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images (3)POLITICS AND POETICS

Call for Papers, Presentations and Performances:

Politics and Poetics

The third symposium of the Leverhulme International Research Network ‘Imaginaries of the Future’

Queen’s University, Belfast, 19-21 January 2016.

Website: https://imaginariesofthefuture.wordpress.com/2015/09/17/cfp-politics-and-poetics-3rd-symposium-of-the-leverhulme-research-network/

What does it mean to think of politics as a poetics, and to do so through the prism of the expectant, the anticipatory, the Not-Yet, and the futural? The third symposium of the ‘Imaginaries of the Future’ International Research Network seeks to investigate the ways in which futures are both imagined and governed, projected, deferred and deterred, through different disciplinary formations, and to explore the effects of competing ways of conceiving futurity.

The ‘hope project’ at the heart of utopianism pursues a future transformed through collective agency, and develops an anticipatory register in which visions of competing futures are mobilized to orient such collective political agency. Conversely, in what ways are creative practices of agency obstructed, and how are visions of ‘the future’ deployed in reactive, prohibitory ways? How does the utopian anticipatory compare with other categories of futurity, such as precaution or pre-emption, risk or threat? How, then, can we theorize the ambivalence of the anticipatory, modes of capture and recuperation?

Symposium participants may interrogate utopianism itself, exploring the poetics of utopian desire, affect, and agency vis-à-vis the politics of contestation, challenge, and transformation. We may also consider the specificity of politics and poetics, and the relations of connectivity between these approaches. Is politics necessarily reducible to calculative and instrumental modes of grasping the future? Is poetics more attuned to the epistemological and ontological uncertainty of the future, to what has not and might not happen? Or, is there a politics to poetics, and a poetics to politics? How can engagement with poetics help map forms of relationality and connection, and what is the role of affect, emotion, memory in creating connections and preconditions for political agency? What might be the political valence of aesthetic and sensual categories of experience — touch, proximity, intimacy, harmony and dissonance? How might technological and cybernetic invention advance both human agential capacity, as well as contribute to a critique of the anthropocentrism of both politics and poetics? And can we think of ethics (say, the Levinasian encounter with the Other, or perhaps the Spinozist endeavour to enhance capacity, agency, connectivity, and joy) as a missing third term between poetics and politics?

We welcome proposals of 250-300 words in length from across the arts and humanities (and beyond) for papers, presentations or performances of up to 20 minutes in length. Please send all proposals to both s.mcmanus@qub.ac.uk and nathaniel.coleman@ncl.ac.uk

Utopia

Utopia

Bursaries

Five travel bursaries, two of up to £1000, and three of up to £350, will be awarded through open competition to individuals who promise to make a significant contribution to the work of the Network. The larger bursaries are intended for applicants traveling a significant distance to attend the symposium. We welcome submissions from all career stages including PhD researchers. Bursary recipients will be expected to contribute a piece of writing and/or embedded media to the Network blog, and will be invited to submit work to be considered for publication opportunities arising from the symposium.

To apply for a bursary, please send a CV along with your proposal to both s.mcmanus@qub.ac.uk and nathaniel.coleman@ncl.ac.uk by 30 October 2015

 

Dr Susan McManus

Lecturer in Political Theory

Politics, International Studies and Philosophy QUB.

Even Bigger Data

Even Bigger Data

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

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Critique of Political Economy

Critique of Political Economy

MARX AND UTOPIA CONFERENCE

The Marx and Philosophy Society’s annual conference will take place on Saturday 13th June 2015 at the UCL Institute of Education, 20 Bedford Way, London.

This year’s theme is ‘Marx and Utopia’
Main speakers:
Lea Ypi (LSE)

Revolutionary Partisanship

David Leopold (Oxford)
Marx’s Critique of Utopia

Gregory Claeys (Royal Holloway)
Marx, Marxism and Utopia

Plus two graduate panels.

For full details, including conference abstracts and programme, see http://www.marxandphilosophy.org.uk.

Attendance is free, and open to all, but please email Meade McCloughan at meade.mccloughan@gmail.com to reserve a place.

Please feel free to forward this email to others who may be interested.

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/marx-and-utopia-conference-london-13th-june-2015

Karl Marx

Karl Marx

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Living Fire

Living Fire

AN EFFECTIVE RESPONSE TO A DYSTOPIAN VISION

(The Higher, 21 May 2015)

What does the recent election result presage for UK higher education (‘Sector stands by for battles …’ (THE, 14 May)? Evidently, a continuation of recent course and speed, namely:

  • removing the fee cap, thus further stratifying the sector;
  • more deregulation and further pickings for the private providers;
  • breaking up national bargaining on employment terms and conditions;
  • intensifying REF pressure through performance management, thus skewing research to serve a political agenda;
  • further encroachment of income-generating activities; and
  • entrenching the consumerist distortion of the academy through more NSS-style ‘assessments’.

