Skip navigation

Tag Archives: Society for Research into Higher Education

EDITORIAL_Student-loans_Devin-BeauregardPOSTGRADUATE ETHICS: ISSUES, DILEMMAS, SOLUTIONS

Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE)

Date – Wednesday, 15 July 2015: 13.00 – 16.15

Venue – SRHE, 73 Collier St, London N1 9BE

Network – Postgraduate Issues

Ethical integrity is an important term that concerns not only the research process but many practical situations. As one of the speakers highlights, the scope of this notion encompasses amongst many ethical scenarios,  ‘… the relationship between policy and governance, practice, and institutional support and administration.’ The aim of today is to provide an environment where postgraduate ethical issues can be discussed and debated. The speakers will highlight different ethical issues and allow participants to respond underling their own ethical dilemmas. As Brooks et al (2014:3) argue, ‘Ethical thinking is intimately connected to practical research sills, which need to be developed and reflected upon.’ ‘The more you think about postgraduate research ethics …’, another speaker will suggest, ‘ … the more important ethics becomes.’ What we hope participants will gain from the Seminar is increased understandings of their own ethical situations and potential ethical solutions.

 

Programme

 

12.00: Registration and Lunch.

 

1.00-2.00: Doctoral Supervisor Training – Supporting Supervisors and Students in Understanding Research IntegrityFiona Denney

 

2.00-3.00: Current issues in research integrityAndrew Rawnsley

 

3.00-3.15: Tea and Coffee break

 

3.15-3.45: Postgraduate ethical Issues in Education Research – Richard Race

 

3.45-4.15: General Discussion and close.

 

Biographies
Fiona Denney

Fiona Denney is currently the Director of the Brunel Educational Excellence Centre at Brunel University, London, which is aimed at enhancing support for both staff and students in order to improve the quality of teaching and learning at all levels throughout the University. Fiona has worked in UK universities for 18 years – both as an academic and as a senior professional member of staff. Prior to working at Brunel, Fiona was the Assistant Director of the Graduate School at King’s College London, where she developed training for researchers, senior staff and doctoral supervisors, provided strategic direction for the development of academics and researchers and hosed the London Hub for the national research development organisation, VITAE. E mail: Fiona.Deeney@Brunel.ac.uk

 

Andrew Rawnsley

Andrew’s expertise lies principally in research ethics and integrity, with a focus on the relationship between policy and governance, practice, and institutional support and administration. He has designed and delivered training across the sector and undertakes frequent consultancy projects on research integrity for a range of universities, as well international speaking engagements. He is a co-author of Epigeum’s “Research Integrity” international online training programme, along with four US-based authors; and Associate Editor for the Biomed Central journal “Research Integrity and Peer Review.” E Mail: A.Rawnsley@tees.ac.uk

 

Richard Race

Richard Race is Senior Lecturer in Education at Roehampton University. Richard has sat on ethics committees at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. He has been Programme Convener on MA Education for the last five years, as well as Programme Convener for MA (Education Sciences) in ASPETE, Athens, Greece. The second edition of his monograph, Multiculturalism and Education (Bloomsbury, London) was recently published. He is working on his second monograph, Integration and Education Policy-Making (Palgrave Macmillan, London).  He has also published a co-edited collection with Vini Lander in 2014: Advancing Race and Ethnicity in Education (Palgrave Macmillan, Houndsmills) E Mail: r.race@roehampton.ac.uk

 

Registration: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

INVESTIGATING HIGHER EDUCATION: A CRITICAL REVIEW OF RESEARCH CONTRIBUTIONS

Society for Research into Higher Education

Call for Contributions to a new SRHE/Routledge Book Publication

See: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/downloads/RoutledgeSRHE50CallforContributions.pdf

Investigating Higher Education: A critical review of Research Contributions

The Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE) was formed as a learned society in 1965, supporting a community of researchers focusing on higher education. In 2015 the Society will be looking back on 50 years of research and looking forward to the future. This presents a great opportunity to take stock of achievements across the field of higher education research.

To mark this milestone anniversary an edited contemporary volume of new contributions is to be published for the SRHE/Routledge book series.

The Book series editors will edit this volume and are now issuing an open call for chapter contributions.

