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Hegemony

Hegemony

THE END OF PROGRESSIVE HEGEMONY: REGRESSIVE TURN IN THE PASSIVE REVOLUTIONS OF LATIN AMERICA

Wednesday 2 December 2015

Evening Guest Lecture in the School of Politics and International Relations,

Queen Mary University of London

The End of Progressive Hegemony: Regressive Turn in the Passive Revolutions of Latin America

Massimo Modonesi, Professor of Sociology, UNAM, Mexico City

The experience of the so-called progressive governments in Latin America (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, Uruguay and Venezuela) seems to have entered an impasse that some authors have labelled the end of a cycle. Starting from their characterization as passive revolutions we can analyse the current processes of these governments according to a shared, defining feature: the relative loss of hegemony, that is to say of the capacity to construct cross-class consensus. This loss is traceable to a shift from a progressive profile to a more regressive one in these governments and their actions, perceptible as much in new equilibriums in their constituent blocs and social alliances, as in their public policy orientation and relationships to social movements. In the short term horizon, it does not appear that there will be an imminent break with the political-institutional order and a return of the Right, but  there is an observable conservative turn in the region ̵ 1; more perceptible in some countries (Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay, and Ecuador) than in others (Venezuela and Bolivia). On the other hand, alongside this emerging context of an offensive by the national and international Right within Latin America, there is also a clear reactivation of protest on the part of popular actors, organizations and movements; they are emphasizing their antagonistic profile once again, against the grain of the subordination they experienced during the progressive cycle of Latin American passive revolutions.

What: Lecture on the present state of progressive governments in Latin America, and the simultaneous reactivation of the Right and popular social movements of the Left.

When: Wednesday 2 December 2015, 18:00-20:00

Where: David Sizer Lecture Theatre (Francis Bancroft), Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Campus

Massimo Modonesi is a Professor of Sociology at the Autonomous National University of Mexico / Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) in Mexico City. He is an editor of arguably the most important sociological journal in Latin America, Observatorio social de América Latina (OSAL), and sits on the editorial board of the leading leftist magazine in Mexico, Memoria. Modonesi is also an authority on the political writings of Antonio Gramsci, and an expert in both contemporary Marxist theory and socio-political movements and the Left in twentieth and twenty-first century Latin America. He is the author of Subalternity, Antagonism, Autonomy (Pluto, 2013), as well as several influential books in Spanish.

Attendance is free of charge, but please register here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/massimo-modonesi-the-end-of-progressive-hegemony-tickets-19634320782

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/lecture-at-qmul-december-2-the-end-of-progressive-hegemony-regressive-turn-in-the-passive-revolutions-of-latin-america-massimo-modonesi

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

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Ernesto Laclau

Ernesto Laclau

HEGEMONY, POPULISM AND EMANICIPATION: REMEMBERING ERNESTO LACLAU

Birkbeck College, University of London

Birkbeck Institute for Humanities

Malet Street

London WC1E 7HX

Friday, December 4th and Saturday, December 5th, 2915

This conference will celebrate the life and work of Ernesto Laclau, who died last year. Originally from Argentina, his ideas about radical democracy and populism influenced grassroots activists, thinkers and politicians from Latin America’s new left to Greece, Spain and Great Britain. His highly original essays and books “drew on the work of Antonio Gramsci to probe the assumptions of Marxism, and to illuminate the modern history of Latin America”, as Robin Blackburn wrote in his obituary, as well as Europe. As he says, “with collaborators including his wife, Chantal Mouffe, and the cultural theorist Stuart Hall, Laclau played a key role in reformulating Marxist theory in the light of the collapse of communism and failure of social democracy. His “post-Marxist” manifesto Hegemony and Socialist Strategy (1985), written with Mouffe, was translated into 30 languages, and sales ran into six figures.” Indeed, as Blackburn points out “Laclau believed that the European left had much to learn from Latin America, with its spirit of self-criticism and innovation. He argued that the left should not be embarrassed by charges of populism, whether directed at Chávez or at the Greek left wing party Syriza. It was crucial to distinguish between right wing populism masquerading wholesale privatization and scapegoating from left-wing programmes of “urbanisation” that introduce or defend social and economic justice combining self-government with the transformation of the relation between the state and the people at its base.

All sessions are 90 minutes. Presentations should be no longer than 30 minutes each.

 

Friday, December 4th

Embassy of Argentina 65 Brook Street, W1 K4AH

12.00-14.00:        Registration and Coffee,

14.00 -14.30:       Opening Comments

Ambassador Alicia Castro

Oscar Guardiola (Birkbeck Institute for Humanities)

14.30 – 16.00:

Oliver Marchart (Kunstakademie, Dusseldorf) Laclau’s Political Ontology

Nancy Fraser (New School) Thinking Antagonism: On the Political Contradictions of Financial Capital (BY SKYPE)

16.30 – 18.00

Letitia Sabsay (LSE) The Rhetorical Foundations of Society

Lasse Thomassen (Birkbeck) Hegemony and Socialist Strategy 30 years after: three research agendas

18.30:         Vin d´honneur

 

Saturday, December 5th,

Birkbeck Institute for Humanities

9.00: Coffee

9.30 – 11:00:

Jean-Claude Monod (CNRS) The part and the whole: metaphor and metonymy in the rhetorical construction of the People

Yannis Stavrakakis (Thessaloniki) Theorising populism in light of the Greek Financial Crisis

11:30-13:00:

Rada Iveković (Paris) Around the somewhat meditative rhetoric of Ernesto Laclau

Ricardo Camargo (Universidad de Chile) Articulation and Assault in Laclau’s Politics

13.00-14.00:        LUNCH

14.00-15.30:

Paula Biglieri (University of Buenos Aires) Populism and Emancipation

Mark Devenney (University of Brighton) The New Hegemony: Resisting Financial and Actuarial Capital

16.00-17.30:

Fabienne Brugère (Université Paris 8) Is Feminism Populism?

Jeremy Gilbert (Uni. of East London) What is a demand? The subject of politics in the later Laclau

17.30 – 18.00:     CLOSING COMMENTS

Website: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/events-calendar/celebrating-the-work-of-ernesto-laclau/

 

Ernesto Laclau

Ernesto Laclau

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

downloadRETHINKING HEGEMONY AND DOMINATION IN TRANSLATION

CALL FOR PAPERS

Rethinking Hegemony and Domination in Translation

Special Issue of: Target – International Journal of Translation Studies

Guest edited by Stefan Baumgarten and Yan Ying (Bangor University, Wales, UK),

and Jordi Cornellà-Detrell (Glasgow University)

 

Rationale

While there is no doubt that the ‘ideological’ and ‘power turn’ have reshaped the discipline of Translation Studies, much work still needs to be done in order to fully understand the ontological and epistemological underpinnings of the impact of ideology and power on the theory and practice of translation. The rapidly changing technological and corporate landscape in which translation theorists and practitioners find themselves immersed makes it necessary to keep exploring issues of power through sustained interdisciplinary engagement with other fields, such as the social sciences, critical philosophy or political science. Despite an increasing awareness of the impossibility of value-free research or practice, there appears to be a certain lack of self-reflection on our own entanglement within contemporary power structures. Structures which, in the apparent absence of an alternative to the current global capitalist orthodoxy, are largely driven by financial, economic and technological forces. With a view to opening a new debate on questions of hegemony and domination in relation to translation, this special issue aims to gather cutting-edge and cross-disciplinary research. By encouraging contributors to rethink the impact of power and ideology on the theory and practice of translation as well as on their own critical reflections, we welcome proposals dealing with contemporary political, sociocultural, (eco)linguistic, financial-economic and technological aspects of translation. The main aim of this special issue is to explore translation as a phenomenon caught in the conflicting forces of individual subjectivities, cross-cultural asymmetries, hegemonic values and the tensions between market-driven and customer-centric approaches.

 

Papers could focus on any of the following themes and aspects:

Towards a (critical) theory of ideology and power relations in translation

  • The legacy of the ‘cultural’ and ‘power’ turns
  • New critical insights into the concepts of power and ideology and their relevance to translation theory
  • Technoscience and posthumanism: a new turn in Translation Studies?

Power and ideology in the translation industry

  • Ideological effects of technological change on translation theory and practice
  • The social and ideological impact of translation technology
  • Neoliberalism and technological rationalization

Politics, policy making and translation

  • (Neo)imperialism after postcolonialism
  • Symbolic violence, heteroglossia and (linguistic) imperialism
  • Translation (technology) as a tool for activism and resistance

 

Deadlines

Submission of 1-2 page proposal by 30 April 2015

Notification of acceptance of proposals by 31 May 2015

Submission of completed papers by 31 December 2015

Submission of revised papers by 31 August 2016

Publication date: March 2017

 

Submission

Articles will be 6000-8000 words in length in English. Paper proposals of 400-500 words as well as the first completed and final versions of papers should be sent directly by email to all the guest editors. Detailed guidelines for papers are available at: https://benjamins.com/#catalog/journals/target/guidelines

Contacts

All inquiries should be sent to all the guest editors: Stefan Baumgarten (s.baumgarten@bangor.ac.uk); Jordi Cornellà-Detrell (jordi.cornella@glasgow.ac.uk); Yan Ying (y.ying@bangor.ac.uk).

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Antonio Gramsci

Antonio Gramsci

PAST AND PRESENT: PHILOSOPHY, POLITICS, AND HISTORY IN THE THOUGHT OF ANTONIO GRAMSCI

International Conference

18-19 June 2015

King’s College London

Speakers: Fabio Frosini (Urbino), Alex Loftus (KCL), Peter Thomas (Brunel); including contributions and chairing from: Carl Levy (Goldsmiths), Magnus Ryner (KCL), Anne Showstack Sassoon (Birkbeck), Leila Simona Talani (KCL), Cosimo Zene (SOAS).

The legacy of the Italian theorist Antonio Gramsci (1891-1937) has been widely acknowledged as one of the most significant intellectual contributions of the twentieth century. Even as the historical events of his life have faded from living memory, Gramsci’s thought has increased in influence and become diffused amongst a multitude of disciplines in the academic firmament; from philosophy to history and geography, through cultural theory and subaltern studies, to international relations, linguistics, critical legal studies and beyond.

In light of the widespread and heterogeneous deployments of his ideas, it seems apt and necessary to return to the texts themselves: Gramsci’s pre-prison and his prison writings, both the Prison Notebooks and the Letters from Prison. The aim of this conference is to bring together a new generation of scholars working on Gramscian themes in order to engage closely with his writings.

Working in collaboration with experienced Gramsci scholars, this conference is the first initiative of a group of early-career researchers and graduate students. Through a combination of panels and workshops, the conference will provide participants with the opportunity to present their work and to receive constructive feedback in a friendly and stimulating environment.

The two-day international conference also aims to contribute to the process of building links between Anglophone and international, in particular Italian, Gramsci scholarship. The organizers hope to create a network through which to share research and encourage interactions between researchers from different countries working on Gramscian thought and related topics. It is proposed that an edited collection of essays will be published as a product of the conference and further engagements.

Gramsci’s perspective is marked by a profound sense of the manifold connections between the explanation of the past and the analysis of the present. Our intention is collectively to investigate the rich potentialities of the theme ‘Past and Present’ in his thought. Participants are invited to explore the conceptual laboratory of Gramsci’s historical-political narration, as well as his endeavour to theorize the unity of theory and practice. This nexus between ‘explication’ of the past and strategic ‘analysis’ of the present is characteristic of the originality of Gramsci’s approach to the ‘question of theory’. More broadly, the conference aspires to study the way in which Gramsci’s historical perspective intermingles with his engaged concern for the future of a ‘big and terrible’ world, in the sense that might today be called ‘global history’.

Gramsci’s ability to dialectically unite seemingly opposed elements (i.e. civil society and the state, structure and superstructure, the spatial elements of historicism, or vice versa the multiple temporalities going across the political space) illuminates the capacity of his thought to stimulate critical renewals in various domains of thought. Further investigation of this critical project reveals the aspect of ‘reciprocal translatability’ that Gramsci identifies between different facets of the knowledge of reality as ‘philosophy’, ‘politics’ and ‘economics’. The conference aims to explore the ongoing elaboration of this ‘homogeneous circle’ (Notebook 4, § 46), that is, the constitution of Gramsci’s conception of the world and its relation to history, understood as a unitary and dynamic process.

Consequently, we encourage paper proposals that analyze Gramsci’s thought (either the prison or his pre-prison writings) from political, philosophical, economic, and historical points of view, whilst evoking the connections between these different dimensions. Inter-disciplinary papers that focus on the reappraisal of Gramscian concepts in the contemporary world (within cultural theory, post-colonial studies, International Relations, geography, history of science, etc.) are also welcome.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to: the Marxian legacy and the philosophy of praxis; Gramsci and global history: the ‘integral historian’; the Gramscian analysis of modernity: crisis, hegemony and passive revolution; the Party and the role of the traditional and organic intellectuals; Gramsci and pragmatism: language, truth, ideology; Anti-economism and Gramsci’s critical economy; Gramscian cultural writings; Centre and periphery; From ‘subaltern social groups’ to global subalternity.

Speakers will have to cover their trip and accommodation expenses.

Abstracts of no more than 400 words should be sent by Friday 23rd January 2015 to: gramsciconference2015@gmail.com

Supported by:

–         Department of European Studies, King’s College London

–         Department of Geography, King’s College London

–         International Gramsci Society

–         International Gramsci Society – Italia

–         Ghilarza Summer School – Scuola internazionale di studi gramsciani

Organizing committee:

Francesca Antonini (Università di Pavia, Italy)

Aaron Bernstein (King’s College London)

Lorenzo Fusaro (Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana (UAM), Mexico)

Robert Jackson (Manchester Metropolitan University)

 

For further information, please contact gramsciconference2015@gmail.com

Website: http://gramsciconference2015.blogspot.co.uk/

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/past-and-present.-philosophy-politics-and-history-in-the-thought-of-gramsci-international-conference-18-19-june-2015-king2019s-college-london

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Books

Books

COUNTER-HEGEMONIC DEMOCRACY AND SOCIAL CHANGE

Information Age Publishing

Announcing a new Book Series

See: http://www.infoagepub.com/series/Counter-Hegemonic-Democracy-and-Social-Change

SERIES EDITOR

Paul R. Carr
Université du Québec en Outaouais

The word “democracy” is increasingly attached to an array of concepts, themes and political and social realities and visions, yet there are currently a number of groups, movements, interests and actors around the world who are contesting the normative, hegemonic meaning and manifestation of formal democracy. Many people do not see their interests served by electoral, representative democracy, that which concerns political parties, voting and tightly controlled electoral processes. Rather, there is visible concern in many quarters with not only the formal process of how elections are shaped and governments are formed but, also, with the political, economic, cultural, social and militaristic outcomes of such institutionalized configurations. There is widespread cynicism, decreasing voter participation, the general sentiment of disenfranchisement and marginalization, and increasing levels of resistance and mobilization in the form of alternatives to the formal “democratic” model, which could be characterized as “counter-hegemonic democracy”.

Counter-hegemonic democracy concerns lived realities inside of as well as outside of the formal political vacuum, touching on how people seek to build a more resilient, deeper, thicker, more critically engaged and meaningful democracy. Some examples could by the mass anti-war, pro-environment, Occupy, World Social Forum and other social movements that have sought to remove some governments and make others more accountable, or to make the world bodies that frame international politics more aligned with the needs of the masses that do not control the levers of power. There are also many other movements that start and cultivate causes through social media, or which seek some form of change at the local level. While often omitted from the mainstream media, many people are not perturbed from seeking social and political change outside of the formal strictures and structures of power, often influencing them as well as carving out terrain for those not considered within the strictly defined and formalized elite decisionmaking circles.

This book series connects with this notion of counter-hegemonic democracy, and seeks out debates, ideas, concerns, examples and proposals that extend and construct knowledge within an inter- and multi-disciplinary vantage-point, including sociology, political science, political economy, economics, education, cultural studies and other connected areas. The books in this series will speak to educators, researchers, scholars, and students interested in democracy, political sociology, multicultural education, social movements, decolonization, media studies and peace studies as well as other connected areas.

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

 

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

Glenn Rikowski’s article, Education, Capital and the Transhuman – can also now be found at Academia: https://www.academia.edu/9033532/Education_Capital_and_the_Transhuman

Antonio Gramsci

Antonio Gramsci

PAST AND PRESENT: PHILOSOPHY, POLITICS, AND HISTORY IN THE THOUGHT OF ANTONIO GRAMSCI

International Conference

18-19 June 2015

London

Speakers: Fabio Frosini (Università di Urbino, Italy), Alex Loftus (King’s College London), Peter Thomas (Brunel University); including contributions from: Anne Showstack-Sassoon (Birkbeck), Cosimo Zene (SOAS).

The legacy of the Italian theorist Antonio Gramsci (1891-1937) has been widely acknowledged as one of the most significant intellectual contributions of the twentieth century. Even as the historical events of his life have faded from living memory, Gramsci’s thought has increased in influence and become diffused amongst a multitude of disciplines in the academic firmament; from philosophy to history and geography, through cultural theory and subaltern studies, to international relations, linguistics, critical legal studies and beyond. In light of the widespread and heterogeneous deployments of his ideas, it seems apt and necessary to return to the texts themselves: Gramsci’s pre-prison and his prison writings, both the Prison Notebooks and the Letters from Prison.

The aim of this conference is to bring together a new generation of scholars working on Gramscian themes in order to engage closely with his writings. Working in collaboration with experienced Gramsci scholars, this conference is the first initiative of a group of early-career researchers and graduate students. Through a combination of panels and workshops, the conference will provide participants with the opportunity to present their work and to receive constructive feedback in a friendly and stimulating environment.

The two-day international conference also aims to contribute to the process of building links between Anglophone and international, in particular Italian, Gramsci scholarship. The organizers hope to create a network through which to share research and encourage interactions between researchers from different countries working on Gramscian thought and related topics. It is proposed that an edited collection of essays will be published as a product of the conference and further engagements.

Gramsci’s perspective is marked by a profound sense of the manifold connections between the explanation of the past and the analysis of the present. Our intention is collectively to investigate the rich potentialities of the theme ‘Past and Present’ in his thought. Participants are invited to explore the conceptual laboratory of Gramsci’s historical-political narration, as well as his endeavour to theorize the unity of theory and practice. This nexus between ‘explication’ of the past and strategic ‘analysis’ of the present is characteristic of the originality of Gramsci’s approach to the ‘question of theory’. More broadly, the conference aspires to study the way in which Gramsci’s historical perspective intermingles with his engaged concern for the future of a ‘big and terrible’ world, in the sense that might today be called ‘global history’.

Gramsci’s ability to dialectically unite seemingly opposed elements (i.e. civil society and the state, structure and superstructure, the spatial elements of historicism, or vice versa the multiple temporalities going across the political space) illuminates the capacity of his thought to stimulate critical renewals in various domains of thought. Further investigation of this critical project reveals the aspect of ‘reciprocal translatability’ that Gramsci identifies between different facets of the knowledge of reality as ‘philosophy’, ‘politics’ and ‘economics’. The conference aims to explore the ongoing elaboration of this ‘homogeneous circle’ (Notebook 4, § 46), that is, the constitution of Gramsci’s conception of the world and its relation to history, understood as a unitary and dynamic process.

Consequently, we encourage paper proposals that analyze Gramsci’s thought (either the prison or his pre-prison writings) from political, philosophical, economic, and historical points of view, whilst evoking the connections between these different dimensions. Inter-disciplinary papers that focus on the reappraisal of Gramscian concepts in the contemporary world (within cultural theory, post-colonial studies, International Relations, geography, history of science, etc.) are also welcome.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to: the Marxian legacy and the philosophy of praxis; Gramsci and global history: the ‘integral historian’; the Gramscian analysis of modernity: crisis, hegemony and passive revolution; the Party and the role of the traditional and organic intellectuals; Gramsci and pragmatism: language, truth, ideology; Anti-economism and Gramsci’s critical economy; Gramscian cultural writings; Centre and periphery; From ‘subaltern social groups’ to global subalternity.

Abstracts of no more than 400 words should be sent by Friday 23 January 2015 to: gramsciconference2015@gmail.com

 

Supported by:

– Department of Geography, King’s College London

– International Gramsci Society

– International Gramsci Society – Italia

– Ghilarza Summer School – Scuola internazionale di studi gramsciani

– Further support tbc

Organizing Committee:

Francesca Antonini (Università di Pavia, Italy)

Aaron Bernstein (King’s College London)

Lorenzo Fusaro (Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana (UAM), Mexico)

Robert Jackson (Manchester Metropolitan University)

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/gramsci-conference-2015-past-and-present

Antonio Gramsci

Antonio Gramsci

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

 

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

Glenn Rikowski’s article, Education, Capital and the Transhuman – can also now be found at Academia: https://www.academia.edu/9033532/Education_Capital_and_the_Transhuman

 

London Radical BookfairTHE SOCIAL PATHOLOGIES OF CONTEMPORARY CIVILIZATION

Fifth International Conference

Erasmus University, Rotterdam, Netherlands

30 & 31 October 2014

www.socialpathologies.com

 

The fifth international conference on The Social Pathologies of Contemporary Civilization explores the nature of contemporary malaises, diseases, illnesses and psychosomatic syndromes in their relation to cultural pathologies of the social body. Usually these conditions are interpreted clinically in terms of individualized symptoms and framed in demographic and epidemiological profiles. They are represented and responded to discretely, as though for the most part unrelated to each other; each having its own professional discourse of etiology, diagnostics, therapeutics, as well as a task force developing health strategy and policy recommendations and interventions. However, these diseases also have a social and cultural profile, one that transcends the particularity of their symptomology and their discrete etiologies. These social pathologies are diseases related to cultural pathologies of the social body and disorders of the collective esprit de corps of contemporary society. They arise from individual and collective experiences of profound and drastic social changes and cultural shifts.

