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Tag Archives: Social theory

JAPMARXIST THEORY AND THE POLITICS OF HISTORY IN MODERN JAPAN

The Center for Social Theory and Comparative History will host its next event on: Marxist Theory and the Politics of History in Modern Japan

Thursday, June 2nd
4:00pm – 6:00 pm
6275 Bunche Hall
Basing himself on his new book, The Sublime Perversion of Capital (Duke University Press, 2016), Gavin Walker will examine the Japanese debate about capitalism from the 1920s to 1950s, using it as his point of departure to consider current discussions of uneven development and contemporary topics in Marxist theory and historiography. Walker locates the debate’s culmination in the work of Uno Kozo, whose investigations into the development of capitalism and the commodification of labour power are essential for rethinking Marxism today. Walker’s analysis of the Japanese debate shows how Marxist thought was globalized from the start.

Gavin Walker teaches in History and East Asian Studies at McGill University. He has written extensively on modern Japan, on Marxism, and on contemporary questions of political organization.

For more information, contact the Center for Social Theory and Comparative History at (310) 206-5675 or abenanav@ucla.edu.

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cstch-lecture-june-2nd-gavin-walker-on-japanese-marxism

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

 

download (4)CONTRADICTIONS: A JOURNAL FOR CRITICAL THOUGHT

Call for Papers
A New Journal
Kontradikce /Contradictions: A Journal for Critical Thought

We are seeking submissions of scholarly articles and theoretical essays that skirt the disciplinary boundaries of political philosophy, social theory, and cultural critique. This peer-reviewed journal, based in Prague, aims to critically revive and update Central and Eastern European traditions of radical thought, bringing them to bear on the historical present and bringing them into international discussions of the theoretical problems involved in emancipatory social change.

The journal is therefore especially interested in 1) articles that delve into the often overlooked or forgotten history of radical left thought in our part of the world and assess this legacy’s contemporary significance; 2) articles that describe and develop related and parallel traditions of thought originating in other regions, bringing these traditions into conversation with the traditions of Central and Eastern Europe; 3) articles that analyze Soviet-type societies and their troubled relationship to historical and contemporary movements for social emancipation; and 4) articles that critically engage with the ideological assumptions and social conditions of “post-communism,” that is, of the discursive association of the communist project with Soviet-type societies and, thus, with a “failed” and irretrievable past.

With these thematic problems in mind, we ask what specific contributions to critical social theory can arise out of the post-Communist experience—that is, out of the historical conflation of communism (the idea and project) with Communism (the party and party-run states) and the subsequent de-legitimation of the former along with the latter. Our focus is thus both geographically specific and global, as we aim to bring together the specific intellectual legacy of those parts of Europe formerly under Communist Party rule with w orldwide reflections of the “fall” of communism as a leading political and intellectual force. Out of this situation, we ask what new visions can emerge.

The journal will be published once a year as a double issue in multilingual format, with one part in English and one part in Czech and Slovak. Submissions are welcome in any of these three languages (English, Czech, or Slovak).

The first issue, with a submission deadline of October 31, 2015, will focus thematically on assessing the current moment and the state of critical social—and in particular Marxist—thought a quarter century after the fall of governments in Central and Eastern Europe that officially sanctioned Marxism while also constraining its development as a tradition of social critique. Submissions are encouraged, but not required, to take this focus into account.

Articles are welcome in the following categories:

· “Studies” and “essays”: These may be articles of a more or less traditional academic character, but with an emphasis on the social significance of the material presented and on original and provocative argumentation. But we also welcome more essayistic contributions that break with some of the conventions of scholarly form. We are interested in rigorously theoretical essays, works of high scholarly value but which might not find a place in other scholarly journals. In this kind of writing, insightful generalization and shrewd observation will be given more weight than an exhaustive accounting for “existing literature” or a detailed description of research methodology. In other words, we have in mind essays that continue in the genre of most classic works in the modern history of ideas, from Rousseau’s Discourses through Benjamin’s “Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction” and Karel Kosík’s Dialectics of the Concrete. More traditionally scholarly articles should be about 4000-9000 words long. Essays can range from 3000 to 10,000 words.

