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downloadRETHINKING HEGEMONY AND DOMINATION IN TRANSLATION

CALL FOR PAPERS

Rethinking Hegemony and Domination in Translation

Special Issue of: Target – International Journal of Translation Studies

Guest edited by Stefan Baumgarten and Yan Ying (Bangor University, Wales, UK),

and Jordi Cornellà-Detrell (Glasgow University)

 

Rationale

While there is no doubt that the ‘ideological’ and ‘power turn’ have reshaped the discipline of Translation Studies, much work still needs to be done in order to fully understand the ontological and epistemological underpinnings of the impact of ideology and power on the theory and practice of translation. The rapidly changing technological and corporate landscape in which translation theorists and practitioners find themselves immersed makes it necessary to keep exploring issues of power through sustained interdisciplinary engagement with other fields, such as the social sciences, critical philosophy or political science. Despite an increasing awareness of the impossibility of value-free research or practice, there appears to be a certain lack of self-reflection on our own entanglement within contemporary power structures. Structures which, in the apparent absence of an alternative to the current global capitalist orthodoxy, are largely driven by financial, economic and technological forces. With a view to opening a new debate on questions of hegemony and domination in relation to translation, this special issue aims to gather cutting-edge and cross-disciplinary research. By encouraging contributors to rethink the impact of power and ideology on the theory and practice of translation as well as on their own critical reflections, we welcome proposals dealing with contemporary political, sociocultural, (eco)linguistic, financial-economic and technological aspects of translation. The main aim of this special issue is to explore translation as a phenomenon caught in the conflicting forces of individual subjectivities, cross-cultural asymmetries, hegemonic values and the tensions between market-driven and customer-centric approaches.

 

Papers could focus on any of the following themes and aspects:

Towards a (critical) theory of ideology and power relations in translation

  • The legacy of the ‘cultural’ and ‘power’ turns
  • New critical insights into the concepts of power and ideology and their relevance to translation theory
  • Technoscience and posthumanism: a new turn in Translation Studies?

Power and ideology in the translation industry

  • Ideological effects of technological change on translation theory and practice
  • The social and ideological impact of translation technology
  • Neoliberalism and technological rationalization

Politics, policy making and translation

  • (Neo)imperialism after postcolonialism
  • Symbolic violence, heteroglossia and (linguistic) imperialism
  • Translation (technology) as a tool for activism and resistance

 

Deadlines

Submission of 1-2 page proposal by 30 April 2015

Notification of acceptance of proposals by 31 May 2015

Submission of completed papers by 31 December 2015

Submission of revised papers by 31 August 2016

Publication date: March 2017

 

Submission

Articles will be 6000-8000 words in length in English. Paper proposals of 400-500 words as well as the first completed and final versions of papers should be sent directly by email to all the guest editors. Detailed guidelines for papers are available at: https://benjamins.com/#catalog/journals/target/guidelines

Contacts

All inquiries should be sent to all the guest editors: Stefan Baumgarten (s.baumgarten@bangor.ac.uk); Jordi Cornellà-Detrell (jordi.cornella@glasgow.ac.uk); Yan Ying (y.ying@bangor.ac.uk).

 

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IT 17RETHINKING DOMINATION AND HEGEMONY IN TRANSLATION: THE FIRST DRAFT PROGRAMME

We are pleased to announce the first draft programme for our forthcoming conference: http://power.bangor.ac.uk/programme.php.en?menu=4&catid=11512&subid=0

If you want to register as a participant, please send an email to the organisers: translationconference2013@bangor.ac.uk

With best wishes,
Stefan Baumgarten

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

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Knowledge is Power

Knowledge is Power

‘DID ANYONE SAY POWER?’ – ABSTRACTS ONLINE

We are pleased to announce that the draft versions of presentation abstracts and mini-biographies are now available on our website: http://power.bangor.ac.uk/programme.php.en?menu=4&catid=11512&subid=0

The first version of the conference programme will be available on the same webpage by the middle of next week.

Please let us also announce that potential participants still have time to register until this Wednesday, 31st July.

Best regards,
The Bangor Conference Team
— 
“Did anyone say Power?”: Rethinking Domination and Hegemony in Translation
International Conference at Bangor University, Wales, UK
Thursday 5 and Friday 6 September 2013
Organisers: Dr Stefan Baumgarten, Dr Yan Ying, Dr Jordi Cornellà-Detrell

 

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

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Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Aesthetics

Aesthetics

DID ANYONE SAY POWER? RETHINKING DOMINATION AND HEGEMONY IN TRANSLATION

Please find below a call for papers for the conference “Did anyone say Power?” Rethinking Domination and Hegemony in Translation. The conference will take place at Bangor University, Wales, UK, from Thursday 5 to Friday 6 September 2013.

We are delighted to announce the following distinguished researchers as our keynote speakers:
–  Professor Christina Schäffner (Aston University, Birmingham, UK)
–  Dr Karen Bennett (University of Lisbon Centre for English Studies (ULICES), Portugal)
–  Professor Luc van Doorslaer (University of Leuven, Centre for Translation Studies (CETRA), Belgium)
–  Professor José Lambert (University of Leuven, Centre for Translation Studies (CETRA), Belgium)

RATIONALE
Translation Studies has come of age, evidenced by proclamations of a series of intellectual ‘turns’, most prominently a ‘cultural turn’ in the 1990s followed by a ‘sociological turn’ in the last decade. Whilst also a ‘power turn’ and an ‘ideological’ turn have been suggested, there is a lack of self-awareness and self-reflection on our own entanglement within contemporary power structures, which are largely driven by financial, economic and technological globalisation. This interdisciplinary conference aims to critically interrogate central concepts such as ‘ideology’ and ‘power’ from self-reflexive, theoretical and practical perspectives. In view of Jean Baudrillard’s suggestion that any theory of power, in order to be ethically credible, must distinguish between relations of dominance and hegemony, we hope to bring together researchers, PhD-students, translators, writers and activists from varying backgrounds to engage in a discussion about the impact of power on the theory and practice of translation as well as on our own critical reflections.

POTENTIAL TOPICS FOR ABSTRACT PROPOSALS
Apart from paper proposals, we are open to suggestions for a range of discussion formats such as poster presentations or audio-recorded roundtables. We are particularly interested in reflections on the ideological effects of technological change on translation theory and practice, whether in the present or future. Paper proposals focusing on any topic within the following two broad theoretical and practical themes will be welcome:

THEORIES OF POWER AND IDEOLOGY
* Ideology, Power and the different ‘Turns’ in Translation Studies
* Power and Ideology from different disciplinary Perspectives
* Ideology and Power in relation to History, Theory, Practice and Technology

DISCOURSE IN TRANSLATION
* Critical Theory and Philosophy
* Capitalist Hegemony
* Political Ideologies
* Subversive and Underground Ideologies

PUBLICATION
Following the conference, we will publish an edited book volume which will engage with the theme of Translation, Power and Globalization. It is also the aim of the organizers to edit a special issue on the theme of Translation, Domination and Hegemony in a peer-reviewed international journal. This section will be updated once we receive the final confirmation from both publishers.

CONTACT
Please send a 250-word abstract and a mini-biography (50-100 words) by Tuesday 30 April 2013 to Dr Stefan Baumgarten (s.baumgarten@bangor.ac.uk). Notification of acceptance of proposals will be communicated by Monday 20 May 2013. For general enquiries about the conference and potential discussion formats please contact Dr Yan Ying (y.ying@bangor.ac.uk) or Dr Jordi Cornellà-Detrell (j.cornella@bangor.ac.uk). The conference website will be available in due course, including information on fees and registration details. The conference programme and abstracts will be published in May. There might be opportunities for some fee waivers for postgraduate presenters. We will not be able however to cover any accommodation or travel costs.

With best wishes from Wales,
Stefan Baumgarten

Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-did-anyone-say-power-rethinking-domination-and-hegemony-in-translation-bangor-5-6-september

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

State of Crisis

STATE OF CRISIS / CRISIS STATE: DOMINATION AND RESISTANCE IN THE WAKE OF NEOLIBERALISM(S)

Great Lakes Graduate Conference in Political Economy

State of Crisis / Crisis State: Domination and Resistance in the Wake of Neoliberalism(s)
May 7-8, 2010
Carleton University, Ottawa

The neoliberal era has been characterized by the privatization of public assets, the growth of a global division of labour, and the development of flexible and highly mobile forms of capital accumulation. Yet the intensification of this capitalist model since the early 1970s has come to a head in the last year, and the world has played witness to multiple global crises, including the worst economic catastrophe since the great depression, the highest recorded atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide, and the continuation of seemingly unending conflicts in the Middle East and Afghanistan.

As such, we posit that a critical interrogation of the neoliberal paradigm is in order. Do contemporary crises mark a break or rupture with neoliberalism or are they an expression of its continuity and retrenchment? Do the present crises of finance, ecology and justice represent the culmination of the neoliberal era, or are they endemic components of a renewable cycle of laissez-faire capitalism? Have we seen the emergence of a new form of social organization continually riddled with instability (the crisis state), or are we merely in a temporary state of crisis?

The Great Lakes Graduate Conference in Political Economy is an interdisciplinary, international meeting of graduate students currently inviting submissions that broadly reflect and interrogate these and other (dis)continuities. We welcome submissions that fit within the broader tradition of political economy, though perhaps the following themes may serve to orient contributions:

* The origins and early history of neoliberalism
* Periodization and theories of capitalist crisis
* The spatialization of crisis: urban neoliberalization and the politics of scale
* The financialization of capital: subprime loans and the mortgage crisis
* The green economy and the ecological limits of capital
* Security, migration and citizenship
* Accumulation by dispossession and colonialism in neoliberal times
* Gender, privatization, and reproductive economies
* Labour unions, precarious employment and permanent exceptionalism
* Post-neoliberalism? Socialism in the twenty-first century

We welcome individual submissions as well as panel proposals. For individual papers, please send an abstract of no more than 250 words; for panel proposals send a 100 word panel abstract along with paper abstracts of up to 250 words. Proposals can be submitted by email until January 31, 2010 to greatlakes2010@gmail.com.

Please refer to http://greatlakes2010.blogspot.com/ for more information.

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Workers Councils in Historical and Comparative Perspective

Call for Essays: Workers Councils in Historical and Comparative Perspective
DARIO AZZELINI Dario & IMMANUEL NESS

14 April 2009

The editors consider workers councils as the definitive form of democratic labor control. Worker councils, seen as worker control over the economic resources that are vital to their lives, has had a prodigious history as one of the most dramatic forms of radical working-class action against business and corporate domination. From the origin of the industrial revolution to the present neoliberal capitalist era, workers councils have been recognized as a tangible means of both expressing working-class radicalism and grasping and consolidating power and control from the ruling class following labor organizing and direct insurgency.

The editors Dario Azzellini and Immanuel Ness are seeking submissions for a special collection on issue on worker councils and worker control from a comparative and historical perspective. The editors consider worker councils as a significant form of challenging capitalism and obtaining and securing worker power over workplaces and communities. We are seeking essays that demonstrate how worker councils have engendered and advanced perceptible gains for labor. We also seek essays that examine the endogenous and exogenous state and capitalist forces aligned against workers councils and democracy under labor control. We encourage submissions that are both contemporary and historical, including case studies and theoretical essays that range over any geographical space (including international, cultural, country, or regional focus).

The editors are seeking academically rigorous essays that also are accessible to workers, trade unionists, and activists. We encourage submissions that are free of jargon and rooted in historical experience. The culmination of the essays will be a book on workers councils published in many languages that embraces theory and action and easily grasped by a wide range of readers seeking democratic and socialist transformation through workers councils.

Possible topics for submission may include the following:

* Theoretical and philosophical consideration of worker councils and worker control
* Historical case studies of worker councils drawn from throughout the world
* Contemporary regional and national examples of workers councils
* Worker councils as a means toward revolutionary transformation

The editors consider the questions related to workers councils as praxis as essential to reclaiming democratic participation from capitalist forms of domination in general and, and particularly significant in the contemporary era of financial crisis. As such, please ensure that the essays are accessible to a broad range of readers, and offer a tangible contribution to research and praxis of social transformation.

Proposals for essays are welcome and are due and will be accepted through August 15 2009. Manuscript submissions are due November 15 2009, with anticipated publication in early 2010. Essays should range from 5,000 to 7,500 words in length, although the editors will consider shorter or longer manuscripts on a case by case basis. Essays will be published in a volume to appear in several languages. The editors have already secured publication agreements from publishers for this work in several languages.

Please send all proposals and manuscript submissions electronically to both editors: Dario Azzellini dnapress@gmx.net and Immanuel Ness iness@brooklyn.cuny.edu

Postal Addresses and telephone:
Dario Azzellini
Lausitzer Str. 10
10999 Berlin
Germany

Tel. +49-30-61288162
Fax: +49-30-61288162
Email: dnapress@gmx.net
http://www.azzellini.net

Immanuel Ness
Brooklyn College Graduate Center/CUNY
25 Broadway – 7th Floor
New York 10004 NY (US)

Tel. +011-212-822-1715
Fax. +011-212-966-4038
Email: iness@brooklyn.cuny.edu
http://www.immanuelness.net

Please circulate this call widely to all interested parties

 

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