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Antonio Gramsci

Antonio Gramsci

GHILARZA SUMMER SCHOOL ON ANTONIO GRAMSCI

Province of Oristano, Sardinia

La Ghilarza Summer School bandisce 15 posti per la partecipazione a un corso di alta formazione sul pensiero di Antonio Gramsci. Il corso si svolgerà a Ghilarza (OR) nel periodo 8-12 settembre 2014 e sarà dedicato al tema: Egemonico/Subalterno.

The Ghilarza Summer School offers 15 scholarships for participating to an advanced studies course on the thought of Antonio Gramsci. The course will be held in Ghilarza (OR) during the period from 8th to 12th September 2014, and will be dedicated to the subject: Hegemonic / Subaltern.

La Ghilarza Summer School publica una convocatoria de 15 becas para participar en un curso avanzado sobre el pensamiento de Antonio Gramsci. El curso se llevará a cabo en Ghilarza (OR) durante el periodo del 8 al 12 de septiembre 2014 y estará dedicado al tema: Hegemónico/Subalterno.

1. Ghilarza Summer School
La Ghilarza Summer School (GSS) è un’iniziativa dell’Associazione Casa Museo Antonio Gramsci di Ghilarza, con la partecipazione istituzionale della Fondazione Istituto Gramsci (Roma) e della International Gramsci Society (IGS), e con il sostegno finanziario della Fondazione Banco di Sardegna.

Le attività della GSS sono orientate da un Consiglio scientifico composto (nel triennio 2014-2017) da: Joseph A. Buttigieg (University of Notre Dame, Indiana/USA, presidente della IGS); Giuseppe Cospito
(Università di Pavia); Gianni Fresu (Associazione Casa Museo Antonio Gramsci, Ghilarza); Gianni Francioni (Università di Pavia, presidente della GSS); Fabio Frosini (Università di Urbino, direttore della GSS); Dora Kanoussi (Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, México); Fiamma Lussana (Università di Sassari); Mauro Pala (Università di Cagliari); Peter D. Thomas (Brunel University, London); Giuseppe Vacca (presidente della Fondazione Istituto Gramsci, Roma); Cosimo Zene (School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London).

Il Consiglio scientifico è coordinato da un Comitato direttivo formato da: Joseph. A. Buttigieg, Giuseppe Cospito (segretario), Gianni Francioni, Fabio Frosini, Giuseppe Vacca.

Il corpo docente dalla GSS 2014 è formato da: Joseph A. Buttigieg (University of Notre Dame, Indiana/USA), Giuseppe Cospito (Università di Pavia), Gianni Francioni (Università di Pavia), Fabio Frosini (Università di Urbino), Marcus E. Green (Otterbein University/USA), Guido Liguori (Università della Calabria), Giancarlo Schirru (Università di Cassino), Giovanni Semeraro (Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói – Rio de Janeiro/Brasil), Peter D. Thomas (Brunel University, London), Giuseppe Vacca (Fondazione Istituto Gramsci, Roma).

2. Criteri di ammissibilità dei candidati [qui e in seguito il genere maschile è utilizzato come neutro, per designare entrambi i sessi] Possono candidarsi alla GSS giovani studiosi, di qualsiasi nazionalità, che siano in possesso di laurea magistrale (o titolo equivalente: M.A., Master, Mestrado, ecc.), che abbiano già svolto ricerche su Gramsci e abbiano conseguito o stiano conseguendo un dottorato di ricerca e/o siano autori di adeguate pubblicazioni su Gramsci.

Gli allievi selezionati devono possedere una competenza dell’italiano sufficiente a seguire le lezioni (che si svolgeranno in italiano) e a intervenire attivamente nella discussione, e devono sapersi confrontare con i testi di Gramsci nella loro versione originale.

3. Criteri di selezione
La GSS privilegia un approccio di carattere storico e interdisciplinare. Per questa ragione, nella selezione delle domande è fatta valere esclusivamente l’obbiettiva rilevanza della formazione del candidato e del progetto di ricerca da lui presentato, rispetto alle finalità scientifiche generali e allo specifico tema selezionato dalla GSS.

La GSS si impegna a favorire la realizzazione della parità di genere. Per questa ragione, le candidature femminili sono particolarmente incoraggiate.

 

From International Gramsci Society: http://www.internationalgramscisociety.org/communications/gss2014.html

 

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Postcolonial

Postcolonial

POSTCOLONIAL THEORY AND THE SPECTER OF CAPITAL

By Vivek Chibber

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Published April 2013

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A provocative intellectual assault on the Subalternists’ foundational work.

Postcolonial theory has become enormously influential as a framework for understanding the Global South. It is also a school of thought popular because of its rejection of the supposedly universalizing categories of the Enlightenment. In this devastating critique, mounted on behalf of the radical Enlightenment tradition, Vivek Chibber offers the most comprehensive response yet to postcolonial theory. Focusing on the hugely popular Subaltern Studies project, Chibber shows that its foundational arguments are based on a series of analytical and historical misapprehensions. He demonstrates that it is possible to affirm a universalizing theory without succumbing to Eurocentrism or reductionism.

POSTCOLONIAL THEORY AND THE SPECTER OF CAPITAL promises to be a historical milestone in contemporary social theory.

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“With its focus on cultural identities and mixtures, postcolonial theory ignored the larger context of capitalist relations and thus limited its scope to Western academia where it excelled in the game of growing and profiting from the liberal guilt feeling. Chibber’s book simply sets the record straight, bringing postcolonialism down from cultural heights to where it belongs, into the very heart of global capitalist processes. The book we were all waiting for, a burst of fresh air dispelling the stale aroma of pseudo-radical academic establishment.” – Slavoj Žižek

“In this scrupulous and perceptive analysis, Vivek Chibber successfully shows that the ‘universalizing categories of Enlightenment thought’ emerge unscathed from the criticisms of postcolonial theorists. He shows further that—perhaps ironically—Subaltern Studies greatly underestimates the role of subaltern agency in bringing about the transformations that they attribute to the European bourgeoisie. Chibber’s analysis also provides a very valuable account of the actual historical sociology of modern European development, of Indian peasant mobilization and activism, and much else. It is a very significant contribution.” – Noam Chomsky

“In this outstanding work—a model of clarity in its architecture and argumentation—key theorists of the ‘Subaltern’ and of postcoloniality have met their most formidable interlocutor and critic yet. Chibber’s critique of postcolonial theory and the historical sociological studies associated with it is, at the same time, a vigorous and welcome defense of the enduring value of certain Enlightenment universals as an analytical framework to both understand and radically change the world we live in.” – Achin Vanaik

“Vivek Chibber has written a stunning critique of postcolonial theory as represented by the Subaltern Studies school. While eschewing all polemics, he shows that their project is undermined by their paradoxical acceptance of an essentially liberal-Whig interpretation of the bourgeois revolutions and capitalist development in the West, which provides the foundation for their fundamental assertion of the difference of the East. Through a series of painstaking empirical and conceptual studies Chibber proceeds to overturn the central pillars of the Subalternists’ framework, while sustaining the credibility of Enlightenment theories. It is a bravura performance that cannot help but shake up our intellectual and political landscape.” – Robert Brenner

“POSTCOLONIAL THEORY AND THE SPECTER OF CAPITAL is a must-read book for students of comparative politics and social theory. Vivek Chibber presents a forceful challenge to the Subaltern Studies school and to postcolonial theory more broadly. Arguing with great clarity, Chibber raises fundamental objections to their ideas about capitalism, power, and agency, and presents an alternative account of these ideas. Most fundamentally, he rejects the fundamental division between ‘East and West’ associated with postcolonial theory and defends the ‘universalizing categories of Enlightenment thought.’ This is a major contribution that is bound to reshape debate on these important issues.” – Joshua Cohen

“In this book, Vivek Chibber has carried out a thoroughgoing dissection of Subaltern Studies. Like a highly skilled anatomist, he lays bare the skeleton, the nervous system, the arteries and veins of this school … In the process the reader is also exposed to the nitty-gritty of a materialist historiography.” – Amiya Kumar Bagchi

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Not Even Marxist? Paul M. Heideman examines Chris Taylor’s critique of Vivek Chibber:

http://www.versobooks.com/blogs/1297-not-even-marxist-paul-m-heideman-examines-chris-taylor-s-critique-of-vivek-chibber

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/new-from-verso-postcolonial-theory-and-the-specter-of-capital-by-vivek-chibber

 

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‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Critical Pedagogy

EDUCATIONAL SPACES OF ALTERITY

CALL FOR PAPERS

Educational Spaces of Alterity
University of Nottingham, Tuesday 26th April 2010

Nottingham Critical Pedagogy invites contributions for a day of workshops considering spaces (both inside and outside the academy) that may help challenge the dominance of neoliberal logics, alienated practices and Eurocentric hegemony in contemporary educational practice, and in so doing contribute to radical social change. We are pleased to announce that John Holloway will be hosting a keynote workshop at the event.

We hope to welcome contributions from a variety of disciplines and from inside and outside the academy. These can be in any format, but we especially encourage those that break from traditional conference paper models: workshops, artistic engagements, poster presentations and performances would all be welcomed. We welcome suggestions for entire workshop sessions (90 minutes), or single contributions, which we will group into workshops.

Our event partners Spaces of Alterity: a conference hosted by the University of Nottingham’s Department of Culture, Film and Media on Wed 27th-Thurs 28th April, with keynote addresses by China Miéville and Alberto Toscano. Both events are designed to work on their own, but participants are more than welcome to attend both should they wish, and we will be co-curating an Annexinema film night with Spaces of Alterity (details tbc) to show short films which touch upon the themes of the two events.

A non-exhaustive list of themes you may wish to consider is offered over the page. Please do not feel these are mutually exclusive:

Critical Education and ‘The Crisis’

  • How can critical education respond to the crisis in higher education and wider societal crises?
  • Do these crises close down or create spaces of hope for critical education?
  • Defending the university? Transforming the university? Abandoning the university?

 

Education and the Affective

  • Emotional epistemologies and pedagogies.
  • The role of hope in critical education.
  • ‘Radical love’.

 

Community Education

  • Skillshare workshops.
  • Social movements/community politics.
  • Challenging the borders between HE and community.
  • The role of non-traditional educational spaces (art galleries, social centres, etc).

 

Border Thinking and Hybridity

  • The importance of identity and difference for critical education.
  • Challenging hegemonic and Eurocentric perspectives.
  • How can we introduce the subaltern into the classroom?

 

Reflections on Practice

  • Experiences of critical education.
  • What can we learn from past experiences, experiments and struggle?

 

Art, Music and Critical Education

  • The role of art and music in critical education.
  • Resonances between critical education and contemporary theory and practice in art and music.
  • Problems of assessment in critical and artistic education: or is assessment the problem?

 

Please send abstracts and information on the format you wish your presentation to take to nottinghamcriticalpedagogy@gmail.com no later than Tuesday 8th February. These should be no more than 300 words, but may contain links to further reading regarding your chosen method of presentation.

Registration is free for Educational Spaces of Alterity but there are fees for Spaces of Alterity: attendance for one day is £25/£35; for both days it’s £45/55 (cheaper price for students and unwaged).

We have a limited amount of money to help cover the travel and accommodation costs of participants who would not otherwise be able to attend, or to help with fees for those who wish to stay for Spaces of Alterity. Details will be announced once abstracts have been received. Food and drink will be provided for all.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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Antonio Gramsci

THE POLITICAL THOUGHT OF ANTONIO GRAMSCI

The Political Thought of Antonio Gramsci: New Developments in Theory and Practice
Manchester Workshop in Political Theory
September 1-3, 2010

Panel 1: New Debates on Gramsci’s Political Thought
Chair: Ian Bruff

Antonio Gramsci and the Lyons Theses: The Dialectics of Living History
Adam Morton

Democratizing the Alliance: Lenin, Bukharin and Gramsci
Mark McNally

Panel 2: New Debates on Gramsci’s Political Thought 2
Chair: Adam Morton

Gramsci and the autonomy of the political
Peter Thomas

Thinking in a ‘Common Sense’ Gramscian Way about Capitalist State Practices
Ian Bruff

The Struggle for Signification and the Construction of Hegemony
Javier Balsa

Panel 3: New Applications of Gramsci in International Relations
Chair: Mark McNally

Transnational Capitalist Practices and the Political Economy of Biofuels. A Gramscian Approach to the Study of European Environmental Policy
Kim Bizzarri

Gramsci and Ambekar on Subalterns/Dalits
Cosimo Zene

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Books

REVIEWING BOOKS FOR HISTORICAL MATERIALISM

The journal Historical Materialism is looking for book reviewers.

Books to be Reviewed:

If you wish to review any of these books, or would like to propose other books for review, please write to a.toscano@gold.ac.uk 

Theodor W. Adorno, Current of Music (2009)

Chris Alden et al. (eds.), China Returns to Africa: A Rising Power and a Continent Embrace (2008)

Chris Alden, China in Africa (2007)

Bastian van Apeldoorn et al. (eds.), Contradictions and Limits of Neoliberal European Governance: From Lisbon to Lisbon (2009)

Paige Arthur, Unfinished Projects: Decolonization and the Philosophy of Jean-Paul Sartre (2010)

Maurizio Atzeni, Workplace Conflict: Mobilization and Solidarity in Argentina (2010)

Simon Baker, Surrealism, History and Revolution (2007)

Giorgio Baratta, Antonio Gramsci in contrappunto (2007)

Luciano Barca, Cronache dall’interno del vertice del PCI, 3 vols. (2005)

Andrew E. Barshay, The Social Sciences in Modern Japan: The Marxian and Modernist Traditions (2004)

Peter Beilharz, Socialism and Modernity (2009)

Daniel Bensaïd, Strategies of Resistance + ‘Who are the Trotskyists?’ (2009)

Olivier Besancenot and Michael Löwy, Che Guevara: His Revolutionary Legacy (2009)

Roland Boer and Jorunn Okland (eds.), Marxist Feminist Criticism of the Bible (2008)

Sergio Bologna, Ceti medi senza futuro? Scritti, appunti sul lavoro e altro (2007)

AA.VV. Condizioni e identità nel lavoro professionale. Riflessioni sul saggio di Sergio Bologna Ceti medi senza futuro? (2008)

Werner Bonefeld (ed.), Subverting the Present, Imagining the Future: Insurrection, Movement, Commons (2008)

Derek Boothman, Traducibilità e processi traduttivi. Un caso: A. Gramsci linguista (2004)

Philip Bounds, Orwell & Marxism: The Political and Cultural Thinking of George Orwell (2009)

Sarah Bracking, Money and Power: Great Predators in the Political Economy of Development (2009)

Peter Bratsis, Everyday Life and the State (2006)

Dennis Broe, Film Noir, American Workers, and Postwar Hollywood (2009)

Michael E. Brown, The Historiography of Communism (2009)

Alex Callinicos, Bonfire of Illusions: The Twin Crises of the Liberal World (2010)

Andrew Chitty and Martin McIvor, Karl Marx and Contemporary Philosophy (2009)

Mike Cole, Critical Race Theory and Education: A Marxist Response (2010)

Sam Coombes, The Early Sartre and Marxism (2008)

Cristina Corradi, Storia dei Marxismi in Italia (2005)

Sean Craven, Against the Spiritual Turn: Marxism, Realism and Critical Theory (2010)

Eric Leif Davin, Crucible of Freedom: Workers’ Democracy in the Industrial Heartland, 1914-1960 (2010)

Michael Decker, Tilling the Hateful Earth: Agricultural Production in the Late Antique East (2009)

Nick Dyer-Witheford and Greig de Peuter, Games of Empire: Global Capitalism and Video Games (2009)

Terry Eagleton and Matthew Beaumont, The Task of the Critic: Terry Eagleton in Dialogue (2009)

Stuart Elden, Terror and Territory: The Spatial Extent of Sovereignty (2009)

Ben Fine, Theories of Social Capital: Researchers Behaving Badly (2010)

Roberto Fineschi, Un nuovo Marx. Filologia e interpretazione dopo la nuova edizione storico-critica (Mega 2) (2008)

Maurice Godelier, In and Out of the West (2009)

Jane Hardy, Poland’s New Capitalism (2009)

David Harvey, A Companion to Marx’s Capital (2010)

David Harvey, The Enigma of Capital (2010)

Wang Hui, The End of the Revolution: China and the Limits of Modernity (2009)

Mobo Gao, The Battle for China’s Past: Mao & the Cultural Revolution (2008)

Richard H. Immerman, Empire for Liberty: A History of American Imperialism from Benjamin Franklin to Paul Wolfowitz (2010)

Ken Jones et al. Schooling in Western Europe: The New Order and its Adversaries (2008) 

Paul R. Josephson, Would Trotsky Wear a Bluetooth? Technological Utopianism Under Socialism, 1917-1989 (2010)

Ray Kiely, Rethinking Imperialism (2010)

John Milios and Dimitris P. Sotiropoulos, Rethinking Imperialism: A Study of Capitalist Rule (2009)

David Laibman, Deep History: A Study in Social Evolution and Human Potential (2007)

Luca La Rovere, Storia dei Guf (2003) and L’Eredità del fascismo (2008)

Gianpasquale Santomassimo, La terza via fascista. Il mito del corporativismo (2006)

Tommaso Baris, Il fascismo in provincia (2007)

Loreto Di Nucci, Lo Stato-partito del fascismo. Genesi, evoluzione e crisi, 1919-1943 (2009)

Domenico Losurdo, Marx e il bilancio storico del Novecento (2009)

Manning Marable, Beyond Black & White, 2nd ed (2009)

Marco Maurizi, Adorno e il tempo del non-identico (2004)

George E. McCarthy, Dreams in Exile: Rediscovering Science and Ethics in Nineteenth-Century Social Theory (2009)

Terrence McDonough et al. (eds.), Contemporary Capitalism and its Crises: Social Structure of Accumulation Theory for the 21st Century (2010)

Patrick McGee, Theory and the Common from Marx to Badiou (2009)

Jim McGuigan, Cool Capitalism (2009)

István Mészáros, The Challenge and Burden of Historical Time: Socialism in the Twenty-First Century (2008)

Claire Metelits, Inside Insurgency: Violence, Civilians, and Revolutionary Group Behavior (On the Front Lines with the FARC, SPLA, and PKK) (2010)

Andrew Milner (ed.), Tenses of Imagination: Raymond Williams on Science Fiction, Utopia and Dystopia (2010)

Sandra Moog and Rob Stones (eds), Nature, Social Relations and Human Needs: Essays in Honour of Ted Benton (2009)

Rosalind C. Morris (ed.), Can the Subaltern Speak? Reflections on the History of an Idea (2010)

Jerry Z. Muller, Capitalism and the Jews (2010)

Antonio Negri, The Labor of Job: The Biblical Text as a Parable of Human Labor (2009)

Jose Neves, Comunismo e Nacionalismo em Portugal. Politica, Cultura e Historia no Seculo XX (2008)

Aldo Pardi, Il sintomo e la rivoluzione. Georges Politzer crocevia tra due epoche (2007)

David Parker (ed.), Ideology, Absolutism and the English Revolution: Debates of the British Communist Historians, 1940-1956 (2008)

Elizabeth J. Perry, Patrolling the Revolution: Worker Militias, Citizenship, and the Modern Chinese State (2006)

Colloque de Cerisy. La Philosophie Déplacée. Autour de Jacques Rancière (2006)

Jonah Raskin, The Mythology of Imperialism: A Revolutionary Critique of British Literature and Society in the Modern Age, new ed. (2009)

Ferruccio Rossi-Landi, Ideologia (2005)

Andrew Sartori, Bengal in Global Concept History: Culturalism in the Age of Capital (2008)

Simon Skempton, Alienation After Derrida (2010)

Kate Soper et al. (eds.), The Politics and Pleasures of Consuming Differently (2009)

Marc Stears, Demanding Democracy: American Radicals in Search of a New Politics (2010)

Simon Stewart, Culture and the Middle Classes (2010)

Yvette Taylor, Classed Intersections: Spaces, Selves, Knowledges (2010)

Kenneth Surin, Freedom Not Yet: Liberation and the Next World Order (2009)

Leila Simona Talani (ed.), The Global Crash: Towards a New Global Financial Regime? (2010)

Hiroshi Uchida (ed.), Marx for the 21st Century (2006)

Paolo Virno, Multitude Between Innovation and Negation (2008)

Sheldon S. Wolin, Democracy Inc.: Managed Democracy and the Specter of Inverted Totalitarianism (2010)

Mark P. Worrell, Dialectic of Solidarity: Labor, Antisemitism and the Frankfurt School (2008)

Li Xing (ed.) The Rise of China and the Capitalist World Order (2010)

Update 6th July 2010 – Revised List

At: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/books-for-review/books-to-be-reviewed/

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

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Social Movements

INTERFACE – A JOURNAL FOR AND ABOUT SOCIAL MOVEMENTS

Interface – A Journal For and About Social Movements

Call for papers – Issue 3: CRISES, SOCIAL MOVEMENTS AND REVOLUTIONARY TRANSFORMATIONS

Interface is a new journal produced twice yearly by activists and academics around the world in response to the development and increased visibility of social movements in the last few years – and the immense amount of knowledge generated in this process. This knowledge is created across the globe, and in many contexts and a variety of ways, and it constitutes an incredibly valuable resource for the further development of social movements. Interface responds to this need, as a tool to help our movements learn from each other’s struggles, by developing analyses and knowledge that allow lessons to be learned from specific movement processes and experiences and translated into a form useful for other movements.

We welcome contributions by movement participants and academics who are developing movement-relevant theory and research. Our goal is to include material that can be used in a range of ways by movements – in terms of its content, its language, its purpose and its form. We are seeking work in a range of different formats, such as conventional articles, review essays, facilitated discussions and interviews, action notes, teaching notes, key documents and analysis, book reviews – and beyond. Both activist and academic peers review research contributions, and other material is sympathetically edited by peers. The editorial process generally will be geared towards assisting authors to find ways of expressing their understanding, so that we all can be heard across geographical, social and political distances.

Our third issue, to be published in May 2010, will have space for general articles on all aspects of understanding social movements, as well as a special themed section on crises, social movements and revolutionary transformations.

CRISES, SOCIAL MOVEMENTS AND REVOLUTIONARY TRANSFORMATIONS

“In every country the process is different, although the content is the same. And the content is the crisis of the ruling class’s hegemony, which occurs either because the ruling class has failed in some major political undertaking, for which it has requested, or forcibly extracted, the consent of broad masses … or because huge masses … have passed suddenly from a state of political passivity to a certain activity, and put forward demands which taken together, albeit not organically formulated, add up to a revolution. A “crisis of authority” is spoken of: this is precisely the crisis of hegemony, or general crisis of the state”

So wrote the Italian revolutionary Antonio Gramsci from behind the walls of Mussolini’s prison, in his famous notes on “State and Civil Society”. His words aptly describe the trajectory of crises in modern history – these are periods when the wheels of economic growth and expansion grind to a halt, when traditional political loyalties melt away, and, crucially, when ruling classes find themselves confronted with popular movements that no longer accept the terms of their rule, and that seek to create alternative social orders.

The clashes between elite projects and popular movements that are at the heart of any “crisis of hegemony” generate thoroughgoing processes of economic, social and political change – these may be reforms that bear the imprint of popular demands, and they may also be changes that reflect the implementation of elite designs. Most importantly, however, crises are typically also those moments when social movements and subaltern groups are able to push the limits of what they previously thought it was possible to achieve in terms of effecting progressive change – it is this dynamic which lies at the heart of revolutionary transformations.

Gramsci himself witnessed, organised within and wrote during the breakdown of liberal capitalism and bourgeois democracy in the 1910s through to the 1930s. This was a conjuncture when tendencies towards stagnation in capitalist accumulation generated the horrors of the First World War and the Great Depression. Movements of workers and colonized peoples threatened the rule of capital and empires, old and new, and elites turned to repressive strategies like fascism in an attempt to secure the continuation of their dominance.

Today social movements are once again having to do their organizing and mobilizing work in the context of economic crisis, one that is arguably of similar proportions to that witnessed by Gramsci, and a political crisis that runs just as deep. The current crisis emerged from the collapse of the US housing market, revealing an intricate web of unsustainable debt and “toxic assets” whose tentacles reached every corner of the global economy. More than just a destruction of “fictitious capital”, the crisis has propelled a breakdown of world industrial production and trade, driving millions of working families to the brink and beyond. And, far from being a one-off, this crisis is the latest and worst in a series of collapses starting with the stock market crash of 1987, the chronic stagnation of the once all-powerful Japanese economy, the Asian financial meltdown of 1997 and the bursting of the dot.com bubble.

The current conjuncture throws into question the fundamentals of the neoliberal project that has been pursued by global elites and transnational institutions over the past three decades. Taking aim at reversing the victories won by popular movements in the aftermath of the Second World War, neoliberalism transferred wealth from popular classes to global elites on a grand scale. The neoliberal project of privatizing the public sector and commodifying public goods, rolling back the welfare states, promoting tax cuts for the rich, manipulating economic crises in the global South and deregulating the world’s financial markets continued unabated through the 1980s and 1990s.

As presaged by Gramsci, neoliberal policies have whittled away the material concessions that underpinned social consensus. Ours is a conjuncture in which global political elites have failed in an undertaking for which they sought popular consent, and as a consequence, popular masses have passed from political passivity to a certain activity.

Since the middle of the 1990s, we have seen the development of large-scale popular movements in several parts of the globe, along with a series of revolutionary situations or transformations in various countries, as well as unprecedented levels of international coordination and alliance-building between movements and direct challenges not only to national but to global power structures. The first stirrings of this activity were in the rise of the Zapatistas in Mexico, the water wars in Bolivia, and the protests on the streets of Seattle. On a global scale we saw dissent explode in the form of opposition to the wars waged by the US on Afghanistan and Iraq. In terms of sheer numbers, the mobilisation of against the latter invasion was the largest political protest ever undertaken, leading the New York Times to call the anti-war movement the world’s “second superpower”.

Each country has had its own movements, and a particular character to how they have moved against the neoliberal project. And for some time many have observed that these campaigns, initiatives and movements are not isolated occurrences, but part of a wider global movement for justice in the face of the neoliberal project. An explosion of analysis looking at these events and movements has occurred in the academic world, matched only by extensive argument and debate within the movements themselves.

In this issue of Interface, we encourage submissions that explore the relationship between crises, social movements and revolutionary transformations in general and the character of the current crisis and how social movements across different regions have related and responded to it in particular. Some of the questions we want to explore are as follows:

– What are the characteristics of the current economic and political crisis, what roles do social movements – from above and below – play in its dynamics, and how does it compare to the political economy of previous cycles of crises and struggle?

– What has been the role played by social movements in moments of crisis in modern history, and what lessons can contemporary popular movements learn from these experiences?

– What kinds of qualitative/quantitative shift in popular mobilisation we might expect to see in a “revolutionary wave”?

– Are crises – and in particular our current crisis – characterized by substantial competitions between different kinds of movements from below? How does such a dynamic affect the capacity to effect radical change?

– What goals do social movements set themselves in context of crisis and what kinds of movement are theoretically or historically capable of bringing about a transformed society?

– What are the criteria of success that activists operate with in terms of the forms of change social movements can achieve in the current conjuncture?

– Is revolutionary transformation a feasible option at present? Is revolution a goal among contemporary social movements?

– What are the characteristic features of elite deployment of coercive strategies when their hegemony is unravelling?

– How have global elites responded to the current crisis in terms of resort to coercion and consent? Have neoliberal elites been successful in trying to reestablish their legitimacy and delegitimizing opponents?

– Are we witnessing any bids for hegemony from elite groups outside the domain of Atlantic neoliberalism?

– How is coercion in its various forms impacting on contemporary social movements and the politics of global justice?

The deadline for contributions for the third issue is January 1, 2010.

Please contact the appropriate editor if you are thinking of submitting an article. You can access the journal and get further details at: http://www.interfacejournal.net/.

Interface is programmatically multilingual: at present we can accept and review submissions in Afrikaans, Catalan, Croatian, Danish, English, French, German, Hungarian, Italian, Maltese, Norwegian, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish and Zulu. We are also willing to try and find suitable referees for submissions in other languages, but cannot guarantee that at this point.

We are also very much looking for activists or academics interested in becoming part of Interface, particularly with the African, South Asian, Spanish-speaking Latin American, East and Central European, Mediterranean, Oceanian and North American groups.

Editorial contacts

Interface is not a traditional, centralised journal with a single key editor! Because we are a global journal, and movements (and their relationships to academia) are organised so differently in different parts of the world, the basic structure of the journal is as a network of regional or linguistically-defined groups, each of which organises its own editorial processes and tries to find an appropriate way of working with its own local realities. Articles and queries should go to the contact person listed below for the relevant region:

Movements in Africa: Please submit papers in Zulu, Afrikaans or English to Richard Pithouse indianocean77@gmail.com; in English to Mammo Muchie mammo@ihis.aau.dk; and in Portuguese to Ana Margarida Esteves anamargarida.esteves@gmail.com.

Movements in the Arab world: Please submit papers in Arabic or English to Rana Barakat barakat.rana@gmail.com or Abdul-Rahim al-Shaikh aalshaikh@birzeit.edu; or in Arabic, English, German or Hebrew to Magid Shihade mshihade@gmail.com.

Movements in Central and South America: Please submit papers in Spanish to Sara Motta saracatherinem@googlemail.com or Adriana Causa acausa@gmail.com and in Portuguese to Ana Margarida Esteves anamargarida.esteves@gmail.com.

Movements in Eastern Europe: Please submit papers in Croatian, English, German, Hungarian, Latvian, Romanian, Russian, Serbian or Turkish to Steffen Böhm steffen@essex.ac.uk or Andrejs Berdnikovs aberdnikovs@gmail.com.

Movements in North America: Please submit papers in English to Ray Sin raysin@ku.edu or Lesley Wood ljwood@yorku.ca.

Movements in South Asia: Please submit papers in English to Alf Nilsen alfgunvald@gmail.com . We are currently looking for another regional editor to work with Alf.

Movements in Southeast Asia and Oceania: Please submit papers in English to Elizabeth Humphrys lizhumphrys@gmail.com, in Spanish to Cristina Flesher Fominaya flesherfomi@gmail.com and in Portuguese to Ana Margarida Esteves anamargarida.esteves@gmail.com.

Movements in Western Europe:
Please submit papers:
* in English to Cristina Flesher Fominaya flesherfomi@gmail.com or Laurence Cox laurence.cox@nuim.ie or
* in French or Italian to Laurence Cox laurence.cox@nuim.ie or
* in German to Steffen Böhm steffen@essex.ac.uk or Laurence Cox laurence.cox@nuim.ie
* in Portuguese to Ana Margarida Esteves anamargarida.esteves@gmail.com
* in Spanish to Cristina Flesher Fominaya flesherfomi@gmail.com
* We can also accept papers in Catalan, Maltese and Norwegian: please contact Laurence Cox laurence.cox@nuim.ie in relation to these.

Transnational Movements:
Please submit papers in English, Dutch, French and Spanish or with special reference to labour or social forums, to Peter Waterman pwaterma@gmail.com; in English, with special reference to dialogue-based movements, to Richard Moore rkm@quaylargo.com; in Arabic, English, German or Hebrew to Magid Shihade mshihade@gmail.com; or in English, French, Italian or German to Laurence Cox laurence.cox@nuim.ie.

Book reviews: In English: please contact Aileen O’Carroll Aileen.OCarroll@nuim.ie.

Movements in Central Asia and East Asia: We are hoping to expand our intellectual and linguistic capacity to include these areas, but at present do not have sufficient editorial expertise to review papers on movements in these regions. Expressions of interest from potential regional editors, willing to help assemble a regional subgroup of academics and activists to review papers on movements in any of these regions, are very welcome.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Spivak

THE QUESTION OF SUBALTERNITY

 

A two-day seminar with Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak at CENDEAC (Murcia, South Eastern Spain)  

1st and 2nd December // 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak: The Question of Subalternity

Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak will lead an intensive seminar at CENDEAC on the 1st and 2nd December 2009. It will be a unique opportunity to engage with Spivak’s thought, through a detailed analysis of some of her most influential texts. 

The seminar will discuss the history and usefulness of the elusive concept of the subaltern based on questions emerging from three texts by Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak available in Spanish translation: “Can the subaltern speak?”, “Subaltern Studies: deconstructing historiography” and “Displacement and the Discourse of Woman”. The two sessions will be entitled: “The Subaltern: Use and Abuse” and “Women, Subalternity, and Strategic Essentialism”.

Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, is University Professor in the Humanities at Columbia University and holds honorary degrees from the Universities of Toronto and London and Oberlin College. She has published, Of Grammatology (translation with critical introduction of Jacques Derrida, De la grammatologie, 1976); Thinking Academic Freedom in Gendered Post-Coloniality (1993); In Other Worlds (1987); Outside in the Teaching Machine (1993); A Critique of Postcolonial Reason (1999); Death of a Discipline(2003), Other Asias (2007). And the forthcoming An Aesthetic Education in an Age of Globalization. She has also translated from Bengali, Mahasweta Devi: Imaginary Maps (1994); Breast Stories (1997), Old Women (1999); Chotti Munda and His Arrow (2002) and Ramproshad Sen’s (eighteenth century Bengali mystic): Song for Kali (2000). The texts “Translation As Culture” (2005), “Translating into English” (2005), and “Rethinking Comparativism” (2009) reflect her concern for the task of the translator.  “Righting Wrongs” (2001), and “Ethics and Politics in Tagore, Coetzee, and Certain Scenes of Teaching” (2004) give a sense of her dedication to supplementing vanguardism. “Can the Subaltern Speak?” (1983) has become a controversial classic.

Information and enrolment:

Attendance is free unless a certificate is required, in which case fees will be 30€ standard, 15€ for the unemployed, full-time students and OAPs, and free to Friends of CENDEAC

Language of the Seminar: English with simultaneous translation into Spanish. 

CENDEAC is accessible for wheelchair users and people with diminished mobility. Whenever possible, we will strive to provide on request a transcript of papers for users with impaired hearing. Auditorium Capacity: 140 people

For more information, including assistance with travel and accommodation, please visit our website: http://www.cendeac.net or contact yhernandez[at]cendeac.net

CENDEAC
Pabellón 5
Antiguo Cuartel de Artillería
C/ Madre Elisea Oliver Molina, s/n
30002-Murcia (España)
Tel.: +34 868 914 769
Fax: +34 868 914 149

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Power to the People?


…masses, proletariat, workers, soviets, nation, community, subalterns, multitude, commons…

Saturday 9th May 2009
Radical Philosophy Conference, Birkbeck College, Malet Street, London

BOOK NOW!

£25/£10 unwaged

Registration and further details: matt.charles@blueyonder.co.uk

Cheques payable to `Radical Philosophy Ltd’ should be sent to: 
Radical Philosophy Conference, Peter Osborne, CRMEP, Middlesex University, Trent Park Campus, Bramley Road, London N14 4YZ

 


PROGRAMME:


Plenary (chair: Peter Osborne, RP)
Gayatri Spivak (Columbia University, NY): ‘They, the People’

 


1. The General Will (chair: Peter Hallward, RP)


David Andress (Portsmouth): ‘The General Will on the Street: Parisian Activism, Sovereignty and Power, 1789–93’

 

Sophie Wahnich

(CNRS, Paris): ‘How Do the People Make Themselves Heard?’

 


2. Urban Collectivities (chair: David Cunningham, RP)

AbdouMaliq Simone (Goldsmiths): ‘Urban Intersections and the Politics of Anticipation’

Erik Swyngedouw (Manchester): ‘Reflections on the Post-Political City’

 

3. Population & Biopolitics (chair: Claudia Aradau, RP)

Couze Venn (Nottingham Trent): ‘Biopolitics, Diasporas and (Neo)Liberal Political Economy’

Encarnacion Gutierrez Rodriguez (Manchester): ‘Feminist Strategies Revisited – Sexopolitics, Multitude and Biopolitics’

 


4. Class, Commons & Multitude (chair: Esther Leslie, RP)

 

Massimo De Angelis

(UEL): ‘Crisis, Tragedies and the Commons’

Daniel Bensaid (University of Paris-VIII), ‘Can We (Still) Break the Vicious Circle of Domination?’

 

 

‘Power to the people!’ was once a revolutionary slogan, but reference to government by the people and for the people soon became an empty cliché of the post-revolutionary status quo. The people has become a notoriously ambiguous and contested term, for which numerous alternatives have been proposed: the proletariat, the workers, the masses, the soviets, the nation, the community, the multitude, the commons… And now? How might we assess the different  conceptions of political change embodied in these often conflicting ideas? What is the political and philosophical significance of `the people’ today?

 

£25/£10 unwaged

Registration and further details: matt.charles@blueyonder.co.uk

Cheques payable to `Radical Philosophy Ltd’ should be sent to: Radical Philosophy Conference, Peter Osborne, CRMEP, Middlesex University, Trent Park Campus, Bramley Road, London N14 4YZ

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk