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Tag Archives: Education Crisis

New College, Oxford

AUTOGENOUS THEORIES OF EDUCATION CRISIS

 

A paper prepared for the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB) Annual Conference, New College, Oxford, 31st March – 2nd April, 2017

Glenn Rikowski, Visiting Fellow, College of Social Science, University of Lincoln, UK

Abstract: ‘Crisis’ is a concept increasingly used in media reports on education. This paper argues that philosophers of education have a unique contribution to make regarding the nature and constitution of education crisis. Thus, they have a responsibility to take up the challenge of developing perspectives on education crises. Following examinations of the concept of crisis and The Marxist-oriented Classical Theory of Education Crisis (where education crises are derivative of economic ones), the paper forges an autogenous theory of education crisis through Robin Barrow’s (2011) précis of R.S. Peters’s concept of education. Some education crises are crises of education; not necessarily crises in education with origins elsewhere in society. For these forms of crisis, the concept of education itself should be the starting point for analysis. The paper opens up a new field of study for educational philosophers by indicating how education crises can emerge from within education institutions and settings.

 

My paper is now available at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/32222291/Autogenous_Theories_of_Education_Crisis and also at ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/315646975_Autogenous_Theories_of_Education_Crisis

 

Glenn Rikowski at ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski

CRISES, COMMODITIES AND EDUCATION: DISRUPTIONS, ERUPTIONS, INTERRUPTIONS AND RUPTURES

Dr. Glenn Rikowski

RESEARCH IN CRITICAL EDUCATION STUDIES (RiCES) SEMINAR

RiCES @LincsCritEd

University of Lincoln

School of Education
Brayford Pool, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, UK, LN6 7TS

Thursday November 19th 1.30-4.00pm in room BH1201:

Dr Glenn Rikowski, Independent Scholar

Crises, Commodities and Education: Disruptions, Eruptions, Interruptions and Ruptures

ABSTRACT

After a brief analysis of the concept of crisis (drawing on the work of Roitman, 2014) and following an outline and critique of some previous work (Rikowski, 2014) – on the Classical Theory of Education Crisis (in the light of Sarup, 1982) and philosophical perspectives on education crises – Rikowski explores the notion of crisis in relation to phenomena pertaining to the social forms of capitalist education. Starting out from Marx’s analysis of the ‘two great classes of commodities’ (following Adam Smith), Rikowski charts what ‘crisis’ might mean, and could be, in terms of the two commodity forms pertaining to educational processes in capitalist society. The final part of the paper explores actual and possible empirical manifestations of these crises of the commodity form in terms of the notions of disruption, eruption, interruption and rupture. It is argued that last two of these forms of crisis pose particular problems for the continuance and development of capitalism in general and the national capital and capitalist education in particular.

Note: A paper will be written prior to the event and posted to Academia. Meanwhile, it would be useful for those interested in coming to the seminar, or for those reading the paper on Academia, to read in advance the following paper (which is on Academia). This is because Rikowski’s paper prepared for the RiCES Seminar builds on and goes beyond this paper:

Rikowski, G. (2014) Crises in Education, Crises of Education, A paper prepared for the Philosophy of Education Seminars at UCL Institute of Education, 2014-15 Programme, 22nd October 2014, 20 Bedford Way, London, online at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

For further information contact Dr. Cassie Earl at: CEarl@lincoln.ac.uk

RiCES – About – People – Research: http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/education/research/researchincriticaleducationstudies/

Research in Critical Education Studies (RiCES) blog: http://criticaleducation.blogs.lincoln.ac.uk/

Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Herbert Marcuse

Herbert Marcuse

PRAXIS AND CRITIQUE: LIBERATION, PEDAGOGY, AND THE UNIVERSITY

International Herbert Marcuse Society Sixth Biennial Conference

Praxis and Critique: Liberation, Pedagogy, and the University

12-15 November 2015, Salisbury University (Salisbury, Maryland, USA)

 

CALL FOR PAPERS: Abstracts due May 20, 2015

 

In recent years, the problems and contradictions intrinsic to capitalist society have resulted in a number of manifest, seemingly permanent, crises. Many researchers, academics, and activists have seized on the urgency of recent coalescing crises—from environmental degradation to economic inequality, political instability to social unraveling, and beyond—in an attempt to ameliorate and analyze the consequences of these dilapidated social relations. The work of Herbert Marcuse aims to radically re-envision social relations via critical theory as a way to formulate a praxis of liberation. However, if we live in a society, as Marcuse puts it, “without negation,” how shall this critical rationality be cultivated?

The International Herbert Marcuse Society seeks papers for the 2015 biennial conference, “Praxis and Critique: Liberation, Pedagogy, and the University,” that address the broad pedagogical concerns of cultivating emancipatory rationality. Faculty, independent scholars, activists, artists, and others are invited to submit papers. Papers may want to address, but are certainly not limited to, the following problematics:

  • What role can and should critical pedagogy play in today’s institutions of higher education? Given Marcuse’s emphasis on praxis, critical pedagogy cannot be limited to classroom space in universities – how can a critical rationality translate into programs of activism, agitation, and organization?
  • How is the work of Marcuse, the Frankfurt School, and/or critical theory generally relevant to the current context of political, social, economic, and cultural struggles?
  • What is the meaning of praxis and critique today? Do Marcuse’s contemporary interlocutors help us refine, understand, recast, or critique visions of a critical rationality?
  • What can we learn from activists and scholars from a wide range of critical theories, dealing with liberation in areas such as critical race theory, intersectionality, LGBTQIA studies, disability studies, and postcolonial theory?
  • How does Marcuse’s critical theory provide a lens through which to assess the current condition of advanced industrial society?

Student participation is also encouraged. The conference organizers are particularly interested in encouraging undergraduate and graduate student participation. To this end, we encourage faculty to teach related or special topics classes in fall 2015 and to bring students of all levels to the conference. Undergraduate students are invited to present papers in special concurrent sessions. Undergraduate and graduate students will also have the opportunity to submit conference papers for publication to special conference editions.

This conference is an interdisciplinary, multimedia engagement with the many dimensions of Herbert Marcuse’s work. So, in addition to the presentation of papers, the conference will also present artistic work.

Artistic Presentations:

The Salisbury University Gallery will present two related exhibitions.

The first is “Versprechen, dass es anders sein kann” (Promises that it can be different) by painter Antje Wichtrey.
Salisbury University Gallery Director, Elizabeth Kauffman, will curate the second exhibition.

For more information, contact the conference organizers:

Dr. Sarah Surak (smsurak@salisbury.edu) and Dr. Robert Kirsch (rekirsch@salisbury.edu)

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

UNICONFLICTS

UNICONFLICTS In Spaces of Crisis: Critical Approaches In, Against and Beyond the University

International Open Gathering

11–14 June 2015

At the Department of Architecture, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece

Encounters and Conflicts in the City

Details: http://urbanconflicts.wordpress.com/

 

Calling

The group “Encounters and Conflicts in the City” calls radical research groups, critical workshops and researchers, students and collectives that are placed in, against and beyond the neoliberal university in an open gathering on the 11-14th June 2015 at the Department of Architecture at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki.

Through this gathering, we aim to create a public space of dialogue transcending divisions among academic and scientific disciplines and to critically approach the urban issues of the era of crisis, through a dialectic, intersectional and postcolonial approach.

The central questions that we wish to raise are two:

  1. What is the role of knowledge, of the university and of researchers in the era of crisis?
  2. What are the critical epistemological and methodological tools for studying the spatial expressions of the ongoing crisis at multiple scales?

Within this context, we seek to examine the ongoing crisis not just as an over-accumulation crisis but also as a crisis of social disobedience and of the inability of the circulation of capital, patriarchy and nationalism. Moving against the mystification of the crisis, we are interested in critical approaches that focus on the spatialization of social relations and examine the spaces of dissent. Particularly, we wish to examine the articulations, the limits, the contradictions and the dialectic relation of commons, enclosures, inclusion, exclusion, insurgency and counter-insurgency as well as their hybrid intermediate forms, which emerge in and through physical space, modes of communication and the constitution of communities. Overall, we aim to break the North/South or East/West dichotomies and to focus on the fields of gender, race, class and culture.

Building on the critical evaluation of social relations, the circulation of social struggles and subjects and communities in motion, we search for their contentious spaces and their spatial transformations, limits, possibilities and contradictions in the era of crisis. Moreover, understanding education as a unity of theory and practice, we seek these epistemological and methodological tools that emerge from and aim to the deepening and the circulation of social struggles and social movements. In the context of today’s global and local crisis, we note that while a plethora of social struggles and insurgencies emerge, the academic research often appropriates and commercializes their ideas. It is exactly here that we identify the dead-end.

Hence, we seek to surpass the so called academic activism and to set as a main target of this open gathering the critical examination of the following:

A. The role of knowledge and of researchers in the university and in social movements

The neoliberal University and the educational system constitute strategic mechanisms for the production and reproduction of social relations. In particular, within a dynamic process of neoliberalization, the university studies are intensified and are linked more and more to the labour market. Within this context, we wish to examine issues such as the production of knowledge, knowledge as a common, the neoliberalization of the University, the new educational enclosures and the concept of Anti-university.

The transformation of knowledge into private property and consequently into a commodity creates new enclosures in the field of knowledge. These new enclosures in neoliberal education are expressed both through the commodification of the physical space of the universities and through the objectification of human abilities. Some indicative examples are the increase of studying costs, the studying loans, the control of access to information, the commercialization of academic papers and books, the securitization of the University space, the criminalization and the rhetoric against student mobilizations, the suppression of the struggles of university employees and the restriction of the freedom of speech.

However, since 1960s and 1970s, the universities are spaces of collective emancipatory movements, of social struggles and of radical experiments of self-organization for the production of knowledge. As a response to these movements, since 1980s, a number of educational reforms have been introduced. These reforms seek to promote the marketization of the university, aiming to produce the appropriate competitive workforce and to supress student movements.

Yet, during the last decade, many dynamic student movements have emerged in France (2006), Greece (2006-2007), the USA (2009-2010), the UK (2010), Italy (2010-2011) and so on, which targeted the enclosure of knowledge and were connected and inspired many other urban social movements.

 

Axes of Discussion

A.1 Social education and emancipatory movements in the universities

-Student movements: limits and contradictions, connection with other urban movements, confrontation of their suppression and criminalization

-Perspectives of a radical pedagogy towards the knowledge as common

-Ideas and practices of free–‐autonomous universities beyond the education of the neoliberal university

A.2 Control and commodification of knowledge

-Public, state and private education in the neoliberal era

-Politics of knowledge enclosures and copyrights

-The suppression of academic freedom and of the freedom of speech

-Knowledge as private property and commodity for the production of value and surplus value

-Student loans and study costs as mechanisms of disciplining

-The cultural politics of the neoliberal university

-Paid and unpaid work at the University

A.3 The role of the researcher

-Lifelong education, competitiveness and the precarious status of the researcher

-The researcher as producer of dominant discourses and her/his role in the reproduction of power

-Competitiveness, academic carrie and academic divisions and hierarchies

-The biopolitical character of the neoliberal education and the construction of new identities

-Education as praxis, understood as a unity of theory and practice

-Researchers, networks and groups against and beyond the neoliberal university

 

B. Critical epistemological and methodological tools for the study of the crisis’s spatial expressions at multiple scales

Against the privatization and commodification of the academic knowledge and the intended hegemony of the neoliberal perspectives, we seek those critical epistemological tools of knowledge production that encourage social emancipation.

During the last years, urban movements and a plethora of visible and invisible practices of resistance and emancipation offer a variety of tools for the destabilization of the dominant ideologies, ways of disaggregation of power, negotiation of contradictions and visibility of differences. In parallel, today there is the urgent need for the promotion, circulation and deepening of these critical perspectives and their linking to social struggles. Thus, we aim to discuss epistemological and methodological tools, such as the following:

B1. Dialectic critical urban theory

Which are those critical approaches that assist us to perceive and examine the multiple dimensions of urban space? How do dialectic approaches and critical urban theory contribute to the understanding of the spaces of social movements and the spaces of capital, racism and patriarchy?

B2. Intersectionality and urban space in the era of crisis

How does intersectionality contribute to the study of the urban space? Which are the intersectional crossings of the multiple systems of domination, oppression and discrimination such as race, class, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, religion, dis/ability, age, cast, language, culture, body size, education level or citizenship?

B3. Cultural and postcolonial approaches

How do cultural and postcolonial studies contribute to the understanding of urban space and the conceptualization of body, identity and modes of communication. How does the criminalization and the suppression of alternative modes of culture, information and lifestyle operate as mechanisms of control, disciplining and normalization? What is the role of social media in the communication of social struggles? We seek the expression of the ongoing crisis through the spaces of architecture, art, media, and internet.

 

Within the above context, we call critical research groups, workshops, collectives and individuals to participate in a gathering during 11-14 June 2015. If you would like to participate, please provide us with your abstract (300 words) by 1 March 2015 at the latest, to the following e-mail: urbanconflicts@gmail.com

Participation is free and we will try to provide accommodation for as many participants as possible.

 

“Encounters and conflicts in the city” group

Costas Athanasiou, Eleni Vasdeki, Elina Kapetanaki, Maria Karagianni, Matina Kapsali, Vaso

Makrygianni, Foteini Mamali, Orestis Pangalos, Haris Tsavdaroglou

Thessaloniki

Thessaloniki

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Crisis

Crisis

Para-Academia

Para-Academia

PARA-ACADEMIA

BOOK LAUNCH

‘Para-academia’
With Deborah Withers, Alex Wardrop, and Charlotte Cooper
Saturday 6th December, 6.30pm

Housmans, radical booksellers since 1945

Caledonian Road, King’s Cross, London, N1 9DX
Entry £3, redeemable against any purchase
‘Academia is dying, and in the process compulsively crushes the desires for learning, creating, teaching, cooperating it claimed to foster’, Isabelle Stengers writes as endorsement for The Para-Academic Handbook: A Toolkit for making-learning-creating-acting, a unique collection exploring the margins of contemporary academia.

The book collects global perspectives of people who feel connected, in different ways, to the practice of para-academia. Those people who work alongside, beside, next to, and rub up against the proper location of the Academy, making the work of higher education a little more irregular and perverse.

This event will discuss the perils, possibilities and necessities of para-academic practice. It will explore how alternatives to the marketised university can not only be sustained, but also flourish. Speakers include editors of the collection Deborah Withers and Alex Wardrop, and contributor Charlotte Cooper.

Events at Housmans: http://www.housmans.com/events.php

Published by Hammer On Press: http://www.hammeronpress.net

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

Glenn Rikowski’s article, Education, Capital and the Transhuman – can also now be found at Academia: https://www.academia.edu/9033532/Education_Capital_and_the_Transhuman

Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski

CRISES IN EDUCATION, CRISES OF EDUCATION

Glenn Rikowski, Visiting Scholar, Department of Education, Anglia Ruskin University, UK

A paper prepared for the Philosophy of Education Seminars at the University of London Institute of Education 2014-15 Programme, 22nd October 2014.

 

INTRODUCTION

The capitalist crisis of 2007-09 cast a grim shadow over social existence in developed Western nations. The fallout from the banking crash of September 2008 post-Lehman cascaded over welfare, health, social services and education provision in the form of austerity measures, the drive to cut sovereign debt levels, the erosion of workers’ living standards and vicious service cuts and taxes aimed at the poor and disadvantaged (e.g. the bedroom tax in the UK).

On the back of this maelstrom, the Journal of Education Policy (JEP) celebrated its 25th anniversary by running a special issue on ‘Education, Capitalism and the Global Crisis’ in 2010[1]. The JEP is to be congratulated on unveiling articles addressing relationships between the crisis of 2007-09 and education: it was unusual for a mainstream education journal to dedicate a whole issue to this topic. However, with the possible exception of Clarke and Newman’s (2010) contribution[2] it could be concluded that little progress has been made in understanding relations between capitalist crises and education since Madan Sarup’s classic Education, State and Crisis: A Marxist Perspective of 1982. Furthermore, there seemed to be a coy elision regarding the constitution of crisis within or of education itself. The crisis of 2007-09 was basically ‘economic’ in nature, it appears, with various spill-over effects for education: e.g. cuts in expenditure, deepening educational inequalities and rationing of access to higher education (Jones, 2010). Thus: education crisis was derivative of, and consequential upon, economic crisis. Furthermore, the economy, or the ‘economic’ system (for structuralists) is the starting point for analysis of education crisis.

The notion that an ‘education crisis’ can only ever be derivative of a capitalist economic one begs the question as to whether all crises can only ever be basically economic in nature; only ‘economic’ crises fundamentally put either the whole capitalist economy and society at risk, or, are the foundation for crises in other parts of the social system but still basically ‘economic’ in nature; thereby generating spectres of reductionism, economic determinism and crude renditions of historical materialism. On the other hand, references to ‘crisis’ litter media reports and academic outputs in relation to all kinds of topics – and there is nearly always some kind of ‘education crisis’ foregrounded by the print media. In terms of everyday usage the concept appears to have extensive legitimacy, though Gamble notes that ‘the term crisis [is] being thrown around fairly indiscriminately in everyday discourse’ (2009, p.7).[3]

It should be borne in mind that the concept of crisis can be traced back to the writings of Hippocrates (c. 460 – c. 370 B.C.) in ancient Greece, where it was used in relation to medicine, specifically indicating the turning point in the course of a disease or medical condition. In such writings as Epidemics, Book 1, Hippocrates used the concept of crisis to denote the point (the turning point) at which a patient either began to make a recovery from illness, or the disease won out and death resulted (Hippocrates, 1983). Furthermore, reading the ground-breaking work on crisis by Janet Roitman (2011 and 2014), which built on the classic text on the topic by Reinhart Koselleck (1988), indicated that an exploration of the concept of crisis beyond the economic sphere could be a worthwhile project. Maybe there could be essentially ‘education crises’ after all, and with this in view, this paper is structured into three parts, as follows.

Part 1 begins with a rudimentary outline of the concept of crisis. Madan Sarup’s (1982) classical theory of education crisis is then explored, coupled with some evidence showing that Sarup’s approach still has relevance for today (with contemporary examples drawn from the United States, Australia and England). It is demonstrated how contemporary accounts of the 2007-09 economic crisis could supplement and deepen Sarup’s account, whilst also avoiding the issue of the possibility of definitive education crises. This is followed by a brief outline and review of some work by Vincent Carpentier (2003, 2006a-b and 2009), which, although manifesting more sophistication (and much better data) as compared with Sarup’s classic work, nevertheless falls prey to subsuming education crises under economic developments. In the same context, David Blacker’s work on The Falling Rate of Learning and the Neoliberal Endgame (2013) is examined. This is an attempt to apply Marx’s notion of the tendency of the rate of profit to fall (TRPF) (via the work of Kliman, 2012) to developments in education in the United States (primarily). Blacker stamps the TRPF on contemporary education and thereby develops an original account of education crisis. Yet nevertheless, his rendering of education crisis is still derivative of economic crisis. Blacker also fails to pin down what a falling rate of learning actually is. He prefers to focus on a fall in the mass of learning and the elimination of learning, instead. These developments rest on economic, but also environmental, crisis. This first part of the paper ends with a brief critique of Crisis Fundamentalism: the notion that real, bona fide crises can only be economic ones. This is what the concept of crisis in education is concerned with.

Part 2 takes another tack: a different starting point, an alternative methodological approach. Rather than viewing education crises as flowing from economic ones, it explores the concept of education and what it is to be an ‘educated person’, and then seeks out possibilities for education crises within educational phenomena, institutions, processes and ethics. Such crises are crises of education, it is argued. The work of R.S. Peters (via Robin Barrow, 2011) is the focus here. There is an attempt to work through what an ‘education crisis’ might be on the basis of Barrow’s rendition of what he (Barrow) takes to be the four key components of Peters’ conception of the educated person. The discussion of some of the consequences of this approach is deepened through bringing the work of Janet Roitman (2011, 2014) to the keyboard. Rather than providing a history of the concept of crisis, as in Koselleck (1988), or providing a new (and improved) concept of crisis, Roitman shows the various ways in which the concept has been, and can be, put to work. Hence, Roitman’s approach to crisis is ‘put to work’ on R.S. Peters’ work on the educated person, pace Barrow. The last base in Part 2 examines the notion of ‘education for its own sake’ and what I call ‘island pedagogy’, flowing from the work of Furedi (2004a and 2009) and his followers. The argument here is that this approach to education crisis falls either into an ethics of blame or conjures up an education Colossus; a kind of Nietzschean figure with a monumental drive to learn and teach, unsullied by material interests and motivations. This approach is also basically idealist, transhistorical and sociologically naïve. It is also the flipside of Crisis Fundamentalism (education crises derive from economic ones – crises in education): quintessentially education crises can only arise within the educational sphere itself – leading to a kind of Educational Crisis Idealism (crises of education).

The Conclusion argues that we need to think about crisis in relation to education and economy in a new way: such crises are not essentially ‘education’ or ‘economic’ in nature. An anti- (rather than post-) structuralist perspective rooted in class struggle is advanced as a way forward, and neither Crisis Fundamentalism (crises in education) nor Educational Crisis Idealism (crises of education) will do. It also discusses the question of whether, and why, exploring the issue of crisis and education is a worthwhile pursuit for critical educators and theorists and for those who wish to move beyond capitalist education and society.

 

The whole paper can be downloaded at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

 

[1] Journal of Education Policy, Vol.25 No.6, November, edited by Stephen Ball, Meg Maguire and Ivor Goodson. A book based on this special 25th Anniversary was produced by the same three editors, also called Education, Capitalism and the Global Crisis, in 2012 (Ball et al, 2012) – but with some additional articles.

[2] Clarke and Newman (2010) explore the notion that crises are ‘socially constructed’ and the roles discourse and social power play in these constructions.

[3] See also: ‘Crisis is much overused in everyday discourse. 24-hour news lives by manufacturing crisis. Most of them are entirely ephemeral. Any event that is in any way out of the ordinary or where there appears to be conflict and the outcome is uncertain becomes labelled a crisis’ (Gamble, 2010, p.704).

Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski

CRISIS AND EDUCATION

Glenn Rikowski 

Anglia Ruskin University

Department of Education

Chelmsford Site

Bishops Hall Lane

Chelmsford, Essex

CM1 1SQ

2013-2014 Joint Research Meetings: Critical Education and Justice (CEJ) and Early Childhood Research Group (ECRG)

ALL WELCOME

OPEN INVITATION

Weds 12 March 2014

CEJ led Research Seminar

4.30-6.30

Room: SAW 005

Dr. Glenn Rikowski will speak on Crisis and Education

Rikowski is an independent education researcher based in London. Until 31st October 2013, he was a Senior Lecturer in Education Studies in the School of Education at the University of Northampton. A number of his papers can be found online at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

For further information: paulette.luff@anglia.ac.uk or dave.hill@anglia.ac.uk

Travelling to the Chelmsford Campus:  http://www.anglia.ac.uk/ruskin/en/home/your_university/anglia_ruskin_campuses/chelmsford/find_chelm.html

ARU

Chelmsford Campus Map:

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.anglia.ac.uk/ruskin/en/home/your_university/anglia_ruskin_campuses/chelmsford/find_chelm.Maincontent.0017.file.tmp/Chelmsford%20campus%20with%20smoking%20areas.pdf

Crisis

Crisis

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

THE SALE OF STUDENT LOANS: HOW DO WE STOP IT?

A Teach-in at the Houses of Parliament: ‘The sale of student loans…how do we stop it?’

Monday, January 13th 2014, 7pm
Details: http://andrewmcgettigan.org/2014/01/07/teach-in-at-the-house-of-commons-monday-13-january/
***
‘The sale of student loans; the latest move turning first rate public universities into third rate private companies: How do we stop it?’

Speakers so far confirmed:

Stefan Collini, Professor of English at Cambridge and author of the ‘Sold Out’ article in the London Review of Books, 24th Oct 2013

Andrew McGettigan, author of The Great University Gamble: Money, Markets and the Future of Higher Education

Natalie Fenton – Professor of Media and Communications at Goldsmith and past president of the University and College Union

As the changes to university funding are advancing Collini argues that ” … the coalition government took the decisive steps in helping to turn some first rate universities into third rate companies. If you still think the time for criticism is over, perhaps you had better think again”.

The Higher Education Teach-In is your opportunity to hear and question the experts so then we can press the Coalition to think again.

*Entry via Cromwell Green Public Entrance – Please allow at least 15 minutes to clear security*

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski
Education Crisis

Education Crisis
Education Crisis

Education Crisis

EDUCATION FOR ACTION

Inspired by the debates in the ‘uncut’ and ‘occupy’ movements around the globe, a group of us have been meeting in Leeds to talk about what’s been happening to adult and workers’ education. We’d like to ask you to join in our discussions so we can generate ideas and action that work in communities and trade unions and inspire new ideas about the content and delivery of an education that we own ourselves.

This group has started to evolve. We are a loose collective that is committed to empowerment through education for a social purpose. Education is being turned into an economic commodity and is being slowly privatised in the interests of the rich and powerful. We want to join forces with others who oppose those that want to reduce the experience of living (for the 99%) to providing consumer demand for stuff!

See: http://education4action.wordpress.com/

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Knowledge

Knowledge

20th and 21st CENTURY FRENCH AND FRANCOPHONE STUDIES INTERNATIONAL COLLOQUIUM

 

20th and 21st Century French and Francophone Studies International Colloquium

New York City: March 6-8 2014

Co-organized and hosted by

NYU, CUNY Graduate Center and Columbia University

 

Call for Papers/ Appel à communications

Money / L’Argent

 

This conference, to be held in New York City on March 6, 7 and 8 2014, will focus on the role that money, economics, dépense, financial crises and equitable or unjust economic distribution have played in 20th and 21st century French and Francophone literatures, visual cultures, theatre, history, theory, translation studies and gender and ethnic studies. Since the financial crises of 2008, there has been an ever widening debate about the role that financial gain plays in the production of culture and the functioning of institutions of higher education throughout the world. At the same time, the crises have energized communities that put into question the culture of capital and the ties between capitalism and culture, all of which has created particularly dynamic, ideological, moral and cultural power struggles. This conference will serve as an open discussion on the way money has worked in stories, aesthetic forms, translations, methodologies, curricula and our own institutions from 1900 to the present.

 

Possible topics include:

Economics and the Cultural Field

National or Global Culture?

Financial Crises and the Avant-garde

Gender and Economic Disparities

Fetishism and the Taboo of Money

Writers and their Institutions

Cinematic Production and Globalization

Copyright and Royalties in the Digital Age

Cultural and Economic Centers and Peripheries

Culture and the Welfare State

Anti-capitalism

“Occupy Wall Street” and “le Comité invisible”

The Great Depression and Art

Money/Colonialism/Postcolonialism

Money/Migration/Art

Poetry and/versus Money

Cognitive Capitalism and the Study of Literature and Film

Esthetic Practices and the Working Class

 

Proposals for individual presentations and for complete panels can be submitted in French or English by August 31, 2013. Please send them to ffsmoney2014@gmail.com. The proposal should be from 200-250 words for each presentation and should include the affiliation, the name and the email address of each participant.

 

Organizers:

Peter Consenstein (CUNY)

Ludovic Cortade (NYU)

Madeleine Dobie (Columbia)

Philip Watts (Columbia)

 

20th and 21st Century French and Francophone Studies International Colloquium

New York City: March 6-8 2014

Co-organized and hosted by

NYU, CUNY Graduate Center and Columbia University

 

Call for Papers/ Appel à communications

Money / L’Argent

 

Ce colloque, qui aura lieu à New York le 6, 7 et 8 mars 2014, met l’accent sur les rôles que jouent l’argent, l’économie, la dépense, les crises financières et la répartition économique—juste ou injuste—dans la littérature, les cultures visuelles, le théâtre, l’histoire, la théorie, la traduction et l’étude de la sexualité et de l’ethnicité au sein des études françaises et francophones des 20e et 21e siècles. Les crises financières de 2008 ont lancé un débat de plus en plus étendu sur l’importance du gain financier dans la production culturelle et dans les systèmes universitaires dans le monde. Ces crises remettent en cause les rapports entre le capitalisme et la culture. Ainsi s’ouvrent des luttes de pouvoirs idéologique, culturelle et morale. Ce colloque se veut un lieu de discussion au sujet du rôle de l’argent dans la littérature, les formes esthétiques, les traductions, les méthodologies et même les programmes d’étude de nos propres universités du début du 20e siècle jusqu’à nos jours.

 

Pistes de réflexion (liste non exhaustive):

L’économie et les champs culturels

Culture nationale ou mondiale?

Les crises financières et les avant-gardes

Genre, sexualité et inégalités économiques

Fétichisme et tabou de l’argent

Les écrivains et les institutions

Le cinéma et la mondialisation

Les droits d’auteur à l’ère numérique

Centres et périphéries culturelles et économiques

La production culturelle et l’État-providence

L’Anticapitalisme

« Occupy Wall Street » et le « Comité invisible »

La crise économique des années 30 et l’art

Argent/Colonialisme/Post-colonialisme

Argent/Migration/Art

La poésie et/versus l’argent

Le capitalisme cognitif et l’étude de la littérature et du cinéma

Les pratiques esthétiques de la classe ouvrière

 

Les propositions de communication individuelles et de panels complets pourront être soumises en français ou en anglais jusqu’au 31 août 2013 à cette adresse email : ffsmoney2014@gmail.com. Veuillez joindre un résumé de 200-250 mots pour chaque communication ainsi que le nom, l’affiliation et le courriel de chaque participant.

Organisateurs :

Peter Consenstein (CUNY)

Ludovic Cortade (NYU)

Madeleine Dobie (Columbia)

Philip Watts (Columbia)

 

First published in: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-20th-21st-century-french-and-francophone-studies-colloquium-money-largent-nyc-6-8-march-2014

 

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

SOCIETY FOR RESEARCH INTO HIGHER EDUCATION (SRHE) ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2013

SRHE Annual Research Conference 11-13 December 2013

SRHE Newer Researchers Conference 10 December 2013

CALL FOR PAPERS AND CONFERENCE REGISTRATION www.srhe.ac.uk/conference2013

 

Experiencing Higher Education: Global Trends and Transformations

Celtic Manor, Newport in South Wales, United Kingdom

 

The SRHE extends a very warm welcome to all who wish to participate in one or both of these conferences, by submitting papers for presentation and/or by attending as a delegate and contributing to the many different discussions and debates within this vibrant three-day event. The Conference welcomes papers relating to further, higher, undergraduate, postgraduate and professional education in a wide range of research domains and is a highly participative event offering a range of plenaries and smaller discussion groups and seminars.

The Society’s Annual Conferences are truly international events bringing together delegates and contributors from over 40 countries. We invite researchers and scholars from the many forms of higher education globally to contribute to these Conferences, stimulating international debate on the way in which higher education is responding to economic, social, political and cultural pressures and both re-defining and re-asserting its nature and purpose. As higher education researchers, we aim to provide research insights and knowledge to inform and guide universities, governments and societies.

Conference Theme

The theme for 2013 is Experiencing Higher Education: Global Trends and Transformations.

Higher education globally is continuing to undergo change at a rapid pace and the experiences of all participants, those who study and those who work within the sector, are being transformed as a consequence. Presentations and discussions will explore global trends and examine what research into higher education tells us about the impact of these changes, with a particular focus on how higher education experiences are now evolving in a global context and embracing new technology.

The Conference will offer the opportunity to explore what it means, in the very broadest sense, to be part of the higher education academic community as a student, an academic researcher or teacher, a leader, a developer or other role.

Types of Contribution

You are invited to contribute to this debate in a variety of ways: by presenting a paper, sharing in a symposium, including work of a conceptual or theoretical nature, by preparing a poster or by organising a round table, on any aspect of this year’s theme or your own research interests. Empirical and scholarly research from a wide range of perspectives is welcome. Registrations from delegates not presenting work this year are also warmly welcomed. The deadline for submission of proposals is Friday 28 June 2013

Registration

Conference registration is now open via www.srhe.ac.uk/conference2013. Early booking discount ends 30 September 2013.

This timetable will enable all submitting authors to receive early notification of accepted papers and take full advantage of early booking discounts. We look forward once again to receiving your proposals and to another very successful conference at the Celtic Manor Resort in Newport, Wales, UK. I encourage you to submit your work and register for the conference as soon as possible. Registration by 30 September 2013 will guarantee accommodation at the Celtic Manor resort (rather than adjacent hotels) and attracts important early registration discounts. You can download the full Call for Papers and find all the information you need on submissions and registration from the Society’s website at www.srhe.ac.uk  – just click on ‘Conference 2013’

SRHE Newer Researchers’ Conference 10 December 2013

The SRHE Newer Researchers’ Conference on the same theme will take place at the Celtic Manor one day in advance of the SRHE Annual Research Conference. This is an excellent event for postgraduate students and newer researchers, providing the opportunity to present research work in a nurturing environment and participate in a number of seminars and discussions. The Call for Papers for this Conference will be issued shortly with the timetable for submissions and registration.

 

Kind regards

Helen Perkins

Director

Society for Research into Higher Education

73 Collier Street

London N1 9BE

Telephone 0207 427 2350

Fax number 0207 278 1135

srheoffice@srhe.ac.uk

http://www.srhe.ac.uk

 

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Marxism Against Postmodernism in Educational Theory

Marxism Against Postmodernism in Educational Theory

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski