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Student Debt

Student Debt

STUDENT DEBT

Berkeley Journal of Sociology

Call for Submissions on Student Debt

In collaboration with Debt and Society, the Berkeley Journal of Sociology is seeking submissions about student debt. Submissions will be considered for the 2015 print edition of the BJS as well as an online series that will launch in September 2015.

In addition to short essays (less than 3,500 words), we are also seeking photo essays, illustrations, reviews, and critical replies to published content.

Submissions must be received by June 1, 2015 and should be emailed to both submissions@berkeleyjournal.org and charlie.eaton@berkeley.edu.

Full BJS submission guidelines can be found here.

The goals of the series are described further here.

Berkley Journal of Sociology: http://berkeleyjournal.org/

Debt& Society: http://debtandsociety.org/a-call-for-submissions-on-student-debt/

Call for Submissions: http://berkeleyjournal.org/2015/04/a-call-for-submissions-on-student-debt/

Submission Guidelines: http://berkeleyjournal.org/submissions/

EDITORIAL_Student-loans_Devin-Beauregard

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Critique of Capitalist Education

Critique of Capitalist Education

A CRITICAL SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS
SPECIAL ISSUE OF CRITICAL SOCIOLOGY

We are constantly confronted by competing and contradictory narratives concerning the importance of education. On one hand, a steady mantra stresses success in the new economy requires at least a college degree—and evidence shows that workers with a college degree earn more and get better jobs over their working lives. On the other hand, the educational system in the US is under assault as public sector funding at all levels is cut, teachers as public sector workers are demonized, and by everyone’s assessment the US is rapidly moving towards a society where a select few receive an elite education and the rest are being left behind.

The editors of Critical Sociology are looking for scholarship that delves into the nature and consequences of education—both within the US and comparatively. At a time when costs to students in public universities in the US double while state governments cut allocations, we read that Germany has decided higher education for all will be free of fees and tuition costs. Are any colleges educating underserved students without leaving them with crippling debts, and if so how? Students and teachers in Colorado resisted revisionist changes to the high school curriculum, are these strategies for institutions of higher education? What is the future for the next generation in the US? How can we understand the logic and role of education (and not pedagogy) under advanced capitalism in the neoliberal era?

Some suggestive topics include, but are not limited to, the following:
* 600,000 students in the US attend colleges where the dropout rate is 85 percent
* many students amass debt but leave without a degree, facing a life of indentured work
* by some estimates three quarters of all college instruction is done by casualized faculty
* school budgets are driven by administrative and not instructional costs
* slashed public sector support for education shift costs onto students
* corporate logic (failed and successful) reshapes governance and decision-making
* faculty are silenced under rules of “civility”
* faculty should avoid “disturbing” students with content that may raise challenges
* graduate program recruit students without funding and few job prospects
* institutions fail to recruit underserved faculty and students

Potential contributors should send a proposal with a tentative title, a short (100-150 word) abstract, and contact/affiliation details to critical.sociology@gmail.com by1 December 2014, and put EDUCATION SYMPOSIUM in your subject line.  All authors will be notified by 15 January and first drafts of papers will be due by 15 June. We anticipate having a session at the annual SSSP meetings in Chicago where authors will discuss their papers and get feedback.

Depending on the number of submissions, we anticipate producing an edited volume to augment the journal symposium. Contact David Fasenfest, Editor, at the email above with any questions.