We may expect more commercial and political attacks on academic freedoms; the elimination of academic governance in favour of corporate interests and ‘brand identity’; and further differentiation between colleagues in stable employment and those on casual contracts. The overall effect will be to undermine the universities’ capacity for genuine critical engagement.

In accelerating the end of the idea of a public university, these changes will fundamentally alter the nature of university education in the UK, and what it means to be a scholar and a student. As such, they represent the demise of the UK’s position, whatever its faults, in the world of higher education, learning, scholarship and research

At present, as scholars and academics, we are not in a good position to resist the implementation of this dystopian vision. Our initiatives in the academy (the Council for the Defence of British Universities and the Campaign for the Public University) have done important work to inform staff and students, as well as the general public, of what’s been going on since 2010 but without significant policy effects. Our trade union, the UCU, has impressive policies against the commercialisation of the sector and performance management but has been unable to turn the tide, and it has been weakened by successive defeats on pensions and pay.

There is a clear paradox here since the large majority of us is opposed to this destruction. We have a duty, therefore, to identify what is under threat, and what an effective response might be.

The future of HE in the UK is in the balance. Now is the time to convene to diagnose the problem, to develop a strategy to defend the sector, and to explain this to the wider society. We urge colleagues to plan a London conference in the autumn to resist this impending disaster.

Signed

Tom Hickey (Brighton UCU)
Professor John Holmwood (Nottingham, and Campaign for the Public University, CPU)
Sean Wallis (UCL, and UCU NEC & London Region)
Professor Thomas Docherty (Warwick, and Council for the Defence of British Universities, CDBU)
Professor Martin McQuillan (Kingston, and CDBU)
Professor Howard Hotson (Oxford, and CDBU)
Professor Miriam David (IoE)
Priyamvada Gopal (Cambridge)
Professor Bob Brecher (Brighton)
Adrian Budd (South Bank UCU)
Professor Dennis Leech (Warwick)
Saladin Meckled-Garcia (UCL UCU)
Professor Kate Chedgzoy (Newcastle)
Professor Des Freedman (Goldsmiths UCU)
Professor Jeff Duckett (QMUL)
Professor Lucie Clapp (UCL)
Professor Jane Rendell (UCL)
Professor Melissa Terras (UCL)
Jim Wolfreys (Kings UCU)
Professor Mike Otsuka (LSE)
Professor Richard Farndale (Cambridge)
Professor Patricia Waugh (Durham)
Professor Jane Hardy (Hertfordshire)
Carlo Morelli (Dundee, and UCU NEC)
Professor Malcolm Povey (Leeds)

See: https://heconvention2.wordpress.com/statement

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

THE GLASS FORTRESS

THE GLASS FORTRESS

THE GLASS FORTRESS

A free adaptation of Zamyatin’s prospective novel “We”, this concept album will take you in the wake of D–503 and I–330, two freedom-and-passion loving people.

A Dystopia tinged with Revolutionary Romanticism, first of its kind.

Album available from January 15th 2015

 

Rémi Orts

Brave New World, 1984, The Wall, Equilibrium and more recently The Hunger Games, modern culture is haunted by the spectre of extremely well-organized societies whose apparent perfection conceals dark dictatorial worlds.

If this formal exercise is known to all, what is the intimate origin, the true source of its inspiration?
In fact, everything comes from a small Russian sci-fi novel published in 1920 by Yevgeny Zamyatin, “We “.

Rémi Orts Project and Alan B wish to pay tribute to this counter-utopia, first of its kind, by revisiting it in their concept album, “The Glass Fortress”.

Let yourself be taken in the wake of Daniel and Iris, two human beings opposed in every way, that nonetheless will rejoin in the same destiny, the choice of Life, even at their own peril…

Adapted from this album, a short film, innovative and moving, will be released in April 2015 with the collaboration of the talented photographer, Fanny Storck.

Lyrics : Alan B
Music : Rémi Orts
Photos : Fanny Storck
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cPuAwNUSLI8&list=PL5KtMvKvWwKDcTibMWVLeKg5YoHuCsZZ-&index=1

See: http://www.remiorts.com/index.php/albums-remiorts/41-remi-project/96-the-glass-fortress

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

William Morris

William Morris

NEWS FROM NOWHERE CLUB: 2015 PROGRAMME

Patron: Peter Hennessy                                                                      

‘Fellowship is life and the lack of fellowship is death.’ William Morris

 

PROGRAMME 2015

VENUE  Epicentre, West St. Leytonstone E11 4LJ

TIMES 7.30 Buffet: please bring something, 8.00 Talk and questions/discussion

TRAVEL Leytonstone or Stratford tube, 257 bus or Leytonstone High Rd overground and short walk

All welcome, just turn up. Free. Donations welcome. Car park.  You need to walk to the front of the building – back door is usually locked. Quiet kids welcome.

Enquiries:   0208 555 5248 or 07443 480 509   info@newsfromnowhereclub.org.

 

Saturday 10 January 2015: Bollington: Utopia in Cheshire? And Letchworth Garden City: Health of the Country, Comforts of the Town

Speakers: Jim Hoyle & William Armitage

Jim moved from Birmingham to Bollington in 2012, having fallen in love with it. He has not been disappointed. His talk will consider every aspect of this unique Cheshire town. Its history, rich cultural life, demographics and campaigns will be covered in a witty presentation……. In 1898 Ebenezer Howard, Letchworth’s founder, had a vision: through careful planning we could elevate many of the desperately poor living & working conditions in towns & villages.  Today Letchworth remains close to its original ideals. William, Board Member of Letchworth Heritage Foundation, was Managing Director of David’s Bookshop in Letchworth for 40 years.

 

Saturday 14 February 2015: The Bethnal Green Tube Shelter Disaster

Speaker: Joy Puritz

One evening in March 1943, 173 people, including 62 children, were crushed to death trying to enter a station shelter. This talk is a description of the circumstances which led to the worst civilian disaster of WWII in this country, whether it could have been avoided & if anyone was to blame. Many have thought there was a cover up. Poignant anecdotes will be related. Joy has been closely involved in the Bethnal Green Memorial Project, an oral history project organised by the University of East London & has studied witness statements taken for the Government enquiry in 1943, interviewed survivors, shown visitors around the memorial sculpture & written texts for the project’s archive & guidebook.

 

Saturday 14 March 2015: The Life of Bees

Speaker: Ian Nichols

Ian, a local beekeeper and active member and Trustee of Essex Beekeepers Association, initiated, as Annual Conference Chair in 2013, a forum on ‘Plants, Pollinators and Pesticides’, with lectures by leading experts. He has worked with prominent figures in the bee world, has done much to promote awareness of the plight of bees in the wider community & was delighted with the award of First Prize and Best in Show for his honey & photography at the Essex Show in 2014. He will give his high speed talk covering: A Short History of the Honey Bee, Life inside the Hive, Bee Products, Danger & Threats to Bees. He will also be selling his award winning honey.

 

Saturday 11 April 2015: ‘The most lovable figure’: George Lansbury and East End politics

Speaker: Professor John Shepherd

‘The most lovable figure in modern politics’ was how A.J.P. Taylor described Christian socialist and pacifist, George Lansbury. At 73 the former rebel in 1932 took over the helm of the Labour Party of only 46 MPs in the Depression years. Throughout a remarkable life, the immensely popular Lansbury remained an extraordinary politician of the people, associated with a multitude of crusades for women’s enfranchisement, social justice and universal disarmament. He was twice jailed for his political beliefs in 1913 over ‘votes for women’ and during the 1921 ‘Poplar Rates Revolt,’ when 30 Labour councillors willingly went to prison in defiance of the government, the courts and their own party leadership. Lansbury never sought personal wealth, travelled everywhere by public transport and made his family home in impoverished East London. His final years were spent in a tireless international crusade, including visits to Hitler and Mussolini in 1937, to prevent the drift towards another world war.

 

Saturday 9 May 2015:  Permaculture: Working with Nature

Speaker: Ros Bedlow

Take a walk in Epping Forest. Trees, grasses, fungi, birds, insects, squirrels, foxes, all going about their business. Things change, but the forest keeps going: sustainable in the true sense of the word. What is it about an ecosystem like this that keeps it going & can we learn anything from it? Permaculture, developed in Australia in the 1970s as a response to agricultural practices which were degrading the land, was based on observation of nature & provided a framework for designing sustainable food growing systems. Ros has taught permaculture since the 1980s  & is particularly interested in the way permaculture ethics & principles can be applied to groups, communities, indeed to any system, to increase their sustainability.

 

Saturday 13 June 2015:  “It’s the Monarchy, Stupid”: Why the Crown is the Biggest Obstacle to Constitutional Reform

Speaker: Graham Smith

The monarchy is the keystone of the British constitution & the source of political & royal power, the wellspring of the establishment’s culture of pomposity & authority.  Yet it is wrong in principle, wrong in practice & bad for British politics, the antithesis of the democratic spirit that drives ever-growing demands for reform & the biggest obstacle to the radical reform Britain needs.  Arguments about devolution, localism & city mayors miss the point: the democratic revolution must happen in Westminster first. Without a seismic shift in our political system’s  foundation, all else is tinkering at the edges of a fundamentally flawed system. Graham is the Chief Executive Officer of Republic campaign.

 

Saturday 11 July (part of the Leytonstone Festival): “All’s Well”: A Musical Journey to Antarctica

Speaker/ Performer: Jake Wilson

In 2012, guitarist & songwriter Jake Wilson released “All’s Well”, a collection of songs marking the centenary of the deaths of Captain Scott & his polar party on their return journey from the South Pole. In 2013, Jake received unique permission to travel to Antarctica & perform his songs in the actual hut where Scott & his team lived & worked before setting out for the Pole. Jake will be talking about Scott & his companions, performing his songs & discussing his own extraordinary musical expedition to Antarctica.  For more information:  http://www.jakewilsonmusic.com

 

Saturday 8 August 2015:  ‘It Happened Here’

Speaker: Kevin Brownlow

Kevin Brownlow, the British film restorer, historian & director recently awarded an honorary Oscar for lifetime services to cinema, will talk about his first film It Happened Here, co-directed with Andrew Mollo when both were teenagers: a counter-factual history of Britain under Nazi occupation in the closing year of World War Two. Often described as the best amateur film ever made, superb in its authenticity & attention to period detail, it contained scenes in which genuine British Nazis were allowed to expound their views, leading to its being misinterpreted & condemned by many as pro-Nazi.  Kevin, who visited Hamburg in 2014 for the film’s first public showing in Germany, will talk & show us excerpts of his film.

 

Saturday 12 September 2015: James Pound, Rector of Wanstead, Natural Philosopher and Astronomer

Speaker: Dr John Fisher

In 1707 James Pound survived a massacre at an outpost of the East India Company near Cambodia. He navigated a small ship through pirate-infested waters. In 1709 he was appointed Rector of Wanstead by Sir Richard Child. Pound, a Fellow of the Royal Society, sought a solution to the problem of determining the longitude at sea, before the Longitude Prize was instituted. From 1710 Wanstead became a leading centre of scientific research. Pound worked with Edmond Halley and Isaac Newton. Pound’s nephew, James Bradley, became the first to demonstrate that the Earth was in motion. The work at Wanstead led to the solution of determining longitude at sea. Dr John Fisher lives in Forest Gate, was a factory worker without any educational qualifications, was one of the first Open University students and later lectured in the history of science at Imperial College, London.

 

Saturday 10 October 2015: Walking with Passion: A One Way Ticket to Jarrow

Speaker: Carole Vincent

Journeying from Jarrow to Trafalgar Square, a group of people from all walks of life came together in August 2014, planning to walk an historic route first taken by the Jarrow March for Jobs on 2 October 1936. However, this was the first of its kind to enlighten communities on route of the devastating privatisation of our NHS & to muster support for the ‘Call999fortheNHS’ Campaign. Carole tells her story of those three weeks & why she walked the 300 miles.

 

Saturday 14 November 2015: Trauma, Grief and Resilience in Gaza

Speakers: Dr Mohamed Altawil and David Harrold

What does it means to be a child in Gaza? You may be surprised by answers from Dr Mohamed Altawil & David Harrold of Palestine Trauma Centre (UK) who work with a trauma centre in Gaza helping children & families. The situations are often harrowing; but the people, especially the children, can be inspiring. Mohamed & David will show the work of the trauma team, recite some poetry & discuss future prospects for these wonderful children who have experienced eight years of siege & four brutal invasions.

 

Saturday 12 December 2015: The Direct Path to Enlightenment

Speaker: Vanaraji

How can we live in a better world? Changing our mind changes the world. The teachings of the Buddha help us change how we think & give us a new perspective on life that leads  to freedom from suffering, for ourselves & others. Vanaraji, an Ordained Buddhist in the Triratana Buddhist Order, will give an overview of Buddhist principles & practices that free us from mundane consciousness & help us experience more vividly the Enlightened world.

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

 

Utopia

Utopia

MICRO-UTOPIAS: EXPLORING CONNECTIONS BETWEEN ANTHROPOLOGY, RELATIONALITY AND CREATIVITY

International Society for Ethnology and Folklore
Internationale Gesellschaft für Ethnologie und Folklore
Société Internationale d´Ethnologie et de Folklore

SIEF2015 12th Congress
Zagreb, Croatia
21-25 June 2015

SIEF2015 Call for Papers opens

The Call for Papers has opened for SIEF2015 and will stay open until January 14th. This Call for Panels brought in the highest number of panel proposals for a SIEF congress yet: there were 121 panel/workshop proposals in total. 108 panels were accepted, of which 2 are poster sessions and 5 workshops.

In order to consolidate the strong thematic currents inspired by the congress theme, the Scientific Committee decided to divide the accepted panels into 18 topical streams. Please go to the Call for Papers page to read more and submit your paper proposal.

 

Micro-utopias: exploring connections in anthropology, relationality and creativity

Convenors

Ruy Blanes (University of Bergen) email
Alex Flynn (Durham University) email
Jonas Leonhard Tinius (University of Cambridge and Universität zu Köln) email
Maïté Maskens (Université Libre de Bruxelles) email
Mail All Convenors

Short Abstract

In this panel we propose to discuss anthropological approaches – ethnographic or theoretical – to human interactions and processes of imagination and creativity, understood as “micro-utopias” following the work of Nicolas Bourriaud and others.

Long Abstract

In this panel we propose to discuss anthropological approaches – ethnographic or theoretical – to human interactions and processes of imagination and creativity. Inspired by the proposals set forth by Bourriaud (1998) concerning art as a product of a relational aesthetics that is a ‘micro-utopia’, a product of communitarian association (or antagonism – see Bishop 2004) working to change the present, we challenge our colleagues to use an understanding of social movement and organization as an art form whereby processes of interaction are understood as generative, transformational, poïetic micro-utopias. We thus propose to move beyond the concrete sphere of artistic production, seeing micro-utopias as part of our morphogenetic élan vital (Bergson 1907), the creativity and improvisation of our unscripted everyday lives (Hallam and Ingold 2008) that is however and necessarily framed as political act produced within historical context (Geuss 2009). Our goal is thus to engage with micro-utopias as ‘concrete utopias’ (McGuire 2011): examples – from artistic collaborations to architectural configurations, political localisms, economic partnerships, religious community makings, etc. – of relationalities and temporal redefinitions.

Discussant: Roger Sansi-Roca

Propose paper

Papers

The panel has no papers to display. Only accepted papers will be shown here: http://www.nomadit.co.uk/sief/sief2015/panels.php5?PanelID=3361

 

GENERAL SIEF CALL FOR PAPERS

SIEF2015 12th Congress: Zagreb, Croatia. 21-25 June 2015

Call for papers, workshop contributions and posters

The call for papers is now open and closes at midnight on January 14th, 2015.

Before you propose a paper, a workshop contribution or a poster, please read the theme of the congress, the rulesbelow, and then browse the list of panels.

For SIEF2015, panels have been divided into thematic streams: Archives, Body/Embodiment, Digital/Virtual, Disciplinary discussions, Food, Gender and sexuality, Heritage, Home, Migration/Borders, Museums, Narrative, Politics and social movements, Religion, Rural, Socialist and post-socialist studies, Urban. The specific streams are complemented by a “General” stream that includes panels that did not directly fit into any of the thematic streams. Apart from the panels, there is also the Workshops and posters stream that includes the workshops ans poster sessions. When browsing through the list of panels, you can alternate between the All panels view that shows all the panels in one list, regardless of the stream and the All streams view that shows the list of streams.

Proposing a paper

Paper proposals must consist of:

  • a paper/contribution/poster title
  • the name/s and email address/es of author/s
  • a short abstract of fewer than 300 characters
  • a long abstract of fewer than 250 words

All proposals must be made via the online form, not by email. There is a ‘propose a paper’ link beneath the long abstract of each panel page, workshop page and the poster session page (in the case of poster sessions and workshops, the “paper” will mean a workshop contribution or a poster proposal). Go to the panel/workshop/poster session page you are interested in and then click on this proposal link to make your proposal directly to that panel/workshop.

On submission of the proposal, the proposing author (but not the co-authors) will receive an automated email confirming receipt. If you do not receive this email, please first check the Login environment – Cocoa (see toolbar above right) to see if your proposal is there. If it is, it simply means your confirmation email got spammed/lost; if it is not, you will need to re-submit, as for some reason the process was not completed. Co-authors cannot be added/removed nor can papers be withdrawn by the proposers themselves – for that, please email congress(at)siefhome.org .

Proposals will be marked as pending until the end of the Call for papers (14/01/2015). Convenors will then be asked to make their decisions over the papers proposed to their panel by 28th of January and to communicate those to the proposers, marking them up within the login environment (Cocoa). Papers which are neither accepted nor rejected, but marked for ‘transfer’, will then be considered by the Scientific Committee to see where else they might fit in the conference programme. There is no guarantee that such papers can be re-housed. We aim to resolve all transfers by the end of February.

Rules

Delegates may only make one presentation, although they may also convene one plenary session or panel; or be a discussant or chair in one plenary session or panel. Even though delegates may make multiple proposals, we discourage this practice as later you will be required to withdraw papers if you have multiple acceptances, inconveniencing those convenors.

Delegates are not obliged to become members of SIEF for 2015, however all are encouraged to support the Society in this way. There will be a financial incentive to do so, in that non-members will pay a higher registration fee.

Workshops

Workshops are conceptualised as practical events, guided discussions and free-format exchanges leading to specific public outputs. They may include elements of performance, exhibition materials, or interactive media displays.

Poster sessions

The poster sessions are meant to provide everyone with the opportunity of presenting their work, without overburdening the program, and accommodate those who do not wish to present orally. Posters must confirm to the same basic requirements as outlined for the panel sessions. Sessions will run throughout the Congress, with dedicated slots when poster presenters will be available at their respective display to discuss their topic with the colleagues. Junior scholars are especially encouraged to participate with a poster presentation.

Useful information for later in this process

Editing your paper/workshop contribution/poster

Paper authors can use the login link in the toolbar above to edit their proposals.

Pre-circulation of papers

SIEF has no rule about this; however many convenors are keen to pre-circulate completed papers. To facilitate this and save on email traffic, if requested by convenors, authors can upload PDFs of their papers within the online system, which will then show as a downloadable file beneath their abstract on the public panel page on this site.

Timing of presentations

Each panel/workshop slot will be 90 minutes long, accommodating a maximum of 3 presenters; each panel/workshop may only extend over three slots, i.e. a maximum of 9 presenters and no longer than a day. Convenors should allot each presenter a maximum of 30 minutes (20 for presentation and 10 for questions/discussion).

We are unable to represent specific intra-panel timings in our programme. Delegates reading the conference book will have to work on the assumption that papers will be evenly distributed through the panel.

Communication between authors/convenors

Convenor/author email addresses are not shown on the panel pages for anti-spam reasons. However there is an in-built secure email messaging system. If you cannot work that, please email congress(at)siefhome.org to obtain relevant email addresses.

Any queries with the above please email congress(at)siefhome.org.

Website: http://www.siefhome.org/congresses/sief2015/cfp.shtml

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Communism of Capital

Communism of Capital

THE COMMUNISM OF CAPITAL

Ephemera Volume 13 Number 3 (August 2013)

Ephemera is at: http://www.ephemerajournal.org

ISBN 9781906948207

Current Issue

The communism of capital? What could this awkward turn of phrase mean, and what might it signify with regards to the state of the world today? Does it merely describe a reality in which communist demands are twisted to become productive of capital, a capitalist realism supplemented by a disarmed communist ideology? Or does the death of the capitalist utopia mean that capital cannot contain the antagonism expressed by Occupy and other movements any more, and therefore must confront communism upfront?

The 12 contributions to this latest issue of ephemera explore the valances of the paradoxical and seemingly incoherent expression that is ‘the communism of capital’. Collectively they stake out new territory for the theorisation and organization of political struggle in a context in which capital has become increasingly aware that its age-old nemesis might today be lurking at its very heart.

You can order a print copy of the whole issue now at your local bookstore!

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editorial

The communism of capital?

Armin Beverungen

Anna-Maria Murtola

Gregory Schwartz

article

Spectre of the commons: Spectrum regulation in the communism of capital

Rachel O’Dwyer

article

Infecting capitalism with the common: The class process, communication, and surplus

David Carlone

article

Pro Bono? On philanthrocapitalism as ideological answer to inequality

Mikkel Thorup

article

Communism, occupy and the question of form

Saroj Giri

note

Does capital need a commons fix?

Massimo De Angelis

note

Communicity

Colin Cremin

note

Common as silence

Peter Fleming

note

Recomposing precarity: Notes on the laboured politics of class composition

Stevphen Shukaitis

review

Theorizing debt for social change

Miranda Joseph

review

The spectre of anarchism

Thomas Swann

review

Friendship and counter-conduct in the neoliberal regime of truth

Richard Weiskopf

review

‘Of luck and leverage’

Joyce Goggin

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Communism of Capital

Communism of Capital

Marxism Against Postmodernism in Educational Theory

Marxism Against Postmodernism in Educational Theory

REVIEW 31: UPDATE DECEMBER 2012

 

Tom Steele on ‘The Nazis, Capitalism and the Working Class’

http://review31.co.uk/article/view/88/the-conformists

 

Jamie Mackay reviews Hancox’s ‘Utopia and the Valley of Tears’:

http://review31.co.uk/article/view/84/i-am-not-giuseppe-fanelli

 

Tom Snow on socially engaged art:

http://review31.co.uk/article/view/86/the-world-is-a-stage

 

David Convery on Maurice Coakley’s ‘Ireland in the World Order’:

http://review31.co.uk/article/view/80/the-dependency-rut

 

Rebecca Close on Eyal Weizman:

http://review31.co.uk/article/view/78/grey-areas

 

 

Review 31: http://www.review31.co.uk

 

First published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/latest-politics-reviews-from-review-31

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

 

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com  

Utopia

Utopia

CREATING WORLDS: THE AFFECTIVE SPACES OF EXPERIENTIAL POLITICS

Final call for participants: 

Creating worlds: The affective spaces of experimental politics

Monday 14 January, 2013
Royal Holloway, Bedford Square, 2 Gower Street, WC1E 6DP.
10am-5pm
Facilitated by Anja Kanngieser and Jenny Pickerall.

This event seeks to bring together those exploring questions of how we live within, formulate, create and antagonise, spaces and places of politics: public and private, macro-political and micro-political. It is specifically interested in inviting conversation about spaces in which self-organisation occur, whereby people come together in some sort of common articulation. Moreover, what is of key interest is the ‘how’: how people come together in what kinds of spaces and places; what forces and desires inform these collective spaces, and how they are sustained; how spaces and subjects are processually entangled; how social reproduction occurs – the lines of class, gender, race, ability; and the ways spaces are differentiated, that is to say, how boundaries are performed. 

Rather than marking topographies of conventional ‘radical’ political sites, such as social centres, camps, protests, assemblies, allotments, workplaces, bookstores, what might be uncovered are the more messy affective and relational threads that run though them, and also far beyond them, and how we might even begin to apprehend and engage with them.

There will be three roundtables on the themes of:

Spatiality and affect with Kye Askins, Harriet Hawkins and Paul Simpson. Facilitated by Anna Feigenbaum

Spatiality and organisation (social reproduction) with Tim Cresswell, Jane Wills and Nazima Kadir. Facilitated by Fabian Frenzel

Spatiality and politics with Adam Ramadan, Andy Davies and Uri Gordon. Facilitated by Gavin Brown.

Please submit a short (200 word) statement by 15 December 2012 on why you would like to attend when registering your interest toanja.kanngieser@rhul.ac.uk. Attendance is limited to 30 people. 

Some travel funding is available for unwaged/ underwaged participants.

This event is part of a series associated with the Protest Camps: Experiments in Alternative Worlds projecthttp://protestcamps.org/ and is funded by an ESRC Postdoctoral Fellowship with Royal Holloway, University of London.

http://www.transversalgeographies.org

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

 

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com 

 

The Individuality Pr♥test: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/transcontinental/the-individuality-prtest

I Love Transcontinental: http://ihearttranscontinental.blogspot.co.uk/

 

 

Utopia

Utopia

DYSTOPIA AND GLOBAL REBELLION

Dystopia and Global Rebellion

Global Studies Association of North America Annual Conference

4-6 May 2012

Universityof Victoria,Vancouver Island, Canada

(Co-sponsored by of the VP of Research, Dean of Social Sciences, and Centre for Global Studies)

Social crisis shakes Europe and the U.S., anti-immigration movements grow, nuclear meltdown radiates Japan, while spreading drought and floods are billboards for global warming.  It seems the future has arrived and it doesn’t look good.

Yet democratic movements spread like wildfire throughout the Middle East, youth movements come alive in the U.K., France, Chile and Spain, rebellion takes to the streets in Greece, and Occupy Wall Street wakes up the U.S. Dystopia and global rebellion indeed. This year’s conference theme focuses our attention on the problems and alternatives we face in our struggle for a just and better world.

Keynote Speakers and Panels:

“Economic Crisis and the Working Class: re-thinking class struggle” — Gary Teeple

“Anti-Globalization or Alter-Globalization? Mapping the Political Ideology of the Global Justice Movement” — Manfred B. Steger.

“Crisis of the Human Condition: Global Rebellion Hits the Wall” — Paul James.

“Building the Counter-Hegemonic Bloc to Neo-Liberal Dystopia” — William Carroll & Jerry Harris.

“Environmental Dystopia and the Green Alternative” — Martha McMahon, Kara Shaw & Waziyatawin.

“The Occupy Movement” — Carl Davidson, Lauren Langman, Jackie Smith, Jay Smith.

For more information on keynote speakers, schedule, registration and conference information go to: http://net4dem.org/mayglobal

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

ANTHROPOLIGICAL MATERIALISM AND MATERIALISM OF ENCOUNTER: REINTERPRETING OUR PRESENT IN THE WAKE OF WALTER BENJAMIN AND LOUIS ALTHUSSER

Call for Participation

German-French summer school, organised by the DFH Saarbrücken 2012

Anthropological Materialism and Materialism of Encounter: Reinterpreting our Present in the Wake of Walter Benjamin and Louis Althusser

A Cooperation of the University of Potsdam and the University Paris-Sorbonne (ParisIV)

Location: University of Potsdam, Institute of Philosophy, Am Neuen Palais 10 (Building 9, Room 1.14), 144469 Potsdam

Date: July 16. – 20. 2012

This cross-cultural and interdisciplinary summer school aims to foster an innovative dialog between the philosophies of Walter Benjamin (1892-1940) and Louis Althusser (1918-1990). After the self-confident liberalism of the 1980s and 90s proclaimed the post-histoire and the end of all utopias, it is today all the more necessary to debate the real frontiers of the global social and political order from a non-dogmatic and unorthodox materialist point of view. To approximate such a materialist perspective, this summer school seeks to interrogate and compare Walter Benjamin’s “anthropological materialism” and Louis Althusser’s “materialism of encounter”. We cordially invite young academics – primarily graduate and Ph.D. students from France and Germany– to propose their research projects or to act as respondents to plenary lectures from a series of renowned Althusser and Benjamin scholars from the fields of philosophy, philology, psychoanalysis, art history, and political theory.

Further Information: http://anthropologicalmaterialism.hypotheses.org/

Organisation:

Prof. Hans-Peter Krüger (Potsdam)
Prof. Gérard Raulet (Paris)
Dr. Marc Berdet (Paris/Potsdam)
Dr. Thomas Ebke (Potsdam)

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

 

Utopia

THE SPECTRE OF UTOPIA: UTOPIAN AND SCIENCE FICTIONS AT THE ‘FIN DE SIÈCLE’ – BY MATTHEW BEAUMONT

PETER LANG – International Academic Publishers are pleased to announce a new book by
——————————————–
Matthew Beaumont 
THE SPECTRE OF UTOPIA: Utopian and Science Fictions at the “Fin de Siècle”

Oxford, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, Frankfurt am Main, New York, Wien, 2012. XII, 307 pp.
Ralahine Utopian Studies. Vol. 12
Edited by Raffaella Baccolini, Joachim Fischer, Tom Moylan and Michael J. Griffin

pb. ISBN 978-3-0343-0725-3
CHF 63.00 / €(D) 47.50 / €(A) 48.80 / € 44.40 / £ 40.00 / US-$ 66.95
€(D) includes VAT – only valid for Germany  /  €(A) includes VAT – only valid for Austria  

In the late nineteenth century, a spectre haunted Europe and the United States: the spectre of utopia. This book re-examines the rise of utopian thought at the “fin de siècle”, situating it in the social and political contradictions of the time and exploring the ways in which it articulated a deepening sense that the capitalist system might not be insuperable after all. The study pays particular attention to Edward Bellamy’s seminal utopian fiction, “Looking Backward” (1888), embedding it in a number of unfamiliar contexts, and reading its richest passages against the grain, but it also offers detailed discussions of William Morris, H.G. Wells and Oscar Wilde. Both historical and theoretical in its approach, this book constitutes a substantial contribution to our understanding of the utopian imaginary, and an original analysis of the counter-culture in which it thrived at the fin de siècle.

Contents: 
Utopian fiction – Science fiction – Disaster fiction – Radical publishing – Feminism – Socialism – Occultism.

“Matthew Beaumont is one of the most brilliant of the younger generation of English critics. His work on late Victorian culture puts him among the most suggestive and original scholars of the period. While focused on Bellamy, this wide-ranging study encompasses a rich variety of authors and intellectual currents, all dealing with the elusive but utterly essential idea of utopia. In its theoretical sophistication and historical depth, Beaumont’s work is both innovative and illuminating” (Terry Eagleton, Distinguished Professor of English at Lancaster University and author of ‘Trouble with Strangers’ and ‘Why Marx Was Right’)

“So much has been written about Looking Backward and late nineteenth-century utopian literature that one wonders if these topics can ever come to us fresh again. Beaumont answers this question by placing Bellamy’s utopia within significant yet rarely studied publication and reception contexts, such as the London Bellamy Library books series designed to educate working-class readers, and by presenting utopia as a constructively troubling spectre, a ghost evaluating the readers’ present by haunting them with a sense of the absence of a suppressed better world existing somewhere between possibility and impossibility. Thus Beaumont does refresh utopia for us” (Kenneth Roemer, Piper Professor, University of Texas at Arlington and author of ‘The Obsolete Necessity: America in Utopian Writings, 1888-1900’ and ‘Utopian Audiences’)

“This is a rich and provocative book in which Beaumont challenges conventional readings of utopian writing at the turn of the twentieth century. Written with insight and clarity, it provides fresh perspectives and unsettles old certainties. It is essential reading for anyone concerned with the cultural context of the time” (Ruth Levitas, Professor of Sociology, University of Bristol and author of ‘The Concept of Utopia’)

Matthew Beaumont is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of English at University College London.

————————————————————-
You can order this book online. Please click on the link below:
————————————————————-
Direct order: http://www.peterlang.com?430725
————————————————————-
Or you may send your order to:
————————————————————-

PETER LANG AG
International Academic Publishers
Moosstrasse 1
P.O. Box 350
CH-2542 Pieterlen
Switzerland
Tel +41 (0)32 376 17 17
Fax +41 (0)32 376 17 27
e-mail: mailto:info@peterlang.com
Internet: http://www.peterlang.com

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski