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images (2)DE-NATURALISING DISASTERS

A WORKSHOP

The ‘De-Naturalising Disasters’ workshop, is part of the ‘Living in the Anthropocene: Rethinking the Nature/Culture Divide’ series.

The event is convened by David Chandler (University of Westminster) and Camilla Royle (King’s College, London).

Further information is available here: http://rethinkingtheanthropocene.blogspot.co.uk/
Date: Friday 18th September, 2015
Venue: Centre for the Study of Democracy, University of Westminster, Westminster Forum, 5th floor, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW (5 minutes walk from Oxford Circus tube station)
Time: 4.00pm-8.00pm

Programme: De-Naturalising Disasters

Introduction: Bruno Latour argues that we should love our ‘monsters’. Nothing illustrates this demand better than how disasters are becoming increasingly central to the political imagination. From the late Ulrich Beck’s views of ’emancipatory catastrophism’ to the UN Post-2015 Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, disasters are becoming a subject of ethical care. Disasters are no longer excluded from politics and seen as external or natural events but are instead seen as enabling agents of political change. The United Nations, for example, is forwarding a new paradigm suggesting that disaster risk should be embedded within everyday governance and development processes and managed through taking responsibility for social and environmental outcomes. In this way, disasters – as outcomes of social processes – enable learning, reflection and potentially emancipatory outcomes. This workshop seeks to discuss how disasters have overcome the nature/culture divide and what is at stake in learning how to love them.

4.00-5.30 “Grand Strategies for Anthropocene Challenges: Can we Learn in Time?” Speaker: Jamie MacIntosh (Professorial Venture Research Fellow & Director of the Institute for Security & Resilience Studies, University College, London) Chair: David Chandler (University of Westminster)

The UK’s recently elected government has now revved up the Whitehall policy machine to distil the 2015 batch of strategies. Ministerial speeches and fanfares are not far off. The UK Government is one among many major and minor bodies that drafts strategies. There were 51 state signatories to the UN Charter in 1945; there are now 193 sovereign bodies. The financial power of several non-state bodies far exceeds that of many UN Leviathans. Nevertheless, after the post-Cold War unipolar moment and Washington Consensus, we are all – for better or worse – immersed in a multipolar world. Moreover, it’s a multipolar world that within a few years and decades will have to face up to the challenges of the Anthropocene with our productivity still flat and inequality growing. There is little evidence that we are developing healthy appetites for the systemic risks and radical uncertainties that abound. Whether you look to elites or the multitudes, the competencies, capabilities and capacity necessary for the species to make it to the 22nd Century cannot be taken for granted. Can we learn in time how to make grand strategies work or are they myths to numb the hapless? Do universities have anything pragmatic to offer?

5.30-6.00 break

6.00-7.30 “Can Disaster Risk Management be Emancipatory?” Speaker: Mark Pelling (Professor of Geography, Centre for Integrated Research on Risk and Resilience, King’s College, London) Chair: Camilla Royle (King’s College, London)

Disaster risk management science has a long critical tradition including work by Hewitt, Wisner and Watts. The advent of climate change adaptation has opened new policy relevance for disaster risk management, but without taking on board this critical viewpoint. The result has been an adaptation science framed around stability seeking. Resilience has come to symbolise this conservative vision for risk management. One response has been to call for Transformative Adaptation. The paper will examine the advent and rise of transformation and its current positioning in the emerging post-2015 development agenda.

7.30 wine reception

Many thanks,
David Chandler and Camilla Royle

David Chandler, Professor of International Relations, Director of the Centre for the Study of Democracy, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Westminster, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW. Tel: ++44 (0)776 525 3073.
Journal Editor, Resilience: International Policies, Practices and Discourses: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/resi20
Amazon books page: http://www.amazon.co.uk/David-Chandler/e/B001HCXV7Y/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0
Personal website: http://www.davidchandler.org/
Twitter: @DavidCh27992090

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

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Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

SOCIAL POLICY, RISK AND EDUCATION

CALL FOR PAPERS

Social Policy, Risk, and Education

This special issue of the journal Policy Futures in Educationwww.wwwords.co.uk/PFIE – takes the broad lens of risk as its point of departure and invite empirical and theoretical papers which focus on the ways in which risk is enacted through and within education. Risk has become a central discourse – a cultural mindset – in modern societies which frames identities and organizes the governance of individuals and populations. The neoliberal, deregulated state, which emphasizes market-based solutions to the distribution of social goods, has collapsed economic and social policy: the paramount reality is competition and risk. Risk in multifarious settings now dominates social, political and economic discourse.

In a world where uncertainty and harm are governed through risk assessment and risk management, it is no surprise that educational policy similarly aligns loss, injury, and disadvantage with educational management strategies. American education, largely associated with formal schooling, has long embraced the concept of risk (e.g. ‘at-risk children’ and ‘a nation at risk’) as the basis for securing the nation’s economic future competitiveness. Public program initiatives such as Head Start are fashioned upon the perception of a perilous future, and attempt to assess and manage negative risks to children and society, as do the policies of many private intervention programs. Similarly, school-age children, from kindergarten through high school, are systematically identified as ‘at risk’ and targeted for academic and social intervention. While the US Department of Education’s ‘A Nation At Risk’ predated Beck’s risk society, the ‘at risk’ child can only be imagined within a risk society. Conversely, both official and unofficial educational sites are also governed by risk, but individual identities are frequently portrayed as ‘risk takers’. Here, risk is aligned with well-being and the enterprising self. Learning to skydive or rock climb, taking a challenging class, ‘having a go’ at spelling a new word, or returning to college to transition a career indicates a life worth living.

The purpose of this themed issue is to bring together international and critical perspectives on risk theory and education in both formal and informal settings.

All papers submitted will be evaluated using the journal’s normal peer review process. Please also see the journal’s guidance for authors: www.wwwords.co.uk/pfie/howtocontribute.asp

Publication for the special issue is planned for 2014. Deadline for submissions is September 1, 2013. Papers should be sent as an email attachment to the Guest Editor, Policy Futures in Education, Professor Steve Bialostok, College of Education, University of Wyoming: stevebialostok@yahoo.com

 

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski
 

Economics

Economics

SOCIAL POLICY, RISK AND EDUCATION – CALL FOR PAPERS

CALL FOR PAPERS

Social Policy, Risk, and Education

This special issue of the journal Policy Futures in Education (www.wwwords.co.uk/PFIE) takes the broad lens of risk as its point of departure and invites empirical and theoretical papers which focus on the ways in which risk is enacted through and within education. Risk has become a central discourse – a cultural mindset – in modern societies which frames identities and organizes the governance of individuals and populations. The neoliberal, deregulated state, which emphasizes market-based solutions to the distribution of social goods, has collapsed economic and social policy: the paramount reality is competition and risk. Risk in multifarious settings now dominates social, political and economic discourse.

In a world where uncertainty and harm are governed through risk assessment and risk management, it is no surprise that educational policy similarly aligns loss, injury, and disadvantage with educational management strategies. American education, largely associated with formal schooling, has long embraced the concept of risk (e.g. ‘at-risk children’ and ‘a nation at risk’) as the basis for securing the nation’s economic future competitiveness. Public program initiatives such as Head Start are fashioned upon the perception of a perilous future, and attempt to assess and manage negative risks to children and society, as do the policies of many private intervention programs. Similarly, school-age children, from kindergarten through high school, are systematically identified as ‘at risk’ and targeted for academic and social intervention. While the US Department of Education’s ‘A Nation At Risk’ predated Beck’s risk society, the ‘at risk’ child can only be imagined within a risk society. Conversely, both official and unofficial educational sites are also governed by risk, but individual identities are frequently portrayed as ‘risk takers’. Here, risk is aligned with well-being and the enterprising self. Learning to skydive or rock climb, taking a challenging class, ‘having a go’ at spelling a new word, or returning to college to transition a career indicates a life worth living.

The purpose of this themed issue is to bring together international and critical perspectives on risk theory and education in both formal and informal settings.

All papers submitted will be evaluated using the journal’s normal peer review process.

Please also see the journal’s information for authors: www.wwwords.co.uk/pfie/howtocontribute.asp

Publication for the special issue is planned for 2013. Deadline for submissions is August 1, 2013. Papers should be sent as an email attachment to the Guest Editor, Policy Futures in Education, Professor Steve Bialostok, College of Education, University of Wyoming: smb@uwy.edu

****END****

 

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blobspot.com

 

Medical Sociology

Medical Sociology

BSA MEDICAL SOCIOLOGY GROUP ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2013 – CALL FOR PAPERS

British Sociological Association

MEDICAL SOCIOLOGY GROUP

ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2013

Call for Papers

Wednesday 11th – Friday 13th September 2013

University of York

 

We look forward to welcoming you to our 45th Annual Conference.

We are pleased to announce Professor Catherine Pope University of Southampton, Professor Sarah Cunningham – Burley, University of Edinburgh have agreed to be our plenary speakers at the 2013 conference.

 

Papers, posters and other forms of presentation will be structured around streams that include:

1.                 Cancer

2.                 Citizenship and health

3.                 Complementary and alternative medicines

4.                 Critical public health

5.                 Embodiment and emotion

6.                 Ethics

7.                 Ethnicity

8.                 Experiences of health and illness

9.                 Evidence

10.               Gender

11.               Health policy

12.               Health service delivery

13.               Health care organisation

14.               Individual, Collective and Global Risk

15.               Inequalities

16.               Lifecourse – reproductive health; chronic conditions; ageing; death and dying

17.               Mental Health

18.               Methods

19.               Open

20.               Patient – professional interaction

21.               Pharmaceuticals

22.               Politics of health

23.               Professions

24.               Risk

25.               Screening and diagnosis

26.               STS and medicine

27.               Theory

28.               Teaching Medical Sociology

 

We welcome abstract submissions for oral presentations, poster presentations and symposia/special events

Further details and abstract submission forms are available from: http://www.britsoc.co.uk/events/medsoc-annual-conference.aspx and events@britsoc.org.uk

The abstract submission deadline is 26th April 2013.

Abstracts received after this date will not be considered.

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Crisis Management

Crisis Management

SECOND COST-Network CONFERENCE 2012

Many intellectuals, Jurgen Habermas among them, argue that the management of the financial crisis undermines democracy. The COST-Network ‘Systemic Risks, Financial Crises and Credit’ invites papers that critically examine this claim.

Do financialization and the management of the financial crisis circumscribe democratic institutions and processes? If yes, what are the mechanisms that restrict democracy?

 

Potential themes include:

–  The sources of power of financial actors

–  The role of knowledge networks in crisis management

–  Conflicting crisis narratives

–  Restructuring the State to accommodate financial capital

–  New hierarchies among nations

–  Diffusion of policy concepts and policy learning processes

–  Resistance and civil society

 

October 11, 2012 to October 13, 2012

Kassel University, Germany

Deadline for Submission of Abstracts: 15th June 2012
Successful candidates will be notified by: 30th June 2012
Deadline for papers: 1st Oct 2012
Please send your abstracts to: COST2012@icdd.uni-kassel.de

See: http://www.uni-kassel.de/einrichtungen/icdd/events/cost-conference/cost-conference-2012/call-for-papers.html

For more information: http://www.worldfinancialcrisis.eu/

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Capitalism

CAPITALIST CRISIS, COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE

 tripleC (cognition, communication, co-operation): Open Access Journal for a Global Sustainable Information Society

Vol. 8. No. 2: Special Issue on Capitalist Crisis, Communication & Culture
Edited by Christian Fuchs, Matthias Schafranek, David Hakken, Marcus Breen
http://www.triple-c.at/index.php/tripleC/issue/current

Suggested citation: Fuchs, Christian, Matthias Schafranek, David Hakken and Marcus Breen. Eds. 2010. Special issue on “Capitalist crisis, communication & culture“. tripleC (cognition, communication, co-operation): Open Access Journal for a Global Sustainable Information Society 8 (2): 193-309.

“Capitalism […] is approaching an apocalyptic zero-point” (Slavoj Žižek).

What is the role of communication in the general situation of capitalist crisis?
The global economic downturn is an indicator of a new worldwide capitalist crisis. The main focus of most public debates as well as of economic and policy analyses is the role of finance capital and the housing market in creating the crisis, less attention is given to the role of communication technologies, the media, and culture in the world economic crisis. The task of this special issue of tripleC is to present analyses of the role of ICTs, the media, and culture in the current crisis of capitalism. The seven papers focus on the causes, development, and effects of the crisis. Each paper relates one or more of these dimensions to ICTs, the media, or culture.

Capitalist Crisis, Communication, & Culture – Introduction to the Special Issue of tripleC
Christian Fuchs, Matthias Schafranek, David Hakken and Marcus
Breen (Special Issue Editors)
pp 193-204
http://www.triple-c.at/index.php/tripleC/article/view/228/189

Computing and the Current Crisis:
The Significant Role of New Information Technologies in Our Socio-Economic Meltdown
David Hakken
pp 205-220
http://www.triple-c.at/index.php/tripleC/article/view/161/193

The Virtual Debt Factory: Towards an Analysis of Debt and Abstraction in the American Credit Crisis
Vincent R. Manzerolle
pp 221-236
http://www.triple-c.at/index.php/tripleC/article/view/149/192

Calculating the Unknown. Rationalities of Operational Risk in Financial Institutions
Matthias Werner and Hajo Greif
pp 237-250
http://www.triple-c.at/index.php/tripleC/article/view/184/194

Crisis, What Crisis? The Media: Business and Journalism in Times of Crisis
Rosario de Mateo, Laura Bergés, Anna Garnatxe*
pp 251-274
http://www.triple-c.at/index.php/tripleC/article/view/212/195

Anglo-American Credit Scoring and Consumer Debt in the Subprime Mortgage Crisis of 2007 as Models for Other Countries?
Thomas Ruddy
pp 275-284
http://www.triple-c.at/index.php/tripleC/article/view/176/198

Crise, Genre et TIC : Recette pour une Dés-Union Pronon- cée. L’Exemple de l’Afrique du Sud (in French)
Joelle Palmieri
pp 285-309
http://www.triple-c.at/index.php/tripleC/article/view/141/197

– – –
Priv.-Doz. Dr. Christian Fuchs
Unified Theory of Information Research Group
christian.fuchs@uti.at
Personal Website: http://fuchs.uti.at
NetPolitics Blog: http://fuchs.uti.at/blog
Research Group: http://www.uti.at
Editor of
tripleC – Cognition, Communication, Co-Operation | Open Access Journal for a Global Sustainable Information Society
http://www.triple-c.at
Fuchs, Christian. 2008. Internet and Society: Social Theory in the Information Age. New York: Routledge.
http://fuchs.uti.at/?page_id=40

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Capitalism

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com/

Capitalist Crisis

CRISIS OF CAPITALISM

Rethinking Marxism: A journal of economics, culture & society

Vol. 22 No. 2
APRIL 2010

http://www.rethinkingmarxism.org

IN THIS ISSUE:

Editors’ Introduction (Full Text)

SYMPOSIUM: CRISIS OF CAPITALISM

The Economic Crisis: A Marxian Interpretation – Stephen Resnick & Richard Wolff
Like most capitalist crises, today’s challenges economists, journalists, and politicians to explain and to overcome it. The post-1930s struggles between neoclassical and Keynesian economics are rejoined. We show that both proved inadequate to preventing crises and served rather to enable and justify (as “solutions” for crises) what were merely oscillations between two forms of capitalism differentiated according to greater or lesser state economic interventions. Our Marxian economic analysis here proceeds differently. We demonstrate how concrete aspects of U.S. economic history (especially real wage, productivity, and personal indebtedness trends) culminated in this deep and enduring crisis. We offer both a class-based critique of and an alternative to neoclassical and Keynesian analyses, including an alternative solution to capitalist crises.

What’s in It for Us? Rethinking the Financial Crisis – Randy Martin
In the aftermath of the financial meltdown, much attention has been given to capital’s crisis. For labor, the crisis augurs more than loss of home, job, or further deterioration of social infrastructure. The evident failure of financial knowledge has wider implications for the purported sovereignty of the professional managerial class in what has been called a knowledge society. Knowledge production has been subordinated to capital yet yielded no mastery of its conditions. Rather, the mutual indebtedness that is a feature of the crisis references an underlying socialization of risk and the work that goes into making it that should properly be the basis for a re-enchantment of socialism.

The Bull-of-Last-Resort: How the U.S. Economy Capitalizes on Nationalism – David Brennan
The dramatic purchase of corporate equities by the U.S. government in 2008 marks a distinct change in the way crises are handled. While many fear that this represents a move toward socialism, others look forward to the progressive possibilities. This paper argues that the policy of massively purchasing stocks is an attempt to provide support for equity values when no other bull could be found. This policy was used because high share values provide important class conditions of existence for capitalist exploitation today. As a consequence, the move to “nationalize” is viewed here as an attempt to protect the capitalist status quo. In this regard, the goals of current government policy are no different from past interventions.

The Green Economy: Grounds for a New Revolutionary Imaginary? – Boone Shear
In this essay I report on and briefly consider the composition, goals, and practices of some social actors in the green economy movement in Massachusetts, where I live. While cognizant of elite interests and state power that are working to shore up capitalist relations of production, I choose to amplify some of the openings and possibilities for intervention and transformation in the green economy rather than focusing on critique or (the very real) possibilities of cooptation and complicity. In doing so I hope to underscore the importance of the following questions: What new discursive formations are emerging from green economic imaginings? How are discourses constructed and contested and what new subjects are being produced in relation to a green social imaginary? Under what conditions are non-capitalist desires being created? What are the possibilities for a new left historical bloc?

2008: A New Chapter for U.S. Imperialism – Antonio Callari
This essay argues that the current economic crisis normalizes a transformation of the U.S. imperialist structure of surplus “accumulation.” Whereas the prior form of imperialism worked to create the conditions for surplus value production within the United States, the new imperialism works to channel globally produced surplus back to it. And whereas the prior form of imperialism was characterized by relatively high labor-power values in the United States, the new imperialism is characterized by a lowering of the value of labor power. The current economic crisis works to normalize this lowering of the value of labor power in the United States. It is this lowering of the value of labor power that sets the conditions for class struggle over the foreseeable future and thus the terms for Marxian theoretical and political work.

Mortgage Stakeholders, 2008 – Damon Rich & Larissa Harris
Red Lines Housing Crisis Learning Center is an exhibition developed between 2006 and 2008 at MIT’s Center for Advanced Visual Studies by artist and designer Damon Rich. An idiosyncratic history of American home finance realized in outsized objects, models, photographs, found artifacts, text, and video documents, the exhibition opened at MIT in September 2008 in the midst of the global crisis spurred by some of its subject matter, and travelled to the Queens Museum of Art in Spring 2009. As in his work with the education non-profit Center for Urban Pedagogy (CUP), which he founded in 1997, Rich,who was trained as an architect and works as an urban designer, asked a question about the built environment–in this case, how is it paid for?–in order to tell a story about race, class, private capital, and public power in the United States.

Betting the House – Anette Baldauf
Since spring 2008, an unprecedented housing crisis has left the front yards of U.S. single-family homes littered with “For Sale” signs, foreclosure notices, and dead flowers. The crisis has emptied out entire neighborhoods in Florida, California, Arizona, and Nevada, destroying years of sustained community building. What is happening in the United States of America? How is it that mostly ethnic minorities and women are stripped of their minimal savings, and why is such a vast rip-off possible? If so many Americans are now dispossessed, relocated to shantytowns, or worse, dumped onto the street, why aren’t they marching on Wall Street? And, finally, are Marxist theorists able to make sense of this tragedy?

As the World Turns: Globalization, Consumption, and the Feminization of Work – Drucilla K. Barker and Susan F. Feiner
It is widely argued that global imbalances are the cause of the financial crisis. Political imbalance (the United States as dominant world force) mirrors economic imbalance (the debt-financed consumption sprees of the past three decades). There is, however, a missing (third) term—gender, which is constitutive of the economy both discursively and materially. Gender, in this sense, is a governing code that feminizes women as well as economically, racially, and culturally marginalized men. The feminization of labor made the consumption patterns of the elite possible and naturalized the type of hegemonic masculinity that characterized the international finance system.

Collaborators in Crisis – Harriet Fraad
This article explores the roots of U.S. passivity as the recent economic crisis loots American lives. It looks at four collaborators in this crisis. One is the recent capitalist economic breakdown. A second is the end of traditional gender roles and marriage. A third is the fall in participation in collectives of almost all kinds. The fourth is the anesthetizing of Americans with psychotropic drugs. I also explore ways to reactivate Americans.

Tragedy and Farce in the Second Great Depression: A Marxian Look at the Panic of 2008 and its Aftermath – Asatar Bair

Capitalism in Crisis

In this essay I recount some of the farcical things that were said about the economic prospects of the United States at the end of the great housing boom and the peak of the stock market in 2007; then I turn to a discussion of the causes of the Panic of 2008, examining the relation between productive and unproductive labor in the economy. I discuss the explanations according to which the Panic and subsequent Second Great Depression are blamed on neoliberal ideology. I critically examine the call for a Keynesian solution of government regulation and stimulus, counterposing it to a Marxian strategy of class transformation.

ALSO IN THIS ISSUE:

Beyond Equality
David M. Bholat
My paper explores the character of Marx’s critique of equality as an ideal and the salience this critique has for progressives today. I suggest a reading of Marx different from the standard Marxist critique of liberalism as an emancipatory but unrealized set of ideals whose primary function in capitalist society is to conceal its conditions of inequality and unfreedom. Rather, I argue that Marx gestures at the limitations of liberal ideals, and shows why they are logically compatible with capital. This means that progressives are tasked with transcending, rather than merely appropriating, ideals such as freedom and equality.

REMARX

Task of the Dreamer
Marc Kaminsky
The incidents in this short story are refracted through the shattered sensorium of a traumatized but ethically intact survivor of the Holocaust. His narrative kaleidoscopically reconfigures horror and everyday life, nightmare and history, the gates of a Jewish ghetto in Nazi-occupied Poland and a checkpoint at the border between Israel and Palestine during the First Intifada. His act of witness defends the specificity of the human being, the other, in the face of the reasons of state and the abstractions of ideology.

REVIEW

Marx is Back: The Marx-Engels-Gesamtausgabe (MEGA) Project
Marcello Musto
After years of neglect, a definitive edition of Marx’s collected works is once more under way. Included are not only the published works of Marx and Engels, but all known correspondence and numerous notebooks of excerpts that are foundational for understanding the development of Marx’s thought. As a result of this project, a different and less dogmatic Marx emerges.

http://www.rethinkingmarxism.org

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

 

HAL

 

CHALLENGING ORTHODOXIES

Call for Papers: Challenging Orthodoxies
The Critical Governance Studies Conference 2010
13-14 December 2010

Keynote Speaker: Nancy Fraser
Henry A. & Louise Loeb
Professor of Philosophy and Politics
New School for Social Research
New York

Conference Organizers: Jonathan S Davies & Penelope Tuck

Registration@ Early Bird £250 (from 1st June)
£300 (from 1st October)