Prof. David Fasenfest
Dept of Sociology
Wayne State University
Editor, Critical Sociology
http://crs.sagepub.com
Follow us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Critical-Sociology/109234272497897
Follow us on Twitter: @critsoc
Association for Critical Sociology website: http://criticalsociology.org
Series Editor, Studies in Critical Social Science
http://www.brill.nl/scss (Hardcover)
http://www.haymarketbooks.org/category/scss-series (Paperback)

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

BIRMINGHAM RADICAL EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT

BRE(A)D

 

ABOUT

We are a newly created group seeking to build and participate in more democratic educational processes;

Our aim is to work together towards higher education experiences that are not consumerist, indebting, authoritarian or judging of individual worth;

We therefore seek to work collectively against the principles that now shape the so-called public university;

Central to the educational experiences we want to create is the idea that students and teachers have much to learn from one another;

Thus all who participate in the Free University-Birmingham are scholars: student-scholars and teacher-scholars;

On our courses learning and teaching entail processes of continuous negotiation to ensure the fullest participation of all, recognising, respecting and celebrating human diversity;

All learning and teaching will be critical—questioning the world as it is to explore how it could be otherwise;

We believe that in order for all learning and teaching to be critical and democratic, dialogue is essential.

All critical, democratic dialogue amongst student-scholars and teacher -scholars should, when possible, not just remain in the classroom;

Thus our ultimate classroom is the wider world; we seek to develop educational processes aiming to build a more socially just and sustainable world.

 

Birmingham Radical Education Development: http://bread4brum.wordpress.com/

 

**END**

 

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

WALL STREET-INFLATED STUDENT DEBT BUBBLE HITS $1 TRILLION: DEBTORS RALLY FOR RELIEF

By Sarah Jaffe

 

The collective weight of American student debt is a drag not just on those paying the debt, but on our entire economy.

April 24, 2012   

You could call it a bubble, but it’s more like a ball and chain. Bubbles are, after all, light and airy.

The collective weight of American student debt is now over $1 trillion, and that weight is a drag not just on those paying the debt, but on our entire economy. It’s hard to calculate exactly, because the lenders are notoriously unwilling to hand over their data, and with students defaulting at ever-higher rates, interest rates and fees are always changing, adding constantly to the weight of the burden college graduates (and those who didn’t graduate but still have to pay off the loans they took out in more hopeful times) carry.

Around the country, activists are marking the date with actions; in New York, a rally and march will be the centerpiece of what the Occupy Student Debt Campaign has dubbed 1-T day; the day the amount of debt we’re carrying to pay for our education officially got too big to bear silently. The rallies aim to end the isolation that debtors often feel, to bring people together to understand that the problem they have is shared by millions of others—and that it calls for political solutions.

“I think that we in America have become so separated from one another, partially due to this debt,” Pam Brown, an organizer with the Occupy Student Debt Campaign, told AlterNet. “The debt makes us very individual; we can’t afford to help someone else, we can’t afford to spend our time in a way that’s not productive.”

How did we get here, with more student debt than credit card debt, with student loans rising twice as fast as mortgage debt at the height of the housing bubble? Recent graduates face terrifying unemployment numbers—ThinkProgress reported that over half of all college grads under the age of 25 are either jobless or underemployed and median wages for grads with bachelor’s degrees are down from 2000—and delinquencies on debt is steadily climbing.

Those are complicated issues, because student lending is a complicated industry, one that highlights the degree to which the government is entwined with Wall Street, and state and federal policy play off one another to push students to ever greater levels of borrowing. As students and debtors rally to shake the stigma off their debt burden and call attention to the involvement of big finance in their education, let’s take a look at the system that led us to a trillion dollars in debt.

The Politics of Debt

You know you have a problem when even Mr. 1 Percent himself, Mitt Romney, is declaring his support for a move to hold student loan interest rates low. “I support extending the temporary relief on interest rates for students as a result of — as a result of student loans, obviously — in part because of the extraordinarily poor conditions in the job market,” Romney said this week, probably in an attempt to blame President Obama for the lousy conditions young workers are facing. (Romney has also said he supports Paul Ryan’s budget, which allows student loan interest rates to go back up to 6.8 percent from the 3.4 percent current rate for new loans. Ryan’s budget also slashes Pell grants, the government’s method of giving rather than lending money to low-income students.)

On the campaign trail, Obama has pounded the issue by calling for Congress to temporarily extend the low interest rates. Members of Congress have introduced legislation to permanently keep the rate at which the government lends money at 3.4 percent. Roosevelt Institute fellow Mike Konzcal has noted that the government borrows at a far lower rate than that, which raises the question of why it is not investing more robustly in young people.

Konczal pointed out that the government makes a profit somewhere around 13 percent for each dollar of loans, and because the loans are not dischargeable in bankruptcy and Social Security payments can even be garnished to make them up, default may even be more profitable for lenders than borrowers making payments on time. There’s almost no risk of losses, which are the reason for high interest in the first place. Keeping interest rates low won’t cost the government money, it will simply cut into its profit margin a little bit. While the big banks that crashed the economy continue to enjoy ultra-low interest rates, there’s no reason to let the rates get any higher.

Original Source, AlterNet: http://www.alternet.org/economy/155133/wall_street-inflated_student_debt_bubble_hits_%241_trillion%3B_debtors_rally_for_relief

Relayed by CCDS Links, April 27 2012

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‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Universities

FOR A PUBLIC UNIVERSITY – CALL FOR PAPERS

Call for Papers – For a Public University

The transformation of Higher Education in the UK is at full speed. The cuts in government funding and the simultaneous increase in tuition fees of up to £9000 per year have dramatic implications. While universities emphasise the need to attract private finance, students are pushed towards courses with direct employment possibilities. At the same time, employers ask for closer co-operation with universities not only in relation to research but also in terms of the development of teaching curricula. The main focus is clear; education should be directed towards business interests in order to strengthen the UK economy.

One outcome is that Higher Education is increasingly commodified as universities exist in the shadow of the market. The space for critical thinking about society has been eroded; students’ ability-to-learn gives way to consumers’ ability-to-pay. Academics have themselves become subject to the charge of irrelevance unless direct policy-relevance is embraced. The critical theoretician is cast adrift as indolent and idle in the race to inform statesmen, to become prophets for science, to make profits for business.

This workshop has the purpose to analyse the underlying dynamics of the transformation of Higher Education in and beyond the UK, to reflect on the social function of Higher Education, as well as develop alternative ways of thinking about how best to deliver Higher Education in the future. The goal is to re-assert ways in which Higher Education can be retained as a public good, available to all.

Papers are invited for the following themes: 

–    Analyses of the current transformation of Higher Education; 

–    Discussions about the social function of Higher Education; and

–    Interventions on how to organise the future of Higher Education.

This one-day workshop is jointly organised by the Local UCU Association at Nottingham University and the Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice (CSSGJ). It will be held at NottinghamUniversity on Friday, 15 June 2012.

All paper proposals should be sent to Andreas Bieler at Andreas.Bieler@nottingham.ac.uk by no later than Friday, 27 April. 

The maximum number of workshop participants will be 25 people, 10 to 12 paper givers plus additional participants.

People who want to participate without giving a paper should also contact Andreas Bieler at: Andreas.Bieler@nottingham.ac.uk as soon as possible. There is no registration fee and two coffee breaks and lunch are provided free of charge by the organisers.

 

Original source: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-for-a-public-university-nottingham-15-june-2012  

 

***END***

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub,Bangor, northWales)  

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Education Crisis

AFTER THE HIGHER EDUCATION BILL IS ‘POSTPONED’: WHAT NEXT IN THE STRUGGLE FOR HIGHER EDUCATION?

Education Activist Network Roundtable discussion – After the HE Bill is ‘postponed’: What next in the struggle for Higher Education?

Venue: King’s College London (Strand) WC2R 2LS, Room S-1.27

Date: 21 Feb 2011

Time: 6:30pm

 

Facebook event: http://www.facebook.com/#!/events/261268643945344/

Participants include: John McDonnell MP; John Holmwood, author of Manifesto for the Public University; Andrew McGettigan, blogger Critical Education; Jim Wolfreys, author of Universities for Hire; Howard Hotson. Oxford academic; Liam Burns NUS President

As the government has announced that it will not seek to pass the HE Bill (based on last summer’s HE White Paper) through parliament until 2015, the Education Activist Network is holding a roundtable discussion with trade unionists, academics and journalists to discuss the way forward in the fight for Higher Education.

The HE Bill, proposed by Universities Minister David Willetts, faces major opposition from academics and HE/FE students, who marched in their tens of thousands against it.

Cameron, Clegg and Willetts do not want to see a repeat of the mobilizations that took place in November/December 2010. One of the reasons the vote is being ‘indefinitely’ postponed is that the government faces significant resistance – UCU’s continued strike action over pensions, the Campaign for the Public University, the No Confidence Campaign as well as growing opposition to the NHS Bill.

This roundtable discussion will aim o build opposition to the trebling of tuition fees, the debt regime and 100% funding cuts to Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, whilst at the same time form the kind of alliance that have the social and economic power to reverse these devastating neoliberal reforms.

 

In solidarity,

Mark Bergfeld & Jim Wolfreys on behalf of EAN Steering Committee

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Our Universities

THE UNIVERSITY IS OURS!

Edufactory

The University is Ours!

Friday, December 2, 2011  

A Conference on Struggles Within and Beyond the Neoliberal University
April 27-29, 2012
Toronto, Ontario

The university belongs to us, those who teach, learn, research, council, clean, and create community. Together we can and do make the university work.

But today this university is in crisis. The neoliberal restructuring of post-secondary education seeks to further embed market logic and corporate-style management into the academy, killing consultation, autonomy and collective decision-making. The salaries of university presidents and the ranks of administrators swell, but the people the university is supposed to serve — students — are offered assembly-line education as class sizes grow, faculty is over-worked, and teaching positions become increasingly precarious. International students and scholars seeking post-secondary or graduate education are treated as cash cows rather than as people who might contribute to both research and society. Debt-burdened students are seen as captive markets by administrators, while faculty is encouraged to leverage public funds for private research on behalf of corporate sponsors.

The attack on what remains of public education has been total. Over the last year we have witnessed the closure of humanities programmes, further tuition hikes, the replacement of financial support with loans, union lockouts, and the accelerated development of private, for-profit universities. Yet at the same time we have seen growing waves of struggle against these incursions, as students, staff and faculty in Europe, Latin America, and across the Middle East organize, occupy and resist the transformation.

Our struggles are not limited to the university, but are a part the widespread resistance against the neoliberal market logic subsuming all sectors of our society. The university is a key battleground in this struggle, and a point of conjuncture for the various labour, economic and social justice struggles that face all of us – workers and students alike. Crucially, these struggles occur on stolen indigenous lands and manifest through colonialism, racism, sexism, homophobia, ablism and other forms of oppression that hurt and divide us and that shape what sorts of knowledge are considered valuable.

We cannot cede the ideal of the university as a site for struggle and debate. We cannot permit the dissolution of proliferating research, ideas and innovations free from the demands and control of the market. We cannot watch as universities are degraded into a mere site for corporate or state-sponsored research and marketing. The time to mobilize is now!

This conference will connect and chart the varied struggles against neoliberal restructuring of the university inNorth Americaand beyond. We envision a series of debriefings on experiences of resistance, the creation of a cartography of local and global struggles, and a strategizing session for students, teachers, workers and activists. We aim to develop a North American network of struggles.

We encourage presentations that raise questions and generate dialogue among the rest of the participants. Ideally, submissions will indicate the specific outcomes they hope will emerge from the discussion. We encourage participation from those with first-hand experience of these crises, and those engaged in the fight for free and public post-secondary education, especially student groups and trade unions.

For a better future for all – join us!

POSSIBLE THEMES:

ü        Mapping the terrain of campus struggle inCanadaandNorth America

ü        Connecting with and learning from global struggles

ü        Waged and unwaged labour in the university

ü        Abolition of student debt

ü        The university and the occupy movement

ü        The cultural politics of the neoliberal university

ü        The death of the humanities

ü        Militarization of the university

ü        Intersections of university struggles other fights against oppression

ü        Environmental justice

ü        Beyond public education

ü        Radical pedagogy

ü        Academic freedom

ü        The politics of research funding

ü        The economics of the neoliberal university

ü        University and student governance

ü        The undergraduate experience of neoliberalism

ü        Alternative/free/autonomous universities

ü        Organizing the education factory

ü        The suppression of on-campus dissent and organization

Please email submissions to universityisours@gmail.com by January 16th.

Also,if you would like to attend the conference, please RSVP to the same address so organizers can plan for numbers.

This conference is organized by the Edu-factory Collective in collaboration with theUniversityofToronto General Assembly.

Edufactory: http://www.edu-factory.org/wp/

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Bonuses for Some

A USER’S GUIDE TO (DEMANDING) THE IMPOSSIBLE

New booklet on art and activism…

A Users Guide to (Demanding) the Impossible: Laboratory of Insurrectionary Imagination

This guide is not a road map or instruction manual. It’s a match struck in the dark, a homemade multi-tool to help you carve out your own path through the ruins of the present, warmed by the stories and strategies of those who took Bertolt Brecht’s words to heart: “Art is not a mirror held up to reality, but a hammer with which to shape it.”

It was written in a whirlwind of three days in December 2010, between the first and second days of action by UK students against the government cuts, and intended to reflect on the possibility of new creative forms of action in the current movements.

“Art is useless, so they tell us, as soon as it truly affects the world it loses its status as art. (You never know, it might slide down the slippery slope, becoming instrumental, propaganda, or even worse craft!). The strange thing is that those who tell us this are often the same people who put art to the crudest instrumental use – the art market. Maybe what they mean is that – art is useless when it’s not ultimately used to make a profit. Perhaps it’s the same logic as that which argues that education has no use outside slotting us into the mutilated world of work and consumption. This guide is for those of us who suspect that art has other uses and who are prepared to seek them.”

PDF available freely online (http://www.minorcompositions.info/usersguide.html), and discounts for ordering multiple copies.

64 pages, A6 size (4.134 x 5.827)

To be released June 1st, 2011

Released by Minor Compositions,London /New York / Port Watson
Minor Compositions is a series of interventions & provocations drawing from autonomous politics, avant-garde aesthetics, and the revolutions of everyday life.

Minor Compositions is an imprint of Autonomedia
www.minorcompositions.info |info@minorcompositions.info

— 
Stevphen Shukaitis
Autonomedia Editorial Collective
http://www.autonomedia.org
http://www.minorcompositions.info

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

HIGHER EDUCATION FUNDING POLICY SEMINAR

SRHE Higher Educational Policy Network

Higher Education Funding Policy: A historical and contemporary analysis

Tuesday 17th May, 4-6.30pm at London Metropolitan University, 166-220 Holloway Road, London, N7 6RP (Room No BEL1-09 in the main Tower Building)

This seminar focuses on the very topical issue of higher education funding policy, offering an opportunity to bring a historical perspective to current policy developments and to consider the potential impacts both locally and globally. The speakers are:

Professor Claire Callender, Birkbeck College and Institute of Education, University of London.

A critical assessment of the Government’s reforms of student funding – all change or no change?

This paper will examine how student financial support has changed over time and critically analyse the Government’s planned reforms, locating them within a historical policy perspective.

Dr Vincent Carpentier, Institute of Education, University of London

Public-private substitution of funding and provision in higher education: national and global implications

This paper will explore the historical connections and tensions between funding, equity and quality policies in HE with a particular focus on the origins and implications of public-private funding in the global context.

Tea and coffee will be available at 4pm and the event will start at 4.15. At 6pm, there will be an opportunity to continue informal discussions of the issues raised in both papers over a glass of wine or juice.

For further details about the Higher Education Policy Network, please contact the network convenor: Professor Carole Leathwood, Institute for Policy Studies in Education, London Metropolitan University, c.leathwood@londonmet.ac.uk.

*****

Network Events are free to SRHE members as part of their membership package.

Delegate fees for non members: £25 (students £20).                                                                                                                                  

To register for this event please contact nmanches@srhe.ac.uk

Details of further meetings can be found on our website www.srhe.ac.uk

Many thanks

Nicola Manches, Administration Assistant, SRHE, 44 Bedford Row, London WC1R 4LL, 020 7447 2525

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Education Crisis

THE ROUGE FORUM – UPDATE 8th APRIL 2011

Dear Friends

You can register now for the Rouge Forum Conference in Chicagoland, May 20-22, with keynoters Peter McLaren, Dennis Carlson, and Substance News’ George Schmidt at: http://www.rougeforumconference.org/

The Rouge Forum Dispatch with news of the Schools Not Banks demonstrations in Oakland and that too rare context which links schools and society is here: http://www.richgibson.com/blog/

Good luck to our side,
Rich Gibson

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Education on Trial

UniCOMMON: THE REBELLION OF LIVING KNOWLEDGE

An extraordinary season of struggle, beyond Uniriot

Uniriot has been several things: the will to compose different political cultures, the desire of conflict and the innovation inside and against the university reformed by the Bologna Process. The attempt of building up a new experimentation outside of any reassuring identity, but creating a new network able to change and being changed by the richness of discussions and the unquestionable reality of the struggle that cross us.

Uniriot.org has been a great platform, a useful tool for the challenge we issued five years ago: not only a showcase of our ideas, but a crossroads of different experiences and projects, new narrations of struggle, communication about the transformations of the university and our research. We have been trying to carry this challenge forward since the movement of 2005, when we created Uniriot, through our experience inside the European struggles during the AntiCPE movement in France, Bologna Burns in Wien and Madrid, until the anomalous wave of 2008 and the incredible autumn we lived in 2010.

We have been profoundly changed during these extraordinary months, together with students, precarious workers and researchers that have passionately animated and continuously organized the struggles of the last year. As we cannot be the same, we close the experience of Uniriot and launch a new political constituent process to live up to our time and the transformations required by the struggles. A new challenge!

The Rebellion of Living Knowledge: UniCommon

UniCommon moves its first step in an era of crisis and austerity: the education reforms enacted without any public funding inside the framework of the failure of the Bologna Process and, at the same time, its extension outside Europe as a tool of exploitation of transnational living knowledge; the dismissal of the public university and the de-qualification of high school education, the massive youth unemployment, precarity and the absence of any future for a whole generation inside and outside the academy.

In this landscape, movements shouted firmly the shelter of public university against cuts, rising tuition fees, free research labor and debt loan, not as mere defence of the extant, but as a strategic field to claim quality of knowledge and free education against any rhetorical meritocracy. Self-education has been our political disposition, focused on the struggle for a qualified and critical knowledge, a device of organization that we are going to practice; our aim is to focus on the transformations of researchers’ status in the era of delegitimization of research work and the peer-review system. Militant research is our collective tool to understand and to map the transformations of the present; self-education is our device beyond the public/private dichotomy to make our university!

UniCommon wants to switch the nexus between education and precarity, creating a new social constituent deal within the new composition of labor, a democratic reappropriation of welfare against private plunders and feudal academic power. We have learnt that where there is a capital relation, there is exploitation of toil, passions, words and knowledge; where there is globalized cognitive capitalism so there is a parasitic power that robs our body, our life.

The European and north-African movements of the last autumn have taught us that the claim for welfare against poverty and rights against exploitation are strictly connected to the claim for democracy and freedom against power and its corruption. Students who have animated the revolts of last years, thousands of precarious and young unemployed took up the book shields to defend their lives: a rioting generation reclaiming knowledge, free access and circulation, income and new welfare, democracy and freedom of choice above our body.

UniCommon is born within the practice of Book Bloc, a common tool of defence, a production of imaginary to express our desire. We have created those book shields as an attempt of combining radicalism and people’s support; the challenge of our time is to build up a wild experimentation, widespread and radical at the same time, to step over the crisis and the failed utopia of cognitive capitalism. The Book Bloc is a transnational practice, against any fixed identity and outside any representation of conflict, it is our defence within the democracy of turmoil!

The failure of Bologna Process does not mean the end of exploitation of our knowledge, on the contrary the crisis deepens the capitalistc command over our body; at the same time, the struggles have showed us their powerful capacity of creating connections despite borders, sharing common projects and practices, shaping a different future where free knowledge, income, rights and citizenship are not just a privilege.

UniCommon is a new compass oriented by self-education, created by the wild demos that blocked the circulation of commodities; it is a device defended by the transnational Book Bloc inside a European space definitely twisted by the Mediterranean revolts, the margins that break into the center to overturn it.

Moreover, Unicommon is a network of communication and political organization, a web platform that will work as a place of information and communication of struggles from high school to the academy, a space of connection among experiences of self-education and autonomous collectives of research. UniCommon.org is a new website inside the 2.0 web time: video as a tool of enquiring and mapping transformations, photos as the continuous effort of imaging the fuzzy movement of our demos and discussions, audios as a precise opinion of different voices, augmented reality to shape and multiply our world.

UniCommon starts from La Sapienza University within a day of large discussions to make a public analysis of the past autumn and to imagine the spring that lies ahead.

Meet you in the struggles, to create the future and subvert the present; to make the university of the common!

°°°°°

Program 24.03.2011

Create the Future, Subvert the Present

10:30 a.m. College of Philosophy, Villa Mirafiori, La Sapienza – Roma
Public assembly of students and precarious collectives and networks

Against the dismissal of public university, creating the university of the common

°°°
2:00 p.m. Lunch break

°°°

4:00 p.m. College of Political Science, LaSapienza – Roma
Round table

After the revolt of the autumn toward the general strike of 6th May 2011

Speakers: Ilenia Caleo (Zeropuntotre); Roberto Ciccarelli (Il manifesto), Claudio Riccio (Link), Eva Pinna (Surf), Luca Tomassini (CPU), Giorgio Sestili (Atenei in rivolta), Simone Famularo (Assemblea di Medicina – La Sapienza)  Francesco Sinopoli (Flc-Cgil), Corrado Zunino (la Repubblica)

°°°
7:30 p.m. aperitif break and videos
°°°

Info: http://www.uniriot.org  /  and from 24th  March  >>> http://www.unicommon.org >>>

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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Education Crisis

Socialism and Hope

INTERNATIONAL SOCIALISM JOURNAL ISSUE 129

http://www.isj.org.uk/

CONTENTS:

Analysis
The student revolt and the crisis

Mad as hatters? The Tea Party movement in the US
Megan Trudell

Police killings and the law
Simon Behrman

Labourism and socialism: Ralph Miliband’s Marxism
Paul Blackledge

True crime stories: some New Labour memoirs
John Newsinger

Marxism and disability
Roddy Slorach

Decoding capitalism
Joseph Choonara

What’s wrong with school history?
Andrew Stone

Why we should be sceptical of climate sceptics
Suzanne Jeffery

Tony Cliff’s Lenin and the Russian Revolution
John Rose

Feedback

Sex work: a rejoinder
Gareth Dale and Xanthe Whittaker

Discussing the alternatives
Grace Lally

Book reviews

A tangled tale
Yuri Prasad

Revolution rewritten
Jack Farmer

Analysing honour
Mark Harvey

Globalising Gramsci
Adrian Budd

Intellectual weapons
Alex Callinicos

Pick of the quarter

This quarter’s selection

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com