· “Translations” and “materials”: Here we include important contributions to Central/Eastern European social thought that can be brought to international attention in English translation; internationally important works in new Czech or Slovak translations; and previously unpublished or long-unavailable “materials,” accompanied by annotation that presents the materials’ significance to contemporary readers (these may be submitted in English, Czech, or Slovak). 3000-10,000 words.

· “Reviews” of recent publications in critical social thought. Reviews may be brief (500-2000 words) or may constitute longer “review studies” (2000-5000 words).

Send all submissions to jgrimfeinberg@gmail.com.
Further information available on www.facebook.com/kontradikce.
First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/new-journal-contradictions

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Feminism

Feminism

BEYOND HOMONORMATIVITY?

Brunel Centre for Social and Political Thought

“The Art of Government: Perspectives in Social and Political Thought”

Workshop: Beyond Homonormativity? Reconsidering Queer Emancipation

Friday 16th January 2015, 2-6pm, MRJD118, Brunel University, London

Lisa Duggan’s analysis of “the new homonormativity … a politics that does not contest dominant heteronormative assumptions and institutions but upholds and sustains them” stress the problem of western, mostly white, “middle class”, urban, lesbian and gay formations’ political aspirations toward acceptance within contemporary neoliberal economic and political systems. These aspirations factually discard earlier GLBT commitments to economic redistribution, liberation and emancipation in the 1970s. Some examples include claims for normative domestic kinship arrangements relying on neoliberal philosophies of privacy, United States and European exceptionalism and homonationalism marginalizing racialized formations, and the concomitant embracing and promotion of models of gay globalization and formal cultural identity that exclude non-normative sexualities.

This workshop asks participants to think about homonormativity as an occasion to go beyond the simple, although necessary, critiques of sexual formations’ reactionary politics and to reflect on positive alternatives of strategies and politics from queer political formations’ experiences and needs.

Does the accent on discourse, norms, identities and individuality, on which the concept of homonormativity mostly relies, obscure wider structural, historical and ideological causes of the contemporary depoliticization and normalization of gay and lesbian formations, or it is a way to highlight the threat of domestication and of foreclosing of radical and outlaw possibilities of queer?

Can a critical analysis of non-Western and non-white sexual and gender diversity and categorizations contribute to a better understanding and critique of the individualistic and liberal conception of Western and colonial sexual epistemology? Can inputs from Marxism on the relationship between commodification, consumption and culture and recognition of actual queer commons in every day life contribute to a theorization of queer ethics that could disentangle the liberal ideology of private/public divide in the interests of new queer and sexual politics? Are there actually existing alternative sexual practices and ethics and queer anti-capitalist politics that could open up a perspective on emancipation?

The workshop will highlight and showcase these and other connected questions from different but interrelated political, methodological and theoretical approaches.

 

Speakers

Gavin Brown, University of Leicester

Gianfranco Rebucini, Brunel University, London

Paul Reynolds, Edge Hill University, Ormskirk

Leticia Sabsay, London School of Economics and Political Science

 

Organised by Gianfranco Rebucini, Braudel Fellow at Brunel University.

For more information, contact: gianfranco.rebucini@gmail.com

BSPT: http://www.brunel.ac.uk/cbass/politics-history-law/politics/research/bspt

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Christmas 2DIFFERENCES, INEQUALITIES AND THE SOCIOLGICAL IMAGINATION

Call for Papers:

‘Differences, Inequalities and the Sociological Imagination’

12th Conference of the European Sociological Association, Prague, Czech Republic, 25–28 August 2015

Critical Political Economy Research Network (RN06)

Re-Imagining Class – Materialities of Resistance, State Power and the Commons

In a context of increasingly authoritarian processes of austerity measures in response to the crisis in Europe and beyond, various groups and social movements have articulated quests for more democracy and reclaiming the Commons. Categories of public goods and the commons include amongst others education, health, environment, food, water, air, energy, land, housing, transport, cities, or waste management. These notions generally engender new forms of horizontal participatory and inclusive bottom up democratic decision-making and communal ownership structures not considered for profit. Democratic imaginaries are however only seldom spelled out, as if such wished-for democratic structures were without a teleology. This raises the question of which concrete conceptions the (radical) Left has to offer with respect to the political economy of democracy and the commons? Which lessons can be drawn from prefigurative politics and existing/real life examples in the organisation of the economy and public goods? Which implications would such imaginaries have for rethinking class, and the materialities within social movements? At the same time, in order to contextualise these processes in the concrete materiality of crisis and resistance, we need to understand the changes and continuities in the imaginaries of state power and authoritarian governance, and the relations between social forces struggling over the prerogatives of resistance and contestation.

As the overall conference theme suggests, it is through sociological imagination that we can begin to understand the current conjuncture and formulate alternatives. Re-imagining class should be a core focus in this process. We are interested in hosting a wide range of topics in sessions that are linked to the above themes. This could include a focus on various social movements on the Commons; contestation and resistance to austerity measures; new forms of democratic participation and citizenship; conceptual reflection and critique on the use of class concepts; authoritarian dimensions of the ongoing capitalist restructuring; new manifestations of the capital-labour conflict; or the social/human geography of contestation and resistance. Of particular importance here are critical feminist political economy perspectives that challenge underlying patriarchal structures and social relations.

We are interested in all of the above plus more. We invite contributions (papers and/or panel proposals) from those with an interest in critical political economy research, regardless of their disciplinary affiliation and whether they are in academia or not. We also hope to attract a diverse range of participants, from a number of countries and backgrounds.

Notes for Authors

Abstracts should not exceed 250 words. Abstracts must be submitted online to the submission platform, see below. Abstracts sent by email cannot be accepted. Abstracts will be peer-reviewed and selected for presentation by the Research Network; the letter of notification will be sent by the conference software system in early April 2015.

Abstract submission deadline: 1 February 2015. Conference website and abstract submission platform: www.esa12thconference.eu

If you have further questions regarding this call, or the Critical Political Economy research network, please contact us at cpern@criticalpoliticaleconomy.net.

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/call-for-papers-2018differences-inequalities-and-the-sociological-imagination2019

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Books

Books

THEORIES OF IDEOLOGY: THE POWER OF ALIENATION AND SUBJECTION

New in Paperback from Haymarket

Theories of Ideology: The Powers of Alienation and Subjection

HM series Marxism & Socialism

BY JAN REHMANN

The emergence of ideology theories marked a re-foundation of Marxist research into the functioning of alienation and subjection. Going beyond traditional concepts of ‘manipulation’ and ‘false consciousness’, they turned to the material existence of hegemonic apparatuses and focused on the mostly unconscious effects of ideological practices, rituals and discourses.

In this magisterial work Jan Rehmann reconstructs the different strands of ideology theories ranging from Marx to Adorno/Horkheimer, from Lenin to Gramsci, from Althusser to Stuart Hall, from Bourdieu to W.F. Haug, from Foucault to Butler. He compares them in a way that a genuine dialogue becomes possible and applies the different methods to the ‘market totalitarianism’ of today’s high-tech-capitalism

About the author

Jan Rehmann, Dr. phil. habil, teaches philosophy and social theories at Union Theological Seminary in New York and the Free University in Berlin. He is co-editor of the Historical-Critical Dictionary of Marxism (HKWM) and author of books on ideology, Neo-Nietzscheanism, Max Weber, the churches in Nazi Germany, and poverty.

See: http://www.haymarketbooks.org/pb/Theories-of-Ideology

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/new-in-paperback-from-haymarket-theories-of-ideology-the-powers-of-alienation-and-subjection-by-jan-rehmann

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Nanopolitics

Nanopolitics

JASON READ AT THE TheoryLAB

Dear All

Please find details of the next event in the seminar programme: Identity, Alterity, Monstrosity: Figures of the Multitude organised by Caroline Williams, TheoryLAB , SPIR and Filippo del Lucchese, Brunel and CIPH, Paris. We hope you will be able to join us.