Multi-disciplinary in approach the conference addresses questions of how these conditions are manifest at the level of individual bodies and minds, as well as how the ‘bodies politic’ are related to the hegemony of reductive biomedical and individual psychologistic perspectives. Rejecting such a reductive diagnosis of contemporary problems of health and well-being, the central research hypothesis guiding the conference is that contemporary epidemics are to be analysed in the light of radical changes in our civilization and of the social hegemonization of the biomedical and psychiatric perspective.

A particular focus of the conference is the role of humanities and social sciences in helping to understand the connection between social transformations and psychiatric perceptions of health and well-being. The conference invites papers offering analyses of social malaises and the health of civilization from faculty, students and researchers in fields of philosophy, sociology, social theory, psychology, and anthropology.

 

Special sub-themes are the following:

􀁸The invented self– What is the status of the late modern subject? We live in so-called ‘neo-liberal’ times in which we experience an intense, marketed pressure to ‘be oneself’, as well as an extreme difficulty to ‘be a self’. Is our alleged individual freedom a strongly directed one? If so, how can we invent ourselves differently? And how should we understand the connection between this newly invented and that socially directed self?

􀁸The sympathetic self– Is a re-ethicization and moral regeneration of political, moral and libidinal economies possible? The domestic economics of the soul need to be scrutinized, ‘miraculous’ and healing social powers – such as the redemptive and transfiguring powers of beauty and love, and the power of gift relations – need to be explored in terms of their capacity to reverse pathogenic vicious circles of individuated egotism into saludogenic virtuous spirals of care, care of the self and care for others.

􀁸The diagnosed self– In most late modern societies in the West, we find a high prevalence of many psychiatric disorders. Such statistics have been known for years, but there is much uncertainty about how to interpret them. How do adults experience the process of receiving these diagnoses, and what does it mean for them to have their experience of suffering filtered through a diagnostic and psychiatric vocabulary?

􀁸The measured self– Research evidence is widely held as a key influence on mental health policy and practice. Whilst hypothesis testing in randomised controlled trials is held as the ‘gold standard’, qualitative research exploring people’s experiences continues to occupy a more marginal position, even though these experiences inform important inter-subjective phenomena. What is and what could be the specific role of qualitative research in contemporary mental health care?

􀁸The amnesiac self– The fading of individual and collective memory due to ongoing processes of individuation and acceleration and to experiences of shock, trauma, repression and aphasia in the psychic life of individuals and societies is amplified in contemporary contexts. Lacking memory, persons and societies live in a liminal extended present and become prone to solipsism and to manipulation. What is forgotten – and what can be remembered – is one of the most urgent ethical-political problems of our age.

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Antonio Gramsci

Antonio Gramsci

GHILARZA SUMMER SCHOOL ON ANTONIO GRAMSCI

Province of Oristano, Sardinia

La Ghilarza Summer School bandisce 15 posti per la partecipazione a un corso di alta formazione sul pensiero di Antonio Gramsci. Il corso si svolgerà a Ghilarza (OR) nel periodo 8-12 settembre 2014 e sarà dedicato al tema: Egemonico/Subalterno.

The Ghilarza Summer School offers 15 scholarships for participating to an advanced studies course on the thought of Antonio Gramsci. The course will be held in Ghilarza (OR) during the period from 8th to 12th September 2014, and will be dedicated to the subject: Hegemonic / Subaltern.

La Ghilarza Summer School publica una convocatoria de 15 becas para participar en un curso avanzado sobre el pensamiento de Antonio Gramsci. El curso se llevará a cabo en Ghilarza (OR) durante el periodo del 8 al 12 de septiembre 2014 y estará dedicado al tema: Hegemónico/Subalterno.

1. Ghilarza Summer School
La Ghilarza Summer School (GSS) è un’iniziativa dell’Associazione Casa Museo Antonio Gramsci di Ghilarza, con la partecipazione istituzionale della Fondazione Istituto Gramsci (Roma) e della International Gramsci Society (IGS), e con il sostegno finanziario della Fondazione Banco di Sardegna.

Le attività della GSS sono orientate da un Consiglio scientifico composto (nel triennio 2014-2017) da: Joseph A. Buttigieg (University of Notre Dame, Indiana/USA, presidente della IGS); Giuseppe Cospito
(Università di Pavia); Gianni Fresu (Associazione Casa Museo Antonio Gramsci, Ghilarza); Gianni Francioni (Università di Pavia, presidente della GSS); Fabio Frosini (Università di Urbino, direttore della GSS); Dora Kanoussi (Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, México); Fiamma Lussana (Università di Sassari); Mauro Pala (Università di Cagliari); Peter D. Thomas (Brunel University, London); Giuseppe Vacca (presidente della Fondazione Istituto Gramsci, Roma); Cosimo Zene (School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London).

Il Consiglio scientifico è coordinato da un Comitato direttivo formato da: Joseph. A. Buttigieg, Giuseppe Cospito (segretario), Gianni Francioni, Fabio Frosini, Giuseppe Vacca.

Il corpo docente dalla GSS 2014 è formato da: Joseph A. Buttigieg (University of Notre Dame, Indiana/USA), Giuseppe Cospito (Università di Pavia), Gianni Francioni (Università di Pavia), Fabio Frosini (Università di Urbino), Marcus E. Green (Otterbein University/USA), Guido Liguori (Università della Calabria), Giancarlo Schirru (Università di Cassino), Giovanni Semeraro (Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói – Rio de Janeiro/Brasil), Peter D. Thomas (Brunel University, London), Giuseppe Vacca (Fondazione Istituto Gramsci, Roma).

2. Criteri di ammissibilità dei candidati [qui e in seguito il genere maschile è utilizzato come neutro, per designare entrambi i sessi] Possono candidarsi alla GSS giovani studiosi, di qualsiasi nazionalità, che siano in possesso di laurea magistrale (o titolo equivalente: M.A., Master, Mestrado, ecc.), che abbiano già svolto ricerche su Gramsci e abbiano conseguito o stiano conseguendo un dottorato di ricerca e/o siano autori di adeguate pubblicazioni su Gramsci.

Gli allievi selezionati devono possedere una competenza dell’italiano sufficiente a seguire le lezioni (che si svolgeranno in italiano) e a intervenire attivamente nella discussione, e devono sapersi confrontare con i testi di Gramsci nella loro versione originale.

3. Criteri di selezione
La GSS privilegia un approccio di carattere storico e interdisciplinare. Per questa ragione, nella selezione delle domande è fatta valere esclusivamente l’obbiettiva rilevanza della formazione del candidato e del progetto di ricerca da lui presentato, rispetto alle finalità scientifiche generali e allo specifico tema selezionato dalla GSS.

La GSS si impegna a favorire la realizzazione della parità di genere. Per questa ragione, le candidature femminili sono particolarmente incoraggiate.

 

From International Gramsci Society: http://www.internationalgramscisociety.org/communications/gss2014.html

 

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The New Left Book Club: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2014/01/05/the-new-left-book-club-call-for-papers/

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski  

 

Protest

Protest

COMMON GROUND: DEMOCRACY AND COLLECTIVITY IN AN AGE OF INDIVIDUALISM

By Jeremy Gilbert

Pluto Press: http://www.plutobooks.com/display.asp?K=9780745325323

ISBN: 9780745325316

Extent: 272pp

Release Date: 08 Nov 2013

Size: 215mm x 135mm

Format: Paperback

Common Ground explores the philosophical relationship between collectivity, individuality, affect and agency in the neoliberal era. Jeremy Gilbert argues that individualism is forced upon us by neoliberal culture, fatally limiting our capacity to escape the current crisis of democratic politics.

The book asks how forces and ideas opposed to neoliberal hegemony, and to the individualist tradition in Western thought, might serve to protect some form of communality, and how far we must accept assumptions about the nature of individuality and collectivity which are the legacy of an elitist tradition. Along the way it examines different ideas and practices of collectivity, from conservative notions of hierarchical and patriarchal communities to the politics of ‘horizontality’ and ‘the commons’ which are at the heart of radical movements today.

Exploring this fundamental faultline in contemporary political struggle, Common Ground proposes a radically non-individualist mode of imagining social life, collective creativity and democratic possibility.

About The Author

Jeremy Gilbert is Professor of Cultural and Political Theory at the University of East London and editor of the journal New Formations. He is the co-author of Discographies: Dance, Music, Culture and the Politics of Sound (2002) and the author of Anti-capitalism and Culture: Radical Theory and Popular Politics (2008).

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

IT 17RETHINKING DOMINATION AND HEGEMONY IN TRANSLATION: THE FIRST DRAFT PROGRAMME

We are pleased to announce the first draft programme for our forthcoming conference: http://power.bangor.ac.uk/programme.php.en?menu=4&catid=11512&subid=0

If you want to register as a participant, please send an email to the organisers: translationconference2013@bangor.ac.uk

With best wishes,
Stefan Baumgarten

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

All that is Solid for Glenn Rikowski: https://rikowski.wordpress.com

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society, by Glenn Rikowski is at Heathwood Press and can be viewed at: http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

Knowledge is Power

Knowledge is Power

‘DID ANYONE SAY POWER?’ – ABSTRACTS ONLINE

We are pleased to announce that the draft versions of presentation abstracts and mini-biographies are now available on our website: http://power.bangor.ac.uk/programme.php.en?menu=4&catid=11512&subid=0

The first version of the conference programme will be available on the same webpage by the middle of next week.

Please let us also announce that potential participants still have time to register until this Wednesday, 31st July.

Best regards,
The Bangor Conference Team
— 
“Did anyone say Power?”: Rethinking Domination and Hegemony in Translation
International Conference at Bangor University, Wales, UK
Thursday 5 and Friday 6 September 2013
Organisers: Dr Stefan Baumgarten, Dr Yan Ying, Dr Jordi Cornellà-Detrell

 

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Debt

Debt

STUDIES IN SOCIAL AND POLITICAL THOUGHT: CONFERENCE 2013

Call for Papers.

Studies in Social and Political Thought Annual Conference 2013: Debt and Obligation.

Keynote Speakers: Keith Ansell-Pearson, Costas Lapavitsas

University of Sussex, June 20-21

 

The global economic crisis has brought the question of debt sharply into focus. From the indebtedness of the individual by means of easy credit, to the universalisation of private debt in financial instruments and the financial stranglehold of whole countries by sovereign debt, debt and the obligation that comes with it dominate the structure of contemporary society and economy. Austerity programmes are implemented by governments around the world, often with disastrous social consequences and without popular support. The narratives of “living within one’s means” and “giving back what is owed” are dominant among the international organisations and power centres that promote these austere solutions. Even democratic legitimation is superseded by the obligation of paying one’s debts, to the extent that technocratic governments replace democratically elected ones for fulfilling that purpose. A “hard but fair” solution is advanced by many in government and elsewhere, where debt reduction seems to be given an almost moral quality, and as such connected to a moral obligation and duty.

The old definition of justice as “telling the truth and giving back what is owed” as given by Cephalus in Plato’s Republic, seems, therefore, to have prevailed–at least in part. For the truthfulness of this justice is hidden, since as Cephalus admits, it is the wealthy that are the major beneficiaries of this type of justice, considering they already have the means of living by it. On the other hand, the concepts of debt and obligation are the cornerstones of many ethical theories and philosophies, from Kant’s categorical imperative and deontological ethics in general to Nietzsche’s genealogical critique of morality. Moreover, a great part of political philosophy and theory is preoccupied with the question of the obligation to the state and what gives it legitimacy. But how are these ethical and political issues put into practice? Depending on one’s point of view there can be either a moral obligation that supports the state’s legitimacy, or one that directly opposes it. In particular, should one follow the moral narrative of paying one’s debts under any circumstances or are there instances where one has an obligation to resist debts placed upon them? Is there such a thing as a just debt? These questions, it could be claimed, have not been given enough critical attention, and theoretical discourse has passed them by.

We are, therefore, seeking papers that will engage theoretically with the concepts of debt and obligation, and explore their relationship with the social, economic, or political spheres. In keeping with the interdisciplinary ethos of SSPT we will accept papers from all related disciplines including politics, sociology, history, political economy, and philosophy. We will also accept papers that do not deal exclusively with the main topic of the conference but are engaged with issues in the general area of social and political thought.

 

Possible theoretical frameworks and topics include, but are not limited to:

Moral Obligation / Political Obligation / Debt from an Economic, Sociological, Historical or Philosophical Perspective / Crisis & Debt / Deontological Ethics / Kantian Ethics and Political Theory / Hegel / Contract Theory / Recognition & Self-Recognition / Nietzsche, Morality, Guilt and “Bad Conscience” / Marxism & Marxisms / Theories of Biopolitics / Instrumental Reason / Critical Theory / Post-Colonialism / Discourse and Democratic Theory / Structuralism and Post-Structuralism / Soft and Hard Power / Hegemony / World-Systems / Sovereignty / Legality and Legitimacy

Please send abstracts of 350 words to ssptconference.2013@gmail.com by Sunday, 5th May 2013.

These should be formatted for blind review, including a cover sheet with name, contact details, institutional affiliation, and paper title. Successful applicants will be notified by 12th May 2013. Finally, all selected papers will be considered for publication in a future issue of SSPT.

A fee of 5 pounds will be applicable, and all delegates will receive a free copy of SSPT.

A PDF version of this CfP is available here.

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski