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EDITORIAL_Student-loans_Devin-BeauregardPOSTGRADUATE ETHICS: ISSUES, DILEMMAS, SOLUTIONS

Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE)

Date – Wednesday, 15 July 2015: 13.00 – 16.15

Venue – SRHE, 73 Collier St, London N1 9BE

Network – Postgraduate Issues

Ethical integrity is an important term that concerns not only the research process but many practical situations. As one of the speakers highlights, the scope of this notion encompasses amongst many ethical scenarios,  ‘… the relationship between policy and governance, practice, and institutional support and administration.’ The aim of today is to provide an environment where postgraduate ethical issues can be discussed and debated. The speakers will highlight different ethical issues and allow participants to respond underling their own ethical dilemmas. As Brooks et al (2014:3) argue, ‘Ethical thinking is intimately connected to practical research sills, which need to be developed and reflected upon.’ ‘The more you think about postgraduate research ethics …’, another speaker will suggest, ‘ … the more important ethics becomes.’ What we hope participants will gain from the Seminar is increased understandings of their own ethical situations and potential ethical solutions.

 

Programme

 

12.00: Registration and Lunch.

 

1.00-2.00: Doctoral Supervisor Training – Supporting Supervisors and Students in Understanding Research IntegrityFiona Denney

 

2.00-3.00: Current issues in research integrityAndrew Rawnsley

 

3.00-3.15: Tea and Coffee break

 

3.15-3.45: Postgraduate ethical Issues in Education Research – Richard Race

 

3.45-4.15: General Discussion and close.

 

Biographies
Fiona Denney

Fiona Denney is currently the Director of the Brunel Educational Excellence Centre at Brunel University, London, which is aimed at enhancing support for both staff and students in order to improve the quality of teaching and learning at all levels throughout the University. Fiona has worked in UK universities for 18 years – both as an academic and as a senior professional member of staff. Prior to working at Brunel, Fiona was the Assistant Director of the Graduate School at King’s College London, where she developed training for researchers, senior staff and doctoral supervisors, provided strategic direction for the development of academics and researchers and hosed the London Hub for the national research development organisation, VITAE. E mail: Fiona.Deeney@Brunel.ac.uk

 

Andrew Rawnsley

Andrew’s expertise lies principally in research ethics and integrity, with a focus on the relationship between policy and governance, practice, and institutional support and administration. He has designed and delivered training across the sector and undertakes frequent consultancy projects on research integrity for a range of universities, as well international speaking engagements. He is a co-author of Epigeum’s “Research Integrity” international online training programme, along with four US-based authors; and Associate Editor for the Biomed Central journal “Research Integrity and Peer Review.” E Mail: A.Rawnsley@tees.ac.uk

 

Richard Race

Richard Race is Senior Lecturer in Education at Roehampton University. Richard has sat on ethics committees at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. He has been Programme Convener on MA Education for the last five years, as well as Programme Convener for MA (Education Sciences) in ASPETE, Athens, Greece. The second edition of his monograph, Multiculturalism and Education (Bloomsbury, London) was recently published. He is working on his second monograph, Integration and Education Policy-Making (Palgrave Macmillan, London).  He has also published a co-edited collection with Vini Lander in 2014: Advancing Race and Ethnicity in Education (Palgrave Macmillan, Houndsmills) E Mail: r.race@roehampton.ac.uk

 

Registration: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/

 

***END***

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CLR James

GRASSROOTS POLITICS IN THE POSTCOLONY

Call for Papers
Race/Ethnicity: Multidisciplinary Global Contexts (Indiana University Press)
Volume 6, Number 3 (Spring 2013)
Grassroots Politics in the Postcolony

Franco Barchiesi (Ohio State University), Guest Editor

Submissions are invited to explore the politics of contention and social movements in the postcolonial world (Africa, Asia, and Latin America), with particular regard to the ways in which race and ethnicity relate to identities and claims revolving around class, gender, nationality, and religion. Comparative discussions of social contestation in different societies are welcome.

Guest Editor Franco Barchiesi, Associate Professor in the Department of African American and African Studies at the Ohio State University, and the editorial staff of Race/Ethnicity invite submissions for Volume 6, Number 3, entitled “Grassroots Politics in the Postcolony”. We welcome submissions from activists, advocates and practitioners working on relevant issues, as well as from scholars in the social sciences and the humanities. In this issue, we look to engage the  following questions:

* How are racial and ethnic identities implicated in collective mobilization (including rural, labor, women, youth, indigenous, and religious movements) in Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the “global South”?
* Is the concept of “social movement” useful to understand contemporary forms of social contention and grassroots politics?
* How do racial inequalities shape local contentious politics and everyday forms of social contestation?
* How do claims for racial and ethnic justice relate to grassroots politics in realities of economic liberalization and privatization?
* In which ways do intersections of race and ethnicity with current social conflicts interrogate the legacies of nationalism and decolonization?
* Do processes of migration and diaspora internationalize postcolonial political identities?
* How do grassroots identities, and their elaborations of race and ethnicity, interrogate political institutions and ideas of citizenship and civil society?
* How have postcolonial social movements responded to the global economic crisis and its impact on racial and ethnic dynamics?

Contributions can include, but are not limited to, case studies, theoretical discussions, and experience-based reflections.

Papers must be received by September 15, 2012 to be considered for publication in this issue.
Submission of artwork for the cover that relates to the theme of the issue is welcome. See website at http://www.raceethnicity.org/coverart.html for submission guidelines.

Please send manuscript publications to the managing editor: Leslie Shortlidge shortlidge.2@osu.edu

See Style Guidelines at http://www.raceethnicity.org  

Submission of artwork for the cover that relates to the theme of the issue is welcome. See website for submission guidelines.

Race/Ethnicity: Multidisciplinary Global Contexts encourages and welcomes contributions by scholars, researchers, grassroots activists, policy advocates, and organizations.

 

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Big Society

DEVELOPMENTS IN CONTEMPORARY CITIZENSHIP

CENTRE FOR EUROPEAN STUDIES POSTGRADUATE RESEARCH GROUP
KING’S COLLEGE LONDON
CALL FOR PAPERS
DEADLINE: MAY 2nd 2011

The European Studies Postgraduate Research Group at King’s College London is pleased to announce a call for papers for their forthcoming research seminar, Developments in Contemporary Citizenship.

The institution of citizenship is undergoing a period of intense scrutiny in academia and political practice. The widening and deepening of the European Union, the social inclusion of migrant populations and the economic inequalities emphasised by the repercussions of the financial crisis are just a few examples of processes which today urge a renewed assessment of citizenship as a normative ideal and a political project.

The seminar is free and open to all. We hope to engage a range of speakers from interdisciplinary backgrounds in debate over theoretical conceptualizations of citizenship (Panel One) as well as case studies of the forms of and provisions for modes of citizenship in dynamically changing societies (Panel Two). The discussions will be chaired by Dr Stathis Kouvelakis and Dr Nagore Calvo of King’s College London. 

Key areas include (but are not limited to):
– The theoretical and social relevance of the concept of citizenship
– Citizenship, nationhood and the State
– Citizenship as inclusion: immigration, race, ethnicity
– Citizenship beyond national borders: the European Union and global rights
– Crisis, recession and economic rights
– Inclusion and exclusion on the local level: citizenship ‘from below’?

We aim to create a space for open discussion and critical development of original work. Papers should be of around 15 minutes’ duration, followed by discussion from the audience. Academics, researchers and postgraduate students are encouraged to send abstracts of no more than 250 words proposing articles, working papers, discussion pieces on theoretical debates or empirical case studies that can offer a new perspective to the debate.

Date: 10th June 2011
Place: King’s College London, Waterloo Campus

Abstracts should be sent to Simon McMahon at simon.mcmahon@kcl.ac.uk by Monday 2nd May at the latest. Speakers will be contacted during the following week.

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Radical Politics

RADICAL DEMOCRACY CONFERENCE

Call for Papers: Radical Democracy Conference

April 4 – April 5, 2011, New York, NY

Paper Abstracts Submission Deadline: January 31

Notification Date: February 18

Full Papers Deadline: March 21

The Department of Politics at The New School for Social Research, in collaboration with the Institute of Comparative Literature and Society at Columbia University, is sponsoring a two-day graduate student conference interrogating the concept, history, and implications of radical democracy. Striving to assess the legacy of antiquity on contemporary radical democratic theory, as well as explore the work of contemporary theorists such as Abensour, Arendt, Castoriadis, Mouffe, Negri, Ranciere, and Wolin, we invite you to submit abstracts on any theme pertaining to the history, meaning, development and application, or critique of the concept OF “radical democracy.”

We strongly encourage submissions that touch upon any of the following themes, however, papers exploring other relevant topics and issues are also strongly encouraged:

    • Promises, limits and critiques of the concept of radical democracy

    • Ancient democratic thought in relation to modernity and post-modernity

    • Technology and the mediums of (radical) democracy

    • Consensus building/agonistic democracy

    • Engendering radical democracy: race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class

    • Post-Leftist democratic politics

    • Radical democracy and anarchism

    • Relationship between radical democracy and traditional regime forms such as oligarchy, liberalism, republicanism, socialism, communism

    • Exploring the relationship between radical democracy and key concepts in political theory such as: participatory/direct democracy; agency and autonomy; state and nation; capitalism; imperialism; anarchy and authority, dictatorship and tyranny; sacrifice and violence; revolution and reform

Interested participants should submit a one-page abstract (up to 300 words) that includes institutional affiliation, academic level, and contact information by Monday, January 31.

You will receive a notification of our decision by Friday, February 18.

Full conference papers will be due by Monday, March 21.

Please submit your abstract at radicaldemocracy@newschool.edu

For more information about the conference, please visit our Web site at: http://constituentpower.blogspot.com

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Sociology

BRITISH SOCIOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION

MEDICAL SOCIOLOGY GROUP

ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2011

We look forward to welcoming you at our 43rd Annual Conference.

Wednesday 14th – Friday 16th September 2011 at the University of Chester

(Please note the date for the conference has changed from previously advertised)

In addition to two high profile plenary speakers, the 2011conference will celebrate our international links with a symposium.

Papers, posters and other forms of presentation will be structured around streams that include: 

1. Cancer                                                                               

2. Embodiment and Emotion                                                           

3. Ethics                                                                                 

4. Ethnicity                                                                             

5. Experiences of Health and Illness                                   

6. Gender                                                                              

7. Health policy, service delivery & organisation                

8. Health technologies and genetics                                   

9. Individual, collective and global risk                                

10. Inequalities                                                                       

11. Lay-professional interface                                                

12. Lifecourse: Reproductive Health; Chronic conditions; ageing; death and dying          

13. Mental Health

14. Methods

15. Patient and public involvement

16. Patient organisation and support groups

17. Preventive Health

18. Randomised controlled trials and evidenced-based medicine

19. Sleep

20. Theory

21. Open Stream

Further details and abstract submission form available from: www.britsoc.co.uk/events/medsoc  and bsamedsoc@britsoc.org.uk

Administrative or general abstract enquires to bsamedsoc@britsoc.org.uk or call 0191 383 0839

The abstract submission is now open. Submit your abstract on line now.

Both members and non-members can submit, BSA members will need to log in using their membership number and e-mail address.

If you would like to become a BSA member and benefit from reduced conference fees, please visit www.britsoc.co.uk/join

Submission closes April 29th 2011.

Abstracts received after this date will not be considered.

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Karl Marx

MEETING ON ‘MARX AT THE MARGINS’ – WITH KEVIN B. ANDERSON

Location: Niebyl Proctor Marxist Library, 6501 Telegraph Ave. Oakland, CA 94609

Saturday September 25th, 2010
2:00 PM

Marx at the Margins: On Nationalism, Ethnicity, and Non-Western Societies

Author event Marx at the Margins: On Nationalism, Ethnicity, and Non-Western Societies by Kevin B. Anderson 

Marx’s critique of capital was far broader than is usually supposed. To be sure, he concentrated on the labor-capital relation within Western Europe and North America. But at the same time, he expended considerable time and energy on the analysis of non-Western societies, as well as race, ethnicity, and nationalism. While some of these writings show a problematically unilinear perspective and, on occasion, traces of ethnocentrism, the overall trajectory of Marx’s writings was toward a critique of national, ethnic, and colonial oppression and toward an appreciation of resistance movements in these spheres.

In 1848, in the Communist Manifesto, Marx and Engels espoused an implicitly and problematically unilinear concept of social progress. Precapitalist societies, especially China, which they characterized in ethnocentric terms as a “most barbarian” society, were destined to be forcibly penetrated and modernized by this new and dynamic social system. In his 1853 articles for the New York Tribune, Marx extended these perspectives to India, while viewing the communal social relations and communal property of the Indian village as a solid foundation for “Oriental despotism.” Postcolonial and postmodern thinkers, most notably Edward Said, have criticized the Communist Manifesto and the 1853 India writings as a form of Orientalist knowledge fundamentally similar to the colonialist mindset.

END

I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work

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Karl Marx

MARX AT THE MARGINS – KEVIN B. ANDERSON

Kevin B. Anderson
Marx at the Margins: On Nationalism, Ethnicity, and Non-Western Societies

336 pages,
6 x 9
© 2010
Cloth $66.00
ISBN: 9780226019826
Published May 2010
Paper $22.50
ISBN: 9780226019833
Published May 2010

http://www.press.uchicago.edu/presssite/metadata.epl?mode=synopsis&isbn=9780226019833

http://www.amazon.com/Marx-Margins-Nationalism-Ethnicity-Non-Western/dp/0226019837/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1265048394&sr=1-1

In Marx at the Margins, Kevin Anderson uncovers a variety of extensive but neglected texts by the well-known political economist which cast what we thought we knew about his work in a startlingly different light. Analyzing a variety of Marx’s writings, including journalistic work written for the New York Tribune, Anderson presents us with a Marx quite at odds with our conventional interpretations. Rather than providing us with an account of Marx as an exclusively class-based thinker, Anderson here offers a portrait of Marx for the twenty-first century: a global theorist whose social critique was sensitive to the varieties of human social and historical development, including not just class, but nationalism, race, and ethnicity, as well.

Marx at the Margins ultimately argues that alongside his overarching critique of capital, Marx created a theory of history that was multi-layered and not easily reduced to a single model of development or revolution. Through highly-informed readings on work ranging from Marx’s unpublished 1879–82 notebooks to his passionate writings about the antislavery cause in the United States, this volume delivers a groundbreaking and canon-changing vision of Karl Marx that is sure to provoke lively debate in Marxist scholarship and beyond.

CONTENTS:

Acknowledgments

List of Abbreviations

Introduction

1. Colonial Encounters in the 1850s: The European Impact on India, Indonesia, and China

2. Russia and Poland: The Relationship of National Emancipation to Revolution

3. Race, Class, and Slavery: The Civil War as a Second American Revolution

4. Ireland: Nationalism, Class, and the Labor Movement

5. From the Grundrisse to Capital: Multilinear Themes

6. Late Writings on Non-Western and Precapitalist Societies

Conclusion

Appendix: The Vicissitudes of the Marx-Engels Gesamtausgabe from the 1920s to Today

Notes

References

Kevin B. Anderson is professor of sociology and political science at the University of California–Santa Barbara and most recently, with Janet Afary, the co-author of ‘Foucault and the Iranian Revolution: Gender and the Seductions of Islamism’, also published by the University of Chicago Press.

Kevin B. Anderson at: http://www.kevin-anderson.com/

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Radical Education against Capital

A RETURN TO EDUCATIONAL APARTHEID? CRITICAL EXAMINATIONS OF RACE, SCHOOLS, AND SEGREGATION

A Critical Education Series

The editors of Critical Education are pleased to announce our second editorial series.  This current series will focus on the articulation of race, schools, and segregation, and will analyze the extent to which schooling may or may not be returning to a state of educational apartheid.

On June 28, 2007, the Supreme Court of the US by a 5-4 margin voted to overturn Jefferson County’s four decade old desegregation plan.  The Meredith case from Jefferson County was conjoined with the Parents Involved in Community Schools case from Seattle, WA, for which a group comprised primarily of white parents from two neighborhoods alleged some 200 students were not admitted to schools of their choice, based on “integration tie-breakers,” which prevented many from attending facilities nearest to their homes.

In Justice Roberts plurality opinion, he argued, “The parties and their amici debate which side is more faithful to the heritage of Brown [v. Board of Education, 1954], but the position of the plaintiffs in Brown was spelled out in their brief and could not have been clearer: ‘The Fourteenth Amendment prevents states from according differential treatment to American children on the basis of their color or race’.  What do racial classifications at issue here do, if not accord differential treatment on the basis of race?”  And, later, “The way to stop discrimination based on race is to stop discrimination on the basis of race.”

Aside from the fact that the plaintiff in the Louisville case ultimately won her appeal in the Jefferson County system, placing her white child into precisely the school she wanted based on her appeal to the district, demonstrating that the system worked, it is the goal of this series to investigate the extent to which Justice Roberts and the other concurring justices have taken steps to erode the civil rights of the racially marginalized in order to serve the interests of the dominant racial group.  It took just a little over 50 years (of monumental effort) to get a case to the Supreme Court to overturn Plessy v. Ferguson. Now, has it taken just a little over 50 years to scale that decision back with the overturning of voluntary desegregation plans in Jefferson County and Seattle School District 1?

In 2003, with a different make-up, the Supreme Court foreshadowed this 2007 verdict by rendering a ‘split decision’ regarding the University of Michigan admission policies. In the Gratz v. Bollinger case, the Supreme Court decided 6-3 that the University of Michigan needed to modify their admission criteria, which assigned points based on race.  However, in the Grutter v. Bollinger case, the Supreme Court decided 5-4 to uphold the University of Michigan Law School’s ruling that race could be one of several factors when selecting students because it furthers “a compelling interest in obtaining the educational benefits that flow from a diverse student body.”

In Jonathan Kozol’s 2005 sobering profile of American education, Shame of the Nation: The Restoration of Apartheid Schooling in America, a lamenting follow-up to his earlier work, Savage Inequalities, he already began to illustrate the retrograde process many public school systems have undergone related to racial balance.  His critique of these pre-Brown-like- segregation systems was balanced, ironically, by rather effusive praise of the Jefferson County system, which attempted to keep this balance in check. Does the 2007 decision remove this one shining example?

Though the course toward educational apartheid may not be pre-destined, what is the likelihood that the “path of least resistance” will lead toward racial separation? How does the lingering legacy of residential segregation complicate this issue?  What connections can we draw to and/or how might further racial segregation exacerbate issues of poverty or unemployment?  Further, where do race and class collide?  And, where is a more distinct analysis necessary? Finally, what can we surmise about the ongoing achievement gap if, in fact, apartheid schooling is afoot?

Undoubtedly, at worst, this decision could prove to be a harbinger for the death of a waning democracy.  Without a compelling public education that helps all our children become critical consumers and citizens, what kind of society might we imagine for ourselves?  At best, though, this decision could marshal the sensibilities of a critical cadre of educators, social workers, health care workers, activists, attorneys, business leaders, etc. to stand in resistance to the injustice that is becoming our nation’s public school system. 

In an LA Times opinion piece a few days before this 2007 decision, Edward Lazarus argued, “Although they may have disagreed about Brown’s parameters, most Americans coalesced around the decision as a national symbol for our belated rejection of racism and bigotry.  Using Brown as a sword to outlaw affirmative action of any kind would destroy that worthy consensus and transform it into just another mirror reflecting a legal and political culture still deeply fractured over race.”  As Allan Johnson (2006), in Privilege, Power, and Difference, claims, there can be no healing until the wounding stops.  Likewise, paraphrasing Malcolm X’s provocation about so-called progress, he reminded us that although the knife in the back of African-Americans may once have been nine inches deep, that it has only been removed a few inches does not indicate progress.  Will this decision plunge the knife further?

Series editors Adam Renner (from Louisville, KY) and Doug Selwyn (formerly of Seattle, WA) invite essays that treat any of the above questions and/or other questions that seek clarity regarding race, education, schooling, and social justice.  We seek essays that explore the history of segregation, desegregation, and affirmative action in the US and abroad.  While we certainly invite empirical/quantitative research regarding these issues, we also welcome more qualitative studies, as well as philosophical/ theoretical work, which provide deep explorations of these phenomena. We especially invite narratives from parents or students who have front line experience of segregation and/or educational apartheid. Additionally, and importantly, we seek essays of resistance, which document the struggle for racial justice in particular locales and/or suggestions for how we might wrestle toward more equitable schooling for all children.

Please visit the Critical Education website for submission criteria: http://www.criticaleducation.org. Also feel free to contact the series editors, Adam Renner (arenner@bellarmine. edu) or Doug Selwyn (dselw001@plattsburg h.edu) with any questions. 

E. Wayne Ross, Professor, Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy, University of British Columbia, 2125 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada, 604-822-2830, wayne.ross@ubc. ca, http://www.ewaynero ss.net

Critical Education: http://www.criticaleducation.org

Cultural Logic: http://eserver.org/clogic

Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor: http://www.workplace-gsc.com

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Cultural Translation

11th December 2009, Cardiff University

Call for Papers

 

Etymologically, the word translation is linked, among other things, to “tradition” on the one hand and to “betrayal” on the other. … And yet the word tradition itself, linked in its roots to translation and betrayal, has to do with handing over. Tradition itself is nothing if it is not a transmission. How is tradition to be transmitted, to be passed on, if not through translation? (Rey Chow)

 

The process of “cultural translation” is inevitably enmeshed in conditions of power – professional, national, international. … Given that that is so, the interesting question for enquiry is … how power enters into the process of “cultural translation” (Talal Asad)

 

 

For this free interdisciplinary conference, we invite proposals on problematics of:

  • Intercultural encounters
  • Translation between cultures
  • Postcolonialism and the politics of translation
  • Diaspora, migration, mobility and cultural practices
  • Ethnicity, language, representation and cultural identity
  • Theories and practices of cultural translation
  • Tradition, transmission, translation and problems of origins
  • Re-examining the assumptions of translation
  • Questions of technology, mediation and the voice
  • Ethical and political problems in academic methodologies

 

Proposals: 400-word proposals for 20-minute papers.

Deadline: 1st September 2009

Email: BowmanP@cf.ac.uk

 

NB: This conference is free. Places are strictly limited. Papers will be selected by committee.

 

Organisation: The conference is organised by:

  • The Cardiff Humanities Research Institute Project, ‘Representing Migration and Mobility in European Cultures’ (Cardiff School of European Studies);
  • The Race, Representation and Cultural Identity Research Group (Cardiff School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies).

 

 

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Postcolonial Ethnicity, Visuality and Cultural Politics

 

Free Day Conference

All Welcome.

Postcolonial Ethnicity, Visuality and Cultural Politics

Cardiff University, Friday 29th May 2009

 

 

Blog: http://cultstud.blogspot.com/

 

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=61785428357

 

Call for Papers (Sorry, no vacancies for this one, but please call again!): http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/jomec/newsandevents/events/09postcolonialethnicitycallforpapers.html

 

Cardiff University:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/jomec/research/researchgroups/racerepresentationandculturalidentity/index.html

 

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Postcolonial Ethnicity, Visuality & Cultural Politics Conference

 

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/jomec/newsandevents/index.html  

 

Date: 27th February 2009.

 

Venue: Room 1.63, Glamorgan Building, Cardiff University, CF10 3NB.

 

Registration: The event is free.

All Welcome – Space is Limited

Please PRE-REGISTER by emailing name(s) to: BowmanP@cf.ac.uk

 

 

Timetable:

 

 

11.00 – 11.30 – Paul Bowman (Cardiff University) “All the girlies say I’m pretty fly for a white guy”: Coercive Mimeticism & Cultural Studies

 

 

11.30 – 12.30 – Ben Pitcher (Middlesex University) Race and Racism after Anti-Racism

 

 

12.30 – 13.30 – Lunch

 

 

13.30 – 14.30 – Mónica Moreno Figueroa (Newcastle University) Looking Emotionally: Photography, Racism and Intimacy in Research

 

 

14.30 – 15.00 – Nasheli Jiménez Del Val (Cardiff University) Pinturas de casta: Mexican caste paintings, a Foucauldian Reading

 

 

15.00 – 15.15 – break

 

 

15.15 – 16.15 – Birgit Breninger & Thomas Kaltenbacher (Salzburg University) Tracking the Cultural Gaze: Acquired Acts of Looking and Learned Plots of Identities in Austria

 

 

16.15 – 16.30 – break

 

 

16.30-17.00 – Corbett Miteff (Cardiff University) Looking through Ethnic Eyes And Finding Global Animation

 

 

17.00-18.30 – Martin McQuillan (Leeds University) Deconstructing Disney, Part II

 

 

For further information & to Reserve A Place: BowmanP@cf.ac.uk

 

 

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