Please distribute to interested colleagues.

Full details and eventbrite link via the TheoryLAB page: http://www.politics.qmul.ac.uk/theorylab/

Seminar Two: 14 May 5-7pm

Venue: Queen Mary University of London, Arts Two, 3.16

 

Jason Read

The Affective Composition of the Political: From Negative Solidarity to Collective Indignation
Jason Read is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Southern Maine. He teaches courses in the history of political philosophy, contemporary social theory, the politics of work, philosophy of film, and philosophy of history. He is the author of The Micro-Politics of Capital: Marx and the Prehistory of the Present (SUNY 2003) and Relations of Production: Transindividuality between Economics and Politics (Brill/Haymarket 2014/15) as well as articles on Althusser, Deleuze, Spinoza, Hegel, Negri, and The Wire.

 

Dr Caroline Williams

School of Politics & International Relations Queen Mary, University of London

327 Mile End Road

London E1 4NS

United Kingdom

Email: c.a.williams@qmul.ac.uk

Webpage: http://www.politics.qmul.ac.uk/staff/drcarolinewilliams.html

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

London Radical BookfairTHE SOCIAL PATHOLOGIES OF CONTEMPORARY CIVILIZATION

Fifth International Conference

Erasmus University, Rotterdam, Netherlands

30 & 31 October 2014

www.socialpathologies.com

 

The fifth international conference on The Social Pathologies of Contemporary Civilization explores the nature of contemporary malaises, diseases, illnesses and psychosomatic syndromes in their relation to cultural pathologies of the social body. Usually these conditions are interpreted clinically in terms of individualized symptoms and framed in demographic and epidemiological profiles. They are represented and responded to discretely, as though for the most part unrelated to each other; each having its own professional discourse of etiology, diagnostics, therapeutics, as well as a task force developing health strategy and policy recommendations and interventions. However, these diseases also have a social and cultural profile, one that transcends the particularity of their symptomology and their discrete etiologies. These social pathologies are diseases related to cultural pathologies of the social body and disorders of the collective esprit de corps of contemporary society. They arise from individual and collective experiences of profound and drastic social changes and cultural shifts.

Multi-disciplinary in approach the conference addresses questions of how these conditions are manifest at the level of individual bodies and minds, as well as how the ‘bodies politic’ are related to the hegemony of reductive biomedical and individual psychologistic perspectives. Rejecting such a reductive diagnosis of contemporary problems of health and well-being, the central research hypothesis guiding the conference is that contemporary epidemics are to be analysed in the light of radical changes in our civilization and of the social hegemonization of the biomedical and psychiatric perspective.

A particular focus of the conference is the role of humanities and social sciences in helping to understand the connection between social transformations and psychiatric perceptions of health and well-being. The conference invites papers offering analyses of social malaises and the health of civilization from faculty, students and researchers in fields of philosophy, sociology, social theory, psychology, and anthropology.

 

Special sub-themes are the following:

􀁸The invented self– What is the status of the late modern subject? We live in so-called ‘neo-liberal’ times in which we experience an intense, marketed pressure to ‘be oneself’, as well as an extreme difficulty to ‘be a self’. Is our alleged individual freedom a strongly directed one? If so, how can we invent ourselves differently? And how should we understand the connection between this newly invented and that socially directed self?

􀁸The sympathetic self– Is a re-ethicization and moral regeneration of political, moral and libidinal economies possible? The domestic economics of the soul need to be scrutinized, ‘miraculous’ and healing social powers – such as the redemptive and transfiguring powers of beauty and love, and the power of gift relations – need to be explored in terms of their capacity to reverse pathogenic vicious circles of individuated egotism into saludogenic virtuous spirals of care, care of the self and care for others.

