related to the central question of the ideological and aesthetic implications of any appeal to futurity, at the heart of which lies the tension between the future as rhetorical evasion and the future as the most persistent and deeply embedded of all heuristic devices.

Keynote speakers:
Mikhail Epstein (Emory)
Jean-Michel Rabaté (Pennsylvania)
Patricia Waugh (Durham)

Plenary panels:

Apocalyptic Futures
Lenin and Futurity
Bloch and Utopian Futures

Proposals for individual papers or integrated panels that engage with any aspect of the central theme are invited. Papers should be of 20 minutes duration to allow adequate time for discussion, and proposals for integrated panels should comprise a chair and three speakers.

Proposals that specifically engage with any of the following themes are particularly welcome:

Ontologies of the Future
Forms of Utopia
Dystopian Futures
Aesthetics and Technology
Eco-criticism and Ecotopia
Gendered Futures
Transhumanism
Futurism(s)
Futures of Freud
Dialectics of the Future
The Future of Theory

Proposals should be no longer than 250 words and should be submitted as an attachment to: alastair.renfrew@durham.ac.uk by Friday 2nd July 2010.

Further information will be available in due course at the conference web-site: http://www.dur.ac.uk/mlac/research/nofuture

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Jean-Paul Sartre

UNFINISHED PROJECTS: DECOLONIZATION AND THE PHILOSOPHY OF JEAN-PAUL SARTRE
By
Paige Arthur

A major rereading of the life and work of Jean-Paul Sartre, published on the 30th anniversary of his death (April 15, 1980)

Sartre’s anticolonialism proves, in Paige Arthur’s sophisticated rendition, far richer and more complex than snide dismissals of his ‘totalitarian’ impulses have allowed.” –— Samuel Moyn, Columbia University

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In this major rereading of Sartre’s life and work, Paige Arthur traces the relationship between the philosopher’s decades-long commitment to decolonization and his intellectual thought. Where other commentators have focused on the tensions between Sartre’s Marxism and his account of existential freedom—usually to denigrate one in favor of the other—Arthur shows that Sartre’s political engagement with global liberation movements and his philosophical framework were inextricably intertwined.

Closely following the postwar movements for decolonization, and then supporting the war of independence in Algeria, Sartre proposed an influential and uncompromising view of imperialism. Analyzing the Western attitude to the “subhuman” colonial subject, he offered an account of the social constraints applying to both ruler and ruled, and came to argue that political violence—on both sides—was a systematic consequence of the colonial order. Arthur’s rich and nuanced book locates Sartre within the political discussions of his time, while also looking forward to contemporary debates about new forms of imperialism and resistance.

“Since the late 1970s, anti-totalitarian discourse has reduced Sartre to an unwitting casualty of the Cold War split. Now, Paige Arthur counters the hysteria and moralizing of the last thirty years with a carefully reasoned and erudite study that reveals Sartre for what he was: a profound and consistent thinker of liberation and decolonization.”—Kristin Ross, author of May’68 and its Afterlives

“Overcoming today’s amnesia about Sartre as a founding spirit of ‘postcolonialism,’ Paige Arthur shows his relevance for our own encounters with ‘globalization.’”—Ronald Aronson, author of Sartre’s Second Critique and Camus and Sartre

Paige Arthur is Deputy Director of Research at the International Center for Transitional Justice. She has taught at both UC Berkeley and the New School University.

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FOR INTERVIEWS & REVIEW COPIES PLEASE CONTACT CLARA HEYWORTH: clara@versobooks.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Clara Heyworth
Publication: 15th April, 2010 clara@versobooks.com
ISBN: 978-1-84467-399-5 Tel. 718-246-8160
20 Jay Street, Suite 1010
Brooklyn, NY 11201
Tel: +1 (718) 246 8160
Fax: +1 (718) 246 8165
Email: clara@versobooks.com
http://www.versobooks.com

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