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images (2)DE-NATURALISING DISASTERS

A WORKSHOP

The ‘De-Naturalising Disasters’ workshop, is part of the ‘Living in the Anthropocene: Rethinking the Nature/Culture Divide’ series.

The event is convened by David Chandler (University of Westminster) and Camilla Royle (King’s College, London).

Further information is available here: http://rethinkingtheanthropocene.blogspot.co.uk/
Date: Friday 18th September, 2015
Venue: Centre for the Study of Democracy, University of Westminster, Westminster Forum, 5th floor, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW (5 minutes walk from Oxford Circus tube station)
Time: 4.00pm-8.00pm

Programme: De-Naturalising Disasters

Introduction: Bruno Latour argues that we should love our ‘monsters’. Nothing illustrates this demand better than how disasters are becoming increasingly central to the political imagination. From the late Ulrich Beck’s views of ’emancipatory catastrophism’ to the UN Post-2015 Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, disasters are becoming a subject of ethical care. Disasters are no longer excluded from politics and seen as external or natural events but are instead seen as enabling agents of political change. The United Nations, for example, is forwarding a new paradigm suggesting that disaster risk should be embedded within everyday governance and development processes and managed through taking responsibility for social and environmental outcomes. In this way, disasters – as outcomes of social processes – enable learning, reflection and potentially emancipatory outcomes. This workshop seeks to discuss how disasters have overcome the nature/culture divide and what is at stake in learning how to love them.

4.00-5.30 “Grand Strategies for Anthropocene Challenges: Can we Learn in Time?” Speaker: Jamie MacIntosh (Professorial Venture Research Fellow & Director of the Institute for Security & Resilience Studies, University College, London) Chair: David Chandler (University of Westminster)

The UK’s recently elected government has now revved up the Whitehall policy machine to distil the 2015 batch of strategies. Ministerial speeches and fanfares are not far off. The UK Government is one among many major and minor bodies that drafts strategies. There were 51 state signatories to the UN Charter in 1945; there are now 193 sovereign bodies. The financial power of several non-state bodies far exceeds that of many UN Leviathans. Nevertheless, after the post-Cold War unipolar moment and Washington Consensus, we are all – for better or worse – immersed in a multipolar world. Moreover, it’s a multipolar world that within a few years and decades will have to face up to the challenges of the Anthropocene with our productivity still flat and inequality growing. There is little evidence that we are developing healthy appetites for the systemic risks and radical uncertainties that abound. Whether you look to elites or the multitudes, the competencies, capabilities and capacity necessary for the species to make it to the 22nd Century cannot be taken for granted. Can we learn in time how to make grand strategies work or are they myths to numb the hapless? Do universities have anything pragmatic to offer?

5.30-6.00 break

6.00-7.30 “Can Disaster Risk Management be Emancipatory?” Speaker: Mark Pelling (Professor of Geography, Centre for Integrated Research on Risk and Resilience, King’s College, London) Chair: Camilla Royle (King’s College, London)

Disaster risk management science has a long critical tradition including work by Hewitt, Wisner and Watts. The advent of climate change adaptation has opened new policy relevance for disaster risk management, but without taking on board this critical viewpoint. The result has been an adaptation science framed around stability seeking. Resilience has come to symbolise this conservative vision for risk management. One response has been to call for Transformative Adaptation. The paper will examine the advent and rise of transformation and its current positioning in the emerging post-2015 development agenda.

7.30 wine reception

Many thanks,
David Chandler and Camilla Royle

David Chandler, Professor of International Relations, Director of the Centre for the Study of Democracy, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Westminster, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW. Tel: ++44 (0)776 525 3073.
Journal Editor, Resilience: International Policies, Practices and Discourses: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/resi20
Amazon books page: http://www.amazon.co.uk/David-Chandler/e/B001HCXV7Y/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0
Personal website: http://www.davidchandler.org/
Twitter: @DavidCh27992090

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Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

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Materialisms

Materialisms

MATERIALISMS READING GROUP

16. Thursday 23 July 2015, we will be discussing McKenzie Wark’s ‘Molecular Red: Theory for the Anthropocene’ which will be introduced by Paul Rekret (Richmond University). For those interested, here is Zizek’s short review of the book: http://www.versobooks.com/blogs/2007-ecology-against-mother-nature-slavoj-zizek-on-molecular-redand Wark’s reply: http://www.publicseminar.org/2015/06/zizek3/#.VXLTrzY4nTa

17. Thursday 10 September 2015 – Miriam Tedeschi (University IUAV, Venice) will be introducing Gilles Deleuze’s ‘Spinoza: Practical Philosophy’

18. Thursday 8 October 2015 – Elisabetta Brighi (University of Westminster) will be introducing Deborah Cowen’s ‘The Deadly Life of Logistics: Mapping Violence in Global Trade’

19. Thursday 5 November 2015 – Graham Jones will be introducing John Protevi’s ‘Political Affect: Connecting the Social and the Somatic’

20. Thursday 3 December 2015 – Nick Srnicek will be introducing Graham Harman’s ‘Bruno Latour: Reassembling the Political’

Meetings are open to all and take place Thursdays 6.30-8.00pm, Westminster Forum, Department of Politics and International Relations, 5th Floor, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW (5 minutes from Oxford Circus tube).

Wine and nibbles will be provided, sponsored by the Centre for the Study of Democracy, University of Westminster and the Centre for Media & Culture Research, London South Bank University.

Suggestions for meetings after Xmas that we have on the table:

Michiel van Ingen (University of Westminster) introducing Kate Soper’s ‘What is Nature: Culture, Politics and the Non-Human’

Philip Cunliffe (University of Kent) introducing Alexander Wendt’s ‘Quantum Mind and Social Science: Unifying Physical and Social Ontology’

David Chandler (University of Westminster) introducing Louise Amoore’s ‘The Politics of Possibility: Risk and Security beyond Probability’

 

If you wish to be added to the Materialisms Reading Group mailing list please contact me at d.chandler@wmin.ac.uk

Best wishes,
David

 

David Chandler, Professor of International Relations, Director of the Centre for the Study of Democracy, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Westminster, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW. Tel: ++44 (0)776 525 3073.
Journal Editor, Resilience: International Policies, Practices and Discourses: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/resi20

Amazon books page: http://www.amazon.co.uk/David-Chandler/e/B001HCXV7Y/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

Personal website: http://www.davidchandler.org/
Twitter: @DavidCh27992090

STUFF

STUFF

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Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

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Big Data

Big Data

THE POLITICS OF DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY

Call for Papers: ‘The Politics of Digital Technology’
Panel Proposal for the International Studies Association 57th Annual Conference, Atlanta Georgia, 16-19 March 2016
Convenors: Linda Monsees and David Chandler

The importance of technology, especially digital technologies, for world politics has increasingly caught the attention of IR-scholars. The so-called digital revolution asks us to rethink the role of technology in our current times and to consider how its specific characteristics might challenge traditional political ontologies. It is now widely acknowledged that technology is more than a residual category for theorizing world politics but in the centre of ongoing transformations. These transformations can be observed in real-world political debates and policy-making (Wikileaks and data gathering, the rule of the algorithm, digital humanitarianism, Big Data and the Internet of Things) and also in a growing theoretical interest in science and technology studies (STS) and the ‘material-turn’.

Contributing to this debate, this panel seeks to rethink the possibilities for theorizing the relationship between technology and politics. The current challenge lies in meaningfully conceptualizing technology and its relation to politics in a way that does not reduce technology to just another variable determining the outcome of policies. However, assuming that all technology is always already political might hinder us from understanding the specific linkages between technology and politics or the distinct characteristics enabling technology to be political. Insights from science and technology studies might help to engage with the social role of technology, but the question of how technology is political remains open. Adapting STS to political science might need additional tools for thoroughly engaging with the political aspects of technology. That is why we would like to bring scholars together who work from different theoretical perspectives and use a variety of approaches.

We welcome contributions that ask how we can grasp the distinct characteristics of the relationship between politics and technology. Theoretical and/or empirical contributions that aim at understanding the above outlined questions are welcomed. Possible contributions might ask about the politics of certain technologies, the specificities of digital technologies or how technologies might challenge traditional categories of International Relations.

Please send proposals with a title (limited to 50 words) and an abstract (limited to 200 words), three tags, and at least one author to Linda Monsees (lmonsees@bigsss.uni-bremen.de) and David Chandler (d.chandler@wmin.ac.uk) by 15 May 2015.

Best wishes,
Linda and David

David Chandler, Professor of International Relations, Director of the Centre for the Study of Democracy, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Westminster, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW. Tel: ++44 (0)776 525 3073.
Journal Editor, Resilience: International Policies, Practices and Discourses: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/resi20
Amazon books page: http://www.amazon.co.uk/David-Chandler/e/B001HCXV7Y/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0
Personal website: http://www.davidchandler.org/
Twitter: @DavidCh27992090

Knowledge

Knowledge

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

North Atlantic Oscillation

North Atlantic Oscillation

BEYOND THE EUROCENTRISM DEBATE

Max-Planck-Institut für ethnologische Forschung

Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

Call for Papers

Workshop “Beyond the Eurocentrism Debate”

28-29 September 2015

Organiser: Matthijs Krul, Department ‘Resilience and Transformation in Eurasia’

Venue: MPI for Social Anthropology, Halle/S.

 

One of the crucial contributions to the rise of ‘global history’ in recent decades is the debate on Eurocentrism in historical explanations of European dominance. An ‘anti-Eurocentric’ literature or school of thought has emerged across the social sciences, causing many scholars to reconsider previous assumptions about the causes and periodization of European ascendancy. A tentative consensus in this literature finds the various civilizations of Eurasia locked in long-term patterns of mutual influence, alternation, and exchange (e.g. Pomeranz 2000).

Despite these developments, however, the scholars involved are by no means agreed on the relevant explanatory models. For some, the central theoretical divide is between ‘diffusionist’ models of core and periphery and their opponents (Blaut 1993); for others, between models of continuity and of transformation in world systems (Chase-Dunn and Hall 1997). Goody (2010) speaks of a Eurasian continuity across the landmass since the Bronze Age; others of a 5000 year world-system (Frank and Gills 1994). But critics contest the privileging of Eurasia over Africa, or indeed the concept of Eurasian continuity itself. Finally, in the anti-Eurocentric literature causal explanations for the eventual ‘rise’ of Europe are often underexplored compared to refutations of claims to European specificity. Bryant (2006) in turn questions its reliance on contingency as an explanatory category.

The aim of this workshop, to be held on the 28th and 29th of September 2015, is to address these conflicting theoretical and methodological perspectives in order to move the debate on Eurocentrism beyond the current deadlocks.

 

We invite papers from across social and historical disciplines to help clarify these issues. For instance:

  • Given the divisions outlined, can we detect sufficient consistency in types of causal explanation within the ‘anti-Eurocentric’ literature and so develop new models of long-term economic change?
  • If the anti-Eurocentric argument in global history is convincing, is it still fruitful to contrast Europe with (east) Asia, or should a ‘Eurasian’ perspective be preferred? And what of Africa and the Americas?
  • What is the causal role of contingency within models of continuity and alternation? What is its explanatory value in historical terms?
  • What kinds of economic and political influence have Asian and other civilizations had on European historical development, and how do these affect the periodization of the rise of European power?
  • What is the role and scope of geographical arguments, such as varieties of climate or agricultural practices, in the debate?
  • What role should be accorded to differences between civilizations in their views on nature, knowledge, and technology in the debate, and how can such explanations avoid circularity?
  • Should social institutions be seen as cause or effect in the arguments about European specificity?

 

Please send an abstract and title to Matthijs Krul (krul@eth.mpg.de) by March 31st 2015.

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/call-for-papers-workshop-beyond-the-eurocentrism-debate

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

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Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

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We Are the Crisis

We Are the Crisis

MARXISM AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS: QUO VADIS?

Call for Papers

Marxism and International Relations Theory: Quo Vadis?

Call for papers for the 9th Pan-European Conference on International Relations

23–26 September 2015, Giardini Naxos, Italy

Marxist thought, along with other dissident approaches, has long constituted a critical source from which crucial interventions into the mainstream theorising in International Relations (IR) have been launched. While in recent years, significant theoretical contributions—ranging from the discussions of ‘new imperialism’ to uneven development and financialisation—have reinforced Marxist frameworks with a broader analytical palette, the disciplinary position of ‘Marxist IR’ as a sub-configuration of IR theory has been challenged by a number of internal critics. Contesting the status of Marxist IR as an antidote to the shortcomings of the mainstream approaches, these sympathetic critics have argued that Marxist IR has failed ‘to develop any adequate critical theory of the political’ (Davenport 2013: 28) and is need of ‘a realist moment’ to bolster its explanatory power (Callinicos 2007: 542). Similarly, some of the most important recent attempts at theorising ‘the international’ have been shaped by a tendency to engage with and adopt the parameters in which neorealism defines the conditions for a unified international theory (Rosenberg 2013). Others, while recognising the contributions of the strong infusion between Marxist IR and historical sociology, have challenged the tendency to focus ‘on the importance in and of themselves of the historical antecedents of contemporary societies’ and tasked the scholars with interrogating ‘the way in which contemporary societies bear the imprint of such historical developments’ (Bruff 2010: 621).

The panel aims to provide a space to engage with these issues, take stock with contemporary theorising in Marxist IR and discuss new research avenues. Possible topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • The role of the Marxist critique in IR and the relationship between Marxism and the mainstream approaches.
  • The promises and limits of the emergent theoretical developments in Marxist IR, such as Political Marxism, Marxist Geopolitics and Uneven and Combined Development.
  • The interactions between Marxism(s) and feminist, postcolonial and anarchist approaches in IR.

Please submit your abstracts (max. 300 words) to Sébastien Rioux(rioux.sebastien@gmail.com) and Cemal Burak Tansel(burak.tansel@nottingham.ac.uk) by 7 January 2015.

For more information, please visitwww.paneuropeanconference.org.

References

Bruff, I. (2010) ‘European Varieties of Capitalism and the International’,European Journal of International Relations, 16(4): 615–638.

Callinicos, A. (2007) ‘Does Capitalism Need the State System?’, Cambridge Review of International Affairs, 20(4): 533–549.

Davenport, A. (2013) ‘Marxism in IR: Condemned to a Realist Fate?’, European Journal of International Relations, 19(1): 27–48.

Rosenberg, J. (2013) ‘Kenneth Waltz and Leon Trotsky: Anarchy in the Mirror of Uneven and Combined Development’, International Politics, 50(2): 183–230.

 

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

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Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

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Norwich Cathedral

Norwich Cathedral

POSTGRADUATE RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES IN POLITICS, PUBLIC POLICY, CULTURE AND SOCIETY, AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF EAST ANGLIA

The School of Politics, Philosophy, Language and Communication Studies

University of East Anglia, Norwich, Norfolk, UK

We welcome applications from excellent candidates for our MPhil/PhD programmes and our Masters by Research.

Areas of study

We supervise topics ranging across political science and international relations.  We particularly encourage students whose research interests will complement or extend our expertise in three general areas:

Critical Global Politics:

Including foreign policy, global media, regional governance, borders, politics and religion, international security, international law, human rights and migration, theorizing global cities and global political economy

Politics and Public Policy:

Including the politics of the EU, theories of the policy process, normative and critical political theory, British political issues and ideologies, environmental policy, competition policy and regulation

Cultural Politics, Communications and Media:

Including cultural politics, media culture and identity, media events and rituals, media and globalisation, communications and media, public service broadcasting, competition policy and regulation, copyright and new business models in the creative industries, new media and society, political communication, international communication, language and politics, interculturalism, and contemporary cultural and political theory.

More details, including on how to apply, can be found at:

http://www.uea.ac.uk/political-social-international-studies/research-degrees

Funding

We invite applications for Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC)-funded doctoral studentships as partners in the Consortium for the Humanities and the Arts Southeast England (CHASE) http://www.chase.ac.uk.  CHASE will be awarding up to 75 studentships in 2015.

The Faculty will also offer up to 15 University-funded PhD studentships available to students from within or outside the EU.

More information on studentships can be found at:

http://www.uea.ac.uk/arts-humanities/graduate-school/studentships

To be considered for a studentship for October 2015 entry, the application deadline is 14 January 2015.  We advise early initial contact with potential supervisors to maximise the chance of success.

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

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Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

London Radical BookfairRESILIENCE: THE GOVERNANCE OF COMPLEXITY

A new book by David Chandler

BOOK LAUNCH AND ROUNDTABLE

Speakers: David Chandler (University of Westminster), Julian Reid (University of Lapland), Phil Hammond (London South Bank University)

Books will be 20% off cover price and there will be wine and nibbles (sponsored by Routledge and the Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Westminster)

Time: 6.00 – 8.00pm, Wednesday 14 May 2014
Venue: Westminster Forum, 5th Floor, 32-38 Wells Street (5 mins from Oxford Circus), University of Westminster.

Resilience: The Governance of Complexity
(Routledge: Critical Issues in Global Politics)
Amazon page: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Resilience-Governance-Complexity-Critical-Politics/dp/0415741408/ref=dp_return_1?ie=UTF8&n=266239&s=books

Resilience has become a central concept in government policy understandings over the last decade. In our complex, global and interconnected world, resilience appears to be the policy ‘buzzword’ of choice, alleged to be the solution to a wide and ever-growing range of policy issues. This book analyses the key aspects of resilience-thinking and highlights how resilience impacts upon traditional conceptions of governance.

This concise and accessible book investigates how resilience-thinking adds new insights into how politics (both domestically and internationally) is understood to work and how problems are perceived and addressed; from educational training in schools to global ethics and from responses to shock events and natural disasters to long-term international policies to promote peace and development. This book also raises searching questions about how resilience-thinking influences the types of knowledge and understanding we value and challenges traditional conceptions of social and political processes.

It sets forward a new and clear conceptualisation of resilience, of use to students, academics and policy-makers, emphasising the links between the rise of resilience and awareness of the complex nature of problems and policy-making.

Table of contents: 1. Introduction: The Rise of Resilience, Part One: Thematics 2. Governing Complexity 3. Resilience: Putting Life to Work Part Two: Resilience and the International 4. The Politics of Limits: The Rise of Complexity in Peacebuilding, 5. The ‘Everyday’ Policy Solution: Culture, from Limit to Resource 6. A New Global Ethic: The Transformative Power of the Embedded Subject Part Three: The Politics of Resilience 7. Revealing the Public: The Reality of the Event and the Banality of Evil 8. The Democracy of Participation 9. The Poverty of Post-Humanism 10. Conclusion: Resilience, the Promise of Complexity

Review: David Chandler’s Resilience takes a fashionably vague catchword and subjects it to a masterful critique and reconstruction. In his words, resilience is ‘a way of thinking about how we think about the being of being.’ As such it is nothing less than an epistemic revolution in the making, a shift in what, following Foucault, it is possible to think. Nicholas Onuf, Professor Emeritus, Department of Politics and International Relations, Florida International University, USA.

About the Author: David Chandler is Professor of International Relations and Director of the Centre for the Study of Democracy, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Westminster. He is the founding editor of the journal Resilience: International Policies, Practices and Discourses. His recent books include: Hollow Hegemony: Rethinking Global Politics, Power and Resistance (Pluto, 2009); International Statebuilding: The Rise of Post-Liberal Governance (Routledge, Critical Issues in Global Politics, 2010); and Freedom vs Necessity in International Relations: Human-Centred Approaches to Security and Development (Zed, 2013).

David Chandler, Professor of International Relations, Director of the Centre for the Study of Democracy, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Westminster, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW. Tel: ++44 (0)776 525 3073.

Journal Editor, Resilience: International Policies, Practices and Discourses: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/resi20

Amazon books page: http://www.amazon.co.uk/David-Chandler/e/B001HCXV7Y/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0 ;

Personal website: http://www.davidchandler.org/;
Twitter: @DavidCh27992090

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Global Capitalism

SPECTRUM JOURNAL OF GLOBAL STUDIES CONFERENCE

Reminder:  CALL FOR PAPERS

First Spectrum Journal of Global Studies Conference: ‘Historical Sociology, Historical Materialism and International Relations’

This is a reminder that the deadline to propose a paper or panel for the November 2012 Spectrum Journal of Global Studies Conference is 1 July, 2012.

The Spectrum Conference will be held in Ankara, Turkeyat the Middle East Technical University from 2-3 November 2012.

Proposals are invited on the conference theme Historical Sociology, Historical Materialism and International Relations.

Featured speakers at the conference will include in alphabetical order:

Adam Morton, University of Nottingham, U.K.

Bastiaan van Apeldoorn, VU University of Amsterdam, Netherland

Benno Teschke, University of Sussex, U.K.

Gonzalo Pozo, University College, London, U.K.

Hannes Lacher, York University, Canada

Jonathan Joseph, Rutherford College, University of Kent, U.K.

Kamran Matin, University of Sussex, U.K.

Neil Davidson, University of Strathclyde, U.K.

Stephen Hobden, Universityof East London, U.K.

Please see the conference website for application and information:

www.spectrumjournalofglobalstudies.net/conf

Guidelines for Participants:

The discipline of International Relations (IR) known as an ‘American’ social science has in the last decade or so been discovering the importance of alternative forms of explaining international relations. More so than any other field of social science, IR has been dominated by positivist conceptions of scientific inquiry. However recent approaches in the philosophy of sciences as well as the sociological turn in IR has changed the boundaries, assumptions and methodologies of our discipline.  Critical realism as an alternative to positivist as well as post-positivist understandings of social science is increasingly becoming the dominant form of philosophyzing about IR. Historical sociological approaches are taking over the static, ahistorical forms of theorizing. Marxist social theory has become more and more relevant to explain the current of changes in the international system. Internationalisation of capitalism has made the concerns of Marxism increasingly relevant to understand and explain the ‘international’. Recent controversies on the relation between the state system and capitalist mode of production have made important contributions to understand the link between what is traditionally understood from international relations and capitalist relations of production. These efforts have to go on as there are yet many other untouched aspects of international relations that require desconstruction and dereification. This conference attempts to further our understanding of the links between historical sociology, critical realism and Marxism. Empirical works combining the insights of Marxist historical sociology and historical materialism with that of international relations is particularly wellcome. We are extending an invitation to all researchers to present research that adress the following issues and similar topics.

How does a historical materialist geopolitics adress the traditional issues of IR?

1.    Geopolitics of state formations

2.    What is the relation between the state system and capitalism?

3.    In what ways does critical realism help Marxism to analyse the international?

4.    What are the limits and the potentials of the theory of combined and uneven development to explain the international?

5.    Historical matarialist analysis of international law

6.    Contemporary forms of imperialism

7.    International state apparatuses and their role in the reproduction of capital

8.    Marx’s method and the world market

9.    Global protest movements and the Arab Spring

10.  Gramscian analysis of global transformations

11.  Historical Sociology of the Middle East and the Balkans

We hope to see both individual papers and panels discussing these themes from different disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives.

We encourage scholars from all around the world to participate in this exciting attempt to link our conceptions of praxis and change with that of what constitutes the ‘international’.

Most papers presented in the conference will later be published in a special issue of the Spectrum or in a separate book.

We look forward to welcoming you all at METU in Ankara.

Check back often for updates through out the coming months!

Inquiries to the program chairs should be directed to: spectrumconference@spectrumjournal.net

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John Locke

MASTERS IN DIALOGUE STUDIES

MA in Dialogue Studies
School of Politics, International Relations and Philosophy (SPIRE), Keele University, UK

The MA in Dialogue Studies is designed for graduates who wish to examine and understand theories of dialogue and their applications in peace-building and in developing intercultural understanding and social cohesion. While definitions of “dialogue” will be explored in the course of the year, it might be loosely defined here as “a range of activities, including but not confined to discussion, through which people of different social, cultural and religious groups deliberately come together for meaningful and constructive interaction.” The MA course explores the theory and practice of dialogue through a unique combination of taught subjects, research, skills-based training and a London-based internship.

The course fills a gap in postgraduate education provision by not only exploring the use of dialogue in conflict and post-conflict situations but also examining its use in combating discrimination, ghettoisation and extremism in countries such as the UK. The main core module accordingly both introduces dialogue for peace-building and explores theUK context for dialogue, drawing on the fields of sociology and history as well as politics.

The degree has a practical outlook and will equip students with knowledge, understanding and skills to effectively engage in and lead dialogue to advance intercultural interaction and understanding and social cohesion. It includes a work placement during which students will gain professional experience with the Dialogue Society. Practical elements will be supported by rigorous, reflective examination of the approaches of governmental and nongovernmental agencies to dialogue, social cohesion and reconciliation. The course’s broad scope and interdisciplinary nature will encourage students to bring broad perspectives to bear on any specific local issues with which they engage professionally.

Students will be able to pursue their particular interests within the degree’s broad remit through a wide choice of elective taught modules and through their dissertation. It will accordingly be possible for each student to choose whether to devote more attention to domestic or to international contexts for dialogue and whether to focus on its applications in peacebuilding or in the promotion of social cohesion.

The course consists of:
•Core module 1: Approaches in Dialogue
•Core module 2: Power, Knowledge and the World
•2 elective taught modules
•A work placement at the Dialogue Society, with practical experience, further training, meetings at relevant government departments and NGOs, and trips exploring multicultural London
•A 15,000 word dissertation

Who is it for?
•Students wishing to explore the theory and practice of intercultural dialogue in the UK context, and in conflict situations abroad
•Professionals and aspiring academics interested in core social issues such as intercultural dialogue, community relations and citizenship
•Activists and dialogue practitioners looking to develop their understanding of relevant social theory while enhancing essential dialogue skills

The MA offers:
•A cutting-edge combination of taught academic subjects, research, skills-based training and internship
•A postgraduate course designed and delivered in partnership by Keele University’s internationally renowned School of Politics, International Relations and Philosophy, and the Dialogue Society, a dynamic London-based dialogue charity
•A broad range of elective modules allowing students to pursue their own particular academic interests
•A head start in professional experience through an internship at the Dialogue Society in the heart of multicultural London
•Cultivation of an unusually wide range of valuable transferable skills, comprising academic, professional and personal skills
•Bursaries available to overseas students through the Dialogue Society in addition to those bursaries offered by SPIRE to selected postgraduates
•Quality research training and support

Aims of the Course
The course aims to provide students with the conceptual and analytical skills and the factual knowledge to develop a critical understanding of theoretical and practical approaches to dialogue, peace-building and community cohesion. This understanding will be supported by understanding of key contexts for dialogue, in theUK and in selected conflict situations. The course also aims to equip students with practical skills to engage in and lead intercultural dialogue, chiefly through the professional experience and training provided through the Dialogue Society placement. Further, the course will prepare students for research and support them in producing a dissertation on their chosen topic.

Career Destination Information
The Dialogue Studies Masters is aimed at people who wish to pursue careers in a whole range of sectors. It is relevant to those wishing to gain employment in the civil or government service at the sub-national, national or global level, or to those looking to work with sub-national, national or international NGOs. The course will also be a good preparation for further postgraduate study and is ideally suited to those interested in pursuing study of the theory and practice of dialogue at PhD level and beyond.

In addition, students will graduate with a range of transferable skills beneficial in any number of contexts. These skills will include at least: cultural sensitivity, empathy, teamwork and leadership skills, project management skills, research skills, public speaking skills, ability to lead and chair discussions, dialogue facilitation skills, critical thinking and problem solving skills.

Course Structure and Content
All students will complete two core taught modules as follows:
1.    Approaches to Dialogue (30 credits)
This module will place the practice of dialogue in the context of key concepts, debates and positions relating to multiculturalism, political community and citizenship in Britain and other national contexts. It will explore social, demographic and political issues in the recent (1945-present) history of immigration in Britain including public and political debates about diversity during this period. It will critically review British national state policies for the management of diversity since 1945, focusing on their ideological underpinnings (including multiculturalism, integration and cohesion). Current political and theoretical debates about multiculturalism will inform analysis of the limits and possibilities for dialogue.
The module will focus primarily on the UK context for dialogue. However, select case studies from other national contexts (e.g. Yugoslavia, South Africa) will be drawn upon to critically explore opportunities for, and barriers to, conflict resolution and peace building.
2.    Power, Knowledge and the World (30 credits)
This module aims to provide a foundation in the philosophy of the social sciences and an examination of the core assumptions that underpin different approaches to knowledge generation. It also aims to provide an understanding of the politics and international relations of knowledge generation and circulation. In other words, it examines how social scientists have approached the questions of what to study, how to study, and the ways in which these issues are bound up with historical and current power structures in the world.
The module will prepare students to engage critically and reflectively with the content of the MA course and to undertake the research involved in writing their dissertation.

Elective Modules
Students will be able to pursue their own interests related to theories, practices and contexts for dialogue in choosing from an eclectic range of elective modules.
Elective modules will be chosen from a wide range of SPIRE modules. It may also be possible for students to take modules in Politics, Diplomatic Studies, Management, Sociology, Cultural Studies, Public Policy and History. The precise list of available modules may vary from year to year.
SPIRE modules:
•    Power, Knowledge and the World
•    Environmental Decision Making: the Case of Complex Technologies
•    Global Environmental Change
•    The Theory of Global Security
•    Contemporary Political Philosophy
•    Environmental Ethics
•    Contesting International Relations
•    Parties and Democracy
•    The Changing International Agenda
•    Comparative European Politics
•    Environmental Movements: North and South
•    Environmental Problems and Policies in the US
•    Diplomatic Law
•    Dimensions of Environmental Politics
•    Environmental Diplomacy
•    The Politics of Sin: Culture Wars in the US
•    Race and Justice: Civil Rights in the US

Relevant modules from other Schools:
NB not all these modules will be available every year and they will not always be compatible with Dialogue Studies students’ core commitments.
* Public Policy modules allowing students to expand their understanding of a key element of UK society which may significantly influence intercultural and interreligious relations and social cohesion. Relevant modules include:
* Politics, Political Economy and Public Policy: Explaining and Making Public Policy (MA Public Policy, School of Public Policy and Professional Practice)
* Policy Implementation and Governance: Policy in Action (30 credits, MA Public Policy, School of Public Policy and Professional Practice)
* Global Media and Culture modules giving students the opportunity to develop understanding of key factors shaping British and international contexts for dialogue: globalisation and media in contemporary culture. Relevant modules include:
* Globalisation, Culture, Society (MA Global Media and Culture, Humanities)
* Contemporary Cultural and Media Theory (MA Global Media and Culture, Humanities)
* Sociology modules, through which students may deepen their understanding of the UK context for dialogue. Relevant modules include:
* City Cultures (MA Urban Futures and Sustainable Communities, School of Sociology and Criminology)
* Urban Governance and Policy Making (MA Urban Futures and Sustainable Communities, School of Sociology and Criminology)
* History modules
* Imperialism (BA History, School of Humanities)
* Right-Wing Movements in Inter-War Europe (BA History, School of Humanities)
* Africa Since 1800 (BA History, School of Humanities)
* Management School skills modules, through which students may pursue valuable professional development to enhance their future career
* Leading People
* People, Processes and Operations
* Right-Wing Movements (20 credits, adapted from BA History, School of Humanities)
Students may also choose to study a modern foreign language (other than English).

Work Placement
10-week placement at the Dialogue Society during the Spring semester (30 credits). Students’ activities will include:
• Helping London-based community centres to branch out and run dialogue projects to bring local communities together, with the support of Dialogue Society staff and resources. Students will work in small teams and will each have the opportunity to manage a small-scale dialogue project. 2011 projects included a seminar on knife crime for local residents, Mothers’ Day visits to local care homes with children who use the community centres, and an official opening celebration for one community centre.
• Supporting ongoing Dialogue Society projects and events.
• Attending weekly sessions at the Dialogue Society’s Dialogue School. This will enable students to further explore and discuss different approaches to dialogue as well as providing training in a number of key skills for organised dialogue.
• Networking at external events.
• Exploring the cultural, religious and political landscape of multicultural London through visits to relevant government departments, other dialogue NGOs, places of worship and areas of particular historical/cultural interest. The 2011 placement included visits to the Department for Communities and Local Government, the Home Office and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, a historical tour of East London and visits to a Gurdwara, a Buddhist Centre and a Synagogue.
• Keeping records of the placement and producing a reflective diary.

Assessment
•    Examination of taught modules will be by written coursework and assessment of tutorial performance only (no written examinations)
The work placement will be assessed on:
•    Attendance
•    Performance and management of assigned tasks
•    The student’s written plans and records
•    The student’s placement diary
•    Students demonstrating an outstanding level of work will receive their degree with distinction.

Funding
SPIRE offers a limited number of bursaries to postgraduate students. Details are available on SPIRE’s website.

The Dialogue Society offers a limited number of bursaries for the Dialogue Studies MA postgraduate degree. The bursary only covers the difference between overseas and home fee rate. Effectively therefore, successful students will only pay University fee at home fee rate. To apply for a Dialogue Society bursary, students must first receive an offer from Keele University for this degree.

Further information
For further information please visit:
http://www.keele.ac.uk/pgapply/
http://www.keele.ac.uk/spire/postgraduatecourses/madialoguestudies/
http://www.dialoguesociety.org/master/dialogue-studies-ma.html

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

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Aesthetics

THE LONG DURÉE OF THE FAR RIGHT

The Longue Durée of the Far Right: Ideology, Organization, State Formation and International Relations

October 2012 (Queen Mary, University of London)

 

Call for Papers

The (re)emergence of far-right parties and social movements in various parts of the world – and particularly in Europe – in recent years has been widely discussed in the press and in academic commentary. In contrast to their ‘revolutionary’ bedfellows on the communist left, since the end of the Cold War far-right parties have come to form a significant and disturbing part of the political geography in a number of countries. Whilst their influence has been uneven – from participating in governing coalitions in Western Europe (the Austrian Freedom Party and the Italian Lega Nord) and in India (the Bharatiya Janata Party) to spawning a violent Islamophobic street movement (the English Defence League in the UK), to forming a major component of anti-imperialist movements across much of the Islamic world – their general appearance across time and space suggests that the current era is comparable to the earlier historical conjunctures of far-right mobilization in the late nineteenth century and inter-war periods. The varied forms of far-right have combined with their contrasting ideological dimensions, which has made the taxonomy of far-right something of an academic industry in itself. In particular, the far-right has come to be divided over its ‘post-fascist’ rhetorical commitment to (liberal) democracy as opposed to an authoritarian and demagogic populism and also between a neo-fascist commitment to a statist and protectionist model of capitalism and an embrace of much of the policy formulas of neo-liberalism by some strands of the contemporary far-right.

These developments raise a number of analytical and political questions. How distinct are these contemporary manifestations of the far-right compared to the previous historical forms of the far-right? How analytically useful is the concept of fascism in describing the generic far-right? What are the social bases of the far-right – past and present? Which methodological framework provides the most useful analytical tool to examine and understand the far-right? What of the relationship between the evolving dynamics of uneven capitalist development and geopolitical order on the determination of far-right movements – historical and contemporary?

The aim of this workshop is to promote an inter-disciplinary engagement with these issues through bringing together scholars from a range of different subject areas (IR, IPE, Geography, History, Sociology, Comparative Politics and Political Theory) to re-think the linkages between the historical, sociological and international dimensions of the far-right – as ideology, movement and state – over the longue durée from its emergence as a distinct and modern form of politics in the late nineteenth century to its more recent re-emergence in their intertwining local, national and international contexts.

Possible themes for consideration, but not limited to:

Comparative historical case studies of far-right movements and states

Analytical issues of comparisons and comparative methodologies

International relations of fascist state formation processes

Far-right movements in colonial and post-colonial contexts

Evolving class and social compositions of the far-right

Political economies of fascist states

Distinctions and relations between ideologies, movements and states

Geopolitical ordering and far-right movements and states – imperial, Cold War and post-Cold War eras

Capitalist development, uneven, combined or  otherwise and conjunctures of crisis on processes of far-right emergence, evolution and transformation

Geographical and spatial variations in the far-right – urban/rural, local/national, north/south

Aesthetic representations in architecture, art and culture

Racialized conceptions of space and territoriality in ideologies and state practices

 

Please send proposals (of no more than 500 words), along with biographical and institutional information to Rick Saull (r.g.saull@qmul.ac.uk) or Alex Anievas

(alexander.anievas@st-annes.ox.ac.uk) by June 4, 2012

 

**END**

 

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Luddites

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HISTORICAL SOCIOLOGY & INTERNATIONAL THEORY – BISA WORKSHOP

BISA working group on Historical Sociology and IR
Centre for Advanced International Theory, University of Sussex

The Historical Sociology of International Theory
One day workshop
Thursday 13th September 2012

The discipline of International Relations is home to a wide range of theoretical approaches and its history is characterized by (metaphorical) debates and competition between these theories. This theoretical pluralism R11; deplored by some and celebrated by others – does not only concern the substantive claims of particular theories but also the conception of theory itself. This refers us back to debates in the philosophy of social science. What counts as theory, what role theory can and should play and how it best fulfils this task is not a settled question in IR.

Moreover, inasmuch as the emergence and development of different theories is strongly influenced by their historical and sociological context, the same is true for conceptions of theory itself. Hence, the  considerable recent changes within the international system – from the end of bipolarity, through the ideological hegemony of market democracy, radical fluctuation in the world economy, to open challenges to the institution of sovereignty – can be expected to affect the conception of theory (and consequently the development of theories) itself. This workshop seeks to explore the ways in which time and place impact on the conception of international theory and to develop an understanding of the nature of international theory and its implications at the beginning of the 21st century.

To this end, we invite papers that analyze the emergence, development, change and implications of conceptions of international theory from a historical sociological perspective. We are particularly, but not solely, interested in contributions that:

·  Reflect on the connection between time, place and conceptions of theory;
·  Provide an historical and sociological account of the development of conceptions of international theories;
·  Explore the implications of recent changes in the international system for conceptions of international theory;
·  And, conversely, investigate the impact of conceptions of international theory on our understanding of the broader historical and sociological context.

Those interested in presenting papers at the workshop should send brief abstracts (no more than 200 words) to: cait@sussex.ac.uk. The deadline for submission of abstracts is 13th June 2012.

BISA: http://www.bisa.ac.uk/

**END**

Luddites

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

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Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Sociology

HISTORICAL SOCIOLOGY, HISTORICAL MATERIALISM AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

CALL FOR PAPERS
Spectrum Journal of Global Studies
Conference on:
Historical Sociology, Historical Materialism and International Relations

November 1-3, 2012
Middle East Technical University
Department of International Relations
Ankara – Turkey

The discipline of International Relations (IR) known as an “ American” social science has in the last decade or so been discovering the importance of alternative forms of explaining international relations. More so than any other field of social science, IR has been dominated by positivist conceptions of scientific inquiry. However recent approaches in the philosophy of sciences as well as the sociological turn in IR has changed the boundaries, assumptions and methodologies of our discipline.  Critical realism as an alternative to positivist as well as post-positivist understandings of social science is increasingly becoming the dominant form of philosophyzing about IR.

Historical sociological approaches are taking over the static, a-historical forms of theorizing. Marxist social theory has become more and more relevant to explain the current of changes in the international system. Internationalisation of capitalism has made the concerns of Marxism increasingly relevant to understand and explain the “international”. Recent controversies on the relation between the state system and capitalist mode of production have made important contributions to understand the link between what is traditionally understood from international relations and capitalist relations of production. These efforts have to go on as there are yet many other untouched aspects of international relations that require deconstruction and de-reification. This conference attempts to further our understanding of the links between historical sociology, critical realism and Marxism. Empirical works combining the insights of Marxist historical sociology and historical materialism with that of international relations is particularly welcome. We are extending an invitation to all researchers to present research that address the following issues and similar topics:

    • How does a historical materialist geopolitics address the traditional issues of IR?
    • Geopolitics of state formations
    • What is the relation between the state system and capitalism?
    • In what ways does critical realism help Marxism to analyse the international?
    • What are the limits and the potentials of he theory of combined and uneven development to explain the international?
    • Historical materialist analysis of international law
    • Contemporary forms of imperialism
    • International State Apparatuses and their role in the reproduction of capital
    • Marx’s method and the world market

We hope to see both individual papers and panels discussing these themes from different disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives.

We encourage scholars from all around the world to participate in this exciting attempt to link our conceptions of praxis and change with that of what constitutes the “international”.

Most papers presented in the conference will later be published in a special issue of the Spectrum journal or in a separate book.

We look forward to welcoming you all at METU in Ankara.
Key note speakers for the conference will later be announced.

For more information and to submit your papers and panel proposals, please contact spectrumconference@spectrumjournal.net

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‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

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