 

Approach and Time Frame

1 June 2014: Open call for contributions

14 July 2014: 500 word proposals to be submitted to editors (see emails below)

18 August 2014: Outcomes of peer review communicated to potential authors

15 December 2014: Draft chapters due

27 February 2015: Final chapters due

December 2015: Book to be launched at SRHE conference

 

Please contact the editors via email with expressions of interest or if you wish to discuss your potential contribution (jenni.case@uct.ac.za & jeroen.huisman@ugent.be).

We warmly invite contributions to this volume from all authors with an interest in the field of higher education research.

Helen Perkins
Director, SRHE

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Education Not for Sale

Education Not for Sale

HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY AND THE TEACHING-RESEARCH NEXUS

Society for Research into Higher Education

Date – 18 June 2014, 13.00-16:00

Venue – London Metropolitan University, 166-220 Holloway Road, London, N7 8DB

Network – Higher Education Policy

This seminar will consider the often contested relationship between teaching and research in higher education. It is particularly timely given the recent call by David Willetts, Minister for Universities, for a cultural change towards a greater emphasis on teaching. The context is one in which research reputation is critical in the global prestige economy of higher education, but where designations of academics and universities as ‘teaching-only’ are not uncommon in an increasingly diversified and stratified HE sector.
‘‘Can we speak of ‘teaching’ and ‘research’ any more, and what does this mean for academic work?”

William Locke, (Institute of Education University of London)

The separation of teaching and research is the result of policy and operational decisions made over some forty years or so to distinguish the way these activities are funded, managed, assessed and rewarded.  This separation has gone so far that institutions and individuals that wish to, must make deliberate efforts to optimise the beneficial relationships between the two core activities.  It could also be argued that the descriptive terms ‘research’ and ‘teaching’ no longer adequately capture the vast array of activities that institutions providing higher education now undertake.  Yet the processes of extension, fragmentation and disintegration, paradoxically, may be creating new spaces and opportunities for reintegrating and reinventing the core activities of higher education.

For this potential to be fully realised, however, may require a very different division of labour and, in particular, a significant reconfiguring of academic work.  This contribution will build on an international study of the academic profession, current evidence of changes in the academy during the recession and studies undertaken for the HEA.

 

“Re-Rethinking links between research, teaching and educational agendas: Should we?”

Dr. Vicky Gunn, (University of Glasgow)

This presentation will note the discursive re-valuing of teaching agendas within research-intensive institutions as part of an apparent shift in emphasis within UK (in different ways depending on the devolved funding regime) and European contexts.  In such a renewed policy focus, pragmatic questions about what this might mean in actuality have yet to be answered.

As this discursive shift is also happening at a time of change in the way academic career pathways are developing, the links between the researcher roles and teaching responsibilities are being embodied through reward and recognition criteria which do not necessarily align with the more centrally driven agendas outlined in the policy statements.  Indeed, reward and recognition criteria tend to focus on individual activity and are not necessarily underpinned with a problematised understanding of the orientations towards aspects of research as well as education that seem present in the academic community.

This paper will outline two sets of orientations: those related to being a researcher as identified by Hakali & Ylijoki (2001) and Åkerlind (2008) and those related to the educational outcomes academics ascribe to what a university education is about (Gunn & Fisk, 2013).  It will suggest that from these, within research-intensive contexts in particular, we might need a new frame of reference for research-teaching linkages, one that encompasses the discussions and practices of the last decade, but reorients curricular activity towards the spaces of researcher development as it is now constructed.

The discussion will draw on the presenter’s work relating to the development of graduate attributes through research-teaching linkages (QAA Scotland) and her recent HEA commissioned review, Considering Teaching Excellence in HE since 2007.
Lunch will be available at 1pm and the event will start at 1.40. After each paper there will be time for questions and discussion, followed by an opportunity to discuss issues raised in both papers over tea or coffee.
For further details about the Higher Education Policy Network, please contact the network convenor, Prof. Carole Leathwood, Institute for Policy Studies in Education, London Metropolitan University, c.leathwood@londonmet.ac.uk

To reserve a place: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/

Note: Unless otherwise stated SRHE events are free to members, there is a charge of £60 for non-members.

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

STUDENT UNIONS AND THE CHANGING NATURE OF STUDENT LEADERSHIP IN THE UK

Society for Research into Higher Education

Date – 2 June 2014: 13.00-17.00

Venue – SRHE, 73 Collier St, London N1 9BE

Network – Student Experience

This event explores the role of student leadership in UK Higher Education, including the role and function of institutional student unions, the National Union of Students and relationships with institutions, sector agencies and the government. Within institutions, the positioning and governance for student union officers, student union staff and senior management varies. The event draws together recent research, analysis of policies and commentaries from representatives and experts.
Speakers include:

Professor Rachel Brooks, University of Surrey: presenting on her work for the NUS and the Leadership Foundation for HE on the changing nature of student leadership.

Jim Dickinson, Chief Executive at Union of UEA Students, responding to the report

Dr Camille Kandiko Howson, King’s College London: presenting on her QAA-funded research on Student Expectations with reference to collective and individual notions of student engagement and representation.

The programme will include a roundtable of discussants of the presentations.

To reserve a place: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/

Note: Unless otherwise stated SRHE events are free to members, there is a charge of £60 for non-members.

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Debt

Debt

RE-IMAGINING THE FUTURE OF HIGHER EDUCATION: EXPLORING THE CO-OPERATIVE UNIVERSITY

Society for Research into Higher Education

Date – Thursday 19th June 2014: 14.00-16.30

Venue – Room 410, Graduate School of Education, 35 Berkeley Square, University of Bristol

Network – South West Higher Education Network Seminar Series

 

SPEAKERS:

We Build the Road as we Travel: Routemaps to a co-operative university, Professor Rebecca Boden, Roehampton University

Social Science Centre, Lincoln: a new type of dissident institution, Professor Mike Neary, University of Lincoln

The Co-operative University: who pays for what? Mr Dan Cook, University of Bristol
Booking: To book your free place or for further information, please contact: Richard.Budd@bristol.ac.uk

SWHE Co-ordinators:
Dr Lisa Lucas (University of Bristol) and Professor Rajani Naidoo (University of Bath)

Note: Unless otherwise stated SRHE events are free to members, there is a charge of £60 for non-members

 

To reserve a place: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

ICCE IV

ICCE IV

SOCIETY FOR RESEARCH INTO HIGHER EDUCATION CONFERENCE 2014: CALL FOR PAPERS

Inspiring future generations; embracing plurality and difference in higher education

SRHE Conference dates: 10-12 December 2014

Venue: Celtic Manor, Newport, Wales, UK.

Closing date for submissions: 27th June 2014

The Society for Research into Higher Education extends a very warm welcome to all who wish to participate.

Researchers are invited to present their work in a variety of ways: by submitting papers for presentation, individually or as part of a symposium or round table, by submitting a poster and/or by attending as a delegate and contributing to the many different discussions and debates within this vibrant three-day event.

We encourage presentations and discussions that explore both global and local perspectives as well as trends in higher education policies and practices. We also welcome conceptual and theoretical contributions that add to current discourses- or initiate new ones.

Of particular interest this year will be contributions examining the increasingly diverse higher education landscape and how the processes of research, of knowledge production, knowledge-exchange, and knowledge sharing are changing in response to increasing plurality and difference within and across the sector.

 

Conference registration is now open. The early booking discount ends on Friday 26 September 2014

Please also note that the SRHE Newer Researchers’ Conference will take place on 9 December 2014. This is an excellent event for postgraduate students and newer researchers, providing the opportunity to present research work in a nurturing environment and participate in seminars and discussions. The call for papers for this conference will be issued shortly with the timetable for submissions and registration.

Further conference details are available from the link below or simply via www.srhe.ac.uk

Conference website: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/conference2014/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Economics

Economics

WHY DO INTERNSHIPS AND PLACEMENTS MATTER?

Society for Research into Higher Education

Why do Internships and Placement Matter? Further Sharing of Current Research

Date – Friday 2 May 2014, 11:00-15:45

Venue – SRHE, 73 Collier Street, London, N1 9BE

Network – Network for Employability, Enterprise and Work based Learning

 

This session is run jointly with the Association of Sandwich Education and Training (ASET)

We had so much interest in our first special interest group session on placements and internships that we are hosting another session on the topic.  Feedback from our sessions has shown that participants would like more opportunity to hear about current research and to discuss it.  We have, therefore, asked some more of our members to talk about their research.  At this session the themes will be short placements, third sector internships, internships for postgraduate students and placements in art and design.  The session will begin with a challenge from our keynote speaker, Andy Phippen, from PlymouthBusinessSchool, who will talk on Placements and Internships: Opportunities beyond the Student Experience.
Programme

11:00 Introductions

11:15 Keynote 1:  Andy Phippen, Associate Head (External Relations)
Plymouth Business School
Placements and Internships – Opportunities Beyond the Student Experience?

12:00 Showcasing of current placement research 1

Among the topics: Short placements
Third sector internships
Internships for PG students
Placements in Art and Design

12:45 Discussion:  Emerging issues for research

13:15 Lunch and networking

14:00 Showcasing of current placement research 2

15:00 Discussion panel of research contributors

15:30 Final remarks and conclusions

15:45 Close
If you are currently working on research into any kind of employability, enterprise and workbased learning and would like to share your work at later events, please contact us on h.e.higson@aston.ac.uk

Convenors:

Professor Helen E Higson OBE, Professor of Higher Education Learning and Management, Deputy Vice Chancellor, Aston University

Dr Richard Blackwell, Deputy Vice Chancellor, Southampton Solent University

 

To reserve a place at this seminar: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/

Note: Unless otherwise stated SRHE events are free to members, there is a charge of £45 for non-members

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

ICCE IV

ICCE IV

INTERROGATING THE HIGHER EDUCATION RESEARCH / POLICY INTERFACE

Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE)

Date – Wed 2nd April 2014, 13.00-16.00pm

Venue – London Metropolitan University

Network – Higher Education Policy Network

 

Higher education researchers often want their research to make a difference, and policy makers often profess a commitment to evidence-based policy-making, but how easy is it to communicate across these different communities? This seminar will provide an opportunity to explore these issues.

 

‘Bearing bad news’ Dr. Vikki Boliver (DurhamUniversity)

Reflecting on her attempts to publicise research showing that White and privately educated applicants are more likely to be offered places at Russell Group universities than equally well qualified applicants from ethnic minority backgrounds and state schools, Dr. Boliver considers ways to foster productive engagement with bad-news research findings.

‘Can researchers and policy makers speak to each other, or are they always looking the other way?’: Professor Jim Gallacher (GlasgowCaledonianUniversity)

Professor Gallacher draws on his experience of working both as an active researcher and co-director of the Centre for Research in Lifelong Learning (CRLL), and an adviser to the Scottish Parliament and a member of the board of the Scottish Funding Council, to consider whether the policy and research communities can have meaningful dialogues.

Lunch will be available at 1pm and the event will start at 1.40. After each paper there will be time for questions and discussion, followed by an opportunity to discuss issues raised in both papers over tea or coffee.

For further details about the Higher Education Policy Network, please contact the network convenor, Prof. Carole Leathwood, Institute for Policy Studies in Education, LondonMetropolitanUniversity, c.leathwood@londonmet.ac.uk

Note: Unless otherwise stated SRHE events are free to members, there is a charge of £60 for non-members.

Reserve a place: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Education System

Education System

CAPITALIST MARKETS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE)

Capitalist Markets in Higher Education: Utopias or Possibilities

Date – Wednesday, 16 April 2014: 14.00-16.00

Venue – University of Bath, Bath, UK

Network – South West Regional Network

 

Speaker: Professor Simon Marginson, Institute of Education

For more than two decades, governments around the world, led by the English-speaking polities, have moved higher education systems closer to the forms of textbook economic markets. Reforms include corporatisation, competitive funding, student charges, output formats and performance reporting. But, no country has established a bona fide economic market in the first-degree education of domestic students. No research university is driven by shareholders, profit, market share, allocative efficiency or the commodity form. There is commercial tuition only in parts of vocational training and international education. At the most, there are regulated quasi-markets, as in post-Browne UK. This differs from the experience of privatisation and commercialisation of transport, communications broadcasting and health insurance in many nations. The article argues that bona fide market reform in higher education is constrained by intrinsic limits specific to the sector (public goods, status competition), and political factors associated with those limits. This suggests that market reform is utopian, and the abstract ideal is sustained for exogenous policy reasons (e.g. fiscal reduction, state control, ordering of contents). But, if capitalist markets are clearly unachievable, a more authentic modernisation agenda is needed.

BIOGRAPHY

Simon worked as a Professor of Higher Education at the University of Melbourne in Australia prior to starting at the Institute of Education in October 2013. His research and scholarship draw broadly on the social sciences and political philosophy, and are focused primarily on higher education policy, systems and institutions. Most of his projects are in comparative and international higher education. In the last decade he has conducted extended inquiries into higher education and globalization, and higher education and research in East Asia. His current research includes a comparative project on the role of higher education in constructing public good, which examines the intersection between on one hand state traditions and political cultures, on the other hand educational practices. In 2014 Simon will deliver the biannual Clark Kerr lectures on higher education in the University of California system. He is Joint Editor-in-Chief of the journal Higher Education.

Too book a place please email Rajani Naidoo at R.Naidoo@bath.ac.uk

 

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

 

Critical Education / Education is Critical

Critical Education / Education is Critical

EPISTEMIC ACCESS, POWERFUL KNOWLEDGE AND THE ROLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY

SRHE Events

Date – 5th February 2014, 4-6.30pm

Venue – London Metropolitan University, 166-220 Holloway Road, London, N7 8DB

Society for Research into Higher Education

Higher Education Policy Network

What do we mean by ‘epistemic access’? How important is access to ‘powerful knowledge’ in the context of policies to widen participation, enhance graduate employment and increase social mobility?

This seminar will explore these issues.

SPEAKERS:

Professor Sue Clegg, Leeds Metropolitan University: ‘Employability, social mobility, and epistemic access’

In a context in which the linkage between graduate employment and social mobility has been challenged and employability curricula are deemed necessary to enhance students’ skills,  Prof. Clegg will explore the relationship between national and institutional policies, curriculum, and powerful knowledge in considering the implications for social and epistemic access.

Professor Michael Young, Institute of Education:  ‘From access to epistemic access and why it matters’

Noting the pressures in South Africa to ‘open access’ to the historically excluded majority, Prof. Young considers what might be meant by access, and considers ‘access to what?’. He argues for the need to extend the distinction between ‘formal’ and ‘epistemic’ access to also include ‘epistemological’ access to reflect on wider debates about knowledge and the curriculum.

Tea and coffee will be available at 4.00pm and the event will start at 4.15. After each paper there will be time for questions and discussion, followed by an opportunity to discuss issues raised in both papers over a glass of wine or juice.

For further details about the Higher Education Policy Network, please contact the network convenor, Professor Carole Leathwood, Institute for Policy Studies in Education, LondonMetropolitanUniversity, c.leathwood@londonmet.ac.uk

Note: Unless otherwise stated SRHE events are free to members, there is a charge of £45 for non-members

Reserve a place: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Laddism

Laddism

LADDISM AND HIGHER EDUCATION

A Society for Research into Higher Education event

Date – 7 February 2014 ; 10.30 – 16.30

Venue – SRHE, 73 Collier Street, London N1 9BE

Network – Student Experience Network (SEN)

A one-day SEN symposium discussing masculine behaviours and student culture.

The Student Experience Network of the SRHE is holding a one day symposium on laddism and Higher Education. Its focus is on the intersection of such masculine behaviours with student culture, minorities, lived experience, and the night-time economy, all areas which also inform and shape pedagogical identities. The day has been organised following the NUS’ 2013 report on lad culture in higher education, That’s What She Said and is thus orientated towards asking how the HE sector should respond to research findings and what further research is necessary.

Emerging Themes from That’s What She Said with a discussion on further research and actions
Isabel Young (co-author of report), seconded by Kelly Temple (NUS)

This presentation reports on a research project, funded by the National Union of Students, which sought to explore women students’ experiences of ‘lad culture’ in educational, social and personal spheres. The project consisted of two parts: (1) a thematic literature review covering areas such as gender and education, cultural studies and policy sociology; and (2) in-depth qualitative research using focus groups and semi-structured interviews with a sample of 40 women students, focusing on their experiences of teaching and learning, extra-curricular activities, social life, and sex and relationships. The findings of this research show that although ‘laddism’ is only one of a variety of potential masculinities, there exists at least a significant minority of women students who find ‘lad cultures’ problematic, citing issues such as misogynist ‘banter’, objectification of women and sexual pressure and harassment. This presentation explores some of the key themes to have emerged from the report, including the evolution of ‘laddism’ and its existence as a behavior; the connection between night economies and the propagation of ‘lad culture’; intersections between gender, race, (dis)ability, sexuality and ‘lad culture’, and more. It will conclude by looking ahead to further research possibilities and actions around the impact of ‘lad culture’ in higher education and more broadly.

Isabel Young has a BA in Sociology and an MA in Gender Studies from the University of Sussex. Her research has explored BAME women’s experiences of anti-Muslim racism, constructions of sexual violence on Facebook ‘banter’ sites, and most recently, the impact of ‘lad culture’ on women students in higher education. She has worked with Survivor’s Network, Woman’s Hour and UK Uncut on the issues of VAWG and the cuts. Isabel currently runs a community programme for migrant mothers as part of the Arbour’s Migrant Women’s Mentoring and Social Inclusion project based in East London.
isabelkayoung@gmail.com

Kelley Temple is the NUS National Women’s Officer. She blogs at: http://www.nusconnect.org.uk/blogs/blog/kelleytemple/
kelley.temple@nus.org.uk

Degrees of Laddishness: Laddism in Higher Education
Professor Carolyn Jackson and Dr. Stephen Dempster
This paper provides insights into how laddism is understood, perpetuated, legitimated and challenged among undergraduates in two British universities. We explore the perceived benefits of subscribing to laddish masculinities, and also the costs of laddishness for male and female students in both student social life and teaching/learning environments. We discuss the ways that laddishness can be problematic for men as well as women, but argue that viewing laddishness as existing in a continuum of potential masculine subject positionings not only enables a more sophisticated understanding of laddishness, but also may suggest strategies through which more extreme laddism might be challenged.
Carolyn Jackson is a Professor in the Department of Educational Research at Lancaster University, and Co-Director of the Centre for Social Justice and Wellbeing in Education. She has published widely on gender issues in education. Her books include Lads and Ladettes in School: Gender and a Fear of Failure (2006), and Girls and Education 3-16: Continuing Concerns, New Agendas (2010, co-edited with Carrie Paechter and Emma Renold). She is currently engaged in two projects exploring laddism in higher education.
c.jackson2@lancaster.ac.uk
Dr. Steven Dempster is a Research and Teaching Associate in the Department of Educational Research at Lancaster University and the Dean of one of Lancaster’s undergraduate colleges.  Steve has published a number of papers on laddism in higher education and is currently working on a further project on laddism in HE, an evaluation of enhancement of teaching and learning in Scottish HEIs, and a study of the impact of the Harry Potter franchise on boys’ literacies.
s.dempster@lancaster.ac.uk

Chanting Students
Dr. Matthew Cheeseman

I began researching and collecting examples of student chanting in 2005 and have found them a stimulating way of thinking about students and their experience of higher education. Far from simple, chants are both verbal forms and performances, full of contradictory meanings and creadings. In this paper I look at how they are received by others and how they operate as expressions of student identity and enactments of ‘lad culture’. Using data collected following an ethnographic methodology, I attempt to situate chanting within larger and no less contradictory performances (such as being a student) and explain its relationship to a language that has become a totemic within the United Kingdom: banter.

Dr. Matthew Cheeseman is a Research and Teaching Associate at the University of Sheffield. He works between English Literature, Folklore, Creative Writing, Music and Education. Alongside Dr. Camille Kandiko, he convenes the Student Experience Network for the SRHE, arranging approximately three symposiums a year. He blogs at http://www.einekleine.com.

Round table on Students’ Union responses, programmes and strategies alongside thoughts on further research.
Abigail Burman, Sophie van der Ham and Kelly Temple

Abigail Burman is an American undergraduate at the University of Oxford. During her time at university she’s served as her college’s Equal Opportunities Officer, focusing on issues of violence and harassment and helped form the first University-wide campaign against sexual violence.

Sophie van der Ham completed a BA in English literature and linguistics at the University of Amsterdam & Edinburgh. She came to the University of Sussex to study an MA in Gender Studies and co-chaired the Women’s Group on campus. She was elected welfare officer at the University of Sussex Students’ Union and is carrying on the zero tolerance to sexual harassment and discrimination campaign that was started by the previous welfare officer. The campaign has been mentioned by The Guardian and aims to work constructively with the University in introducing a sexual violence policy.

The day will conclude with a general discussion, with the option to splinter into smaller groups in order to discuss research strands.

Laddism

Laddism

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Digitisation Perspectives

Digitisation Perspectives

THE DIGITAL STUDENT EXPERIENCE

The Digital Student Experience: Exploring the role of technology on the student experience

Society for Research into Higher Education

Date – Friday 15 November 2013

Venue – SRHE, 73 Collier Street, LondonN1 9BE

Network – Student Experience/Digital University

This event has been put together by the SRHE Student Experience Network and the Digital University Network. We will be exploring the role of technology on the student experience, with a focus on research that has engaged students and investigates their experiences.

Draft programme:

11:00am: Coffee and registration
11:30am: Introduction
11:45am: Jeremy Segrott, Cardiff University, ‘Connecting academic writers – the #Acwri Twitter group’.
12:30pm: Lunch
1:30pm: Melissa Highton, University of Oxford, ‘Researching the Digital Student Experience of Oxford University’
2:15pm: Eve Stirling, University of Sheffield, ‘Stories from Facebook’
3:00pm: Panel with questions from Twitter
3:30pm: Tea and close

‘Connecting academic writers – the #Acwri Twitter group’:

This presentation discusses our experience of developing #Acwri – a Twitter-based support network that aims to identify common challenges in the writing process; enable participants to reflect on their own practice as writers; and share strategies for effective writing.  Acwri ‘meets’ on Twitter fortnightly, using synchronous tweets (messages) and a keyword (#acwri – short for academic writing), enabling anyone with a Twitter account to follow and/participate. 

Jeremy Segrott is a research fellow in public health based in the DECIPHer Research Centre at Cardiff University His research focuses on the role of family relationships and parenting in the prevention of alcohol misuse by young people, and the effectiveness of family and school-based prevention programmes. 

‘Researching the Digital Student Experience of Oxford University’:

In 2011 researchers at Oxford University undertook a study of the student digital experience within the University in an attempt to identify technologies which appropriately support Oxford’s traditional teaching methods, graduate skills expectations, and the social dimension of student life. The purpose of the study was to inform institutional decision-making and to understand how current technologies, systems and services are perceived and experienced by students and staff.

Melissa Highton is Director of Academic IT at Oxford University. She is responsible for developing use of technology in learning and teaching across the university and maintaining Oxford’s world-class reputation in the areas of IT support for learning, teaching and research.  She leads service delivery and projects in Academic IT to meet the needs of lecturers and researchers in furthering the strategic goals of the University.

‘Stories from Facebook’

Facebook is ubiquitous in many of the lives of young undergraduate students. Research in this area shows that Facebook is a key tool in being a student (Selwyn, 2009), both through social support and supporting academic study. The focus of Eve’s research is exploring the realities of social media use by undergraduates. Specifically their use of Facebook in the first-year transition to university. She did this through a mixed method two-phase approach of large-scale questionnaires (n=685) and a longitudinal connective ethnography (n=6), across Facebook and the university campus. The findings are presented in six narrative stories of my Facebook friends at key moments across the academic year. Drawing on this data she presents two contrasting themes – “this Uni is run on Facebook” and “disconnection (I don’t want to be here, anymore)” to explore the role of technology and specifically Facebook, on the student experience.

Eve Stirling currently undertaking an ESRC funded PhD researching first year undergraduates’ usage of Facebook in their transition into university life. Her research interests include technology and higher education (HE), the use of social media in HE and the pedagogical impacts of these. She is also interested in design thinking and its influence on the research process, ethnographic research methods and the influence of space and time on the student experience. She is a member of IRis, Interdisciplinary Research in Socio-Digital Worlds and the Centre for the Study of New Literacies at The University of Sheffield. She is senior Lecturer in Design at SheffieldHallamUniversity.

Reserve a place at thus event: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/

 Note: Unless otherwise stated SRHE events are free to members, there is a charge of £45 for non-members.

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski