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Education Crisis

Education Crisis

THE ABOLITION OF THE UNIVERSITY

CALL FOR PAPERS

The Open Library of Humanities (OLM)

CFP: The Abolition of the University: Deadline: Nov 1st, 2015

Deadline: 1st November 2015

In 1968, Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o and his colleagues at the University of Nairobi called for the abolition of the English department. They attacked an enduring colonial legacy and envisioned an intellectual renaissance in Africa. In 2012, at the University of Glasgow: “Forty years after Ngũgĩ and his colleagues argued for it in Nairobi, the abolition of the Scottish Department was achieved by managerial diktat in Glasgow.” Two institutional interventions: the first driven by the desire to liberate education from epistemological and pedagogical domination; the second, by the neoliberal business model. This special edition seeks to consider the chequered history of the westernised university, to diagnose its embattled present, and to imagine its future.

In recent months, academics, non-academic staff, students and their allies across the UK, Canada, the Netherlands, Ireland, Albania, Finland, Colombia, Mexico and elsewhere, have staged protests against neoliberal reform of universities. Wendy Brown argues that the evolution of neoliberalism from a set of economic policies into mode of reason imperils not just liberal institutions but democracy itself. Education across the board is jeopardised by the corporate university model. The liberal arts face multidirectional threats, of extinction and irrelevance. Yet as Gayatri Spivak suggests, if the humanities is the ethical healthcare of society, what resources can we summon to reform, destroy, transform, or re-create the university? Or less innocently, as Bill Readings suggests, simply foster a space where academics (and students) can “work without alibis” in acknowledgement that radical possibilities are constrained by the societies in which universities are situated.

This special edition calls for a cross-disciplinary response, from the humanities and social sciences to all critical, creative and deviant positionalities. Diverse submissions are encouraged from policy reform to short stories. In particular, the edition reaches out to those who traditionally or purposefully find themselves outside the ivory towers: those not included and unassimilated.

Contributions will be considered around (but not limited to) these themes:

  • The western / imperial history of the university
  • Literary / creative representations of the university
  • Epistemologies / pedagogies of possibility
  • Western imperial humanism and the humanities
  • The co-option of postcolonial / Black / queer studies and ‘minority’ / transnational / diasporic literatures
  • Education in an age of neoliberalism / neo-colonialism
  • New models for higher education, including cooperatives, free schools etc.
  • The pedagogy of debt
  • The ‘Student As Producer’
  • Accelerationism and competition in the university
  • Activism: Strike / Occupy / Transform (In / Against / Beyond)
  • Resistance through radical poetics / humanisms

The special collection, edited by Lou Dear (University of Glasgow, l.dear.1@research.gla.ac.uk) and Martin Eve (Birkbeck, University of London, martin.eve@bbk.ac.uk), is to be published in the Open Library of Humanities (ISSN 2056-6700). The OLH is an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation-funded open-access journal with a strong emphasis on quality peer review and a prestigious academic steering board. Unlike some open-access publications, the OLH has no author-facing charges and is instead financially supported by an international consortium of libraries.

Submissions should be made online at: https://submit.openlibhums.org/ in accordance with the author guidelines and clearly marking the entry as [“The Abolition of the University,” SPECIAL COLLECTION]. Innovative submissions that do not clearly fit the submission guidelines are welcome and we encourage authors to contact the editors to discuss this. Submissions will then undergo a double-blind peer-review process. Authors will be notified of the outcome as soon as reports are received.

See: https://www.openlibhums.org/2015/05/14/cfp-the-abolition-of-the-university-deadline-nov-1st-2015/

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OPEN LIBRARY OF HUMANITIES: https://www.openlibhums.org/

 

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debunking-economicsWILL WE CRASH AGAIN? WHY CAPITALISM NEEDS DEBT WRITE-OFFS TO SURVIVE

Conway Hall Ethical Society & London Futurists presents:

London Thinks – Will We Crash Again? Why Capitalism Needs Debt Write-offs to Survive

With STEVE KEEN

Tuesday 1st September @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm | £5 – £10

CONWAY HALL

25 Red Lion Square, London, WC1R 4RL United Kingdom

Website: http://conwayhall.org.uk/

Booking: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/will-we-crash-again-why-capitalism-needs-debt-write-offs-to-survive-tickets-17879762852

Mainstream economists failed to anticipate the great financial crash of 2007-8. In this talk, Professor Steve Keen will share his view on the bigger picture – including recent financial developments around the world. He will review options for the future of economics, highlight the little-understood importance of debt, and argue that significant debt write-downs are needed in order to limit future financial crashes.