􀁸The diagnosed self– In most late modern societies in the West, we find a high prevalence of many psychiatric disorders. Such statistics have been known for years, but there is much uncertainty about how to interpret them. How do adults experience the process of receiving these diagnoses, and what does it mean for them to have their experience of suffering filtered through a diagnostic and psychiatric vocabulary?

􀁸The measured self– Research evidence is widely held as a key influence on mental health policy and practice. Whilst hypothesis testing in randomised controlled trials is held as the ‘gold standard’, qualitative research exploring people’s experiences continues to occupy a more marginal position, even though these experiences inform important inter-subjective phenomena. What is and what could be the specific role of qualitative research in contemporary mental health care?

􀁸The amnesiac self– The fading of individual and collective memory due to ongoing processes of individuation and acceleration and to experiences of shock, trauma, repression and aphasia in the psychic life of individuals and societies is amplified in contemporary contexts. Lacking memory, persons and societies live in a liminal extended present and become prone to solipsism and to manipulation. What is forgotten – and what can be remembered – is one of the most urgent ethical-political problems of our age.

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Social Movements

Social Movements

CLASS: THE ELEPHANT IN THE ROOM!

The modern labourer, on the contrary, instead of rising with the process of industry, sinks deeper and deeper below the conditions of existence of his own class. He becomes a pauper, and pauperism develops more rapidly than population and wealth” K. Marx and F. Engels, Communist Manifesto, 1848

How to conceptualise class in the face of expanded impoverishment, commodification of social rights, increased social and spatial segregation, criminalised poor, austerity, global wars and ecological crisis? Under the contemporary conditions of capitalism, as class based inequalities have become sharper, the ways in which class is conceptualised matter more with respect to its political consequences.

With the discussion of class re-emerging in the social sciences, we hope to both foregrounds its centrality and search for critical perspectives. Perspectives which might shift the direction of class struggle from attacks on the ‘undeserving poor’ to the potentialities of the revolutionary class.

“A Sense of Inequality: 5 approaches, 3 themes and a variation”

Dr Wendy Bottero, The University of Manchester

“Class: Don’t Mention the War”

Professor Andrew Sayer, Lancaster University

“Sociology and Its Poor: Rethinking Social Class”

Dr Imogen Tyler, Lancaster University

Organised by: Department of Sociology, Lancaster University

Date: Wednesday, 19 March 2014

Time: 16:15 – 18:30

Location: Cavendish Colloquium Room (Faraday Building LB02), Lancaster University

See: https://twitter.com/SociologyLancs/status/435382047591260160

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Jean Baudrillard

Jean Baudrillard

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BAUDRILLARD STUDIES

The January 2014 issue of the International Journal of Baudrillard Studies is now available. Includes an interview with Mike Gane.

January Issue: http://www.ubishops.ca/baudrillardstudies/vol11_1/v11-1-tofc.html
Home Page: http://www.ubishops.ca/baudrillardstudies/
*******************************************
Dr Richard G. Smith, PhD (Bristol)
Co-Director of the Centre for Urban Theory, Department of Geography, College of Science, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP, UK Tel. +44(0)1792 602558; Fax +44(0)1792 295955
E-mail: r.g.smith@Swansea.ac.uk
Web: http://www.swansea.ac.uk/staff/science/geography/r.g.smith/
Skype: dr.richard.g.smith

A few Baudrillard publications:

Smith RG ed. (forthcoming) Jean Baudrillard: Selected Contemporary Writings (Sage, London)

Smith RG and Clarke DB eds. (forthcoming) Jean Baudrillard: from Hyperreality to Disappearance (Uncollected Interviews, 1986-2011) (Edinburgh University Press)

Smith RG, Clarke DB and Doel MA eds. (2011) “Special Issue: Baudrillard Redux”, Special Issue of Cultural Politics, Vol 7, Issue 3, November, pp. 325–476

Smith RG ed. (2010) The Baudrillard Dictionary (Edinburgh University Press)

Clarke D, Doel M, Merrin W, Smith RG eds. (2009) Jean Baudrillard: Fatal Theories (Routledge, London).

 

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Dialogue

Dialogue

DIALOGUE STUDIES – CALLS FOR PAPERS

Journal of Dialogue Studies – JDS Spring 2014, Vol 2, No 1, ‘Critiquing Dialogue Theories’

Submissions deadline: 7th February 2014

The Journal of Dialogue Studies is a multidisciplinary, peer-reviewed academic journal published twice a year. It seeks to bring together a body of original scholarship on the theory and practice of dialogue for appraisal and discussion, and to help to establish Dialogue Studies as a distinct academic field. It publishes conceptual, research and/or case-based works on dialogue theory and practice, and papers that discuss wider social, cultural or political issues as these relate to the practice and evaluation of dialogue.
The second issue, to be published in April 2014, will have a particular focus on the critical examination of key dialogue theories. The Editors would particularly like to invite papers which address critical/evaluative questions such as the following:
–          Which dialogue theories are/have been most influential in practice?
–          Do dialogue theories make sense in relation to relevant bodies of research and established theories?
–          Do dialogue theories sufficiently take account of power imbalances?
–          How far are dialogue theories relevant/useful to dialogue in practice?

In addition to papers responding to the theme of ‘critiquing dialogue theories’, the Editors will also consider any paper within the general remit of the Journal, including those exploring the parameters, viability and usefulness of Dialogue Studies as an academic field, as requested in the call for papers for Volume 1, Number 1. Please see the call for papers for Volume 1, Number 1 here:http://www.dialoguesociety.org/publications/academia/829-journal-of-dialogue-studies.html

Academic Editor: Prof Paul Weller, Derby University
For Editorial Team and Board please see the Dialogue Society website.
The Journal of Dialogue Studies is published by the Institute for Dialogue Studies, a subsidiary body of registered charity the Dialogue Society.
For submission guidelines and further information please seehttp://www.dialoguesociety.org/publications/academia/944-journal-of-dialogue-studies-vol-2-no-1.html

Please send any queries to the Editorial Team via journal@dialoguesociety.org.
An A4 poster to print/share with contacts is available here:http://www.dialoguesociety.org/newsletter/poster/Journal-Vol2No1-Poster.pdf

Academic Workshop Call for Papers: Dialogue Theories, Volume II
New deadline for submission of abstracts: 17:00 UK time on 23rd January 2014.
The workshop will be held on 26th and 27th June 2014.
NB abstracts must follow the specific requirements given on the webpage, which also gives details of the submission procedure, submission schedule, selection criteria and arrangements for the workshop:
http://www.dialoguesociety.org/forthcoming/915-academic-workshop-and-book-chapter-call-for-papers-dialogue-theories-volume-ii.html

The Dialogue Society invites papers from scholars and practitioners of dialogue, ultimately to be published as a companion volume to Dialogue Theories, published earlier this year. The book, by Frances Sleap and Dr Omer Sener and edited by Professor Paul Weller, aims to advance theoretical and practical engagement with dialogue by introducing the work of ten individuals who have made significant and insightful contributions to thought in this area. The thinkers selected come from diverse fields, from religious studies and interfaith dialogue, through philosophy and social theory, to communication studies, public opinion analysis and even quantum physics. For further information and a preview, please see http://www.dialoguesociety.org/publications/academia/875-dialogue-theories.html
The Dialogue Society is inviting papers introducing a ‘dialogue thinker’ of the author’s choice. The thinker may come from any field. He/she must have made a significant contribution to ideas about dialogue, and these ideas must be to some extent transferable to fields beyond the thinker’s own specialism. Please note that the workshop and the resulting book are not intended to be restricted to interfaith dialogue.
A two day workshop held at the Dialogue Society will allow people to exchange ideas on their chosen thinkers and to dialogically refine their papers prior to their publication as chapters in Dialogue Theories, volume II (publication date: autumn 2014). The editors for the book will be the editor and authors of the first volume (Paul Weller, Omer Sener and Frances Sleap).

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo   

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Teaching Marx

Teaching Marx

BRUNEL SOCIAL AND POLITICAL THOUGHT RESEARCH SEMINARS – UPDATE NOVEMBER 2013

Wednesday 27th November 2013, 1:00pm, Gaskell Building Room 239

Sara R. Farris (Goldsmiths, University of London)
‘From the Jewish Question to the Muslim Question’

Brunel Social and Political Thought Research Group Seminar Series 2013/14
Re/Dis/Order

Following successful seminar series and international conferences in the last years, the Brunel Social and Political Thought research group will organise another seminar series in 2013/14: ‘Re/Dis/Order’. This seminar series aims to explore the different ways in which the constitution, transformation and negation of political order have been understood by some of the key theorists of modern political thought, from the early modern period to contemporary social and political theory. Seminars are open to all.

Term 1

Wednesday 30th October 2013, 4:00pm, Gaskell Building Room 239
State and Capital

Andrea Bardin (BrunelUniversity)
‘Mechanising the Organic: Hobbes and the Epistemological Revolution in Civil Science’

Matthijs Krul (Brunel University)
‘Neoliberal Visions of Order: Theories of the State in the New Institutional Economic History’
Wednesday 13th November 2013, 1:00pm, Gaskell Building Room 239

Fabio Raimondi (University of Salerno)
‘Althusser, Machiavelli and the Problem of Political Power’

Wednesday 27th November 2013, 1:00pm, Gaskell Building Room 239

Sara R. Farris (Goldsmiths, University of London)
‘From the Jewish Question to the Muslim Question’

Wednesday 11th December 2013, 1:00pm, Gaskell Building Room 239

Fillippo del Lucchese (Brunel University)
‘Machiavelli and Constituent Power’

Term 2

Wednesday 8th January 2014, 1:00pm, Gaskell Building Room 239

Peter D. Thomas (Brunel University)
‘“We Good Subalterns”: Gramsci’s Theory of Political Modernity’
Wednesday 29th January 2014, 1:00pm, Gaskell Building Room 210

Banu Bargu (SOAS)
‘Sovereignty as Erasure’

Wednesday 5th February 2014, 1:00pm, Gaskell Building Room 239

Nathaniel Boyd (Brunel University)
‘Organising the Body Politic: Hegel’s Corporate Theory of State’

Wednesday 19th February 2014, 1:00pm, Gaskell Building Room 239

Jamie Pitman (Brunel University)
‘Castor and Pollux? The Marx-Engels Relationship’

Ebubekir Dursun (Brunel University)
‘“Stubborn, Insociable, Froward, Intractable”: the History of the Excluded in Hobbes’s Leviathan’

Wednesday 5th March 2014, 1:00pm, Gaskell Building Room 239

John Roberts (Brunel University)
‘Beyond Flows, Fluids and Networks: Social Theory and the Fetishism of the Global Informational Economy’
Wednesday 26th March 2014, 1:00pm, Gaskell Building Room 239

Mark Neocleous (Brunel University)
Book Launch
‘War Power, Police Power’
(Edinburgh University Press, 2014)

All seminars take place at Brunel University. Directions to the campus can be found here:
http://www.brunel.ac.uk/about/ campus/directions

For further information, please contact:

Peter Thomas <PeterD.Thomas@brunel.ac.uk>

Visit the Brunel SPT Research Group webpages:

http://www.brunel.ac.uk/ courses/postgraduate/modern- political-thought-violence- and-revolution-ma>
http://www.brunel.ac.uk/sss/ politics/research-groups-and- centres/social-and-political- thought>
http://www.facebook.com/ pages/Brunel-University- Modern-Political-Thought/ 205393026150272?sk=wall>

Other Brunel SPT Activities in 2013/14

Film Screening Series
(Organised in Collaboration with the Isambard Centre for Historical Research)

Paths of Shame: WWI in Cinema

1st October: S. Kubrick, Paths of Glory (1957)

15th October: R. Bernard, Wooden Crosses (1932)

29th October: J. Losey, King and Country (1964)

12th November: J. Renoir, La Grande Illusion (1939)

26th November: F. Rosi, Many Wars Ago (1970)

10th December: D. Trumbo, Johnny Got His Gun (1971)

All screenings in Gaskell Building Room 239 @ 5:30pm

Organised by Alison Carrol and Filippo del Lucchese

For more information, contact:
Alison Carrol <Alison.Carrol@brunel.ac.uk>
Filippo Dellucchese <Filippo.Dellucchese@brunel. ac.uk>

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Debt

Debt

STUDIES IN SOCIAL AND POLITICAL THOUGHT: CONFERENCE 2013

Call for Papers.

Studies in Social and Political Thought Annual Conference 2013: Debt and Obligation.

Keynote Speakers: Keith Ansell-Pearson, Costas Lapavitsas

University of Sussex, June 20-21

 

The global economic crisis has brought the question of debt sharply into focus. From the indebtedness of the individual by means of easy credit, to the universalisation of private debt in financial instruments and the financial stranglehold of whole countries by sovereign debt, debt and the obligation that comes with it dominate the structure of contemporary society and economy. Austerity programmes are implemented by governments around the world, often with disastrous social consequences and without popular support. The narratives of “living within one’s means” and “giving back what is owed” are dominant among the international organisations and power centres that promote these austere solutions. Even democratic legitimation is superseded by the obligation of paying one’s debts, to the extent that technocratic governments replace democratically elected ones for fulfilling that purpose. A “hard but fair” solution is advanced by many in government and elsewhere, where debt reduction seems to be given an almost moral quality, and as such connected to a moral obligation and duty.

The old definition of justice as “telling the truth and giving back what is owed” as given by Cephalus in Plato’s Republic, seems, therefore, to have prevailed–at least in part. For the truthfulness of this justice is hidden, since as Cephalus admits, it is the wealthy that are the major beneficiaries of this type of justice, considering they already have the means of living by it. On the other hand, the concepts of debt and obligation are the cornerstones of many ethical theories and philosophies, from Kant’s categorical imperative and deontological ethics in general to Nietzsche’s genealogical critique of morality. Moreover, a great part of political philosophy and theory is preoccupied with the question of the obligation to the state and what gives it legitimacy. But how are these ethical and political issues put into practice? Depending on one’s point of view there can be either a moral obligation that supports the state’s legitimacy, or one that directly opposes it. In particular, should one follow the moral narrative of paying one’s debts under any circumstances or are there instances where one has an obligation to resist debts placed upon them? Is there such a thing as a just debt? These questions, it could be claimed, have not been given enough critical attention, and theoretical discourse has passed them by.

We are, therefore, seeking papers that will engage theoretically with the concepts of debt and obligation, and explore their relationship with the social, economic, or political spheres. In keeping with the interdisciplinary ethos of SSPT we will accept papers from all related disciplines including politics, sociology, history, political economy, and philosophy. We will also accept papers that do not deal exclusively with the main topic of the conference but are engaged with issues in the general area of social and political thought.

 

Possible theoretical frameworks and topics include, but are not limited to:

Moral Obligation / Political Obligation / Debt from an Economic, Sociological, Historical or Philosophical Perspective / Crisis & Debt / Deontological Ethics / Kantian Ethics and Political Theory / Hegel / Contract Theory / Recognition & Self-Recognition / Nietzsche, Morality, Guilt and “Bad Conscience” / Marxism & Marxisms / Theories of Biopolitics / Instrumental Reason / Critical Theory / Post-Colonialism / Discourse and Democratic Theory / Structuralism and Post-Structuralism / Soft and Hard Power / Hegemony / World-Systems / Sovereignty / Legality and Legitimacy

Please send abstracts of 350 words to ssptconference.2013@gmail.com by Sunday, 5th May 2013.

These should be formatted for blind review, including a cover sheet with name, contact details, institutional affiliation, and paper title. Successful applicants will be notified by 12th May 2013. Finally, all selected papers will be considered for publication in a future issue of SSPT.

A fee of 5 pounds will be applicable, and all delegates will receive a free copy of SSPT.

A PDF version of this CfP is available here.

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski