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imagesPOST-SOCIALIST ECONOMIES, NATIONALISTIC CONFLICTS AND LABOUR IN CENTRAL-EASTERN EUROPE AND THE FORMER SOVIET UNION

One Day Workshop at Middlesex University, Hendon, London NW4 4BT

Hosted by the Business School and the Post-Socialist Labour Studies Group.
Friday May 29 2015, from 9.30am to 6pm

For further information, and to register at the workshop, please contact:
Claudio Morrison (c.morrison@mdx.ac.uk) or Elena Karoullas (E.Karoullas@mdx.ac.uk)

A workshop is jointly sponsored by the Royal Economic Society and the London Region of BUIRA (British Universities Industrial Relations Association) will be held under the auspices of the Post Socialist Labour Studies Group at Middlesex University on Friday May 29th 2015. The workshop focuses on ethno-national conflicts in post-socialist and post-soviet states and the political economy of the region, explorin g links between emergent neoliberal forms of capitalism and the rise of radical nationalism. Guest speakers will include practitioners in labour and industrial relations and economic policy from the region as well as academic specialists and labour representatives from countries gravely affected by present and past conflicts such as Ukraine, Russia, Serbia and Bosnia-Herzegovina.

Confirmed participant speakers include:
Dr Claudio Morrison (LWO, Middlesex University); Professor Martin Upchurch (LWO, Middlesex University); Professor John Grahl (Economics, Middlesex University); Dr Daryna Grechyna (Economics, Middlesex University); Kiril Buketov (IUF Uniting Food, Farm and Hotel Workers Worldwide); Volodymyr Ishenko (Center for Social and Labour Research, Kiev); Goran Markovic (East Sarajevo University, Sarajevo Plenum); Filip Ilkowski (Institute of Political Science, Warsaw) Petr Bizyukov (Centre for Social and Labour Rights, Moscow); Veronika Biziukova (Levada analy tical centre, Moscow); Professor Vera Trappmann (University of Leeds) Dr. Jelena Timotijevic (University of Brighton); Dr Jan Fidrmuc (Economics, Brunel University).

Directions to the Hendon Campus
http://www.mdx.ac.uk/get-in-touch/directions-london
Facebook Event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1577293192531879/

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/post-socialist-economies-nationalistic-conflicts-and-labour

Modernism

Modernism

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

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Work

Work

JOURNAL OF LABOR SCIENCES

I would  like to divulge the table of contents of the first number of the Labor Sciences Journal, a new academic/activist journal founded by DIEESE – the Inter-Union Department of Statistics and Socioeconomic Studies in Brazil. The titles of the articles are below, in Portuguese and English, as well as the link to access them. It’s an excellent resource for scholars of labor in Latin America.

Cordially, Professor Dr. Sean Purdy
Departamento de História
Universidade de São Paulo

CONTENTS:

-Strikes and the gender question: a panorama of the work stoppages motivated by questions related to women between 1983 and 2011

-Apprenticeship as an instrument for the implementation of the fundamental human right to professionalization

-Gender Assymmetries In The Brazilian Labor Market: Crisis And Public Policies

-Juridical Forms of the Reduction of the Workweek in Brazil

-Labor As Seen By Social Anthropology

-Labor, industry and strategies of development

-Modern Times: a reading of labor through images

-The recent evolution of the Brazilian labor market from the perspective of the concept of the industrial reserve army

Barbara Weinstein: The Discourse of Technical Competence: Strategies of Authority and Power
in Industrializing Brazil

http://rct.dieese.org.br/rct/index.php/rct/issue/view/2/showToc

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

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Work

WORK AFTER FORDISM

Work after Fordism: A workshop on theorizing organisational diversity and dominant trends in contemporary capitalism

The workshop will have presentations by:

• Professor Benjamin Coriat (Université Paris XIII)

• Professor Rick Delbridge (University of Cardiff)

• Professor Ulrich Jürgens (University of Berlin)

• Professor Paul Thompson (University of Strathclyde)

• Professor Karel Williams (University of Manchester)

• Dr John Buchanan (University of Sydney)

• Dr Sarah Jenkins (University of Cardiff)

• Dr Marco Hauptmeier (University of Cardiff)

• Dr Giuliano Maielli (Queen Mary, University of London)

• Dr Matt Vidal (King’s College London)

Full details and a schedule can also be found at: http://www.busman.qmul.ac.uk/newsandevents/events/items/55041.html

The workshop is free and will provide a light lunch.

To reserve a place, please contact Ade Alele: a.alele@qmul.ac.uk.

Best wishes

Matt Vidal

 

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Digitisation Perspectives

EPHEMERA – VOLUME 10 NUMBERS 3 – 4

The Digital Labour Group in the Faculty of Information and Media Studies at the University of Western Ontario and /ephemera: theory and politics in organization/ are pleased to announce the arrival of Volume 10: 3-4:

*** Digital Labour: Workers, Authors, Citizens ***

Edited by Jonathan Burston, Nick Dyer-Witheford and Alison Hearn

ephemera: http://www.ephemeraweb.org/

Born out of the conference of the same name held in the fall of 2009 at the University of Western Ontario, this special double issue of / ephemera / addresses the implications of digital labour as they are emerging in practice, politics, policy, culture, and theoretical enquiry. As workers, as authors, and as citizens, we are increasingly summoned and disciplined by new digital technologies that define the workplace and produce ever more complex regimes of surveillance and control. At the same time, new possibilities for agency and new spaces for collectivity are borne from these multiplying digital innovations.

This volume explores this social dialectic, with a specific focus on new forms of labour. Papers examine the histories and theories of digital capitalism, foundational assumptions in debates about digital labour, issues of intellectual property and copyright, material changes in the digital workplace, transnational perspectives on digital labour, the issue of free labour and new definitions of work, and struggles and contests on the scene of digital production.

Contributors include Brian Holmes, Andrea Fumagalli and Cristina Morini, David Hesmondhalgh, Ursula Huws, Barry King, Jack Bratich, Enda Brophy and many others.

This issue also contains vital contributions from union and guild activists hailing from the Canadian Media Guild (CMG), the Screen Actors Guild (SAG), the American  Federation of Television and Radio Artists (AFTRA), the University of Western Ontario Faculty Association and the Canadian Association of University Teachers (CAUT).

The Digital Labour Group: Jonathan Burston, Edward Comor, James Compton, Nick Dyer-Witheford, Alison Hearn, Ajit Pyati, Sandra Smeltzer, Matt Stahl, Samuel E. Trosow.

 

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Karl Marx

THE MODERN MARX

The Modern Marx: A World Still Wanting to be Won
Dr. William A. Pelz
June 11, 2011, Saturday, 2:30 pm
Open University of the Left
Lincoln Park Public Library

1150 W. Fullerton, Chicago, corner Racine
Across from DePaul University 8232;(Red Line: Fullerton)

“The interest in Marx seems a vindication,” the historian Eric Hobsbawm wrote in 2008 as the global economic crisis unfolded.  “His analysis of capitalism put its finger on globalization and periodic crises and instabilities. Over the past few decades people thought the market would sort everything out, which seemed to me a statement of theology rather than reality” (The Sunday Times, 11/21/08). 

Indications of Marx’s relevancy abound, from Fukushima to the Gulf of Mexico, from the Arab Spring to Wisconsin, from anti-austerity social movements in Europe to the austerity legislation that threatens Chicago’s public school students and teachers.  

Yet, Marxist thought remains on the historical margin.  Can a reinterpretation of Marx challenge the legitimacy of market theology?  What can be learned from Marx’s own political struggles, his sense of history, his political mark on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries? 

Open University welcomes historian Dr. William A. Pelz, author of the new biography, Karl Marx: A World to Win (Pearson, 2011).  The book covers the important aspects of his life and the major theoretical arguments of his work.  It also explores the Industrial Revolution through the lens of Marx’s view of socialism, not simply as an ethical idea but also as a way of framing the industrial system and its impact on workers.  (Copies of the book will be available from the author.)  Karl Marx is part of Pearson’s Library of World Biographies series, which includes books on Simon Bolivar and Sun Yat Sen. 

A Chicago native, Bill Pelz is an academic historian and specialist in European and comparative labor history.  His previous books include Against Capitalism: The European Left on the March (2007); The Spartkusbund and the German Working Class Movement (1988), and Wilhelm Liebknecht and German Social Democracy (1994).  His articles have appeared in the American Historical Review, Film & History, German History, German Studies Review, International Labor and Working Class History, International Review of Social History, Labor Studies, Journal of European Studies, Science & Society, Soviet Studies, Sozialismus, JahrBuch fuar Forschungen zur Geschichte der Arbeiterbewegung, and International Labor History Yearbook, among others.Pluto Press will publish his forthcoming book, a history of the European working class, next year. 

Open University events are free and open to the public.  Now in its 23rd year, the Open University of the Left is Chicago’s premier progressive forum and film series: http://www.openuniversityoftheleft.org/  

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World Crisis

BEYOND PRECARIOUS LABOR: RETHINKING SOCIALIST STRATEGIES

A Conference sponsored by the Center for Place, Culture and Politics & The Socialist Register

May 12th and 13th, 2011

CUNYGraduateCenter

365Fifth Avenue@34th Street

Free and open to the public; no registration required

Final schedule TBA

CONFIRMED SPEAKERS include:

Gilbert Achcar, Professor of Development Studies and International Relations, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London

Patrick Bond, Professor and Director of the Centre for Civil Society, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Ursula Huws, Professor of International Labour Studies at the Working Lives Research Institute, London Metropolitan University

Saru Jayaraman, Restaurant Opportunities Center

Leo Panitch, Editor, the Socialist Register

Ai-Jen Poo, Domestic Workers United

Saket Soni, New Orleans Worker Center for Racial Justice

Hilary Wainwright, Co-editor of Red Pepper and Research Director of the New Politics Project of the Transnational Institute, Amsterdam

And many others …

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

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Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

A World To Win

STRIKES AND SOCIAL CONFLICTS IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

International Conference
Lisbon, 17, 18, 19 March, 2011

The twentieth century has been confirmed as the century when the capital-labour conflict was most severe. The International Conference on Strikes and Social Conflicts in the Twentieth Century will host submissions on the strikes and social conflicts in the twentieth century and works on the theoretical discussion on the role of unions and political organizations. We also invite researchers to submit papers on methodology and the historiography of labour.

We welcome submissions on labour conflicts that occurred in factories, universities or public services, on rural and urban conflicts and also on conflicts that developed into civil wars or revolutions. National and international comparisons are also welcome.

After the Russian revolution the relative strengths of capital and labour were never again the same, with a period of revolution and counter-revolution that ended with World War II. Protagonist of the victory over fascism, the labour movement found itself neglected in the core countries under the impact of economic growth in the 1950s and the 1960s. But May 1968 quickly reversed the situation, with a following boom of labour studies during the 1970s. Nevertheless once the crisis of the 1970s was over, capital has regained the initiative, with the deterioration of labour laws, the crisis of trade unions and the subsequent despise in the academy for the study of social conflicts. The recent crisis, however, shows that workers, the ones who create value, are not obsolete. The social movements regain, in the last decade, a central role in the world.

The intensification of social conflicts in the last decade promoted a comeback to the academia of the studies on labour and the social movements. This conference aims to be part of this process: to retrieve, promote and disseminate the history of social conflicts during the twentieth century.

The Scientific Committee
Álvaro Bianchi (AEL)
Raquel Varela (IHC)
Sjaak van der Velden (IISH)
Serge Wolikow (MSH)
Xavier Domènech (CEDIF)

Conference Languages
Conference languages are Portuguese, English, French and Spanish (simultaneous translation Portuguese/English).

Preliminary Program

The Conference will have sessions in the mornings and afternoons. There will be conferences of invited speakers, among other, Marcel van der Linden, Fernando Rosas, Serge Wolikow, Beverly Silver, Kevin Murphy, Ricardo Antunes, Álvaro Bianchi, Dave Lyddon, Xavier Doménech.

During the conference there will be an excursion guided by Professor Fernando Rosas (Lisbon of the Revolutions); a debate about cinema and labour movement and a debate about Crisis and Social Change.

Contact information:

Instituto de História Contemporânea/ Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas (Universidade Nova de Lisboa), Av. de Berna, 26 C, 1069-061 Lisboa, Portugal. E-Mail: ihc@fcsh.unl.pt

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Austerity

CRITICAL LABOUR STUDIES 7th SYMPOSIUM

19th and 20th February 2011
Location: The Manchester Museum , The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester

PROGRAMME:

SATURDAY

9.00-9.30 – Registration

9.30 – 11.00 – Restructuring and Unions

‘Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Culture? Industrial Restructuring and Culture Change: The Strategic Response of Organised Labour’ – Discussion generated by Bill Gray, Convenor, (Tata, Corus UK, Scunthorpe) and Ian Greenwood, (Leeds University Business School, Centre for Employment Relations Innovation and Change, CERIC).

‘Changing union and management strategies in a context of restructuring, marketisation and privatisation – the CWU in Royal Mail’ – Stephen Mustchin, David Beale, (University of Manchester )

‘Milking the Masses for Inspiration’: The Outsourcing of Creative Labour by Apple and Google’ Birgitta Bergvall-Kåreborn (Luleå University of Technology) Debra Howcroft (University of Manchester)

11.00-11.15. Coffee and Tea

11.15-12.15 Migration, Exploitation and Labour

‘Networks of Support for New Migrant Communities: Institutional Goals versus Substantive Goals?’ Robert MacKenzie, Chris Forde and Zinovijus Ciupijus, (Leeds University Business School)

‘Lets get back to normal’? Migrant workers, sectarianism and some problems with the labour movement in the north of Ireland ” Brian Garvey, Paul Stewart, Jolanta Kulinska, Sherley Dolo, Andrius Cislikaukas

12.15 – 1.00 Lunch

1.00-2.00 Activism and New Agendas in the Current Climate

‘Who is The Activist?   Biographies of worker activists from the North East’ John Stirling (University of Northumbria) and Jo McBride (University of Bradford), Discussant: Shirley Winter

‘Prevailing languages of class – fairness and equality in trade union discourse’ Sian Moore (London Metropolitan University)

2.00-3.00 – Communities, Renewal and the Worker Representation

‘Active unions, active communities: a local example of trade union/community engagement’ Jane Holgate CERIC Leeds University and John Page, Secretary of Hackney Unite

‘The Role of Trades Councils’ Geoff Brown Secretary of Manchester Trades Council

‘Developing the Trade Union Branch: the case of the UCU’ Beverley Woodburn UCU

3.00-3.30 Coffee and Tea

3.30 – 4.30 Politics, Academics and Worker Struggle

‘The BA Dispute in 2010’ – Speaker from UNITE BASSA

‘Objective but Not Detached: In Defence of Partisanship in Employment Relations Research’ Professor Ralph Darlington University of Salford

4.30 Book Launch

Tommy McKearney IWU – organized labour and politics in Northern Ireland ‘From Insurrection to Parliament’ (Pluto Books)

5.30 CLOSE OF DAY

SUNDAY

9.00-9.30 Coffee and Tea

9.30-10.45 Left Behind: Young Workers

‘Young workers in crisis’ – three presentations – Lef Kretsos (Coventry University), Mel Simms, Manuela Galetto (Warwick University)

‘Emerging prospects and constraints on getting labour history into the schools: a US perspective’ Anthony Tambureno (West Virginia University)

10.45-12.00 Internationalism and Work

‘International Political Economy of Work and Employability‘ Phoebe Moore, Salford University

‘Flexicurity and atypical employment as integrated parts of the new neoliberal employment agenda: a view from Greece and the European South.’ Stelios Gialis, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki

‘China and the International Labour Movement’, Charles Umney, University of Leeds

12.00-12.30 LUNCH

12.30 -2.00 – The End of the Public and Free University Britain ?

Cases from the frontline: UWE (Andy Danford, UWE) and Sian Moore (London Metropolitan),

Discussion

2.00- 3.00 CLS Meeting

Finish 3.00

Organisers: Jane Holgate, Debra Howcroft, Miguel Martinez Lucio, and Jo McBride
Contact: miguel.martinezlucio@manchester.ac.uk, or debra.howcroft@mbs.ac.uk

Cheques for £60 (waged) or £40 (unwaged) (which includes all food and refreshments) should be made out to ‘Critical Labour Studies’ and sent to Miguel Martinez Lucio (staff), Manchester University , PMO Division, Manchester Business School, Booth Street West, Manchester M15 6PB.

Please do confirm you are coming so we can plan the catering and support

For Updates, Changes and Accommodation Links Check – http://criticallabourstudies.org.uk/site  
For Hotels in Manchester you can try: http://www.booking.com/city/gb/manchester.html
Manchester Business School has some cheaper accommodation: http://www.mbs.ac.uk/aboutus/conference-hotel/hotel-services.aspx

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No Future

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON RESEARCHING WORK AND LEARNING

Special Conference Announcement
International Conference on Researching Work and Learning (RWL)

The Seventh RWL Conference will be taking place in Shanghai, China (December 4-7, 2011)

All conference information can be found at http://www.rwlecnu.org/

Deadline for proposals (papers, symposia, workshops, poster sessions) is March 1st, 2011.

Conference Streams include:
a) Learning, Organizational Change and Organizational Development
b) Professional Work and Learning
c) Leadership Studies in Work and Learning
d) Labour Studies in Work and Learning
e) Trade Unions’ Education and Learning
f) Quality of Work/Learning Life
g) Trans-nationalism, Migration, Work and Learning
h) Work, Learning and Community
i) Learning Theory, Skills and Work
j) Identity, Work and Learning
k) Gender, Ethnicity, Spirituality, Diversity in Workplace and Learning
l) Vocational Education, Labour Markets and Learning
m) Policy Studies, Work and Learning
n) Unpaid Work and Learning
o) Historical Approaches to Work, Learning and Social Change
p) Best practice studies, work and learning

About the RWL Series:
The RWL international conference series was established in 1999 and has run continuously since on a bi-annual basis. Successful conferences have been held in the UK, Canada, Finland, Australia, South Africa, Denmark. In close association with the Journal of Workplace Learning and Emerald Publishing, the RWL series is the longest, continuously running international conference series in the field of work and learning studies currently in operation.

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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

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Work, work, work

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 3rd OCTOBER 2010

EVENTS

SEMINAR: THE TASKS OF THE CRITICAL SCHOLAR/ACTIVIST IN EDUCATION

with
Dr. Michael W. Apple, John Bascom Professor of Curriculum and Instruction and Educational Policy Studies, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Tuesday, October 12, 2010
1:00 – 2:00 pm
OISE Building – 252 Bloor Street West
Second Floor, Room 2-211

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CONFERENCE: THE RACE TO GLOBALIZE HIGHER EDUCATION

January 21-22, 2011
Sutton Place Hotel, Toronto, ON

The Ontario Confederation of University Faculty Associations (OCUFA) will be holding “The Race to Globalize Higher Education” to bring together speakers and participants from universities, research institutes, government, and the private sector in Canada, the United States, and Australia.

The fee for those registering on or before October 30, 2010, is $350.00, which includes continental breakfasts, lunch, refreshments and all materials.  The registration fee after October 30, 2010 is $400.00. The student rate is $150.00.

To register, please visit: http://www.ocufa.on.ca/conferences.c2011reg.gk

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CALL FOR PAPERS, WORKSHOPS AND PRESENTATIONS: WHEN UNIONS MATTER MOST – OPPORTUNITIES FOR COLLABORATION AND SOLIDARITY

The Pacific Northwest Labour History Association’s (PNLHA) 43rd annual conference, presented in collaboration with the Simon Fraser University Centre for Labour Studies

June 17th – 19th, 2011
Simon Fraser University Harbour Centre, Vancouver, BC

The labour movement goes far beyond unionized workers. Significant struggles for workers’ rights have always involved non-union sectors, both locally and internationally. Some collaborations have been highly successful, others have left lingering distrust.

This conference seeks to find the best historical models for organizing, strategic alliances and coalitions, and to connect these models with contemporary actions to consider how the labour movement can strengthen for the future.

We invite proposals for academic research, panels, individual presentations, interactive workshops, drama, music, art, memorabilia displays and other forms of presentation. Interactive sessions are preferred and the reading of papers is discouraged.

Proposal deadline is January 14, 2011.  Please send a short summary and list of all presenters to Ms. Joey Hartman, PNLHA BC Vice President, by email to pnlha@shaw.ca, or by mail to #2402 – 6888 Station Hill Drive, Burnaby, BC,
Canada, V3N 4X5.

For further information contact Joey Hartman at 604-540-0245. For updates, check our website: http://www.pnlha.org

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NEWS & VIEWS

STRIKING IN A TIME OF AUSTERITY: THE NOSM STRIKE IN NORTHERN ONTARIO

by Scott Neigh, The Bullet

The 150 members of Unit 2 of Ontario Public Service Employees Union (OPSEU) Local 677 have been on strike since August 16. The office, technical, and administrative workers at the Northern Ontario School of Medicine (NOSM) went on strike after almost a year of negotiations to try and achieve a first collective agreement. At the forefront of the struggle are basic quality-of-work and quality-of-life issues. But lurking in the background are larger questions of how workers in the broader public sector and their employers will position themselves with respect to the austerity agenda declared with such fanfare by world leaders at the G20 summit in Toronto in June, and affirmed in this year’s federal and provincial budgets by the Harper and McGuinty governments.

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/417.php

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NEW REPORT REVEALS THE FUTURE OF LITERACY IN CANADA’S LARGEST CITIES

A new report from the Canadian Council on Learning (CCL) provides an unprecedented look at the future state of adult literacy in Vancouver, Toronto, Ottawa and Montreal, from 2001 through 2031. 

Released to coincide with UNESCO International Literacy Day, The Future of Literacy in Canada’s Largest Cities uses statistical projections to generate literacy profiles for the country’s largest metropolitan areas. According to the report, the four cities will experience significant, above-average growth in the number of adults with low literacy in the coming decades.

Read more: http://www.ccl-cca.ca/CCL/Newsroom/Releases/20100908literacy2031.html

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REFORMER ELECTED TO HEAD ATU TRANSIT UNION

by Mark Brenner, Labor Notes

Larry Hanley was elected president today of the 190,000-member Amalgamated Transit Union, which organizes bus drivers in cities across the U.S. and Canada, by delegates to the ATU Convention.

Hanley helped found the Keep America Moving coalition to build support for mass transit. Labor Notes’ Mark Brenner interviewed Hanley this month about how he would run the ATU differently and organize transit workers together with community members.

Read more:
http://www.labornotes.org/blogs/2010/09/reformer-elected-head-ATU-transit-union

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SOCIAL PLANNING COUNCIL: CALL OUT TO CANDIDATES AND ORGANIZATIONS TO ENDORSE THE TORONTO OPEN BUDGET INITIATIVE DECLARATION TODAY

Social Planning Toronto is working with the Toronto Open Budget Initiative (TOBI) to get the word out to Mayoral and City Council candidates – it’s time to open the City’s budget process! TOBI, a broad-based group of residents and community organizations, is working to make the City’s budget process more open, transparent, inclusive and participatory. At present, residents and groups have only two opportunities to weigh in on the City budget process, both after most of the real decisions have already been made. In response to the lack of opportunity for meaningful civic engagement on the City’s capital and operating budgets, members developed the TOBI Declaration of Principles, Values and Recommended Actions to improve the City’s budget process. Principles and values include: inclusiveness, accessibility, integrity and transparency, influence, accountability, and flexibility and transformation. Recommended actions include changes to the process that would have residents and groups have their say throughout the budget process, starting at the early formative stages.

Are you a candidate for City Hall or a worker, volunteer or board member from a community group? We need to hear from you! Check out our new website at http://www.torontoopenbudget.ca to read over the TOBI Declaration and send in the Statement of Support to endorse these ideas for change. Deadline for submitting endorsements is Wednesday, October 6. After October 6, TOBI will be publicly releasing the list of endorsers. Event details to follow.

For more information or to join TOBI, please contact Beth Wilson at beth@socialplanningtoronto.org or call (416) 351-0095 x257.

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10 WAYS TO SOLVE THE JOBS PROBLEM

Imagine a no-holds-barred “summit” that comes up with ideas to solve both our job and environmental problems. What might it come up with?

Read more:
http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/a-resilient-community/10-ways-to-solve-the-jobs-problem

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VIDEO: THE VALUE OF LIFELONG LEARNING

http://www.ccl-cca.ca/CCL/Newsroom/MultimediaCentre/AudioVideoArchive/LifelongLearning.html
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ONLINE JOURNAL ARTICLES

‘KNOWLEDGE WORKERS’ AS THE NEW APPRENTICES: THE INFLUENCE OF ORGANISATIONAL AUTONOMY, GOALS AND VALUES ON THE NURTURING OF EXPERTISE

Alison Fuller and Lorna Unwin
Vocations and Learning
Volume 3, Number 3, 203-222, DOI: 10.1007/s12186-010-9043-4
http://www.springerlink.com/content/qk662k1662437628/

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GENDER DIFFERENCES IN THE CORRELATES OF VOLUNTEERING AND CHARITABLE GIVING
Christopher J. Einolf
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly published 28 September 2010
http://nvs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0899764010385949v1

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THE CHINESE REFORM EXPERIENCE: A CRITICAL ASSESSMENT
Martin Hart-Landsberg
Review of Radical Political Economics published 28 September 2010
http://rrp.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0486613410383954v1

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JOB POSTINGS

PROGRAM DIRECTOR, CHILD CARE CATERING
Real Food for Real Kids
Toronto, Ontario

Start date: November 1, 2010
Interviews: October 14-15, 2010
Hours per week: Full time
Compensation: Commensurate with experience & ability
Application Deadline: 12:00 noon on Oct 12, 2010

Real Food for Real Kids (RFRK) is Canada’s leading all-natural catering company for child care centres, schools and camps. Every day, we cook and deliver delicious meals and snacks to over 5,000 children throughout the GTA. We make food fresh from scratch using only natural ingredients, including as much local and organic food as possible.

About the Program Director for Child Care Catering:
You’ll take on responsibility for the development, growth, and delivery of
the child care catering program at RFRK.

We’re looking for a rare breed: part strategic superhero, part relationship builder, part manager, and all business (except when they’re not). Someone who can run a tight ship, but is loved by everyone sailing it. We need a problem-solver, cut-to-the-chaser, seasoned listener, and motivational speaker wrapped into one.

For more details and to apply: http://www.goodworkcanada.ca/greenjobs.php?id=12430

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EDUCATION COORDINATOR, NORTH YORK HARVEST FOOD BANK
Toronto, Ontario

North York Harvest Food Bank is one of Toronto’s largest food banks. An independent not-for-profit organization, we work with communities who face short-term emergencies and long-term poverty in northern Toronto.

Position Summary

The Education Coordinator develops and facilitates learning opportunities for North York Harvest stakeholders including visiting schools and corporate volunteer groups. These include Sort & Learn Tours which are conducted on-site and combine a classroom activity with a food sorting activity. We also offer off-site workshops for school and community groups.

Reporting Relationship: The Education Coordinator reports to the Senior Manager, Community Engagement.

Hours: 15 hours/week including some weekend or evening hours.

For more details and to apply:
http://www.goodworkcanada.ca/greenjobs.php?id=12415

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For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca.

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

No Future

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Radical Pedagogy

Radical Pedagogy

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 12th OCTOBER 2009

 

OUR MANDATE: The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

To change your subscription settings, visit http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

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NOW AVAILABLE! UPDATED & EXPANDED EDITION OF “INTEGRATING EQUITY, ADDRESSING BARRIERS: INNOVATIVE LEARNING PRACTICES BY UNIONS”

The Labour Education Centre is pleased to announce the publication of the updated and expanded new edition of the report “Integrating Equity, Addressing Barriers: Innovative Learning Practices by Unions”.

Available on LEC’s website: http://www.laboureducation.org  Printed copies are available for $10 plus shipping / 25% discount for 10 or more copies.

The second edition features 11 new sketches as well as updates for most of the 35 sketches included in the first edition.

Original 2-4 page “sketches” provide a sampling of programs from different parts of Canada. The 46 sketches include programs from local, provincial and national unions, from central labour bodies at the labour council, regional building trades council, provincial and territorial federation and level of the Canadian Labour Congress. Some are joint union-management initiatives; some are community-sponsored. Each sketch outlines how the program started and evolved, impacts and what’s next, contact information and references. The 190-page report includes an introduction and additional references.

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THE POLITICS OF OLDER ADULT EDUCATION: POSSIBILITIES FOR TRANSFORMATIVE PRACTICE

Marvin Formosa, University of Malta
Wednesday, October 14, 2009
12.00-1.30 pm
Room 7-162, OISE/University of Toronto
252 Bloor St. West, Toronto

In recent decades, late-life learning has developed into a global success story. Whether holding a ‘top-down’ administrative arrangement or embodying a culture of self-help, there can be no doubt as to the triumph of programs in meeting the educational, social, and psychological needs of older persons. However, a cautionary note must be warranted. Research has reported that in many cases programs of older adult education tend to function as yet another euphemism for glorified occupational therapy that is both conservative and oppressive. Moreover, practice models seem to be running the risk of becoming obsolete as societies embark on a ‘late-modern’ (as opposed to a ‘modernist’) model of the life course in which the sequential division between learning, work and retirement is becoming increasingly blurred.

This seminar puts forward the suggestion that older adult education must go through a cultural revolution to remain relevant to current ageing lifestyles as well as become an agent of transformative change. Seven possible directions are outlined: embracing a transformational rationale, ensuring that access overcomes class, gender and ethnic biases to become more equally distributed, guaranteeing that teaching and learning strategies are suited to older persons, promoting ICT knowledge whilst making greater use of e-learning techniques, extending its activities to frail and physically dependent elders including those in residential/nursing homes, and organizing activities that promote intergenerational learning.

Marvin Formosa (European Centre of Gerontology, University of Malta) is currently writing a handbook on ‘Lifelong Learning in Later Life’ (Sense, 2010). He has published on older adult learning in the journals Education and Ageing, Ageing International, Recerca, and Malta Review of Educational Research. His most recent publications include ‘Class Dynamics in Later Life’ and ‘Supporting Family Careers of Older Persons in Europe’. This year, Marvin Formosa is a visiting scholar in the Adult Education and Community Development Program, OISE/UT.

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VINCENZO PIETROPAOLO – HARVEST PILGRIMS EXHIBIT

Launch: Sunday, October 18
1-5 pm
Workers Arts and Heritage Centre
51 Stuart Street
Hamilton, ON
905-522-3003
http://www.wahc-museum.ca

Acclaimed Canadian documentary photographer and social activist Vincenzo Pietropaolo has been photographing migrant agriculture workers and recording their stories since 1984 – in the process travelling to forty locations throughout Ontario and to their homes in Mexico, Jamaica, and Montserrat.

Pietropaolo has borne witness to these “harvest pilgrims” — tens of thousands of migrant workers who arrive in the spring, leave in the fall, are the backbone of the agricultural industry in Canada — yet continue to be denied many of the basic workplace rights that protect other workers in Canada.

Meet the artist at the book launch and photo exhibition of HARVEST PILGRIMS, Sunday October 18.

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TRANSFORMING CRITICAL PEDAGOGY: REFLECTIONS ON THE FREIRE CONFERENCE GATHERING IN SPAIN, OCTOBER 28

*Do you look at the world and feel that things need to change?
* Do you watch the news everyday in sadness and despair waiting for that one news item that would give you hope for the world you live in?
* Do you believe that another world is possible?

Then come join The Transformative Learning Centre at OISE for our 2009-2010 Dialogue Circles Series.

Upcoming events include:

*Transforming Critical Pedagogy: Reflections on the Freire Conference Gathering in Spain, Emear O’Neill, Wednesday October 28
* Buy-Nothing Day, Wednesday November 25
* Inter-faith Dialogue, Wednesday December 16

Everyone is invited!
Hosted in the 7th Floor Peace Lounge at OISE, 252 Bloor St. W (at St. George) from 4:00 to 5:30 pm, last Wednesday of every month, Sept 2009 to April 2010.

For more information, visit the TLC website at: http://tlc.oise.utoronto.ca

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ISRAEL / PALESTINE: FREEDOM OF SPEECH, FREEDOM TO TEACH

A conference on elementary, secondary, and post-secondary education – rights and repression

Friday, October 16, 7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.
Saturday, October 17, 9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Steelworkers Hall, 25 Cecil Street, Toronto

Friday, October 16 Panel:
7:00-9:00: Sharing Stories of Repression and Fightback Panelists include Javier Davila, Adnan Husain, Golta Shahidi, and Palestinian educator, Saed Abu-Hijleh

Saturday, October 17 Programme: 9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

9:00 – 10:30 – Keynote addresses: Yafa Jarrar and Sherene Razack

11:00-12:30 – Sectoral Workshops
*Post-Secondary Faculty – Academic Research, Conferences, Publication and Organizing
*Post-Secondary Faculty -Teaching and the Curriculum
*Elementary and Secondary Teachers – The Classroom, the Curriculum and Finding Spaces within the Union
*Student Organizing
*Community

Lunch – 12:30 – 1:30 – vegetarian with vegan and gluten-free options (included in registration)

1:30 – 2:30 – Legal Context: Know Your Rights as Activists – Yutaka Dirks and Irina Ceric
2:45 – 4:00 – Plenary
4:00 – 4:15 – Closing Comments

Registration: $5–$30 sliding scale (incl. lunch with vegetarian, vegan,and gluten-free options)

For further information and to pre-register, contact us at freedomtoteach.registration@yahoo.ca.

*Organized by Educators for Peace and Justice, Faculty for Palestine, and Students Against Israeli Apartheid*

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INDIGENOUS SOVEREIGNTY WEEK – TORONTO

Forums, art, performances and discussions supporting and celebrating the Indigenous struggle for land and sovereignty on Turtle Island

http://www.defendersoftheland.org/toronto

October 26 – November 1, 2009

Invited speakers include:
* Arthur Manuel, Secwepemc Nation
* Algonquins of Barriere Lake
* Shawn Brant, Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory
* Pauline Shirt, Plains Cree
* Russell Diabo, Mohawk Nation, Kahnawake.
* Grafton Antone, Oneida
* Vicki Monague, Beausoleil FN

Featured events:
* Opening Ceremonies with Men’s and Women’s Drum Circle, Youth slam poetry and speaker
* Dear Harper: A Canadian Colonial History
* Justice Redone
* Struggles for Land
* Haudenosaunee Storytelling
* The Great Indian Bus Tour. Exploring the indigenous history of Toronto
* Building the Circle Stronger: Traditional feast, Sharing Circle and Next Steps meeting
* and more …

Full schedule will be updated shortly. Please visit our website often.

Email iswtoronto@gmail.com for more.

+++++

VIDEO: SOLIDARITY! RESISTANCE! CHANGE! ORGANIZING WORKING CLASS COMMUNITIES

Steve Williams in Toronto, October 2 2009

Steve Williams is co-director of the California based group POWER: People Organized to win Employment Rights, which since the late 1990’s has been one of the most important Worker’s Action Centres in the U.S., and co-authour of the book Towards Land, Work and Power: Charting a Path of Resistance to U.S.-led Imperialism.

* Moderated by Stephanie Ross – Prof. Labour Studies, York University.
* Sam Gindin – Visiting Packer Chair in Social Justice at York University.

A Left Streamed Video: http://www.socialistproject.ca/leftstreamed/

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PLANNING MEETING FOR DAY OF ACTION, CAMPAIGN FOR A POVERTY-FREE ONTARIO 

On behalf of the over 300,000 members of the Canadian Federation of Students-Ontario, we would like to invite your organisation to participate in and help shape the campaign for a Poverty-Free Ontario, bringing students, community and labour organisations together in a united call for the government to invest in people by supporting basic social services and standards. Your organisation has been contacted to participate because you have endorsed the campaign for a Poverty-Free Ontario or have expressed interest in doing so.

On October 15, we will be holding a planning meeting to discuss how we can coordinate our organising and build for the day of action. The planning meeting will be held on:

Thursday, October 15
12 pm
Ryerson Student Center
55 Gould Street, Toronto

We are pleased to invite a representative of your organisation to join us for a catered lunch and a discussion of how to effectively mobilise to challenge our government’s spending priorities and call for investment in people.

Please RSVP soon, and notify us of who is able to attend. We will be following up in the next few days to confirm participation. Please do not hesitate to contact me should you have any further questions or concerns.

In solidarity,
Shelley Melanson
Chairperson Canadian Federation of Students – Ontario
office – 416.925.3825 x 29
cell – 416.882.9927
http://www.cfsontario.ca

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ONTARIO FEDERATION OF LABOUR EMPLOYMENT EQUITY SEMINAR

November 9 & 10
Doubletree International Plaza Hotel
655 Dixon Road, Toronto

Mobilizing for equality rights makes our unions, the trades labour movement and communities stronger and better for everyone. To increase our actions the OFL is holding a seminar on Employment Equity.

Although the Employment Equity legislation was dismantled in 1995 by the Conservative Harris government, the labour movement has continued to push for employment equity gains through collective bargaining over the past decade.

The seminar will assist advocates through political action and collective bargaining, dispel myths and focus on the positive realities of employment equity and help overcome the challenges of implementing employment equity.

The registration fee is $150. The deadline for registration is October 26, 2007.

For more information or to register, contact Catherine Corcoran, Secretary
p: 416-443-7656, f: 416.441.0722, email: ccorcoran@ofl.ca

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FORUM – FROM CRISIS TO JUSTICE: LABOUR AND COMMUNITY WORKING TOGETHER FOR AN EQUITABLE AND INCLUSIVE ECONOMIC FUTURE

Saturday, November 21, 2009
Sheraton Centre Hotel
Toronto, Ontario

The population of Ontario is becoming more diverse. By 2011 most new entrants to the labour force will be peoples of colour. Yet in percentage terms, fewer and fewer peoples of colour are joining unions.

To bring about a deeper familiarity between unions and communities, unions must work in solidarity with peoples of colour on issues that are important to these communities, in order to build long lasting relationships of trust, respect and sustainability.
Why? The survival of the labour movement is at stake.

The Forum will:

* Link activists from unions and community organizations to advance a shared vision for social, economic and environmental justice in our workplaces and in our communities;

* Develop best practices and policies that can be implemented locally, provincially and nationally through collective bargaining and form the framework to lobby for effective provincial and national employment equity and for organizing legislation.

* Increase public awareness of the potential for “green-collar” jobs to provide equitable pathways out of poverty, curb global warming, and transform the economy.

The registration fee is $130 per delegate and cheques are payable to “OFL From Crisis to Justice Forum”. Delegates can register on-line at http://www.ofl.ca
Registration and payment must be received by November 1, 2009.

Additional information and forms can be found on the OFL website: http://www.ofl.ca or contact us directly by calling Paulette Hazel at 416.443.7667 – toll free 1.(800).668.9138 or e-mail phazel@ofl.ca

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HERE’S THE SKINNY ON WHY WAL-MART IS SO EVIL (AND HAS MADE SUCH A KILLING)

By David Moberg, In These Times.

Wal-Mart’s origins in the Ozarks created a patriarchal and religiously-tinged corporate culture that dominated the American marketplace.

http://www.alternet.org/story/143009/here%27s_the_skinny_on_why_wal-mart_is_so_evil_(and_has_made_such_a_killing)

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ORGANIZED AGAINST LABOR: ATTACKS ON UNIVERSITY UNION CENTERS

Source: Inside Higher Education

Conservative group has been filing information requests and complaints against university centers that work with unions; AAUP charges violation of academic freedom.

To read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2009/10/12/labor

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NEW REPORT! ALLIANCES FOR CHANGE: ORGANIZING FOR THE 21ST CENTURY

Workers’ centers, youth-based action groups, and urban justice organizations are among those changing the face of traditional community organizing. Many of these groups engage a range of approaches beyond targeted campaign work from service delivery to media ownership to voter engagement. This report looks at nearly a dozen examples of organizing efforts rising to scale and adapting to the urgent challenges and political opportunities at the beginning of the 21st century.

http://www.buildingmovement.org/news/entry/93

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MICHAEL MOORE WAS RIGHT: PROGRESSIVES DON’T WATCH ENOUGH TV

By Vanessa Richmond, AlterNet.

Why TV is ground zero for understanding American culture — the 9 best shows on air that you should be watching.

http://www.alternet.org/story/143178/michael_moore_was_right%3A_progressives_don%27t_watch_enough_tv

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REPORT – CANADA IS FALLING BEHIND OTHER COUNTRIES ON SOCIAL INNOVATION

Cross-sector collaboration needed to advance social innovation in Canada

October 8, 2009 – Canada is falling behind other countries, such as Australia, the UK and the US in recognizing the value of social innovation (SI) for addressing complex public policy issues.

A new report from Canadian Policy Research Networks (CPRN), Social Innovation in Canada: An Update by Mark Goldenberg, Wathira Kamoji, Larry Orton and Michael Williamson highlights the urgency of the social challenges before us, such as climate change, sustainability, poverty and globalization, particularly in the midst of a global economic downturn, and points to the importance of fostering SI as a solution.

The report notes that while governments in Canada have acknowledged the importance of social capital and the social economy, and have been relatively active in these areas in recent years, Canada has missed opportunities to encourage SI by failing to develop adequate models for public support, engagement and funding. The report calls on Canadian leaders to establish a cross-sectoral national strategy to advance SI in this country.

To read more: http://www.cprn.org/doc.cfm?doc=2057&l=en&utm_source=20091008&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Newsletter

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MURRAY DOBBIN’S BLOG – THE VALUE OF TILTING AT WINDMILLS

It’s easy to get demoralized these days with so much going wrong around the world. So it is incredibly encouraging to see a campaign for justice and workers’ health and safety prevail against supposedly insurmountable odds.

That is how the “odds” would have been described a year and a half ago for anyone musing about taking on the asbestos industry in Quebec.

To read more: http://murraydobbin.ca/2009/10/08/the-value-of-tilting-at-windmills/

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REQUEST FOR PAPERS – COSMOPOLITANISM AND COLLECTIVITY: CULTURAL REPRESENTATIONS VS. THEORIES OF COMMUNITY IN THE 20TH AND 21ST CENTURY

We are inviting paper proposals for an accepted seminar at the 2010 Annual Meeting of the American Comparative Literature Association (New Orleans, April 1-4). Please do not submit proposals directly to the organizers–see specific instructions for online submission below. Papers must be submitted before November 13. Note: seminars at the ACLA are typically held over the course of three days–participants are expected to attend all meetings.

Session description: “Cosmopolitanism and Collectivity: Cultural Representations vs. Theories of Community in the 20th and 21st Century”

This panel intends to interrogate the relationship between collectivity and cosmopolitanism by studying the disjoints between the accounts of both concepts produced by culture on the one hand and theory on the other. The ultimate goal of this panel will be to complicate our understanding of the possibilities and limitations of contemporary forms of collectivity in relation to a renewed interest in the category of the universal in general and concepts such as cosmopolitanism in particular. Furthermore, this panel seeks to trace the historically and materially concrete determinations that link current conceptions of collectivity and cosmopolitanism. However, it strives to do so not by focusing on the harmonic parallels but rather on the contestations and differences between theoretical and cultural versions of thinking/representing the collective.

Proposals should not be submitted directly to the organizers but via the ACLA website prior to November 13, 2009: http://www.acla.org/submit/index.php.

When submitting a proposal, be sure to select the correct title of the seminar to which you are applying in the dropdown menu immediately following the field for the proposal text.

General information about the conference topic and logistics can be found on the ACLA 2010 website: http://www.acla.org/acla2010/

Please feel free to contact us any time with questions or concerns–all best,

Emilio Sauri (University of Illinois at Chicago), esauri1@uic.edu
Mathias Nilges (St. Francis Xavier University, Canada), mnilges@stfx.ca

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CO-OP WEEK: A TIME TO CELEBRATE!    

Co-op Week– October 11-17 — is here, and co-operators across Canada are preparing for next week’s celebrations.

Co-op Week is a time for co-op and credit union members across Canada to reflect on the achievements of the co-operative sector and the contribution our sector has made to the lives of Canadians and their communities.

This year Co-op Week themes focus on the advantages of co-operatives and credit unions in an uncertain economy. Co-op Week 2009 is highlighting three of these advantages:

Co-operatives are…putting people first
Co-operatives are…creating sustainable jobs
Co-operatives are…investing in communities

In addition, International Credit Union Day — which will be celebrated this year on Thursday, October 15 — will have its own theme “Your Money, Your Choice, Your Credit Union”.

A calendar of Co-op Week events activities can be found at http://www.coopscanada.coop/en/orphan/CoopWeekEvents

If your event isn’t listed, please contact Donna Balkan at communications@coopscanada.coop and it will be posted as soon as possible.

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CALL FOR ADVISORS – BEST START RESOURCE CENTRE

Over the past few years, the Best Start Resource Centre (http://www.beststart.org), a program of Health Nexus, has produced a number of brochures and booklets on topics related to preconception, pregnancy and child development. These documents have generally been produced in French and English and have mainly been distributed in Ontario.

Health Nexus (http://www.healthnexus.ca) has recently received funding from Citizenship and Immigration Canada, Ontario Region, to translate eight of their existing resources for the general public into other languages. Our standard resource adaptation process includes input from advisors as well as testing with end users, to ensure that adaptations meet the needs of the various linguistic and cultural groups. To this end, Health Nexus is seeking two Advisors for each of the following languages:

1. Arabic
2. Tagalog (Filipino)
3. Spanish
4. Punjabi
5. Urdu
6. Hindi
7. Tamil
8. Simplified Chinese

At least one Advisor per language will be a service provider working in reproductive health or child development. Advisors will review the identified resources, provide insights on adaptations needed to make the resources linguistically and culturally appropriate, and help ensure proper wording. Advisors will review the completed translations. An honorarium will be provided to each Advisor.

This project begins immediately, and is to be completed by March 31st, 2010.

If you are interested in being an Advisor, please send a brief (300 words or less) letter of interest outlining your background and experience by October 14, 2009 to:

Subha Sankaran
Health Promotion Consultant
Health Nexus
s.sankaran@healthnexus.ca
http://www.healthnexus.ca
http://www.beststart.org

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JOB POSTING: PROJECT COORDINATOR – COLOUR OF POVERTY CAMPAIGN

The Colour of Poverty Campaign seeks to hire an individual committed to racial justice to help coordinate a province wide project to increase awareness of and efforts to mitigate the impact of racialized poverty and racial inequities.  The project aims at building community capacity through various activities in six communities across Ontario, namely, Hamilton, London, Peel, Ottawa, Toronto, and Windsor.

Responsibilities:

* Overall coordination of the project, meeting timelines and deliverables
* Liaison with and support of the six lead partners at the 6 project sites
* Research, writing and development of new tools
* Assist in organizing the web content, working with the webmaster to make the site the go-to site in the province for racial equity work and analysis as it relates to racialized communities, particularly with respect to poverty reduction and eradication
* Help organize training for community animators for the 6 communities
* Help organize the first community meeting in each of the 6 communities

Qualifications:

* Post-secondary degree from a recognized university related to education, social work, political science, community development or interdisciplinary studies.
* Knowledge and experience conducting public education, outreach, community development, and policy analysis
* Experience working with community groups, non-profit agencies, advocacy or activist groups
* Experience with campaign strategy and grassroots mobilization
* Experience in event planning, conducting workshops, training and facilitation
* Ability to take initiative and problem solve with minimal supervision
* Excellent facilitation, organization, writing and communication skills
* Knowledge and understanding of anti-oppression and anti-racism frameworks
* Valid driver’s license and access to a vehicle is an asset
* Must be able to attend meetings on evenings and weekends

Duration: 1 year contract – Full Time 35 hours per week
Salary: $45,000 pa (including statutory benefits)
Deadline for application: November 20, 2009
Anticipated start date: January 2, 2010

Please send cover letter, resume and writing sample in confidence to the Colour of Poverty Campaign Steering Committee c/o the Metro Toronto Chinese and Southeast Asian Legal Clinic at 180 Dundas Street West, Suite 1701, Toronto, Ontario. Fax: (416) 971-9674 or email: goa@lao.on.ca

The Colour of Poverty Campaign is an equal opportunity employer. We encourage applications from members of racialized communities, First Nations People, women, and people with disabilities. We thank all applicants but only those chosen for an interview will be contacted.

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JOB POSTING: KAIROS PARTNERS AND NETWORKS ASSOCIATE

KAIROS, the national social justice of eleven national churches and church related organizations, is seeking a Partners and Networks Associate to join our outreach team.

The Partners and Network Associate works to strengthen KAIROS’ relationships with partners from the Global South, Canadian ecumenical activist networks and the general public. S/he collaborates with partnership staff in coordinating the visits of Southern partners to Canada, and plans special events with partners to engage donors, foundations, government and networks. S/he also facilitates general promotion of KAIROS and promotion and distribution of KAIROS print resources The Partners and Networks Associate is on the front line for information and support to KAIROS activists, and shares reception responsibilities.

If you are a creative, energetic individual with a passion for engaging people in social justice, please apply.

To read the complete posting, click here: http://www.kairoscanada.org/en/who-we-are/job-opportunities/

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ONLINE JOURNAL ARTICLES

* Addressing the underemployment of persons with disabilities: Recommendations for expanding organizational social responsibility
Karen S. Markel, Lizabeth A. Barclay
Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal
http://www.springerlink.com/content/t0087r34h1000720/

* First approaches toward understanding Mexico City’s culture of consumption
Steven B. Bunker
Journal of Urban History published 8 October 2009, 10.1177/0096144209349894
http://juh.sagepub.com/cgi/rapidpdf/0096144209349894v1

*All the world’s New York, all New York’s a stage: Drama, draft riots, and democracy in the mid-nineteenth century
Hilary Moss
Journal of Urban History published 22 September 2009, 10.1177/0096144209347095
http://juh.sagepub.com/cgi/rapidpdf/0096144209347095v1

* Private equity and American labor: Multiple, pragmatic responses mirroring labor’s strengths and weaknesses
Larry W. Beeferman
JIR 2009;51 543-556
http://jir.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/51/4/543

* Sin city or suburban crucible? Searching for meanings in the new Las Vegas
Lawrence Culver
Journal of Urban History published 15 September 2009, 10.1177/0096144209347100
http://juh.sagepub.com/cgi/rapidpdf/0096144209347100v1

*Book Review: DeRienzo, H. (2008). The Concept of Community: Lessons From the Bronx. Milan, Italy: IPOC di Pietro Condemi
Angela M. Eikenberry
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly 2009;38 905-907
http://nvs.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/38/5/905

***END***

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

 

It's CrisisTime!

It's CrisisTime!

CRISIS WHAT CRISIS: FORWARD TO THE PAST?

 

 Critical Labour Studies: 6th Symposium 2009

Venue: The School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London

Saturday 21st/Sunday 22nd November 2009

Statement of Intent
It is clear to researchers and activists, both in the trade union movement and universities, that global capitalism is increasingly shaping the worlds of work and employment. The imposition of this neo-liberal orthodoxy has many profound implications, not least that states seek to both de-legitimise workers’ opposition and marginalise their organisations. However, just as capitalism has embraced neo-liberal strategies, there has emerged a new politics of resistance that is varied and diverse, embracing: trade union and socialist organisations, green and ecological protest movements, anti-war activists, feminists, human rights campaigners and NGOs. It is against this background that the Critical Labour Studies (CLS) symposium has aimed to bring together researchers and activists to discuss key features of work and employment from a radical and labour-focused perspective. We recognise that while left academic researchers participate in the usual round of mainstream conferences, the scope for focused radical debate around these themes is actually quite limited. Through CLS we have developed an open working group and discussion forum that engages with many of the challenges facing researchers and trade unionists within the current environment of work and employment. By ‘labour’, we anticipate, in the traditions of radical researchers over the ages, a broad understanding of myriad social, economic and political agendas. To date, themes have included: race, identity and organising migrant workers, global unionism and organising internationally, the new politics of production, privatisation, outsourcing and offshoring. The list of themes and questions that concern us continues to develop over time, and the intention will be to reflect this evolving agenda at this year’s symposium. An ancillary objective is to engage in genuinely critical debate, rescuing this term from its co-option by mainstream agendas.

The Format of the Symposium
Building on the successes of the past five years, the forthcoming symposium will be structured as a series of plenary sessions. Each will be organised around a particular theme with speakers and discussants, followed by a broad discussion. It has been an important principle of CLS that the conference is not based on the convention of academic conferences with specific papers being presented in separate streams. Rather our intention has been to deepen discussion and debate, and to bring together researchers and labour/union movement activists (where possible) in joint sessions. All sessions are genuinely open and inclusive and involve a broad range of participants, from established academics to early-career researchers, and from established trade union officials to shop-floor representatives and grass-roots activists. The distinctive organising principles of CLS are, therefore, to assist unions and workers in dealing with the challenges faced in the neo-liberal world of work and employment. Ultimately, discussion of strategies and tactics are related to the broader aim of creating a socialist society.

*CLS PROGRAMME 2009*

VENUE: School of Oriental and African Studies
– Khalili Lecture Theater (KLT), University of London, Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square, London, WC1H 0XG

DATES: 21st and 22nd of November

Organisers: Demet Dinler, Jane Holgate and Miguel Martinez Lucio

Saturday 21st

8.30-9.30 Registration (with coffee and tea)

9.30 Welcome and introduction

First Session – Work Intensification and Lean Production

10.00 – 11.00

‘Is that Banana Active?’ Lean and Mean in the Civil Service
Speaker from PCS, Bob Carter (de Montfort University), Andy Danford (University of West of England), Debra Howcroft (University of Manchester), Helen Richardson (University of Salford), Andrew Smith (University of East of London), Phil Taylor (University of Strathclyde)

11.00-11.30 tea and coffee

11.30-12.30

Challenging lean production in the car industry. The politics of developing critical research agenda in and beyond the shop floor.
Steve Craig (UCATT), Ken Murphy (UNITE and Paul Stewart (Strathclyde University)

12.30-1.00

Prospects for a Critical Labour Psychology
Thomas Ryan (Northumbria University)

1.00-2.00 Lunch

Second Session – Labour Markets, Migration and Labour

2.00-2.45

The growth of living wage campaigns across university campuses

Clare Soloman – SOAS coordinator of the campaign; Jose Stalin Bermudez – shop steward; Demet Dinler – SOAS

2.45-3.30

Adapt or Decline – A Trade Union Future for Black Workers

Jane Holgate (Working Lives Institute) and Wilf Sullivan (TUC)

3.30- 4.00 tea and coffee

4.00-4.30

Racism, Nationalism and the Labour Movement in Northern Ireland: Racist bigots; they haven’t gone away you know

Independent Workers Union (IWU) address to CLS – Tommy McKearney IWU

4.30-5.30 Towards a Critical approach to Migration and Labour

Migration research: Why theory and methodology matters
Jutta Moehrke, Stoke-on-Trent Citizens Advice Bureau
Steve French, Centre for Industrial Relations, Keele University

Migration and the Politics of Research: Comparisons and Stereotypes
Heather Connolly and Miguel Martinez Lucio (University of Manchester)

Social 7pm onwards Rugby Tavern, 9 Great James St London, WC1N 3ES

Sunday 22nd

Third Session: Politics and Unions: Class and Organising

9.30 tea and coffee

10.00-11.00

Organising and Class
Mel Simms (Warwick) and Martin Smith GMB

11.00-12.00

Towards a Typology of Alternative Trade Union Futures in Western Europe
Martin Upchurch (Middlesex University), Andy Mathers (University of the West of England), Graham Taylor (University of the West of England)

12.-12.30

Time for a different model of public sector trade unionism
Roger Kline (UCU)
12.30-1.30 – Lunch

1.30 -2.30 – Open Discussion: CLS and Future Developments
_______

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If you would like to be added to the CLS email list, please go to:
https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/cgi-bin/webadmin?A0=CRITICAL-LABOUR-STUDIES

Check out our website: http://criticallabourstudies.org.uk/site/

Registration and Contact for the Conference

• The sessions will be held at the Khalili Lecture Theater (KLT) and registration is at the entrance of this lecture theatre in SOAS.
• The registration fee for the weekend is £60.00 (unwaged or low waged £40). This will include food, tea/coffee and Saturday evening’s entertainment.
• For further information contact Demet Dinler dd1@soas.ac.uk, Jane Holgatej.holgate@londonmet.ac.uk, or Miguel Martinez Lucio Miguel.MartinezLucio@manchester.ac.uk.
• TO REGISTER AND SEND YOUR CHEQUE CONTACT Jane Holgatej.holgate@londonmet.ac.uk – Dr Jane Holgate, Working Lives Research Institute, London Metropolitan University, 31 Jewry Street, London EC3N 2EY – Make cheques payable to the ‘LONDON ORGANISERS NETWORK’.
• It is recommended that you register and confirm attendance in advance of the conference due to the restrictions on numbers.

This event is supported by Historical Materialism, Capital and Class, and the BUIRA Marxist Study Group

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk