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MARX, ENGELS AND THE CRITIQUE OF ACADEMIC LABOR

Call for Papers

Marx, Engels and the Critique of Academic Labor

Special Issue of Workplace: A journal for academic labor

Guest Editors: Karen Gregory & Joss Winn

Articles in Workplace have repeatedly called for increased collective organisation in opposition to a disturbing trajectory: individual autonomy is decreasing, contractual conditions are worsening, individual mental health issues are rising, and academic work is being intensified. Despite our theoretical advances and concerted practical efforts to resist these conditions, the gains of the 20th century labor movement are diminishing and the history of the university appears to be on a determinate course.

To date, this course is often spoken of in the language of “crisis.” While crisis may indeed point us toward the contemporary social experience of work and study within the university, we suggest that there is one response to the transformation of the university that has yet to be adequately explored: A thoroughgoing and reflexive critique of academic labor and its ensuing forms of value. By this, we mean a negative critique of academic labor and its role in the political economy of capitalism; one which focuses on understanding the basic character of ‘labor’ in capitalism as a historically specific social form. Beyond the framework of crisis, what productive, definite social relations are actively resituating the university and its labor within the demands, proliferations, and contradictions of capital?

We aim to produce a negative critique of academic labor that not only makes transparent these social relations, but repositions academic labor within a new conversation of possibility.

We are calling for papers that acknowledge the foundational work of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels for labor theory and engage closely and critically with the critique of political economy. Marx regarded his discovery of the dual character of labor in capitalism (i.e. concrete and abstract) as one of his most important achievements and “the pivot on which a clear comprehension of political economy turns.” With this in mind, we seek contributions that employ Marx’s and Engels’ critical categories of labor, value, the commodity, capital, etc. in reflexive ways which illuminate the role and character of academic labor today and how its existing form might be, according to Marx, abolished, transcended and overcome (aufheben).

 

Contributions:

  1. A variety of forms and approaches, demonstrating a close engagement with Marx’s theory and

method: Theoretical critiques, case studies, historical analyses, (auto-)ethnographies, essays, and

narratives are all welcome. Contributors from all academic disciplines are encouraged.

  1. Any reasonable length will be considered. Where appropriate they should adopt a consistent style

(e.g. Chicago, Harvard, MLA, APA).

  1. Will be Refereed.
  2. Contributions and questions should be sent to:

Joss Winn (jwinn@lincoln.ac.uk) and Karen Gregory (kgregory@ccny.cuny.edu)

Publication timetable

  • Fully referenced ABSTRACTS by 1st February 2015
  • Authors notified by 1st March 2015
  • Deadline for full contributions: 1st September 2015
  • Authors notified of initial reviews by 1st November 2015
  • Revised papers due: 10th January 2016
  • Publication date: March 2016.

Possible themes that contributions may address include, but are not limited to:

The Promise of Autonomy and The Nature of Academic “Time”

The Laboring “Academic” Body

Technology and Circuits of Value Production

Managerial Labor and Productions of Surplus

Markets of Value: Debt, Data, and Student Production

The Emotional Labor of Restructuring: Alt-Ac Careers and Contingent Labor

The Labor of Solidarity and the Future of Organization

Learning to Labor: Structures of Academic Authority and Reproduction

Teaching, Learning, and the Commodity-Form

The Business of Higher Education and Fictitious Capital

The Pedagogical Labor of Anti-Racism

Production and Consumption: The Academic Labor of Students

The Division of Labor In Higher Education

Hidden Abodes of Academic Production

The Formal and Real Subsumption of the University

Alienation, Abstraction and Labor Inside the University

Gender, Race, and Academic Wages

New Geographies of Academic Labor and Academic Markets

The University, the State and Money: Forms of the Capital Relation

New Critical Historical Approaches to the Study of Academic Labor

About the Editors:

 

Karen Gregory

kgregory@ccny.cuny.edu @claudikincaid

Karen Gregory is lecturer in Sociology at the Center for Worker Education/Division of Interdisciplinary Studies at the City College of New York, where she heads the CCNY City Lab. She is an ethnographer and theory-building scholar whose research focuses on the entanglement of contemporary spirituality, labor precarity, and entrepreneurialism, with an emphasis on the role of the laboring body. Karen cofounded the CUNY Digital Labor Working Group and her work has been published in Women’s Studies Quarterly, Women and Performance, The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy, and Contexts.

Joss Winn

jwinn@lincoln.ac.uk @josswinn

Joss Winn is a senior lecturer in the School of Education at the University of Lincoln, UK. His research extends broadly to a critique of the political economy of higher education. Currently, his writing and teaching is focused on the history and political economy of science and technology in higher education, its affordances for and impact on academic labor, and the way by which academics can control the means of knowledge production through co-operative and ultimately post-capitalist forms of work and democracy. His article, “Writing About Academic Labor,” is published in Workplace 25, 1-15.

Details at: http://josswinn.org/2014/12/call-for-papers-marx-engels-and-the-critique-of-academic-labor/

See also: http://blogs.ubc.ca/ices/2014/11/30/cfp-marx-engels-and-the-critique-of-academic-labor-ices-criticaltheory-criticalpedagogy-frankfurtschool/

Karl Marx

Karl Marx

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Gigi Roggero

Gigi Roggero

DOING AND UNDOING ACADEMIC LABOUR

CENTRE FOR RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE 2012

Conference 2012

Doing and Undoing Academic Labour

June 7, 2012
9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Learning Landscapes (MB1019)
University of Lincoln

 

In recent decades, a wealth of information has been produced about academic labour: the financialisation of knowledge, diminution of professional autonomy and collegiality through managerialism and audit cultures; the subsumption of higher education into circulations of capital, proletarianisation of intellectual work, shift from dreams of enlightenment and emancipation to imperatives of ‘employability’, and experiences of alienation and anger amongst educators across the world.

This has also been a period of intensifying awareness about the significance of these processes, not only for teachers and students in universities, but for all labour and intellectual, social and political life as well. And now we watch the growth of a transnational movements that is inventing new ways of knowing and producing knowledge, new forms of education, and new possibilities for pedagogy to play a progressive role in struggles for alterantives within the academy and beyond.

Yet within the academy, the proliferation of critical work on these issues is not always accompanied by qualitative changes in everyday practice. The conditions of academic labour for many in the UK are indeed becoming more precarious and repressive – and in unequal measure across institutions and disciplines, and in patterns that retrench existing inequalities of gender, physical ability, class, race and sexuality. The critical analysis of academic labour promises much, but often remains disconnected from the ways we work in practice with others.

This conference brings together scholars and activists from a range of disciplines to discuss these problems, and to consider how critical knowledge about new forms of academic labour can be linked to struggles to humanise labour and knowledge production within and beyond the university.

 

Contributions from:

Mette Louise Berg

Rob Coley

Anna Curcio

Richard Hall

Maria Do Mar Pereira

Dean Lockwood

Andrew McGettigan

Justine Mercer

Sara Motta

Adam O’Meara

Gigi Roggero 

Howard Stevenson

 

Public / Free / Open

This conference is public, free and open to everyone. Please register so we know how many people will be attending. If you have any questions about the event, please contact Dr. Sarah Amsler at samsler@lincoln.ac.uk.

Getting here

Doing and Undoing Academic Labour will be held in Learning Landscapes,  MB1019, the University of Lincoln. Click here for a map of the site.

 

Link to Conference: http://cerd.blogs.lincoln.ac.uk/conference/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Work, work, work

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 18th JULY 2010

EVENTS

THE END OF POVERTY? – A FEATURE LENGTH DOCUMENTARY FILM

July 22
6:00pm – 10:00pm
Hart House, U of T, East Common Room
7 Kings College Circle
Toronto, ON

The End of Poverty? is a daring, thought-provoking and very timely documentary by award-winning filmmaker, Philippe Diaz, revealing that poverty is not an accident. It began with military conquest, slavery and colonization that resulted in the seizure of land, minerals and forced… labor. Today, global poverty has reached new levels because of unfair debt, trade and tax policies — in other words, wealthy countries exploiting the weaknesses of poor, developing countries.

More info: http://www.theendofpoverty.com/

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RED IS THE NEW GREEN: MARX’S ECOLOGY WORKSHOP

Wednesday, July 21
6-8 pm
Admission: $7 or pay what you can
Bloor Gladstone Library
1101 Bloor St. West
Toronto

More info: foundationforsocialeconomics@gmail.com

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THEATRE OF THE OPPRESSED PARTICIPATORY WORKSHOP

Workshop on processing the events of the G20 meeting, with Naomi Tessler.

Wednesday, July 21
7 pm
Admission: $15 ($7 sliding scale)
Friends House
60 Lowther Ave.
Toronto

More info: peaceworks@primus.ca

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HOTEL WORKERS RISING: MAKE HISTORY ON JULY 22!

Join hotel workers across North America in a historic protest against global hotel corporations. In 15 cities, including Vancouver and Toronto, hotel workers will be demonstrating their unity and their determination to fight for respect in an industry dominated by wealthy multinational companies that continue cutting jobs and trying to squeeze more from workers.

Thursday, July 22
5:00pm
Toronto: Hyatt Regency Toronto, 370 King St. W (at Peter)
Vancouver: Hyatt Regency Vancouver, 655 Burrard St.

More info: http://www.hotelworkersrising.org/update.php?city_id=160

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COCAL (COALITION OF CONTINGENT ACADEMIC LABOR) IX CONFERENCE

August 13-15, 2010
Université Laval
Québec City, PQ

The host for the Coalition of Contingent Academic Labor (COCAL IX) will be the Syndicat des chargées et chargés de cours de l’Université Laval (SCCCUL) which is affiliated with the Fédération des enseignantes et enseignants du Québec (FNEEQ-CSN).

COCAL is a coalition of higher education activists from the North American continent. We are united in working to improve working conditions at colleges and universities for contingent faculty, including adjunct, part-time, and non-tenure track instructors, and graduate teaching assistants.

More info: http://cocalinternational.org/events.html

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NEWS & VIEWS

$16 BILLION FOR THE WRONG PLANES

Michael Byers, Toronto Star

On Friday, Defence Minister Peter MacKay made it official, publicly committing Canadian taxpayers to a $16 billion deal for the purchase and maintenance of 65 F-35s.

The contract will not be put out for tender because the Harper government has determined that only one plane fits its operational requirements. Or, more accurately, the Harper government has drawn up the operational requirements to exclude everything but the F-35.

http://www.thestar.com/opinion/editorialopinion/article/836959–16-billion-for-the-wrong-planes

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WALL STREET IS LAUNDERING DRUG MONEY AND GETTING AWAY WITH IT

Zach Carter, Alternet

Wall Street has been caught laundering massive amounts of drug money. So why isn’t anybody being punished?

http://www.alternet.org/economy/147564/wall_street_is_laundering_drug_money_and_getting_away_with_it/
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HOTEL WORKERS TRAINING FOR CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE IN 15 CITIES

John Wojcik, People’s World

More than 1,000 cooks, dishwashers and housekeepers are taking an unusual detour on their way home from work this week. They are stopping off at two-hour training sessions where their union is preparing them to carry out nonviolent civil disobedience on July 22 at Hyatt hotels in 15 cities.

http://peoplesworld.org/hotel-workers-training-for-civil-disobedience-in-15-cities/

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IMMIGRANT WORKERS AT NON-UNION CHICKEN PLANT STOP WORK OVER DANGEROUS CONDITIONS

Francisco Risso, Labor Notes

Chicken processing workers stopped the line for an hour at the Case Farms plant in Morganton, North Carolina, over dangerous and abusive conditions.

The remarkable wildcat action, in late April, won the non-union and largely immigrant workforce several gains—including an all-important decrease in line speed—which they have preserved.

http://www.labornotes.org/2010/07/immigrant-workers-non-union-chicken-plant-stop-work-over-dangerous-conditions

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THE G20 DEBACLE: WHAT IT MIGHT HAVE LOOKED LIKE INSIDE THE FENCE

Justin Podur, The Bullet

Consolidation and free trade, which serve the western members of the G20 better than its big, poor members, are the substantial commitments of the declaration. Both sets of policies have proven immensely unpopular where they have been imposed. To defend them, like defending the summits, governments have turned to police forces and fear.

http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/380.php

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VIDEO – BARGAINING IN AN ERA OF WAGE RESTRAINT: RE-THINKING STRATEGIES FOR THE PUBLIC SECTOR

with:

– Sam Gindin, Visiting Packer Chair in Social Justice at York University, Toronto and active with the Toronto Workers’ Assembly.
–  Michael Hurley, President of the Ontario Council of Hospital Unions and Vice-President of the Canadian Union of Public Employees, Ontario.

http://socialistproject.ca/lists/lt.php?id=cUpXCQQGBwNFAQIGGglZAQ%3D%3D

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ONLINE ARTICLES

PLEASURE AND MEANING: THE TWO FOUNDATIONS OF HAPPINESS
Jiyun Wu
Applied Research in Quality of Life, Volume 5, Number 1 / March, 2010
http://www.springerlink.com/content/f907hm8l124x8262/

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ON THE MODERN MEANING OF PHILANTHROPY
Marty Sulek
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly 2010;39 193-212
http://nvs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/39/2/193

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BOOK REVIEW: THE ROUTLEDGE INTERNATIONAL HANDBOOK OF LIFELONG LEARNING (ED. PETER JARVIS)
Miriam Zukas
Vocations and Learning, Volume 3, Number 1 / April, 2010
http://www.springerlink.com/content/g09141500562q2k8/

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FAILING YOUNG PEOPLE? EDUCATION AND ASPIRATIONS IN A DEPRIVED COMMUNITY
S. Sinclair, J.H. McKendrick, and G. Scott
Education, Citizenship and Social Justice 2010;5 5-20
http://esj.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/5/1/5

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STEPPING UP, STEPPING BACK: WOMEN ACTIVISTS ‘TALK UNION’ ACROSS GENERATIONS
Berger-Marks Foundation, 2010
http://www.bergermarks.org/resources/SteppingUpSteppingBack.pdf

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OUR MANDATE:

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

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MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Work, work, work

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

F.W. Taylor

LEARNING OUTCOMES: THE ABSURD BECOMES LOGICAL

This is the title of a topical and important new paper by John J. Crocitti, Professor of History, San Diego Mesa College which is now available at The Flow of Ideas web site.

As Professor Crocitti notes:

“Ultimately, the drive towards SLO [Student Learning Outcomes] constitutes an effort by politicians, business people, opportunist professors and bureaucrats to deskill and control academic labor in the manner that management applied Taylorism to industrial labor during the early twentieth century”

The article can be viewed at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=contributions&sub=Learning%20Outcomes

Glenn Rikowski

Workplace

Workplace

WORKPLACE: A JOURNAL FOR ACADEMIC LABOR – ISSUE 16

 

The Editors of Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor are pleased to announce the release of Workplace #16 on:

“Academic Knowledge, Labor, and Neoliberalism”

Check it out at: http://m1.cust.educ.ubc.ca/journal/index.php/workplace/issue/current

Table of Contents

Articles

Knowledge Production and the Superexploitation of Contingent Academic Labor – by Bruno Gulli

The Education Agenda is a War Agenda: Connecting Reason to Power and Power to Resistance – by Rich Gibson, E. Wayne Ross
   
The Rise of Venture Philanthropy and the Ongoing Neoliberal Assault on Public Education: The Eli and Edith Broad Foundation – by Kenneth Saltman

Feature Articles

Theses on College and University Administration: A Critical Perspective – by John F. Welsh
   
The Status Degradation Ceremony: The Phenomenology of Social Control in Higher Education – by John F. Welsh

Book Reviews

Review of ‘The Last Professors: The Corporate University and the Fate of the Humanities’ (Desi Bradley)

Authentic Bona fide Democrats Must Go Beyond Liberalism, Capitalism, and Imperialism: A Review of Dewey’s Dream: Universities and  Democracies in an Age of Education Reform (Richard A. Brosio)

Review of Capitalizing on Disaster: Taking and Breaking Public Schools (Prentice Chandler)

Review of Pedagogy and Praxis in the Age of Empire: Towards a New Humanism (Abraham P. Deleon)

Review of Cary Nelson and the Struggle for the University: Poetry, Politics, and the Profession (Leah Schweitzer)

Review of Rhetoric and Resistance in the Corporate Academy (Lisa Tremain)

Read the Workplace Blog: http://blogs.ubc.ca/workplace/
Join us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=24374363807&ref=ts

E. Wayne Ross
Professor
Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy
University of British Columbia
2125 Main Mall
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4
Canada
604-822-2830
wayne.ross@ubc.ca
http://www.ewayneross.net

Critical Education: http://www.criticaleducation.org
Cultural Logic: http://www.eserver.org/clogic
Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor: http://www.workplace-gsc.com

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Academic Labor and Law

Special Section of Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor

 

Guest EditorJennifer Wingard

University of Houston

 

The historical connections between legislation, the courts, and the academy have been complex and multi-layered. This has been evident from early federal economic policies, such as the Morell Act and the GI Bill, through national and state legislation that protected student and faculty rights, such as the First Amendment and affirmative action clauses. These connections continue into our current moment of state and national efforts to define the work of the university, such as The Academic Bill of Rights and court cases regarding distance learning. The question, then, becomes whether and to what extent the impact of legislation and litigation reveals or masks the shifting mission of the academy. Have these shifts been primarily economic, with scarcities of funding leading many to want to legislate what is considered a university education, how it should be financed, and who should benefit from it? Are the shifts primarily ideological, with political interests working to change access, funding, and the intellectual project of higher education? Or are the shifts a combination of both political and economic influences? One thing does become clear from these discussions: at their core, the legal battles surrounding higher education are about the changing nature of the university –the use of managerial/corporate language; the desire to professionalize students rather than liberally educate them; the need to create transparent structures of evaluation for both students and faculty; and the attempt to define the types of knowledge produced and disseminated in the classroom. These are changes for which faculty, students, administrators, as well as citizens who feel they have a stake in higher education, seek legal redress. This special section of Workplace aims to explore the ways in which legislation and court cases impact the work of students, professors, contingent faculty, and graduate students in the university. Potential topics include but are not limited to:

 

Academic Freedom for students and/or faculty

* Horowitz’s Academic Bill of Rights

* Missouri’s Emily Booker Intellectual Diversity Act

* First Amendment court cases concerning faculty and student’s rights to freely express themselves in the classroom and on campuses

* Facebook/Myspace/Blog court cases

* Current legislative and budgetary “attacks” on area studies (i.e. Queer Studies in Georgia, Women’s Studies in Florida)

Affirmative Action

* The implementation of state and university diversity initiatives in the 1970s

* The current repeal of affirmative action law across the country

* Benefits, including Health Benefits, Domestic Partner Benefits

* How universities in states with same-sex marriage bans deal with domestic partner benefits

Collective Bargaining

* The recent rulings at NYU and Brown about the status of graduate students as employees

* State anti-unionization measures and how they impact contingent faculty

Copyright/Intellectual Property

* In Distance Learning

* In corporate sponsored science research

* In government sponsored research

Disability Rights and Higher Education

* How the ADA impacts the university

* Sexual Harassment and Consensual Relationships

* How diversity laws and sexual harassment policies impact the university

Tenure

* The Bennington Case

* Post 9/11 court cases

 

Contributions for Workplace should be 4000-6000 words in length and should conform to MLA style. If interested, please send an abstract via word attachment to Jennifer Wingard (jwingard@central.uh.edu) by Friday, May 22, 2009. Completed essays will be due via email by Monday, August 24, 2009.

 

E. Wayne Ross

Professor

Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy

University of British Columbia

2125 Main Mall

Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4

Canada

604-822-2830

wayne.ross@ubc.ca

 

http://www.ewayneross.net

 

Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor: http://www.workplace-gsc.com

Cultural Logic: http://eserver.org/clogic

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski  

Mental Labour and a New Issue of ‘Workplace’

 

 

The editors of Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor are proud to announce our latest issue, which is now available online at http://www.cust. educ.ubc. ca/workplace/.

 

 

The issue begins with a special “Mental Labor” section, which was generously compiled and guest edited by Steven Wexler. We express our heartiest gratitude to him, as well as to web designers Stephen Petrina and Franc Feng.

 

 

The lead section includes:

 

 

(I’m)Material Labor in the Digital Age

by Steven Wexler

 

 

Autonomy vs. Insecurity: The (Mis)Fortunes of Mental Labor in a Global Network

by David B. Downing

 

 

Extreme Work-Study, or, The Real “Kid Nation”

by Marc Bousquet

 

 

From the Grundrisse to Capital and Beyond: Then and Now

by George Caffentzis

 

 

Ideology and the Crisis of Capitalism

by Thomas A. Hirschl, Daniel B. Ahlquist and Leland L. Glenna

 

 

Gender, Contingent Labor, and Our Virtual Bodies

by Desi Bradley

 

 

 

Our regular segment of “Feature Articles” contains the following:

 

 

Capitalism, Audit, and the Demise of the Humanistic Academy

by Charles Thorpe

 

 

Troubling Data: A Foucauldian Perspective of “a Multiple Data Source Approach” to Professional Learning and Evaluation

by Mark C. Baildon

 

 

And our “Book Reviews” section, edited for the final time by William Vaughn, features four new entries:

 

 

Pedagogy and Praxis in the Age of Empire: Towards a New Humanism

Reviewed by Dana Carluccio

 

 

Taking Back the Workers’ Law: How to Fight the Assault on Labor Rights

Reviewed by William Vaughn

 

 

Three Strikes: Labor’s Heartland Losses and What They Mean for Working Americans

Reviewed by Philip Eubanks

 

 

Teachers as Owners: A Key to Revitalizing Public Education

Reviewed by William Vaughn

 

 

 

The editors are extremely thankful to William Vaughn for years of fine work with the Book Reviews, and we are sorry to see him go. We are pleased to report, however, that Steven Wexler will take on the role of reviews editor in the coming issues.

 

Thank you for your continuing support of the journal, and please keep Workplace in mind as a venue for your future scholarship. Send submissions to cscarter@ou. edu or wayne.ross@ubc. ca.

 

 

Solidarity,

 

Chris Carter

Wayne Ross

Stephen Petrina

Co-editors, Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor

 

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Rikowski web site, The Flow of Ideas is at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk