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Panopticon

Panopticon

WRITING AND RESISTANCE

New Formations

We are pleased to announce the publication of New Formations Issue 83: ‘Writing and Resistance’
For online details see http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/issue/nf83.html

[Please note that the deadline for the next general issue of New Formations is May 31st 2015. For  contributors guidelines see http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/contributors.htm]

Details for this issue:
This issue of New Formations presents a range of exciting new work which spans and connects the fields of cultural studies, literary theory and radical political philosophy. Two contributors are concerned with the specificities of contemporary sexual politics. Three others address the relationships between writing, disclosure and interpretation. A further two texts offer radical philosophical interpretations of emergent political currents in Greece, Spain, Turkey and beyond. While there is no single theme, all the contributions share a concern to bring the most sophisticated theoretical tools available to bear upon the analysis of a range of urgent and emergent political questions. This continues to be the overriding purpose of New Formations: to explore the intersections between culture, theory and politics in order to understand the changing nature of each in the twenty-first century.

CONTENTS

Jeremy Gilbert: Editorial
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_editorial.pdf

David Alderson: Acting Straight: Reality TV, Gender Self-Consciousness and Forms of Capital

Clare Birchall: Aesthetics of the Secret
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_birchall.pdf

Naomi Booth: ‘Bathetic masochism and the shrinking woman’

Elizabeth Coles: ‘Psychoanalysis and the Poem: On Reading in Sándor Ferenczi and D.W. Winnicott’

Costas Douzinas: ‘Notes Towards an Analytics of Resistance’
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_douzinas.pdf

Sarah Kember: Why ‘Write? Feminism, publishing and the politics of communication’

Serhat Karakayali and Özge Yaka: ‘The Spirit of Gezi: The Recomposition of Political Subjectivities in Turkey’

REVIEWS:

James Penney Better tables
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_reviews_penney.pdf

Dhanveer Singh Brar Hieroglyphics of the flesh
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_reviews_singh_brar.pdf

Jade Munslow Ong Women, Crime and Sexual Transgression
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_reviews_munslow_ong.pdf

Caspar Melville Can sociologists write?
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_reviews_melville.pdf

Joseph Darlington That Dawn to Be Alive
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_reviews_darlington.pdf

Elena Tzelepis    Again Antigone
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_reviews_tzelepis.pdf

Jeremy Gilbert
http://www.jeremygilbert.org
@jemgilbert

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Critical Education / Education is Critical

Critical Education / Education is Critical

DEMOCRACY AND COLLECTIVE ACTION IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY

A message from Jeremy Gilbert

A Public Event with:

Angela McRobbie

Hilary Wainwright

Mark Fisher

Jeremy Gilbert

Neal Lawson

November 11th 2014, 6:30pm-8:30pm
Committee Room 6, House of Commons

All details and booking: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/democracy-and-collective-action-in-the-twenty-first-century-tickets-13633868267?aff=eventful%2Fr%2Feventful

‘Reclaim Modernity: Beyond Markets, Beyond Machines’ is a new pamphlet published by Compass and written by Mark Fisher and Jeremy Gilbert. A brief introduction to the pamphlet can be read here, and you can click through to short piece I wrote about the pamphlet for the Guardian website, and then to the actual document, from there:
http://jeremygilbertwriting.wordpress.com/2014/10/21/reclaim-modernity/

A related essay on UKIP, Populism and the Left is here:
https://www.opendemocracy.net/ourkingdom/jeremy-gilbert/populism-and-left-does-ukip-matter-can-democracy-be-saved
Please circulate widely
Jeremy Gilbert
http://www.jeremygilbert.org
@jemgilbert=

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

Aesthetics

Aesthetics

THE POLITICS OF COMMON GROUND

Seminar: The Politics of Common Ground

Tuesday April 29th @ 3-5PM, Room LTB B

University of Essex, Colchester Campus

For this seminar Professor Jeremy Gilbert will discuss his new book: Common Ground: Democracy and Collectivity in an Age of Individualism.

Common Ground explores the philosophical relationship between collectivity, individuality, affect and agency in the neoliberal era. Jeremy Gilbert argues that individualism is forced upon us by neoliberal culture, fatally limiting our capacity to escape the current crisis of democratic politics.

The book asks how forces and ideas opposed to neoliberal hegemony, and to the individualist tradition in Western thought, might serve to protect some form of communality, and how far we must accept assumptions about the nature of individuality and collectivity which are the legacy of an elitist tradition. Along the way it examines different ideas and practices of collectivity, from conservative notions of hierarchical and patriarchal communities to the politics of ‘horizontality’ and ‘the commons’ which are at the heart of radical movements today.

Exploring this fundamental fault line in contemporary political struggle, Common Ground proposes a radically non-individualist mode of imagining social life, collective creativity and democratic possibility.

Professor Jeremy Gilbert is a writer, researcher and activist whose work has appeared in various British, continental, American and Australian publications and has been translated into French, Spanish and German. His most recent book is Common Ground: Democracy and Collectivity in an Age of Individualism (Pluto 2013) and he has co-authored books on the philosophy of dance music and the relationship between culture and politics in Blair’s Britain as well as publishing numerous articles on cultural theory, politics and music.

Sponsored by the Centre for Work, Organization, and Society

This seminar is part of an ongoing workshop series on artist collectives.

For more information contact Stevphen Shukaitis: sshuka@essex.ac.uk

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Communisation

Communisation

COMMON GROUND

Interview and Discussion with Lawrence Grossberg

 

Dear Friends

I’ve written and introduction to / summary of my latest book, Common Ground,for the Compass website.

It’s here: http://www.compassonline.org.uk/collectivity-in-an-age-of-individualism/

At the same time, I’ve published on my blog a copy the long discussion of the book and its themes between myself and Lawrence Grossberg.

It’s here: http://jeremygilbertwriting.wordpress.com/2014/04/02/common-ground-a-discussion-with-lawrence-grossberg-about-my-latest-book/

 

Please pass on to anyone who might be interested

Thanks!

Jeremy Gilbert

http://www.jeremygilbert.org
@jemgilbert

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Neoliberalism

Neoliberalism

NEOLIBERAL CULTURE – SPECIAL ISSUE OF ‘NEW FORMATIONS’

New Formations: A Journal of Culture/Theory/Politics

Issue 80-81: Neoliberal Culture
New Formations 80-81 is a special double issue on neoliberal culture.

Contributors discuss the genesis, persistence and diverse forms of power of neoliberalism, across a range of cultural sites and discursive genres – from political philosophy to pornography, from economics to photographic technology.

More information, and a selection of free articles, available at: http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/issue/nf8081.html

CONTENTS

Jeremy Gilbert
What Kind of Thing Is ‘Neoliberalism’?

Paul Gilroy
‘… We Got to Get over Before We Go Under …’ Fragments for a History of Black Vernacular Neoliberalism

Paul Patton
Foucault’s ‘Critique’ of Neoliberalism, Rawls and the Genealogy of Public Reason

Jo Littler
Meritocracy as Plutocracy: the Marketising of ‘Equality’ under Neoliberalism

Neal Curtis
Thought Bubble: Neoliberalism and the Politics of Knowledge

Mark Fisher and Jeremy Gilbert
Capitalist Realism and Neoliberal Hegemony: A Dialogue

Stephen Maddison
Beyond the Entrepreneurial Voyeur? Sex, Porn and Cultural Politics

Angela McRobbie
Feminism, the Family and the New ‘Mediated’ Maternalism

Jodi Dean
Complexity as Capture – Neoliberalism and the Loop of Drive

Lucy Potter and Claire Westall
Neoliberal Britain’s Austerity Foodscape: Home Economics, Veg Patch Capitalism and Culinary Temporality

Nicky Marsh
Hit Your Educable Public Right in the Supermarket Where They Live’: Risk and Failure in the Work of William Gaddis

Mark Hayward
ATMs, Teleprompters and Photobooths: a Short History of Neoliberal Optics

New Formations is available through many university libraries, via many major aggregators, including Project Muse.
Subscriptions information, including low-price electronic subscriptions is available by following the link from the home page.
New Formations is published by one of the UK’s few remaining independent radical publishers. Please don’t pirate the articles. If you can’t get access to them through your university library then please ask them to subscribe. If you’re not connected to a university then please consider taking out an electronic subscription.

The deadline for submissions to the next unthemed issue is April 30th 2014. For details please see: http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/contributors.html
http://www.jeremygilbert.org
@jemgilbert

 

**END**

Neoliberalism

Neoliberalism

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Protest

Protest

COMMON GROUND: DEMOCRACY AND COLLECTIVITY IN AN AGE OF INDIVIDUALISM

By Jeremy Gilbert

Pluto Press: http://www.plutobooks.com/display.asp?K=9780745325323

ISBN: 9780745325316

Extent: 272pp

Release Date: 08 Nov 2013

Size: 215mm x 135mm

Format: Paperback

Common Ground explores the philosophical relationship between collectivity, individuality, affect and agency in the neoliberal era. Jeremy Gilbert argues that individualism is forced upon us by neoliberal culture, fatally limiting our capacity to escape the current crisis of democratic politics.

The book asks how forces and ideas opposed to neoliberal hegemony, and to the individualist tradition in Western thought, might serve to protect some form of communality, and how far we must accept assumptions about the nature of individuality and collectivity which are the legacy of an elitist tradition. Along the way it examines different ideas and practices of collectivity, from conservative notions of hierarchical and patriarchal communities to the politics of ‘horizontality’ and ‘the commons’ which are at the heart of radical movements today.

Exploring this fundamental faultline in contemporary political struggle, Common Ground proposes a radically non-individualist mode of imagining social life, collective creativity and democratic possibility.

About The Author

Jeremy Gilbert is Professor of Cultural and Political Theory at the University of East London and editor of the journal New Formations. He is the co-author of Discographies: Dance, Music, Culture and the Politics of Sound (2002) and the author of Anti-capitalism and Culture: Radical Theory and Popular Politics (2008).

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Gilles Deleuze

DELEUZE AND GUATTARI AND OCCUPY

Saturday 25th Feb 2-5pm

Occupy LSX / School of Ideas
Featherstone Rd
Islington
EC1Y 8RX

An afternoon of talks, about the relevance of Deleuze and Guattari’s ideas to Occupy. 

Deleuze and Guattari’s writings are considered, by political activists, philosophers, artists and writers to provide the most insightful analysis of the crisis we face today.  It is claimed that the rhizomic, nomadic and creative nature of Occupy is inherently DeleuzeoGuattarian. This afternoon of talks tests these claims and asks; does Deleuze and Guattari’s conceptual apparatus scythe right through to the heart of capitalist production: do they provide vitalist, non-paranoid, (entirely pragmatic) systems of thought around which both a world can be torn down and a new one built? 

How it feels to be free: becoming-together with Deleuze & Guattari  
Jeremy Gilbert, Reader at the University of East London.

Minor Politics, Activism, and Occupy 
Nick Thoburn, Lecturer in Sociology: University of Manchester.

Worldwide, Occupy will not publish a solidified list of aims or a manifesto, preferring to speak of a thousand struggles, a thousand acts of resistance spoken though thousands of voices. Is this the same as Deleuze and Guattari’s A Thousand Plateaus? 
Andrew Conio, Senior Lecturer University of Wolverhampton, Associate Lecturer Chelsea School of Art.

Further information contact A.Conio@wlv.ac.uk 

The School of Ideas: http://schoolofideas.org.uk/ 

**END**

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Richard Alpert

RADICAL FOUCAULT EXPANDED! AN INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

September 8th – 9th, Universityof East London(Docklands Campus)
Centre for Cultural Studies Research, University of East London
http://culturalstudiesresearch.org/?p=591

Following the  superb international response to our initial call for papers, we have decided to expand the  event into a two-day conference. This has opened up a very limited amount of space for further contributions. Abstracts of no more than 350 words are invited, to arrive no later than Sunday May 8th 201.

The publication of Michel Foucault’s Lectures at the Collège de France, 1983-84 in English will be complete in April 2011 and his first Collège de France lecture course, La Volunté de Savoir will be published for the first time in February. The Centre for Cultural Studies Research at the University of East London is holding a an international conference which will re-assess Foucault’s contribution to radical thought and the application of his ideas to contemporary politics. What does it mean to draw on Foucault as a resource for radical politics, and how are we to understand the politics which implicitly informs his work?

Many commentators today would seem to claim Foucault as  the theorist of a politics which eschews all utopian ambition in favour of a certain governmental pragmatism, while others would claim him for a rigorous but ultimately rather simple libertarianism: can either of these positions ever be adequate to the radicalism of Foucault’s  analyses? Does it matter?

What is the significance of Foucault’s ideas of ‘governmentality’ and ‘biopolitics’ in understanding his later oeuvre and its implications; do either of these terms deserve to carry the weight attributed to them by some commentators? What is the ongoing relevance of Foucault’s account of disciplinarity: is, it, as Lazzarato has claimed, a historical category no longer fully applicable to contemporary forms of power?

How can Foucauldian ideas be brought bear on the analysis of austerity politics? Is there a role for Foucault’s ideas in formulating effective resistance to the increasing erosion of civil liberties that operates both within countries and across state boundaries? Can the notion of bio-power account for contemporary forms of racism? How can Foucauldian epistemology enable an understanding of the biopolitics of contemporary scientific discourse?

Confirmed Keynotes:
Stuart Elden, Professor in the Department of Geography, Durham University.
Mark Kelly, Lecturer in Philosophy, Middlesex University.

Subjects may include, but are not limited to:
Foucauldian thought and contemporary subjectivation
Foucault and other thinkers
Governmentality and everyday life
Strategic discourses of war and terror
New technologies of the self
Foucault and new forms of resistance
Heterotopias  now and in the future
Foucault and the erosion of the state
Disciplinary society and the society of control
Foucault, British politics and the ‘big society’
Foucault, post-Fordism and post-democracy

Email abstracts to Jeremy Gilbert (j.gilbert@uel.ac.uk) and Debra Benita Shaw (d.shaw@uel.ac.uk)

Registration will cost £110.00 per delegate (including lunch, not including accommodation or dinner) for both days. A day-rate of 65.00 will be available, but delegates will be strongly encouraged to attend on both days, and the organisers cannot promise to accommodate requests to present on a particular day.

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

All that is Solid for Glenn Rikowski: https://rikowski.wordpress.com

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

MUSIC, POLITICS AND AGENCY

A one-day conference presented by:
Centre for Cultural Studies Research, University of East London
Faculty of Social Sciences, Open University
Media Industries Research Centre, University of Leeds

May 20th 2011
11:00 – 18:00
University of East London
Docklands Campus
Room EB.2.43
Permalink: http://culturalstudiesresearch.org/?p=694

Can music change anything, or does its potency lie merely in its exemplary status as an organised human activity? What are the effects of power relations on music and to what extent is music itself a site at which power relations can be reinforced, challenged or subverted? What are the economic, affective, corporeal or ideological mechanisms through which these processes occur? Has the age of  recorded music as a potent social force now passed, a relic of the twentieth century; or with the music industry in crisis, is music culture in fact the first post-capitalist sector of the cultural economy, only now emerging from the long shadow of the culture industry? What historical or contemporary examples can we draw on to address some or all of these questions?

This conference is programmed by Jeremy Gilbert (Centre for Cultural Studies Research, University of East London), David Hesmondhalgh (Media Industries Research Centre, Institute of Communications Studies) and Jason Toynbee (Centre for Research on Socio-Cultural Change, Open University).

The conference is free to attend, but pre-registration is recommended.
To register email j.gilbert@uel.ac.uk with the subject “Music, Politics and Agency Registration”
For any further information, email j.gilbert@uel.ac.uk

UEL Docklands Campus is best reached via Cyprus DLR (Docklands Light Railway) station, which is literally located at the campus.
For information about the campus, see http://www.uel.ac.uk/campuses/docklands.htm

Room EB.2.43 is on the second floor of the main building (‘East Building’) which is to the left of the main square upon entering from the square from Cyprus DLR .
See http://journeyplanner.tfl.gov.uk/user/XSLT_TRIP_REQUEST2?language=en to plan your journey.

Speakers and Papers

Anne Danielsen
Power, mediation, and aesthetics in the music of Public Enemy

Anne Danielsen is Professor and Head of Research in the Department of Musicology at the University of Oslo. Her publications include Pleasure and Presence: the Funk Grooves of James Brown and Parliament (2006) and Musical Rhythm in the Age of Digital Reproduction (2010).

Barry Shank
The political agency of music

Barry Shank teaches popular music, American studies and cultural theory in the department of Comparative Studies at Ohio State University.  He is the author ofDissonant Identities: The Rock’n’Roll Scene in Austin, Texas and A Token of My Affection: Greeting Cards and American Business Culture.  He is currently completing a book for Duke University Press entitled Silence, Noise, Beauty: The Political Agency of Music.

David Hesmondhalgh
Music and human flourishing

David Hesmondhalgh teaches and researches at the University of Leeds. His books include Creative Labour: Media Work in Three Cultural Industries (2011), co-written with Sarah Baker, and Western Music and its Others: Difference, Appropriation and Representation in Music (with Georgina Born, 2000).

Helen Reddington
The sound of women musicians in the punk era

Helen Reddington lectures in songwriting and production on the University of East London’s Music Cultures BA. Her research interests include the punk subculture and women’s engagement with music technology. Her book The Lost Women of Rock Music will appear revised in paperback in January 2012 and a double CD of archive material by her punk-pop band is due to be released by the label Damaged Goods later this year.

Jeremy Gilbert
Music after capitalism? Culture, creativity and markets

Jeremy Gilbert is Reader in Cultural Studies at the University of East London. His publications include (with Ewan Pearson) Discographies: Dance Music Culture and the Politics of Sound (Routledge 1999) and Anticapitalism and Culture: Radical Theory and Popular Politics  (Berg 2008). He is co-director of the Centre for Cultural Studies Research, editor of new formations and a founder member of Lucky Cloud Sound System.

John Street
Music as political thought and action: the arguments and the evidence

John Street is a professor of politics at the University of East Anglia. His latest book is Music and Politics, which is due to be published by Polity later this year. He is a member of the editorial group of the journal Popular Music.

Martin Stokes
Scale, agency and music in religious movements

Martin Stokes is University Lecturer in Ethnomusicology and Tutorial Fellow at St. John’s College, University of Oxford. Martin is an ethnomusicologist with a particular interest in social and cultural theory. His most recent book The Republic of Love: Cultural Intimacy in Turkish Popular Music, has just been published by the University of Chicago Press (2010).

Tim Lawrence
Rhizomatic musicianship: Arthur Russell and after

Tim Lawrence is a Reader in Cultural Studies at the University of East London and the programme leader of the Music Culture: Theory and Production degree. He is the author of Love Saves the Day: A History of American Dance Music Culture, 1970-79 (Duke University Press, 2003) and Hold On to Your Dreams: Arthur Russell and the Downtown Music Scene, 1973-92 (Duke University Press, 2009). He is a founding member of the Centre for Cultural Studies Research and Lucky Cloud Sound System.

Tuulikki Pietilä
Body politic: youth musics in the “New South Africa”

Tuulikki Pietilä is a social anthropologist and a research fellow in the Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies. She has published a monograph and a number of articles on trade and gender in Kilimanjaro and the post-colonial Africa more broadly. Currently she is studying South African music and music industry.

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

2001

THE ART OF PROTEST

The Centre for Cultural Studies Research, University of East London, presents:
The Art of Protest

A seminar to mark the launch of Fight Back! A reader on the winter protests (see http://www.opendemocracy.net/ourkingdom/anthony-barnett/britains-winter-of-protest-fight-for-future)

March 2nd 2011, 14:00-17:00

Papers:

Dan Hancox
Pow! in Parliament Square: Riot music and the kettled generation

Dan Hancox is a freelance journalist writing on music and politics for The Guardian, New Statesman and others, and the editor of Fight Back! A reader on the winter of protest.

Jesse Darling
[Protest] Signs and the Signified: handmade propaganda in the age of the branded demographic.

Jesse Darling is a journeyman auto-ethnographer and artist of many media working in /dasein/ by design and the performance of everyday life. JD lives on the fringes of London and wherever.

Adam Harper
The Art and Reality of Protest

Adam Harper blogs on aesthetics and criticism in music, art and life at Rouge’s Foam. He has written for The Guardian and Wire magazine and is the author of Infinite Music: Imagining the Next Millennium of Human Music-making, forthcoming for Zer0 books.

Respondents:
Steve Goodman
Steve Goodman is author of ‘Sonic Warfare: sound, affect & the ecology of fear’, MIT Press, 2010. He also runs the record label Hyperdub, and DJs/produces under the name Kode9.

Andrew Blake
Andrew Blake is currently Associate Dean of the School of Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of East London, and a saxophonist and composer. His books on music include The Land without Music: Music, Culture and Society in Twentieth Century Britain (1997), the edited collection Living through Pop (1999), and most recently Popular Music: the Age of Multimedia (2007). He contributed to the Cambridge History of Twentieth Century Music and the Cambridge Companion to Recorded Music. He is also the author of books on sport, consumer culture, and fiction,including The Irresistible Rise of Harry Potter, which has been translated into six languages.

Chair: Jeremy GIlbert
author of Anticapitalism and Culture (Berg 2008)

For more Information and for a full audio recording of recent events in the centre see: http://culturalstudiesresearch.org/

Location: UEL Docklands Campus
Transport: Cyprus DLR station is located right next to the campus (just follow signs out of the station)

Room  EB.1.07
(First Floor, East Building, which is to the left on entering the main square from Cyprus station
Upon entering the building from the main square, take the first staircase on the right, to the first floor, and follow signs to Eb.1.07)

All Welcome – no booking required
For further info: J.Gilbert@uel.ac.uk

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Perterloo

Midnight

RADICAL FOUCAULT

CALL FOR PAPERS

Radical Foucault: A One Day Conference

Centre for Cultural Studies Research, University of East London

The publication of Michel Foucault’s Lectures at the Collège de France, 1983-84 in English will be complete in April 2011 and his first Collège de France lecture course, La Volunté de Savoir will be published for the first time in February. The Centre for Cultural Studies Research at the University of East London is holding a one-day conference on Friday, September 9th, 2011 which will re-assess Foucault’s contribution to radical thought and the application of his ideas to contemporary politics. What does it mean to draw on Foucault as a resource for radical politics, and how are we to understand the politics which implicitly informs his work?

Many commentators today would seem to claim Foucault as the theorist of a politics which eschews all utopian ambition in favour of a certain governmental pragmatism, while others would claim him for a rigorous but ultimately rather simple libertarianism: can either of these positions ever be adequate to the radicalism of Foucault’s  analyses? Does it matter?

What is the significance of Foucault’s ideas of ‘governmentality’ and ‘biopolitics’ in understanding his later oeuvre and its implications; do either of these terms deserve to carry the weight attributed to them by some commentators? What is the ongoing relevance of Foucault’s account of disciplinarity: is, it, as Lazzarato has claimed, a historical category no longer fully applicable to contemporary forms of power?
How can Foucauldian ideas be brought bear on the analysis of austerity politics? Is there a role for Foucault’s ideas in formulating effective resistance to the increasing erosion of civil liberties that operates both within countries and across state boundaries? Can the notion of bio-power account for contemporary forms of racism? How can Foucauldian epistemology enable an understanding of the biopolitics of contemporary scientific discourse?

Confirmed Keynotes:
Stuart Elden, Professor in the Department of Geography, Durham University.
Mark Kelly, Lecturer in Philosophy, Middlesex University.

Abstracts of no more than 350 words are invited, to arrive no later than Tuesday, 1st March 2011. Subjects may include, but are not limited to:

Foucauldian thought and contemporary subjectivation
Foucault and other thinkers
Governmentality and everyday life
Strategic discourses of war and terror
New technologies of the self
Foucault and new forms of resistance
Heterotopias  now and in the future
Foucault and the erosion of the state
Disciplinary society and the society of control
Foucault, British politics and the ‘big society’
Foucault, post-Fordism and post-democracy

Email abstracts to Jeremy Gilbert (j.gilbert@uel.ac.uk) and Debra Benita Shaw (d.shaw@uel.ac.uk)

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Protest Against Austerity

THE POLITICS OF ‘PAIN’ IN AN AGE OF AUSTERITY

Please forward widely

(NB: A full audio recording of our last seminar, ‘The Politics of Debt’, is now available at: http://culturalstudiesresearch.org/)

UEL Centre for Cultural Studies Research presents: The Politics of Pain
8 December 2010, 15:00 to 17:00

Pain has become one of the central discourses of the coalition government as it embarks on its cuts programme. The cuts are inevitable, we are told, and the pain must be shared in the interests of fairness. But is the pain necessary, should it be shared, is it really being shared, how will the pain affect the social fabric, and what are the psychosocial consequences of the crisis? This is the second seminar in the Centre for Cultural Studies Research’s three-part “Debt, Pain, Work” series that interrogates the discourses and policies of the coalition government.

Speakers

Kate Pickett, Professor of Epidemiology at the University of York, co-author of The Spirit Level: Why More Equal Societies Almost Always Do Better

Mike Rustin, Professor of Sociology in the School of Humanities and Social Sciences at UEL and author of The Good Society and the Inner World

Jeremy Gilbert, Reader in Cultural Studies in the School of Humanities and Social Sciences at UEL and author of Anti-Capitalism and Culture: Radical Theory and Popular Politics

For more Information and for a full audio recording of the last seminar in this series see:  http://culturalstudiesresearch.org/

UEL Docklands Campus
Transport: Cyprus DLR station is located right next to the campus (just follow signs out of the station)

Room  EB.G.14: (Ground Floor, East Building, which is to the left on entering the main square from Cyprus station)

All Welcome – no booking required

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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