Steve Keen is a Professor of Economics & Head of the School of Economics, History & Politics at Kingston University. He was one of the handful of economists to realise that a serious economic crisis was imminent, and to publicly warn of it, from as early as December 2005.

A staunch critic of mainstream economics, his book Debunking Economics is now in its 2nd edition and has been translated into Chinese, French and Spanish.

The event will be moderated by David Wood, Chair of London Futurists. The talk will be followed by audience Q&A.

A cash bar will be available at the event. Afterwards, there will be the chance to continue the discussion at a nearby pub.

Organised in partnership with the London Futurists

London Futurists hold regular speaker events to explore radical scenarios for the next 3-40 years.

For more details, see http://londonfuturists.com/.

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

Student Debt

Student Debt

STUDENT DEBT

Berkeley Journal of Sociology

Call for Submissions on Student Debt

In collaboration with Debt and Society, the Berkeley Journal of Sociology is seeking submissions about student debt. Submissions will be considered for the 2015 print edition of the BJS as well as an online series that will launch in September 2015.

In addition to short essays (less than 3,500 words), we are also seeking photo essays, illustrations, reviews, and critical replies to published content.

Submissions must be received by June 1, 2015 and should be emailed to both submissions@berkeleyjournal.org and charlie.eaton@berkeley.edu.

Full BJS submission guidelines can be found here.

The goals of the series are described further here.

Berkley Journal of Sociology: http://berkeleyjournal.org/

Debt& Society: http://debtandsociety.org/a-call-for-submissions-on-student-debt/

Call for Submissions: http://berkeleyjournal.org/2015/04/a-call-for-submissions-on-student-debt/

Submission Guidelines: http://berkeleyjournal.org/submissions/

EDITORIAL_Student-loans_Devin-Beauregard

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

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Fat Cat Food

Fat Cat Food

MONEY, DEBT AND FINANCE: TOWARDS A POLITICAL ECONOMY OF FINANCIAL INNOVATION

Call for participants

The Open Political Economy Network (OPEN) of The Open University will be holding its first workshop on Friday, 26 June.

Title: Money, debt and finance: towards a political economy of financial innovation

Organisers: Dimitris P. Sotiropoulos (The Open University Business School) and Andrew Trigg (Department of Economics, The Open University).

Date: Friday 26 June 2015

Place: The Open University in London, Room 2 (Ground Floor), 1-11 Hawley Crescent, Camden Town, London NW1 8NP. Nearest underground: Camden Town (Northern Line).

Modern developments in financial innovation, usually described by the term ‘financialization’, have been mostly approached from two distinct viewpoints. On the one hand, the mainstream financial literature heavily downplays the historical and social nature of financial innovation in relation to risk management. On the other hand, critical approaches in the field of political economy tend to see contemporary trends in financial innovation as a distortion of capitalist economic structures. This event explores an alternative research agenda in political economy based on Marx’s analysis and other related currents in Political Economy. Financial crises can thus be seen as moments innate in the workings of the economic system but not necessarily a sign of decline; finance and financial innovation can be integral to capitalism and not parasitic or dysfunctional within it.

By drawing on the research and expertise of a diverse range of scholars, the event will explore possible foundations for a new analytical paradigm for considering the political economy of money, debt and financial innovation. The workshop is also an opportunity for participants (academics, students, activists) to engage in a dialogue with the speakers and share their perspectives about the development of this paradigm.

Speakers will include (in alphabetical order):

Paul Auerbach, Kingston University, London

Riccardo Bellofiore, University of Bergamo, Italy

Ole Bjerg, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark

Dick Bryan, University of Sydney, Australia

Bob Jessop, Lancaster University, UK

John Kannankulam, Marburg University, Germany

Spyros Lapatsioras, University of Crete, Greece

John Milios, National Technical University of Athens, Greece

Dimitris P. Sotiropoulos, The Open University Business School, UK

Jan Toporowski, SOAS, London

Andrew Trigg, The Open University, UK

 

Workshop details

The workshop is funded by the Open University research centre, IKD, and is open to all. Registration is free but necessary as there are limited spaces available. Lunch and refreshments will be provided. More information will follow, including a programme and abstracts of papers.

For registration please email: Atalanta Richards at Socsci-IKD-Events@open.ac.uk

For further information:  https://www.open.ac.uk/ikd/events/

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/call-for-participants-money-debt-and-finance-towards-a-political-economy-of-financial-innovation

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

money

Neoliberalism

Neoliberalism

THE GLOBALISATION LECTURES AT SOAS – NOW ONLINE

 

Women and the ‘Arab Spring’: Lessons from Iran?

Haideh Moghissi, Professor and Trudeau Fellow, Department of Equity Studies, York University, Toronto

6 March 2013

 

Is Islamism the Arab Destiny?

Aziz Al-Azmeh, CEU University Professor, School of Historical and Interdisciplinary Studies, Central European University, Budapest

6 February 2013

 

Which Democracy for a Multipolar World?

Chantal Mouffe, Professor of political theory and director of the Centre for the Study of Democracy at the University of Westminster

28 November 2012

 

Globalisation in Time: Between the Camera and the Clock

Marcus Verhagen, Art historian and critic, Sotheby’s Institute of Art and Goldsmiths College, University of London

31 October 2012

 

Men who Tiptoe into their Marital Bedrooms: The Novelist and Dictatorship

Hisham Matar

5 March 2012

 

Inclusion and Participation: a New Agenda for the Globalised Economy

Heiner Flassbeck (Director on Globalization and Development Strategies, UNCTAD)

1 February 2012

 

Corporate Takeovers, Internet Challenges: does journalism have a future?

Dr Serge Halimi (Director, Le Monde Diplomatique)

2 March 2011

 

Nobel Prize Winner Dr Shirin Ebadi on The Role of Women in Promoting Peace in the Middle East

Dr Shirin Ebadi (Winner of the Nobel Peace Prize in 2003)

2 February 2011

 

World Literature and World Languages

Tariq Ali (Novelist, Playwright and Historian; Editor – New Left Review)

1 December 2010

 

Peasant Struggles and Ecology in the Age of Globalisation

Hugo Blanco (Leader of the Peasant Confederation, Peru)

27 October 2010

 

Humanitarianism at the Risk of Imperialism

Dr Rony Brauman (1999 Nobel Peace Prize winner and Former President of Doctors without Borders (MSF, Paris))

3 March 2010

 

For a Green and Just Way out of the Global Crisis

Dr Susan George

20 January 2010

 

The American Empire in Light of the Global Crisis

Professor Alex Callinicos and Professor Leo Panitch

25 November 2009

 

Noam Chomsky: Crises and the Unipolar Moment

Professor Noam Chomsky

27 October 2009

 

The World’s Third Spaces: Neither Global Nor National?

Prof. Saskia Sassen – Lynd Professor Of Sociology And Member, The Committee On Global Thought, At Columbia University (New York)

25 February 2009

 

Beyond Neoliberal Globalisation And Us Hegemony: What Next?

Prof. Samir Amin – Director Of The Third World Forum (Dakar, Senegal)

26 November 2008

 

The Imperial Paradox: Ideologies of Empire

Prof. Ellen Meiksins Wood Professor Emerita of Political Science at York University (Toronto, Canada)

29 October 2008

 

Counter-Hegemonic Globalisation: Has the Movement Reached its Limits?

Professor Boaventura de Sousa Santos

22 April 2008

 

New Left Wing Governments in South America. Venezuela, Bolivia, Ecuador: A First Balance-Sheet

Dr Eric Toussaint (World Social Forum and Committee for the Abolition of Third World Debt)

25 February 2008

 

The Present Financial Crisis: How to Stop Globalisation from Eating Itself

Robert Wade, Professor of Political Economy and Development (LSE)

22 January 2008

 

First Published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/online-the-globalisation-lectures-at-soas-u.-of-london

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

 

CLR James

CLR James

BLACK STUDIES: GRAMMARS OF THE FUGITIVE

 

Black Studies: Grammars of the Fugitive
A public lecture with Stefano Harney and Fred Moten
Friday 6th December 2013 @ 6.30pm
Ian Gulland Lecture Theatre / Whitehead Building / Goldsmiths College, University of London

Black Studies Group (London) and Centre for Cultural Studies (Goldsmiths College) are delighted to host a public lecture to be delivered by Fred Moten and Stefano Harney. The publication of their Undercommons: Fugitive Planning and Black Study (Minor Compositions, 2013) marked a culmination point in an ongoing project in which they have sought to reinvigorate contemporary social thought and aesthetic critique by way of the black radical tradition. Deploying concepts such as “study”, “undercommons”, “debt”, “speculative practice”, “blackness” and “fugitivity”, Harney and Moten have loosened what for many now seems like the strained and distant relations between intellectual thought, academic labour and collective (under)common action. We hope you can join the Black Studies Group in coming together to make delusional plans with both Moten and Harney.

Bios:
Fred Moten received his Ph.D. in English from UC Berkeley. He is a student of Afro-diasporic social and cultural life with teaching, research and creative interests in poetry, performance studies and
critical theory. His books include In the Break: The Aesthetics of the Black Radical Tradition, Hughson’s Tavern, B. Jenkins, The Undercommons: Fugitive Planning and Black Study (with his frequent collaborator Stefano Harney) and The Feel Trio.

Stefano Harney is Professor of Strategic Management Education, Singapore Management University and co-founder of the School for Study, an ensemble teaching project. He employs autonomist and postcolonial theory in looking into issues associated with race, work, and social organization. Recent books include The Ends of Management (co-authored with Tim Edkins) and The Undercommons: Fugitive Planning and Black Study (co-authored with Fred Moten). Stefano lives and works in Singapore.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/486889024765629/?source=1
Goldsmiths Events Page: http://www.gold.ac.uk/calendar/?id=7091
Contact the organisers: black.studies.reading.group@gmail.com
All welcome, no registration required.

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Work

Work

WORK AND COMPULSION

Call for Papers

Work and Compulsion: Coerced Labour in Domestic, Service, Agricultural, Factory and Sex Work, ca. 1850-2000s

The International Conference of Labour and Social History (ITH), Austria, announces the 50th Linz Conference, 25-28 Sept. 2014.

Preparatory group:

Prof. em. Dirk Hoerder (Salzburg, Austria)
Prof. Marcel van der Linden (International Institute of Social History, Amsterdam)
Dr. Magaly Rodríguez García (Vrije Universiteit Brussel)
Dr. Elise van Nederveen Meerkerk (Wageningen University)
For the ITH: Univ.-Doz. Dr. Berthold Unfried (Institute of Economic and Social History, University of Vienna), Mag. Eva Himmelstoss

Objectives

The conference focuses on the exploitation of human labour in the range of forced labour and debt bondage, which contrary to chattel slavery, have received little scholarly attention. In spite of the gradual abolition of slavery (understood as the legal ownership of humans) in the course of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, other forms of coerced labour persisted in most regions of the world. Indeed, while most nations increasingly condemned the maintenance of slavery and slave trade, they tolerated labour relationships that involved violent control, economic exploitation through the appropriation of labour power, restriction of workers’ freedom of movement and fraudulent debt obligations. Hence the conference deals with historical situations of coerced labour worldwide.

The aims of this conference are five-fold:

 1.  To write a global and comparative history of the political-institutional and gender structures, the economics of and working conditions within coerced labour, as well as the evolution of forced labour (internal or cross-border) migration of male and female workers and the role played by intermediaries. In short, the whole praxis of coerced labour in colonized segments of the world, core countries, post-imperial states, new industrial economies and other low-income countries.
 2.  To problematize (the increasing) forced labour and labour mobility in colonial territories, in Africa and Asia in particular, and to relate them to developments in intra-European labour regulation and regimentation and to the expansion of North Atlantic capital across the world.
 3.  To deal with the twentieth-century forms of coerced labour, whether through confinement to labour camps or debt bondage of individual production and service workers to creditors (for the costs of the voyage) or to individual employers (for the duration of their stay).
 4.  To question whether the application of the forced-labour model to systemic employer-employee relations under constraining circumstances is justified, or whether the ILO’s differentiation between forced labour and sub-standard or exploitative working conditions can/should be maintained. These issues are related to the naming and conceptualization of “force”, “coercion” and “consent”, as well as to the utility of the notions of “human trafficking” and “modern-day slavery”.
 5.  To explore the experiences and aspects of human agency or resistance by forced/bonded workers, organizing initiatives and the silence or activity of non-state actors such as trade unions and NGOs.

Programme structure and themes

Keynotes:

 1.  Agency of men and women under coercion.
 2.  A historical overview of the definitions of “slavery”, “forced labour”, “trafficking” and “modern slavery”, and their evolution within the realm of international governmental and non-governmental organisations.

Section I – Coerced labour in the colonial and non-colonial world (ca. 1850-1940):
Working conditions, employee-employer relationships and migration patterns (who was transported in which direction) within systems of indentured labour, debt bondage, peonage, servitude, compulsory labour and so on. Examples are the twentieth-century credit-ticket migrations from Southern China; the British (and other) empire-imposed indentured labour involving long-distance migration in the macro-regions of the Indian Ocean and the Plantation Belt from the 1830s to the 1930s; European forced-labour regimes imposed on men, women and children within particular colonies; forced labour migration from the colonies to Europe during the First World War (the so-called “colonial auxiliaries”); and forms of involuntary (child) servitude in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the United States.

Section II – Politically imposed labour on home territories: The labour relations, working conditions and agency of workers sent to concentration camps, remote labour colonies or industrial camps under Fascism or Stalinism, in Japan during the Second World War, as prisoners or under peonage in the (southern) United States, in communist China, in Cuba, or as persecuted minorities like the Roma as well as, in the present, use of forced labour from political and other prisoners from dictatorial or authoritarian regimes by Western companies, require further study.

Section III – Coerced labour since the end of the Second World War: The phenomenon of coerced labour – often called “modern slavery” since the last decades – concerns questions of global divisions of labour, economic, gender and racial inequality. While numbers and definitions are contested by academic, UN and ILO experts, official and unofficial data range from 17 to 27 million women, men and children worldwide. This section aims to include papers with empirical information on the extent to which debt, power relationships and poverty lead to the virtual “enslavement” of people through systematic recruitment by means of intimidation or threat of violence, aggressive control by labour intermediaries such as “coyotes”, “snakes” or procurers, and/or brutal enforcement of debt collection after arrival. The experiences and resistance strategies of the workers concerned will be fundamental to better understand the degree of labour constraints and/or the consent to so-called “3D jobs” (dirty, dangerous and demeaning).

Concluding discussion:
General debate on the accuracy of the current definitions used by state and non-state actors, the impact that new research can have on policies and the development or adjustment of analytical methods that can further the knowledge of coerced labour from past and present.

Call for Papers

Proposed papers need to address the conference topics mentioned above in section I, II or III and should include:

 *   An abstract (max. 300 words)
 *   The targeted thematic section
 *   A biographical note (max. 200 words)
 *   Full address and email-address

Sessions will be reserved for ongoing research on the level of doctoral dissertations and of postdoctoral research (depending on high-quality abstracts being submitted).
A special effort will be made to include paper presenters from all regions of the world and both senior and beginning researchers. The conference language will be English.

The organizers will not be able to reimburse costs for travel or hotel accommodation. However, we will establish a limited fund to which scholars with insufficient means of their own may write a motivated application for (partial) reimbursement of travel costs. Grants will be contingent on sufficient funding.

The conference fee includes accommodation (in shared double rooms provided by the ITH) and meals. Participants taking responsibility for their own accommodation will pay a reduced fee.

Proposals to be sent to Magaly Rodríguez García: mrodrigu@vub.ac.be

Time schedule:

Deadline for submission of proposals: 1 November 2013
Notification of acceptance: 1 December 2013
Deadline for full papers: 1 August 2014

A publication of selected conference papers is planned; final manuscripts due 1 April 2015.

 

First published in: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-work-and-compulsion-coerced-labour-in-domestic-service-agricultural-factory-and-sex-work-ca.-1850-2000s

 

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Debt

Debt

STUDIES IN SOCIAL AND POLITICAL THOUGHT: CONFERENCE 2013

Call for Papers.

Studies in Social and Political Thought Annual Conference 2013: Debt and Obligation.

Keynote Speakers: Keith Ansell-Pearson, Costas Lapavitsas

University of Sussex, June 20-21

 

The global economic crisis has brought the question of debt sharply into focus. From the indebtedness of the individual by means of easy credit, to the universalisation of private debt in financial instruments and the financial stranglehold of whole countries by sovereign debt, debt and the obligation that comes with it dominate the structure of contemporary society and economy. Austerity programmes are implemented by governments around the world, often with disastrous social consequences and without popular support. The narratives of “living within one’s means” and “giving back what is owed” are dominant among the international organisations and power centres that promote these austere solutions. Even democratic legitimation is superseded by the obligation of paying one’s debts, to the extent that technocratic governments replace democratically elected ones for fulfilling that purpose. A “hard but fair” solution is advanced by many in government and elsewhere, where debt reduction seems to be given an almost moral quality, and as such connected to a moral obligation and duty.

The old definition of justice as “telling the truth and giving back what is owed” as given by Cephalus in Plato’s Republic, seems, therefore, to have prevailed–at least in part. For the truthfulness of this justice is hidden, since as Cephalus admits, it is the wealthy that are the major beneficiaries of this type of justice, considering they already have the means of living by it. On the other hand, the concepts of debt and obligation are the cornerstones of many ethical theories and philosophies, from Kant’s categorical imperative and deontological ethics in general to Nietzsche’s genealogical critique of morality. Moreover, a great part of political philosophy and theory is preoccupied with the question of the obligation to the state and what gives it legitimacy. But how are these ethical and political issues put into practice? Depending on one’s point of view there can be either a moral obligation that supports the state’s legitimacy, or one that directly opposes it. In particular, should one follow the moral narrative of paying one’s debts under any circumstances or are there instances where one has an obligation to resist debts placed upon them? Is there such a thing as a just debt? These questions, it could be claimed, have not been given enough critical attention, and theoretical discourse has passed them by.

We are, therefore, seeking papers that will engage theoretically with the concepts of debt and obligation, and explore their relationship with the social, economic, or political spheres. In keeping with the interdisciplinary ethos of SSPT we will accept papers from all related disciplines including politics, sociology, history, political economy, and philosophy. We will also accept papers that do not deal exclusively with the main topic of the conference but are engaged with issues in the general area of social and political thought.

 

Possible theoretical frameworks and topics include, but are not limited to:

Moral Obligation / Political Obligation / Debt from an Economic, Sociological, Historical or Philosophical Perspective / Crisis & Debt / Deontological Ethics / Kantian Ethics and Political Theory / Hegel / Contract Theory / Recognition & Self-Recognition / Nietzsche, Morality, Guilt and “Bad Conscience” / Marxism & Marxisms / Theories of Biopolitics / Instrumental Reason / Critical Theory / Post-Colonialism / Discourse and Democratic Theory / Structuralism and Post-Structuralism / Soft and Hard Power / Hegemony / World-Systems / Sovereignty / Legality and Legitimacy

Please send abstracts of 350 words to ssptconference.2013@gmail.com by Sunday, 5th May 2013.

These should be formatted for blind review, including a cover sheet with name, contact details, institutional affiliation, and paper title. Successful applicants will be notified by 12th May 2013. Finally, all selected papers will be considered for publication in a future issue of SSPT.

A fee of 5 pounds will be applicable, and all delegates will receive a free copy of SSPT.

A PDF version of this CfP is available here.

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon

MEMEFEST FESTIVAL OF SOCIALLY RESPONSIVE COMMUNICATION AND ART 2012

Memefest, an international organization dedicated to promoting new, productive and relevant forms of cultural activism, together with the Queensland College of Art, Griffith University, this year introduces the Memefest/Griffith-QCA award for ‘Imaginative Critical Intervention’.

This award invites cultural activists, creatives and thinkers from the productive margins of professions, radical theorists, imaginative intellectuals and anyone who is uncomfortable with the status quo and dreams of alternative futures that are more satisfying, just, and sustainable, to submit projects for peer feedback, broader dissemination, and a chance to work collaboratively with other imaginative activists, artists, researchers and intellectuals.

Memefest FESTIVAL 2012 theme: DEBT (debt, la dette, χρέος, dolg, задолженность, долг, debito, дълг, ŝuldo, חוב, schuld, deuda, borç …)

You can’t evict an idea whose time has come! 

These words express the nature of the current global movement against the rule of money over life. They belong to the people, the 99%, who are bringing the fundamental urgent issues to the streets, into the media, into the realm of public consciousness, into the schools, universities, jobs, homes and intimate discussions and relationships. 

These words also express something else. They speak about a state of mind, a focus and a concise articulation of the problem. The idea whose time has come is mainly about three things. First: interventions that create a rupture in the order of things with the goal to redefine our fields of experience and the relationship between being, doing and saying. Second: dialogue. Third: creating new emancipatory social institutions. 

If communication and art are to play a relevant role in shaping a future worth having, we need to further redirect, reinvent and re-imagine our own understanding and the way we think, theorise and practice them both. Debt is not only an opportunity to do so, but also an urgent responsibility. 

The Friendly Competition

Participants are invited to submit works three categories: critical writing, visual communication practice and the participatory art/communication category Beyond…

This year’s theme for Visual communication practice and Critical writing is: DEBT. Participants will respond with their work to three carefully chosen texts:

I. First written text is taken from the book Debt, the first 5000 years by American social anthropologist David Greaber in which he explains the function of debt in human history, showing that the current situation is not as natural at all as it seems to be.

II. Second visual text is taken from the documentary Debtocracy by Katerina Kitidi and Aris Hatzistefanou, who together with economist Samir Amin, philosopher Alain Badiou, sociologist and geographer David Harvey and other guests research the reasons for the crisis in Greece, while also showing how Latino American Ecuador stood up to the IMF and refused to acknowledge legitimacy to their enforced slavery. 

III. Third is the song No Banker Left Behind by American slide guitar virtuoso, taken from his politically engaged and critically acclaimed album Pull Up Some Dust and Sit Down (2011). 

Category Beyond…:

While a lot of subversive writing, communication and art has emerged which challenges the status quo using its own conventions, very few of these initiatives have employed a mode of communication that is not rooted in commercial culture itself.

The ‘Beyond…’ category hopes to bring out new visual and conceptual forms of communication and art which catalyse social change while engaging people as something more than mere consumers.

This category draws on the traditions of independent artistic practice in that the entries will have no brief other than to identity and radically address important issues on a deeply felt personal level. However, we expect that, unlike most ‘museum’ art, it will generate genuine participatory relations with its audience and be able to work outside institutional sites and conventions. Participatory art and communication is the core principle of what we are looking for at Beyond…

More about Beyond… here: http://www.memefest.org/en/competition/beyond_intro/

Awards: 

The international editorial and curatorial board will select the most convincing works. Among strong traditional awards, which you can see on www.memefest.org, two new awards are introduced this year.

1) The first Griffith-QCA/ Memefest Award for Critical Imaginative Critical Intervention.

Best authors of all three categories (critical writing, visual communication practice and Beyond…) will be invited toBrisbaneto take part in a special extradisciplinary workshop resulting in a public intervention in the city ofBrisbane.

2) Authors of best works in the category: critical writing will be invited to publish their work in the academic peer reviewed journal Zoontechnica http://zoontechnica.com.

Deadline for your submissions is May 30th.

Participation is free of charge and there is no age limit or any other restriction. Your work can be submitted online.

See more about our Awards here: www.memefest.org/en/competition/awards_2012/

More information on the whole Friendly competition: http://www.memefest.org/en/competition/intro/

More information on the Festival of Socially responsive communication and Art: www.memefest.org

Contact Patricia Laboca: memefest@memefest.org

 

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub,Bangor, northWales)  

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

WALL STREET-INFLATED STUDENT DEBT BUBBLE HITS $1 TRILLION: DEBTORS RALLY FOR RELIEF

By Sarah Jaffe

 

The collective weight of American student debt is a drag not just on those paying the debt, but on our entire economy.

April 24, 2012   

You could call it a bubble, but it’s more like a ball and chain. Bubbles are, after all, light and airy.

The collective weight of American student debt is now over $1 trillion, and that weight is a drag not just on those paying the debt, but on our entire economy. It’s hard to calculate exactly, because the lenders are notoriously unwilling to hand over their data, and with students defaulting at ever-higher rates, interest rates and fees are always changing, adding constantly to the weight of the burden college graduates (and those who didn’t graduate but still have to pay off the loans they took out in more hopeful times) carry.

Around the country, activists are marking the date with actions; in New York, a rally and march will be the centerpiece of what the Occupy Student Debt Campaign has dubbed 1-T day; the day the amount of debt we’re carrying to pay for our education officially got too big to bear silently. The rallies aim to end the isolation that debtors often feel, to bring people together to understand that the problem they have is shared by millions of others—and that it calls for political solutions.

“I think that we in America have become so separated from one another, partially due to this debt,” Pam Brown, an organizer with the Occupy Student Debt Campaign, told AlterNet. “The debt makes us very individual; we can’t afford to help someone else, we can’t afford to spend our time in a way that’s not productive.”

How did we get here, with more student debt than credit card debt, with student loans rising twice as fast as mortgage debt at the height of the housing bubble? Recent graduates face terrifying unemployment numbers—ThinkProgress reported that over half of all college grads under the age of 25 are either jobless or underemployed and median wages for grads with bachelor’s degrees are down from 2000—and delinquencies on debt is steadily climbing.

Those are complicated issues, because student lending is a complicated industry, one that highlights the degree to which the government is entwined with Wall Street, and state and federal policy play off one another to push students to ever greater levels of borrowing. As students and debtors rally to shake the stigma off their debt burden and call attention to the involvement of big finance in their education, let’s take a look at the system that led us to a trillion dollars in debt.

The Politics of Debt

You know you have a problem when even Mr. 1 Percent himself, Mitt Romney, is declaring his support for a move to hold student loan interest rates low. “I support extending the temporary relief on interest rates for students as a result of — as a result of student loans, obviously — in part because of the extraordinarily poor conditions in the job market,” Romney said this week, probably in an attempt to blame President Obama for the lousy conditions young workers are facing. (Romney has also said he supports Paul Ryan’s budget, which allows student loan interest rates to go back up to 6.8 percent from the 3.4 percent current rate for new loans. Ryan’s budget also slashes Pell grants, the government’s method of giving rather than lending money to low-income students.)

On the campaign trail, Obama has pounded the issue by calling for Congress to temporarily extend the low interest rates. Members of Congress have introduced legislation to permanently keep the rate at which the government lends money at 3.4 percent. Roosevelt Institute fellow Mike Konzcal has noted that the government borrows at a far lower rate than that, which raises the question of why it is not investing more robustly in young people.

Konczal pointed out that the government makes a profit somewhere around 13 percent for each dollar of loans, and because the loans are not dischargeable in bankruptcy and Social Security payments can even be garnished to make them up, default may even be more profitable for lenders than borrowers making payments on time. There’s almost no risk of losses, which are the reason for high interest in the first place. Keeping interest rates low won’t cost the government money, it will simply cut into its profit margin a little bit. While the big banks that crashed the economy continue to enjoy ultra-low interest rates, there’s no reason to let the rates get any higher.

Original Source, AlterNet: http://www.alternet.org/economy/155133/wall_street-inflated_student_debt_bubble_hits_%241_trillion%3B_debtors_rally_for_relief

Relayed by CCDS Links, April 27 2012

**END**

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Egypt

EXPLOITATION, DEBT AND AID IN EGYPT AND TUNISIA

MONDAY JANUARY 23rdExploitation, Debt & Aid in Egypt and Tunisia: What Direction for the Revolutions? with Dr Adam Hanieh

At The Gallery, Farringdon, London
70/77 Cowcross Street, London, EC1M 6EJ. (near Farringdon Tube station)
note new start time at 6.45 p.m. to 8.45 p.m.

We suggest you arrive 15 minutes beforehand in order to settle in with your glass of wine.
Entrance fee: £3 (£2 concessions)

In the wake of the uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia, international financial institutions such as the World Bank and International Monetary Fund, in partnership with the Gulf Arab States, have rushed to offer loans and investment packages to the new transitional regimes. The possible conditionalities attached to these aid packages have provoked widespread concern from the region’s political movements, and need to be seen in the context of ongoing struggles to achieve the social and economic demands that underpinned the uprisings.

Dr. Adam Hanieh will examine the logic of financial aid in the Middle East, locating the discussion within the political economy of the uprisings and the neoliberal transformation of the region over the past two decades. Dr. Hanieh is a Lecturer in Development Studies at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), and is author of the recently published Capitalism and Class in the Gulf Arab States (Palgrave-MacMillan 2011).

Friends of Le Monde Diplomatique is a UK-based affiliate of the Les Amis Le Monde Diplomatique which supports the writings and tradition which has evolved over 50 years of publication of the Le Monde Diplomatique Newspaper. Our “Cafe Diplo” meetings at The Gallery at Farringdon, in the City of London on selected Monday evenings, are presented (in English) in the context of our global anti neo-conservative-liberal tradition, and give an opportunity for lively debate between speakers and audience.

See: http://mondediplofriends.org.uk/calendar.htm

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Aesthetics

KOSMOPROLET ISSUE 3

Kosmoprolet #3  is now available in print. 

The Editorial can be found in English here: http://www.kosmoprolet.org/english

Contents:

  • Editorial
  • Arabischer Frühling im Herbst des Kapitals
  • Jenseits der Agrarrevolution
  • Schranken proletarischer Emanzipation. Zur Kritik der Gewerkschaften
  • Fragebogen zur Leiharbeit
  • Der Existenzialismus als Zerfallsprodukt revolutionärer Theorie
  • Zwischen Arbeiterautonomie und Kommunisierung.
  • Eine Kritik an den “28 Thesen zur Klassengesellschaft”
  • Über die Kommunisierung und ihre Theoretiker
  • Proletarische Bewegung und Produktivkraftkritik

 

Addendum, 13.50 GMT, 28th December 2011: There is a translation app on this journal’s site which allows you to read the content in English. It works really well. … Glenn

**END**

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski