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EDUCATION

EDUCATION

UNIVERSITY GOVERNANCE AND MANAGEMENT: CRITICAL ENGAGEMENTS WITH THEORY, POLICY AND PRACTICE

 

Society for Research into Higher Education

Date – 13 May, 16:00-18:30

Venue – London Metropolitan University, Room GCG-08

Network – Higher Education Policy

This seminar provides an opportunity to critically examine changing modes of university governance and management in the context of global trends in higher education policy.

Two papers will stimulate the debate:

 

‘Ruling knowledge: Universities and the governance of knowledge creation’ Professor Rebecca Boden, University of Roehampton

Governance can be broadly defined as systems for or approaches to decision-making. The governance of universities is therefore the means by which decisions are made within them. Any form of governing involves the exercise of some form of power, and in this paper I explore the shifting and complex landscape of governing power in UK universities and ramifications that has for the nature of the knowledges produced and what they are used for. I will also suggest how governing regimes might be beneficially reformed to aid the further development of the social role of the university.

 

‘Appointing university executives: a case of managerialism in action?’ Dr Sue Shepherd, University of Kent

The prevailing academic narrative asserts that managerialism is all pervasive in today’s universities. But what exactly is managerialism and how does it differ from new public management and neoliberalism, terms with which it is often confused or conflated? In an attempt to gain greater conceptual clarity, this paper presents an ideal-type model of managerialism as ideology. This is then utilised to explore the extent to which recent changes to the appointment of deputy and pro vice chancellors might be considered symptomatic of ideal-type managerialism.  Thus, the academic narrative itself is subjected to critical examination.

Tea and coffee will be available at 4pm and the event will start at 4.15. After each paper there will be time for questions and discussion, followed by an opportunity to discuss issues raised in both papers over a glass of wine or juice.

 

For further details about the Higher Education Policy Network, please contact the network convenor, Prof. Carole Leathwood, Institute for Policy Studies in Education, London Metropolitan University: c.leathwood@londonmet.ac.uk.

To reserve a place: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/

Note: Unless otherwise stated SRHE events are free to members, there is a charge of £60 for non-members

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

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Annihilate Creativity!

Annihilate Creativity!

CULTURAL CAPITAL: THE RISE AND FALL OF CREATIVE BRITAIN

BY ROBERT HEWISON

OUT NOW

“Hewison’s analysis of how a golden age turned to lead is highly authoritative, well argued & conceptually robust.” Guardian

See: http://www.versobooks.com/books/1760-cultural-capital

————

Britain began the twenty-first century convinced of its creativity. Throughout the New Labour era, the visual and performing arts, museums and galleries, were ceaselessly promoted as a stimulus to national economic revival, a post-industrial revolution where spending on culture would solve everything, from national decline to crime. Tony Blair heralded it a “golden age.” Yet despite huge investment, the audience for the arts remained a privileged minority. So what went wrong?

In Cultural Capital, leading historian Robert Hewison gives an in-depth account of how creative Britain lost its way. From Cool Britannia and the Millennium Dome to the Olympics and beyond, he shows how culture became a commodity, and how target-obsessed managerialism stifled creativity. In response to the failures of New Labour and the austerity measures of the Coalition government, Hewison argues for a new relationship between politics and the arts.

————

ROBERT HEWISON is a historian of contemporary British culture. Beginning in 1939 with Under Siege, his series of books presents a portrait of Britain that runs from the perils of wartime to the counterrevolution of Thatcherism in The Heritage Industry. He is an internationally recognized authority on the work of John Ruskin, and has held chairs at Oxford, Lancaster and City Universities. He is an Associate of the think tank Demos, and has written on the arts for the Sunday Times since 1981. He has been a consultant to the Clore Duffield Foundation, the Gulbenkian Foundation, the Arts Council, the Heritage Lottery Fund and the Royal Shakespeare Company, and is on the editorial advisory board of the journal Cultural Trends.

————

“A brilliant analysis of the way that the intrinsic value of art was undermined by a Blair-led government’s attempts to control creative production and turn it into an instrument of social engineering. It is a timely warning about the dangers of political interference and a rallying cry for art to both be publicly supported and maintain a hard won independence. Art needs this independence from power in order to show us to ourselves in ways that the media and politics never do and never can.” – Antony Gormley

“Long Britain’s best chronicler of culture and political policy, Robert Hewison turns his unflinching gaze on the New Labour era, a time of targets, access and excellence for all, complete with the National Lottery, Cool Britannia, the Millennium Dome and the 2012 Olympics. It’s not a pretty sight, and his findings of folly, incompetence and vanity will entertain and disturb readers in equal measure. They should also embarrass any politicians and arts administrators who retain a degree of self-awareness.” – Alwyn Turner, author of A Classless Society

“This is essential reading for anyone who has the slightest interest in the funding of the arts in this country.” – Richard Eyre

————

PAPERBACK: NOVEMBER 2014 / 288 pages / ISBN: 9781781685914 / £14.99 / $24.95 / $28.95 (Canada)

CULTURAL CAPITAL is available at a 40% discount (paperback) on our website, with free shipping and bundled ebook. Purchasing details here:http://www.versobooks.com/books/1760-cultural-capital

————

Visit Verso’s website for information on our upcoming events, new reviews and publications and special offers: http://www.versobooks.com

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​First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cultural-capital-by-robert-hewison-out-now

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Education

EUROPEAN EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH JOURNAL – VOLUME 11 NUMBER 2 (2012)

Just published at:
http://www.wwwords.eu/EERJ/content/pdfs/11/issue11_2.asp

EUROPEAN EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH JOURNAL
Volume 11 Number 2, 2012, ISSN 1474-9041

SPECIAL ISSUE
GOVERNING KNOWLEDGE? PISA in Focus
Guest Editors: LUÍS MIGUEL CARVALHO, SOTIRIA GREK, ERIC MANGEZ & XAVIER PONS

Jenny Ozga. Introduction. AssessingPISA

Luís Miguel Carvalho. The Fabrications and Travels of a Knowledge-Policy Instrument

Eric Mangez & Mathieu Hilgers. The Field of Knowledge and the Policy Field in Education:PISA and the production of knowledge for policy

Xavier Pons. Going beyond the ‘PISA Shock’ Discourse: an analysis of the cognitive reception ofPISA in six European countries, 2001-2008

Eszter Neumann, Adél Kiss & Ildikó Fejes, with Iván Bajomi, Eszter Berényi, Zoltán A. Biró & Júlia Vida. The Hard Work of Interpretation: the national politics of PISA reception in Hungary and Romania

Sotiria Grek. What PISA Knows and Can Do: studying the role of national actors in the making of PISA

 

ARTICLES
Per-Olof Erixon, Anders Marner, Manfred Scheid, Tommy Strandberg & Hans Örtegren. School Subject Paradigms and Teaching Practice in the Screen Culture: art, music and the mother tongue (Swedish) under pressure

Ian Hardy. ‘Managing’ Managerialism: the impact of educational auditing on an academic ‘specialist’ school

Cristina Sin. Researching Research in Master’s Degrees inEurope

Anna Rytivaara. ‘We Don’t Question Whether We Can Do This’: teacher identity in two co-teachers’ narratives

 

REVIEW ESSAY
Magali Ballatore. Honouring Higher Education?

 

Access to the full texts of current articles is restricted to those who have a Personal subscription, or those whose institution has a Library subscription.

PERSONAL SUBSCRIPTION Subscription to all numbers of the January-December 2012 volume (this includes full access to ALL back numbers) is available to private individuals at a cost of US$50.00. If you wish to subscribe you may do so immediately at www.wwwords.eu/subscribeEERJ.asp

LIBRARY SUBSCRIPTION (institution-wide access). If you are working within an institution that maintains a Library, please urge them to purchase a Library subscription so access is provided throughout your institution; full details for libraries can be found at www.symposium-journals.eu/prices.html

For all editorial matters, including articles offered for publication, please contact the Editor, Professor Martin Lawn (m.lawn@btinternet.com).

In the event of problems concerning subscription, or difficulty in gaining access, please contact the publishers at support@symposium-journals.co.uk

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Karl Marx in Film

Karl Marx in Film

DEPARTMENT OF OMNISHAMBLES

FACULTY OF THE INHUMANITIES / DEPTARTMENT OF OMNISHAMBLES /

Many think the Department of Omnishambles is a recent phenomenon in Higher Education, arising from radical cuts to university budgets, rampant managerialism, and the effective redesignation of teaching academics as full-time administrators.

This is in fact not the case.

ABOUT OMNISHAMBLES

Please feel free to post your own contributions to the Department of Omnishambles at the Faculty of the Inhumanities, or you can try to reach the administrator directly at JohannesDeSilentio@mail.com; although he or she may not, in fact, exist. 

Department of Omnishambles is at: http://departmentofomnishambles.tumblr.com/

This is brilliant! A must-read for academics and others interested in knowledge stuff! – Glenn Rikowski

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

F.W. Taylor

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING AND BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (CEBM) 2011


Call for Papers
October 28-30, 2011     

Shanghai, China

Web site: http://www.engii.org/cet2011/cebm2011.aspx
The 2011 International Conference on Engineering and Business Management (CEBM2011) will be held in Shanghai/China, Oct. 28-30, 2011, CEBM is part of World Congress on Engineering and Technology (CET) which will take place in Shanghai China. The CET is composed of several conferences on the frontier topics in the engineering and technological subjects.

The CET conference proceedings will be published by IEEE, and the accepted papers will be indexed by Ei Compendex and ISTP.

IEEE (IEEE Conference Calendar): http://www.engii.org/cet2011/NewsContent.aspx?newsID=527  

Paper Submission Deadline: April 30, 2011
Acceptance Notification: June 15, 2011

The conference is soliciting state-of-the-art research papers in the following areas of interest:

  • Business Project Management
  • Crisis, Emergency and Risk Management
  • Customer Management
  • Data Mining and E-commerce
  • Decision Making Process
  • Digital City
  • E-Government
  • Engineering Management
  • Enterprise Management
  • Environmental and Energy Management
  • Financial Analysis
  • Geographic Information System
  • Human Resources Management
  • Information Assurance and Security
  • Investment Analysis
  • Knowledge Management
  • Logistics Management
  • Management Consulting
  • Management of Information Systems
  • Operations Research and Management Science
  • Process Improvement
  • Project Management
  • Quality Control
  • Requirement Analysis
  • Sales and Marketing
  • Service Science
  • Systems Engineering and Analysis
  • Technology Innovation
  • Transportation Management
  • Urban Management

 

For more information, please contact:
Email: cebm@engii.org
QQ: 58329403
QQ group: 133861010 133861899

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

European Philosophy

MIDDLESEX UNIVERSITY PHILOSOPHY DEPARTMENT CAMPAIGN – UPDATE 8th JUNE 2010

From http://savemdxphil.com/

Posted on 8 June 2010
http://savemdxphil.com/2010/06/08/announcement-8-june-the-crmep-is-moving-to-kingston-university/ by aletheiaticverse http://savemdxphil.com/author/aletheiaticverse/

The campaign to save our philosophy programmes has just won a partial but significant victory: Kingston University
http://www.kingston.ac.uk/ in south-west London announced today that it will re-establish our Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy http://www.web.mdx.ac.uk/CRMEP/ (CRMEP) at Kingston, by employing the four senior staff in Philosophy at Middlesex (Eric Alliez, Peter Hallward, Peter Osborne and Stella Sandford). Our MA and PhD programmes (full-time and part-time) will be re-launched at Kingston this September, and all current post-graduate students will be invited to move along with the staff. Institutions in France and Germany have also made significant new proposals for collaboration with the CRMEP, which may allow it to expand the European dimensions of its work considerably in the near future.

This remarkable turn of events would never been possible without the extraordinary local and international campaign that began six weeks ago, to save our philosophy programmes.

Like Middlesex, Kingston is a post-1992 university, with a commitment to widening participation in education. Unlike Middlesex, Kingston is expanding rather than cutting back its provision in humanities subjects, and it is investing in research in these areas. In addition to taking on CRMEP staff, Kingston will be making a number of other high-level appointments over the coming months, and is launching its own London Graduate School in conjunction with colleagues from several other Universities internationally.  We believe that Kingston will provide an enthusiastic and supportive base for the activities of the CRMEP.

Although we have not won all the demands made by our campaign, the move to Kingston is a major achievement. We have found a way to keep all of our postgraduate programmes open, and to keep most of the CRMEP staff together in a single unit. We have preserved a place in London for the unique academic community that has built up around the Centre and its distinctive research interests, and this will continue to be a place where the criteria for entry and participation remain as open as possible. The campaign has directly refuted the line that Middlesex managers have repeated for many years now – a variation of the line that ‘there is no alternative’ but to follow the neoliberal way of the world, and to close down small academic departments in favour of large vocational ones. The campaign hasn’t merely proved that ‘another way is possible’: it has helped to indicate what needs to be done to make such a way a reality, and shown that there are universities in the UK and in Europe that are willing to embrace it.

We hope that the campaign will continue, evolving to become one of several contributions from a range of institutions across London and the region to a broader and deeper struggle in support of philosophy, the humanities and public education more generally. Some of the protestors who made the biggest impact in our campaign came from supportive universities such as Sussex, KCL, SOAS, Westminster and Goldsmiths. This emerging network of education activists isn’t going to disperse, and is likely to play an important role in the struggles that will soon affect the entire sector. Although the closure of Philosophy at Middlesex is yet another indication of the ongoing commercialisation of education in the UK, our campaign, along with other recent mobilisations at universities up and down the country, has helped change the balance of power across higher education. The campaign to save philosophy at Middlesex has already made a powerful intervention in the fight for public education in general and for endangered humanities programmes in particular. The future looks challenging but there is now much to build on, at Middlesex, at Kingston and across the UK.

Eric Alliez, Peter Hallward, Peter Osborne and Stella Sandford

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

 

Philosophy

MIDDLESEX PHILOSOPHY DEPARTMENT CLOSURE – VIDEO

A video of interviews with those protesting to save Middlesex University Philosophy Department from closure: http://vimeo.com/11523774

More information about the protest & campaign here: http://savemdxphil.com/

Update 9th May 2010:

There was a very interesting article in The Observer today about leading academics backing student and staff actions to save philosophy at Middlesex University. Slavoj Zizek and Alain Badiou (amonsgt others) have spoken out about the importance and quality of philosophy at Middlesex University.

The article can be found on p.8 in the hard copy version of The Observer:

Doward, J. (2010) Academic revolt over philosophy cutbacks, The Observer, 9th May, p.8.

However, the online version has a different title:

Doward, J. (2010) Middlessex University cuts spark international protest from philosophers, The Observer, 9th May, online at: http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/may/09/middlesex-university-cuts-protest-philosophers

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

STAFF AND STUDENTS RECLAIM KING’S COLLEGE LONDON

Last Tuesday’s (30 March) strike in defence of education at King’s exceeded all expectations. More than 250 people joined loud and vibrant picket lines on all four King’s campuses. Security guards at one campus indicated that numbers entering their building were as much as 75% down. At the main building on the Strand only a small trickle of students and staff went in.

Support for the strike was boosted after the latest hapless intervention by senior management, who refused to allow non-UCU staff to take annual leave yesterday. This prompted more than sixty of those obliged to work on the Strand to sign a card expressing solidarity with the pickets. Members of other unions on all sites brought refreshments out to colleagues on strike and stood with them during breaks. Local cafes displayed UCU material explaining our reasons for striking. Students brought cakes for pickets, played musical instruments, set up stalls and hung a huge banner over the entrance to the Strand: ‘Education massacre: do not enter.’

Messages of support have flooded in from King’s alumni, students and non-UCU staff, as well as from universities and colleges across the country. Colleagues brought solidarity greetings and donations in person from UCL, Westminster, QMW, London Metropolitan University, the Institute of Education, Southwark College, City and Islington College, Tower Hamlets College, the University of the Arts and the London Nautical School. Supporters also came along from local workplaces, including the National Theatre and the National Gallery, and from other unions, including the NUT, PCS, Unite and Unison.

Around 50 people attended a lunchtime rally at Waterloo, while more than 200 students joined pickets for a rally on the Strand, which took place in an electric atmosphere. The huge crowd heard speeches from UCU representatives at King’s and elsewhere, from members of other unions and from a Sussex student who told of their struggles with their own management. Many students heard for the first time of the appalling treatment of our colleagues in Engineering by King’s management. The ‘We Support our Teachers’ campaign was a lively presence throughout the day. Dozens of students expressed their disdain at the way the College’s senior management addresses them in Orwellian ‘Newspeak’. Many have written to the Principal and Vice-Principal complaining that they feel patronised by senior management.

Our campaign in defence of education at King’s is partly about our colleagues’ livelihoods, and about the lack of regard shown to them by senior management. But it is clear that it is also about much more than this. The creeping culture of managerialism in universities is also an issue. The support we have received from students, and from colleagues who are either members of other unions, or not yet members of UCU, is an indication that this campaign is also about defending the values that underpin education at King’s and elsewhere, which include collegiality, respect for individuals, cooperation, intellectual integrity and academic independence.

The verve, humour, creativity and imagination of yesterday’s pickets offered us all a glimpse of the potential that exists within this institution for staff and students to make education at King’s more rewarding and more enjoyable. All too often this potential is either stifled or by-passed by the dead hand of senior management.

Our thanks and congratulations go to all who took part yesterday, and to everyone who showed their support for our campaign. Senior management teams across the country are offering no resistance to government cuts. They are determined to follow the example set by King’s and impose redundancies and department closures on their staff and students. The magnificent collective response to these attacks that we have seen at Leeds, Sussex, Kent and King’s is a powerful reminder to all that if we stand together we can defend our education system from the ministers and managers who want to turn it into a marketplace.

Jim Wolfreys

President KCL UCU

Please continue to send donations and messages of support to: ucu@kcl.ac.uk

For more information on our dispute see: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/ucu

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

KING’S COLLEGE LONDON, TUESDAY 30 MARCH: CELEBRATE RESISTANCE TO EDUCATION CUTS!

Tuesday 30 March will see the first ever local strike against management by UCU members at King’s College London. We have voted overwhelmingly to take industrial action against a £27m cuts programme that has put 205 jobs at risk of redundancy, with more to follow. 

* Whole departments are set to close – Engineering, Dental Mictobiology, American Studies, Equality and Diversity – with other areas also under threat – Palaeography, Logic, Linguistics, the Institute of Psychiatry, Biomedical and Health Sciences.

* All this in a College where 202 staff earn over £100k a year, with a combined salary bill of £29m, and where a £100k salary cap would save £9m a year.

* Management have by-passed the proper channels of consultation to impose redundancies. Most staff learned that the country’s oldest Engineering department was to close via the College’s website, before any formal consultation had taken place.

All this helps explain why King’s staff returned the highest proportion of votes in our union’s history (85%) for some form of industrial action. But this fight is not about King’s alone. If our management’s redundancies are not stopped, it will give confidence to every management team in higher, further and adult education, who believe that the top-down management model in place at King’s can impose cuts on everyone, everywhere. More seriously, it will convince any future government that education is a soft target as they try to recoup the billions spent on the banking sector.
 
Speaking at King’s four days before the strike Tony Benn told students and staff that, ‘What you’re doing is educating College management in the importance of education.’ At a time when Peter Mandelson is attempting to prevent young people from going to university, and the Chancellor of the Exchequer is contemplating cuts that will be ‘worse than Thatcher’, we also need to educate the present government, and its successor, about the importance of education. So our fight is also your fight.
 
We are calling on everyone to join us on our picket lines (7am to 5pm) on Tuesday 30 March. We want our strike to be a lively celebration of resistance to cuts and a demonstration of our resolve to defend our colleagues’ jobs and our students’ education.
 
Join our rallies on Tuesday, open to everyone:
 
Tues 30 March 1pm KCL Strand and Waterloo site entrances
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/about/campuses/strand.html
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/about/campuses/waterloo.html

Tues 30 March 6pm London School of Economics, U8, Tower One, Ground Floor http://www2.lse.ac.uk/mapsAndDirections/findingYourWayAroundLSE.aspx
 
Please send donations and messages of support to: ucu@kcl.ac.uk
 
For more information on our dispute see http://www.kcl.ac.uk/ucu
 
In solidarity,
 
Jim Wolfreys, President KCL UCU 

Justine Stephens, Head of Campaigns, UCU, Carlow Street, London, NW1 7LH

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Popular Education

FIFTH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF THE POPULAR EDUCATION NETWORK

ANNOUNCEMENT AND FIRST CALL

The Fifth International Conference of the Popular Education Network (PEN) will take place at the University of Edinburgh, from Friday 23 to Sunday 25 April 2010, hosted by the Department of Higher and Community Education.  This conference builds on the success of previous PEN conferences held in Edinburgh (2000), Barcelona (2002), Braga (2004) and Maynooth (2007).

The Popular Education Network now has about 160 members in 60 institutions in 25 countries.  Membership of the network is free, and participation in PEN conferences is open to all who subscribe to the broad values and purposes of the network (see below).

The language of the conference will be English, but there will opportunities for informal translation as appropriate.  Non-English speakers are welcome to attend and participate fully.

CONFERENCE PROGRAMME

The conference is not organised around any particular theme – although certain key concerns may well emerge.  For example:

  • The effects of globalisation on our work;
  • Sustaining political commitment and ideological coherence in hard times;
  • Developing alliances and strategic collaborations;
  • Radicalising research and making it ‘really useful’;
  • Contesting managerialism and the culture of the accountant;
  • Respecting diversity without abandoning solidarity;
  • Exploiting relative autonomy;
  • Working with progressive social movements;
  • Developing curriculum and pedagogy;
  • Using ICT in subversive and counter-hegemonic ways;
  • Engaging dialectically with the politics of policy;
  • Developing more democratic, creative and expressive ways of working.

The conference will be seminar/workshop-based, with the emphasis on discussion, dialogue and debate rather than simply the formal presentation of academic/research papers.  In this spirit of collegiality we invite participants to present academic papers, curriculum materials, or accounts of unfinished research in progress. Please respond by completing the return slip at the end of this message and emailing it back to us by 26th February 2010.  We would also welcome ideas or suggestions about anything in particular you would like to see in the conference programme – or you would wish to offer.

The conference is an opportunity for university-based teachers and researchers, and others involved in higher education, who share a common interest in popular education – many of whom work in considerable isolation in their own institutions – to meet, exchange ideas, learn from each other and enjoy some much needed solidarity and conviviality. 

We hope that PEN members far and wide will be interested in participating in this conference.  Please also feel free to pass on information about it to anyone else who might be interested in attending.  For further information about the network and previous conferences, see the attached paper [not included here: GR].  The conference is open to all who work in higher education and who are willing to subscribe in general terms to the Popular Education Network statement of intent:

Popular education is:

•       Rooted in the real interests and struggles of ordinary people

•       Overtly political and critical of the status quo

•       Committed to progressive social and political change in the interests of a fairer and more egalitarian society.

Popular education has the following characteristics:

•       Its curriculum comes out of the concrete experience and material interests of people in communities of resistance and struggle

•       Its pedagogy is collective, focused primarily on group as distinct from individual learning and development

•       It attempts to forge a direct connection between education and social change.

If you are interested in a fuller account of this particular view of popular education and its relation to higher education, see Crowther J, Galloway V and Martin I (eds) (2005) Popular Education: Engaging the Academy – International Perspectives Leicester, UK: National Institute of Adult Continuing Education (ISBN 1 86201 209 1), which contains several chapters based on presentations at previous PEN conferences.

NOT-FOR-PROFIT CONFERENCE

As in the past, the conference will be organised on a strictly non-commercial basis.  No one will make any money out of it!  Local costs will therefore be kept to an absolute minimum.  The conference fee is £50.  This covers room costs, paper work and food/refreshments while the conference is in session.  Details about booking accommodation will be sent to those who express interest in participating.  Participants are expected to make their own travel arrangements.

We look forward to hearing from you – and to seeing you in Edinburgh this April!

RETURN SLIP

This is to confirm that I would like to attend the Fourth International Conference of the Popular Education Network at the University of Edinburgh from 23 to 25 April 2010.

Name:

Department/agency:

Institution/organisation:

Country:

Email address:

If you would like to lead a seminar discussion, run a workshop or take responsibility for a session for any other purpose, please give brief details:

If you have any ideas/suggestions about what you would like to see in the conference programme, please make them here:

If you can speak a language in addition to English and could help with informal translation, please indicate language(s):

Special requirements (e.g., diet, mobility, access etc)

PLEASE EMAIL THIS RETURN SLIP BACK TO JIM CROWTHER (jim.crowther@ed.ac.uk) BY 25 FEBRUARY 2010.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Professor Dave Hill

JOURNAL FOR CRITICAL EDUCATION POLICY STUDIES: VOL.7 NO.2

The new edition of The Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies -JCEPS 7(2) is now published online at: http://www.jceps.com

The contents are:

1.Dave Hill (University of Northampton, England, and Middlesex University, London, England): Race and Class in Britain: a Critique of the statistical basis for Critical Race Theory in Britain

2.Tom G. Griffiths (University of Newcastle, Australia), Jo Williams (Victoria University, Australia): Mass schooling for socialist transformation in Cuba and Venezuela

3.Peter McLaren (University of California, Los Angeles, USA): Guided by a Red Star: the Cuban literacy campaign and the challenge of history

4.M. Wangeci Gatimu (Western Oregon University, Monmouth, Oregon, USA): Rationale for Critical Pedagogy of Decolonization: Kenya as a Unit of Analysis

5.Jennifer A. Sandlin (Arizona State University, USA), Richard Kahn (University of North Dakota, USA), David Darts (New York University, USA) and Kevin Tavin, (The Ohio State University, USA): To Find the Cost of Freedom: Theorizing and Practicing a Critical Pedagogy of Consumption

6.Brian Lack (Georgia State University, USA): No Excuses: A Critique of the Knowledge Is Power Program (KIPP) within Charter Schools in the USA

7. Sondra Cuban and Nelly Stromquist (Lancaster University, UK and University of Maryland, USA): It Is Difficult To Be A Woman With A Dream Of An Education: Challenging U.S. Adult Basic Education Policies to Support Women Immigrants’ Self-Determination

8.Bill Templer (University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia): A Two-Tier Model for a More Simplified and Sustainable English as an International Language

9.Prentice Chandler (Athens State University, United States) and Douglas McKnight (The University of Alabama, United States): The Failure of Social Education in the United States: A Critique of Teaching the National Story from “White” Colourblind Eyes

10.Seçkin Özsoy (Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey): A Utopian Educator from Turkey:Ýsmail Hakký Tonguç (1893-1960)

11.Domingos Leite Lima Filho (Federal Technological University of Paraná UTFPR, Brazil): Educational Policies and Globalization: elements for some criticism on the international organizations’ proposals for Latin America and the Caribbean Islands Countries

12.Andrea Beckmann (University of Lincoln, UK), Charlie Cooper (University of Hull, UK) and Dave Hill (University of Northampton, and Middlesex University, UK): Neoliberalization and managerialization of ‘education’ in England and Wales – a case for reconstructing education

13.Jane-Frances Lobnibe (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, USA): International Students and the Politics of Difference in US Higher Education

14.Magnus Dahlstedt (University of Linkoping, Sweden): Democratic Governmentality: National Imaginations, Popular Movements and Governing the Citizen

15.Torie L. Weiston-Serdan (Claremont Graduate University, California, USA): A Radical Redistribution of Capital

16.Brad Porfilio (Lewis University, Romeoville, Illinois, USA) and Greg Dimitriadis (University of Buffalo, New York, USA): Book Review: Marc Pruyn and Luis Huerta-Charles Eds. Teaching Peter McLaren: Paths of Dissent (New York: Peter Lang)

The Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies seeks and publishes articles that critique global, national, neo-liberal, neo-conservative, New Labour, Third Way, postmodernist and other analyses of policy developments, as well as those that attempt to report on, analyse and develop Socialist/ Marxist transformative policy for schooling and education from a number of Radical Left perspectives. JCEPS also addresses issues of social class, ‘race’, gender, sexual orientation, disability and capital/ism; critical pedagogies; new public managerialism and academic / non-academic labour, and empowerment/ disempowerment. JCEPS welcomes articles from academics and activists throughout the globe. It is a refereed / peer reviewed/ peer juried international journal.

Contact: dave.hill@ieps.org.uk and DAVE6@mdx.ac.uk.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

F.W. Taylor

LEARNING OUTCOMES: THE ABSURD BECOMES LOGICAL

This is the title of a topical and important new paper by John J. Crocitti, Professor of History, San Diego Mesa College which is now available at The Flow of Ideas web site.

As Professor Crocitti notes:

“Ultimately, the drive towards SLO [Student Learning Outcomes] constitutes an effort by politicians, business people, opportunist professors and bureaucrats to deskill and control academic labor in the manner that management applied Taylorism to industrial labor during the early twentieth century”

The article can be viewed at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=contributions&sub=Learning%20Outcomes

Glenn Rikowski