Please read the information overleaf and submit abstracts to@ esme.farrington@wbs.ac.uk 
Please contact Esme for further information
Visit: http://go.warwick.ac.uk/orthodoxies

We are pleased to announce a call for papers for the Critical Governance Studies conference at Warwick on 13-14 December this year. The goal of the conference is to bring together scholars and critical practitioners challenging orthodoxies and developing critical approaches to the study and practice of governance. At a time of crisis and discontent, and with the renaissance of social critique, we believe that the conference is timely and will enhance critical governance research across the social sciences. The conference is cross-disciplinary and we encourage colleagues to submit abstracts on themes that might include, among others, critical approaches to the governance of citizens, space, money, networks, risk, security, science and The University. The conference theme is ‘challenging orthodoxies’ and we ask colleagues to address it in their abstracts by describing a problematic orthodoxy, subjecting it to critical challenge and outlining new areas of inquiry and new social practices based on the critical approach. At the same time, we invite people to interrogate the key terms, ‘governance’, ‘orthodoxy’ and ‘critique’.

Individual abstract submissions are welcome from now until 31st October. Proposals for panels and streams following these guidelines are also welcome. Conference registration opens on 1st June with an early bird rate of £250, plus accommodation, rising to £300 plus accommodation from 1st October. Details of how to register and book accommodation on campus will be available online from 1st June. Please email abstracts and other proposals to esme.farrington@wbs.ac.uk.

Please circulate this information to relevant contacts and networks and submit abstracts and other proposals to esme.farrington@wbs.ac.uk.  Esme is available on 02476 522525 if you have any other queries.  

Thanks
Esme

Esme Farrington
Research Programme Co-ordinator
Governance and Public Management (GPM)
Warwick Business School
The University of Warwick
Coventry CV4 7AL
Tel:  +44 (0)24 7652 2525
Fax: +44 (0)24 7652 4410
esme.farrington@wbs.ac.uk 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Critical Hope

UTOPIA, DYSTOPIA AND CRITICAL THEORY

Studies in Social and Political Thought Annual Graduate Conference
Thursday 13 May 2010
University of Sussex Center for Literature & Philosophy, Brighton

‘Utopia, Dystopia and Critical Theory’
A One-day Interdisciplinary Conference for Postgraduate and Research Students.

Keynote Speaker: Professor Peter Osborne (Middlesex)

’Knowledge has no light except that shed on the world by redemption’ Theordor Adorno, Minima Moralia (153)

1st CALL FOR PAPERS

Postgraduate and Research Students as well as early career researchers working in philosophy, social, political and/or literary theory are invited to submit an abstract of 200 to 400 words on any topic related to the conference theme, prepared for blind reviewing, for a 20-minute paper to be followed by 10 minutes of discussion.
Eight papers will be selected for three themed sessions, followed by a keynote talk.

Papers presented at the conference will be considered for publication in Studies and Social & Political Thought, a graduate journal published by the Center for Social and Political Theory at the University of Sussex since 1990 (http://www.sussex.ac.uk/cspt/1-6-1.html).

The deadline for submissions is 04 April 2010. Notification of acceptance will be sent out within a week. Abstracts or questions should be addressed to: sspt2010@googlemail.com

Possible topics include:

Feminist Futures
Science Fiction, Cultural Politics and the Political Imagination
Utopia and/or Dystopia
Crisis (of Capitalism/Feminism/the State/Marxism/Critical Theory etc)
Ends (of History/Ideology/Capitalism/Communism/Neo-Liberalism/Postcoloniality etc)
Immanent and Transcendent Criticism
Environment, Catastrophe, Risk
Futures (of Critical Theory/Post-modernity/Europe/Islam/Secular
Humanism/Globalisation etc)
Infinity and Totality
Representations of Transcendence/Utopia/Dystopia/Apocalypse
Negative Theology
Iconography, Idolatory and Ideology Critique

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

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