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images (9)SPACE, IDENTITIES AND MEMORY

Birkbeck Institutes of Social Research and the Humanities Graduate Conference

CALL FOR PAPERS

Space, Identities and Memory

Deadline for Submission of Abstracts: 11/03/2016.

Contact: bihbisrconference@gmail.com

We invite postgraduate researchers, academics, activists, artists, and practitioners from across disciplines to contribute to the Birkbeck Institutes’ (BIH/BISR) annual two day conference held from the 13th to the 14th  May 2016.

This year’s conference theme seeks to examine the interplay between identity, space and memory, exploring the ways in which identities may be created, formed and informed by spatial and temporal contexts. In particular, we seek to examine to what extent identities are performed in response to political, social and cultural pressures, including historical circumstances leading to the construction of acceptable and unacceptable identities.

The conference aims to capture the complex overlaying of identities in time and space, and the agency of individuals and communities as they address their own complex understandings of the temporality of identity. Conversely, we hope the conference will highlight how space and time are influenced and shaped by everyday life, sociabilities, mobilisations and processes of subjectivation. In particular we are seeking papers that engage with topics such as:

 

  • The built environment: how are housing, architecture, urbanity and concepts of public and private space harnessed in the self-fashioning of individual and communal identity?
  • Gender, sexuality and race, the politics of becoming and the deterritorialisation of the body;
  • ’Home’, domesticity and concepts of solitude and isolation across time and space;
  • Spaces of dissent and resistance: how is memory imbricated in public spaces as sites of encounters, direct action and creative practices?
  • Displacements and borders: constructing or disassembling boundaries from local to global;
  • Explorations in the use of maps, social cartography and critical geography;
  • Exclusion and inclusion in institutional spaces: how have institutionalised spaces cemented or challenged contemporary and past perspectives on identity?
  • Narrating the past: memorialisation, contestation and re-enactment
  • Innovative methods and approaches in the investigation of the intersections between space, identity and memory

 

Our first confirmed keynote speaker is Andy Merrifield. The conference will conclude with a round table bringing together activists, practitioners and academics.

This is an interdisciplinary conference, designed to foster creative thinking and new research agendas. To this end, we encourage papers from a diversity of disciplinary backgrounds that explore the interconnections of space, identity and memory.

We are particularly interested in receiving contributions from artists and practitioners in education, the heritage sector or related fields to participate in this interdisciplinary conference.

Proposals

We warmly welcome abstracts for 20-minute panel papers. Abstracts should be between 200-300 words in length. Please include a short biography with your submission.  The deadline for submission of abstracts is the 11/03/2016. Authors will be notified regarding the acceptance of their paper after submissions have been reviewed and no later than 31/03/2016.

Contact Details

Please send enquiries and proposals to Beth Hodgett, Calum Wright, Eva Lauenstein & Moniza Rizzini at:

bihbisrconference@gmail.com

images (11)

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

images

 

Time

Time

EDUCATION, TIME-POVERTY AND WELL-BEING

Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain

London Branch

Professor John White (UCL Institute of Education) will speak on:

Education, time-poverty and well-being
Wednesday 17 February
Institute of Education, UCL, 20 Bedford Way
Room 903
5:30-7:15

All are welcome.

 

Paper is attached at: here.

https://gallery.mailchimp.com/884bd4ab8bd9964e2855c7409/files/IOE_seminar_J_White_time_poverty_FNL.pdf

Inquiries: sun.yun.14@ucl.ac.uk

Abstract: This paper will present a critical discussion of ‘objective list’ well-being goods, related to the current aims of the English National Curriculum and to problems of time-poverty in the population.

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Time

Time

CAPITAL, VALUE, AND TIME

The Beirut Institute for Critical Analysis and Research (BICAR) and the Mahdi Amel Cultural Center invite you to the workshop and discussion:

Capital, Value, and Time

April 1st, 2015 at the UNESCO Building, 4-7 pm

The workshop revisits Marx’s seminal critique of political economy in Capital and The Grundrisse. It aims to understand the contemporary re-appropriation of Marx through the value theory approach (Alfred Sohn-Rethel, Moishe Postone, Kojin Karatani) and point to some of the breakthroughs and limitations that these different trajectories of the value theory approach raise (Hegelian reading of Marx, Kantian reading of Marx). The paradoxes of time, value, and the money form will be discussed through the reading and discussion of a number of texts. Understanding Marx in relation to Hegel and Kant, the workshop aims to hone a historical, philosophical, and political economic conception of dialectics.

Participation is free and open to the public.

Please email to info@bicar-lebanon.org if you are interested to participate. + readings will be circulated upon request +

The Beirut Institute for Critical Analysis and Research (BICAR) develops research in critical thought and a practice of critical pedagogy. Through workshops, seminars, public discussions, and publications, BICAR provides a platform for researchers, teachers, academics, artists, writers, students, and interested members of the public to engage critically with social, cultural, and political developments. BICAR is committed to the relationships between intellectual inquiry, social reality, political praxis, and concrete change. In light of its locale in Beirut and Lebanon, BICAR is an environment for collective reflection, analysis, and response to the contradictions of labor, capital, production, and subjectivization in conditions of globalisation.

More soon at http://www.bicar-lebanon.org

The Mahdi Amel Cultural Center was founded in the spring of 2003 and in continuation of the work of “Société des Amis de Hassan Hamdan / Mahdi Amel”, which was established in Lyon (France) following Mahdi Amel’s assassination. CCMA’s mission consists in the dissemination of the works of a thinker who lost his life for the cause of freedom, and to encourage research that preserves and continues his legacy, in addition tot he Center’s contribution to intellectual, cultural, and artistic inquiry.

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/beirut-workshop-on-capital-value-and-time

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Workplace

Workplace

MARX, ENGELS AND THE CRITIQUE OF ACADEMIC LABOR

Call for Papers

Marx, Engels and the Critique of Academic Labor

Special Issue of Workplace: A journal for academic labor

Guest Editors: Karen Gregory & Joss Winn

Articles in Workplace have repeatedly called for increased collective organisation in opposition to a disturbing trajectory: individual autonomy is decreasing, contractual conditions are worsening, individual mental health issues are rising, and academic work is being intensified. Despite our theoretical advances and concerted practical efforts to resist these conditions, the gains of the 20th century labor movement are diminishing and the history of the university appears to be on a determinate course.

To date, this course is often spoken of in the language of “crisis.” While crisis may indeed point us toward the contemporary social experience of work and study within the university, we suggest that there is one response to the transformation of the university that has yet to be adequately explored: A thoroughgoing and reflexive critique of academic labor and its ensuing forms of value. By this, we mean a negative critique of academic labor and its role in the political economy of capitalism; one which focuses on understanding the basic character of ‘labor’ in capitalism as a historically specific social form. Beyond the framework of crisis, what productive, definite social relations are actively resituating the university and its labor within the demands, proliferations, and contradictions of capital?

We aim to produce a negative critique of academic labor that not only makes transparent these social relations, but repositions academic labor within a new conversation of possibility.

We are calling for papers that acknowledge the foundational work of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels for labor theory and engage closely and critically with the critique of political economy. Marx regarded his discovery of the dual character of labor in capitalism (i.e. concrete and abstract) as one of his most important achievements and “the pivot on which a clear comprehension of political economy turns.” With this in mind, we seek contributions that employ Marx’s and Engels’ critical categories of labor, value, the commodity, capital, etc. in reflexive ways which illuminate the role and character of academic labor today and how its existing form might be, according to Marx, abolished, transcended and overcome (aufheben).

 

Contributions:

  1. A variety of forms and approaches, demonstrating a close engagement with Marx’s theory and

method: Theoretical critiques, case studies, historical analyses, (auto-)ethnographies, essays, and

narratives are all welcome. Contributors from all academic disciplines are encouraged.

  1. Any reasonable length will be considered. Where appropriate they should adopt a consistent style

(e.g. Chicago, Harvard, MLA, APA).

  1. Will be Refereed.
  2. Contributions and questions should be sent to:

Joss Winn (jwinn@lincoln.ac.uk) and Karen Gregory (kgregory@ccny.cuny.edu)

Publication timetable

  • Fully referenced ABSTRACTS by 1st February 2015
  • Authors notified by 1st March 2015
  • Deadline for full contributions: 1st September 2015
  • Authors notified of initial reviews by 1st November 2015
  • Revised papers due: 10th January 2016
  • Publication date: March 2016.

Possible themes that contributions may address include, but are not limited to:

The Promise of Autonomy and The Nature of Academic “Time”

The Laboring “Academic” Body

Technology and Circuits of Value Production

Managerial Labor and Productions of Surplus

Markets of Value: Debt, Data, and Student Production

The Emotional Labor of Restructuring: Alt-Ac Careers and Contingent Labor

The Labor of Solidarity and the Future of Organization

Learning to Labor: Structures of Academic Authority and Reproduction

Teaching, Learning, and the Commodity-Form

The Business of Higher Education and Fictitious Capital

The Pedagogical Labor of Anti-Racism

Production and Consumption: The Academic Labor of Students

The Division of Labor In Higher Education

Hidden Abodes of Academic Production

The Formal and Real Subsumption of the University

Alienation, Abstraction and Labor Inside the University

Gender, Race, and Academic Wages

New Geographies of Academic Labor and Academic Markets

The University, the State and Money: Forms of the Capital Relation

New Critical Historical Approaches to the Study of Academic Labor

About the Editors:

 

Karen Gregory

kgregory@ccny.cuny.edu @claudikincaid

Karen Gregory is lecturer in Sociology at the Center for Worker Education/Division of Interdisciplinary Studies at the City College of New York, where she heads the CCNY City Lab. She is an ethnographer and theory-building scholar whose research focuses on the entanglement of contemporary spirituality, labor precarity, and entrepreneurialism, with an emphasis on the role of the laboring body. Karen cofounded the CUNY Digital Labor Working Group and her work has been published in Women’s Studies Quarterly, Women and Performance, The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy, and Contexts.

Joss Winn

jwinn@lincoln.ac.uk @josswinn

Joss Winn is a senior lecturer in the School of Education at the University of Lincoln, UK. His research extends broadly to a critique of the political economy of higher education. Currently, his writing and teaching is focused on the history and political economy of science and technology in higher education, its affordances for and impact on academic labor, and the way by which academics can control the means of knowledge production through co-operative and ultimately post-capitalist forms of work and democracy. His article, “Writing About Academic Labor,” is published in Workplace 25, 1-15.

Details at: http://josswinn.org/2014/12/call-for-papers-marx-engels-and-the-critique-of-academic-labor/

See also: http://blogs.ubc.ca/ices/2014/11/30/cfp-marx-engels-and-the-critique-of-academic-labor-ices-criticaltheory-criticalpedagogy-frankfurtschool/

Karl Marx

Karl Marx

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Communisation

Communisation

JOURNAL OF CULTURAL RESEARCH IN ART EDUCATION

The Journal of Cultural Research in Art Education (jCRAE) is an annual publication of the United States Society for Education through Art. jCRAE focuses on social and cultural research relevant for art and visual culture education, including cultural foundations of art education, cross-cultural and multicultural research in art education, and cultural aspects of art in education. These areas should be interpreted in a broad sense and can include community arts organizations, schools, arts administration, art therapy, and other disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches that are relevant to art and visual culture education. Theoretical research and research in which qualitative and/or quantitative methods as well as visual and other formats and strategies are used will be considered for publication.

CALL FOR PAPERS for 2014

Mini-themed issue (Volume 34, 2014) on Space, Place, And Time in Art and Visual Culture Education

How do space and place affect the way we experience the world and create art? How do they affect the politics of who we are and how we teach? The Journal of Cultural Research in Art Education invites submissions for a mini-themed issue on Space, Place, and (or) Time in Art and Visual Culture Education, to be published Summer 2014.

Submissions from a broad range of perspectives are encouraged. A variety of formats are also welcome—including traditional academic essays, visual essays, or alternative formats—that fit the purposes of the journal to address issues of art, education, and culture.  Image-based submissions should be accompanied by explanatory text or an artist statement. Short manuscripts are generally 1,000 to 2,000 words, longer manuscripts 3,000 to 4,000 words.

Click here for a longer prospectus on the theme, or to submit, please visit http://www.jcrae.org.

Submissions on other topics are always welcome; space, place, and (or) time are a “mini-theme.”

Preferred deadline: 1 November, 2013

Send your submissions electronically to the journal editor, Elizabeth Garber, at egarber@email.arizona.edu.

Elizabeth Garber, Editor
University of Arizona
School of Art, PO 210002
Tucson AZ 85721.0002
egarber@email.arizona.edu

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

North Atlantic Oscillation

North Atlantic Oscillation

KRITIKOS – VOLUME 10, April-June 2013

 

Anima Minima: Lyotard’s Monstrous Infancy…(k.locke)

Social Work Meets Cultural Studies: Art, Advocacy and Methods in Social Justice…(h.m.sloane)

Kritikos Reviews: http://intertheory.org/reviews.htm

 


Intertheory Press, New Books:

 

Order now:

Jean Baudrillard: From the Ocean to the Desert – The Poetics of Radicality

by Gerry Coulter 

http://intertheory.org/gerrycoulter.htm

It is in the deserts of postmodernity where Baudrillard both found and left us. It is in these deserts that we become aware, as did Baudrillard and other poststructuralist thinkers, that theory precedes the world (there is nothing that can be said of the world that is not already framed by our approach to it). It is within Coulter’s absolutely lucid exploration – and it goes without saying that the work of Jean Baudrillard should be recognized in such an appropriate revelation – that Baudrillard’s thought is unveiled.

About the Author
Gerry Coulter is the founding editor of the International Journal of Baudrillard Studies He has received Bishop’s University’s highest award for teaching – the William and Nancy Turner Prize.

Order now: 
Integral Reality 

by Robert Hassan and Nicholas Ruiz III

http://intertheory.org/ir.html

 

In this political, cultural and philosophical analysis, Hassan and Ruiz explore developing concepts of time, space and capital in relation to politics today.

About the Authors
Robert Hassan is a Media and Communications Research Fellow–University of Melbourne, Australia. His recent books include 27/7: Time and Temporality in the Network Society (Cambridge UP, 2007) and The New Media Theory Reader (Open UP, 2006)

 

Nicholas Ruiz III, Ph.D was born in New York City in 1970. He is the author of The Metaphysics of Capital and America in Absentia. He is also the editor of Kritikos.

 

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Game of Thrones

Game of Thrones

NEW FORMATIONS 77

BERNARD STIEGLER: TECHNICS, POLITICS, INDIVIDUATION

New Formations 77
… is out now at: http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/contents.html?utm_source=emailhosts&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=2013-03-06_NF77

AVAILABLE FREE ONLINE:

Editorial: http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf77%20edit.pdf?utm_source=emailhosts&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=2013-03-06_NF77

Interview with Bernard Stiegler by Ben Roberts, Jeremy Gilbert and Mark Hayward:
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf77%20interview.pdf?utm_source=emailhosts&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=2013-03-06_NF77

ALSO IN THIS ISSUE:
Ben Roberts on Stiegler’s challenge to media theory
Stephen Barker on a critical politics of re-individuation
Mark B. N. Hansen on technics and the temporal object
Judith Wambacq and Bart Buseyne on real time
Bram Leven on aesthetics in Stiegler
Patrick Crogan on editing individuation
Marcel Swiboda on mnemotechnics and orthographic temporal objects
John Hutnyk on proletarianisation
Oliver Marchart on antagonism and technicity

MORE ON THIS ISSUE:
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/issue/nf77.html?utm_source=emailhosts&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=2013-03-06_NF77

SUBSCRIPTIONS:
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/orders.html?utm_source=emailhosts&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=2013-03-06_NF77

NB: THE DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION TO BE CONSIDERED FOR THE NEXT UNTHEMED ISSUE OF NEW FORMATIONS (PUBLICATION NOVEMBER 2013) IS MARCH 31ST, 2013.  SEE: http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/contributors.html

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Island

HISTORY, MEMORY AND GREEN IMAGINARIES

NOW BOOKING:

History, Memory and Green Imaginaries
A symposium presented by the Centre for Research in Memory, Narrative and Histories, University of Brighton
Friday 30th November 2012
9.30am – 5.00pm
M2, Grand Parade, University of Brighton

This symposium invites reflection on the ways in which history and memory inform and shape contemporary green imaginaries. It brings together cultural theorists, historians, cultural geographers, educators and policy actors.

Keynote: ‘The problem of the past’
Alastair Bonnett, Professor of Social Geography, NewcastleUniversity

Roundtable: ‘Austerity and sustainability’
The Home Front and ‘austerity Britain’ are significant points of reference in current debates about sustainability. What kinds of possibilities and limitations follow from the use of historical resources in public debate about environmental issues?

Ayers Rock

Tim Cooper, Senior Lecturer in History, University of Exeter, ‘The limits of
history in green imaginaries’.

Victoria Johnson, Head of Climate Change and Energy, New Economics Foundation, ‘“Ration me up” and other nef projects’

James Piers Taylor, British Film Institute Documentation Editor and permaculture educator, ‘Re-member, re-vision and re-claim: using archival film to facilitate local conversations about community resilience’.

Panel: ‘Ecological history’
How can historical research inform environmental thinking? Three historians discuss this question in relation to their research and practice.

Vinita Damodaran, Senior Lecturer in South Asian History, University of Sussex, ‘“Primitive places and wild tribes”: colonial and indigenous understandings of nature in Eastern India in the nineteenth century’.

Erin Gill, environmental journalist and historian, ‘“Lost” environmental histories: the stories we’ve forgotten’.

Karin Jaschke, Senior Lecturer in Architecture, University of Brighton, ‘Historiography as process: towards an Ecological History of Architecture’.

Closing remarks: ‘Culture is natural: biosemiotics, recycling, and the evolutionary structurations of biological and cultural change’ Wendy Wheeler, Professor Emeritus of English Literature and Cultural
Inquiry, London Metropolitan University.

Registration:
This event is open to all. Please register in advance by following the link below. The registration fee is £35, or £25 for students/unaffiliated delegates, including lunch and refreshments.

Enquiries: Cheryl Roberts / cr16@brighton.ac.uk
Programme and abstracts: http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/mnh
Register: http://shop.brighton.ac.uk/

Dr Rebecca Bramall
Senior Lecturer in Media Studies
Faculty of Arts
University of Brighton
+44 (0)1273 644651
r.bramall@brighton.ac.uk
http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/staff/rebecca-bramall

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Tempus Fugit

MARX’S TEMPORALITIES – MASSIMILIANO TOMBA

Now Out!

Marx’s Temporalities
Massimiliano Tomba, University of Padua

Translated from the Italian by Peter D. Thomas and Sara R. Farris

The book rethinks the central categories of Marx’s work beyond any philosophy of history, providing a critical analysis of his political and theoretical development from his early writings, to the elaboration of the critique of political economy and his final anthropological studies on pre-individualistic and communist forms. The study aims to integrate the paradigm of the spatialisation of time with that of the temporalisation of space, showing how capital places diverse temporalities into hierarchies that incessantly produce and reproduce new forms of class struggle. An adequate historiographical paradigm for globalised capitalism has to consider the plurality of temporal layers that are combined and come into conflict in the violently unifying historical dimension of modernity.

Author: Massimiliano Tomba

Biographical note
Massimiliano Tomba is Professor of Philosophy of Human Rights at the University of Padua. He has published many books, translations and articles, including Crisis and Critique in Bruno Bauer (2002) and La vera politica. Kant e Benjamin (2006)

Readership
All interested in Marx’s thought, the concept of historical time in the modern world and the history of political thought and philosophy

Table of contents
Preface
Chapter One: The Historical Materialist
Appendix One: Marx as Historical Materialist. Re-reading the Eighteenth Brumaire
Chapter Two: A New Phenotype
Chapter Three: Capital as Phantasmagoria
Appendix Two: A Contribution to the Historiography of Layers of Time
Bibliography
http://www.brill.com/marxs-temporalities

 

First published in: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/now-out-marxs-temporalities-massimiliano-tomba-university-of-padua

 

**END**

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

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Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Time

GLOBALISATION IN TIME

‘THE GLOBALISATION LECTURES’

2012-2013

Organised by the Department of Development Studies

School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS)

University of London

Convenor: Professor Gilbert Achcar

GLOBALISATION IN TIME: BETWEEN THE CAMERA AND THE CLOCK

(A video and slides will be shown during the lecture.)

MARCUS VERHAGEN

Art historian and critic, Sotheby’s Institute of Art and Goldsmiths College, University of London

Wednesday 31 October, 6:30pm

SOAS, Brunei Gallery Lecture Theatre

Free entrance, no booking required, first come first seated

MARCUS VERHAGEN is an art historian and critic who has taught at universities in the USA and the UK. In the years since 2002, when he started to work on contemporary art, he has written over 60 articles and reviews for art magazines such as Art Monthly, Frieze and Art Review. He has also published in several journals, including Representations, Third Text, New Left Review and Afterall. He currently teaches at Sotheby’s Institute of Art and Goldsmiths College.

 

Published first  in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/globalisation-in-time-between-the-camera-and-the-clock-with-marcus-verhagen-soas-31-october

 

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Time

Time

AGAIN, A TIME MACHINE – FINAL PART

Again, A Time Machine – Final Part

STEWART HOME

Presented as part of Book Works’ Again A Time Machine, an exhibition in which the twin poles of archive and distribution are explored through new art commissions, performance and the written and spoken word, SPACE hosts the first UK retrospective of Stewart Home’s work.

Exhibition continues: 6 April to 20 May 2012

Monday to Friday 10am-5pm

Saturday to Sunday 12-6pm

SPACE, 129-131 Mare Street, London E8 3RH

Tel. 020 8525 4330

Collected here are more than thirty years of cultural interventions, including Art Strike Bed, Vermeer II and Becoming (M)other (in which Home re-imagines his mother’s 1960s modelling portfolio in ways that would make Cindy Sherman blush), and issues of Smile, Re-action, novels, pamphlets, films and other ephemera. In his multiple egoistic persona Home claims to have strived not just for greatness but also grooviness and is more than ever convinced that since the world is disenchanted, telling outrageous lies is the only means of approaching ‘truth’ and thus making life fabulous once again.

 

A Night of Psychedelic Noir

Sunday 20 May 9pm-late

The exhibition concludes with a night of readings by Home, and Semina authors Katrina Palmer and Bridget Penney, and a screening of cult kung-fu films, including Master of the Flying Guillotine.

Sarah Pierce

The Artist Talks

Jonathan Monk

Dora Garcia

Make the Living Look Dead

The Happy Hypocrite

Opening 17 April 6.30-8.30pm

18 April to 2 June 2012

Wednesday to Saturday 12-6pm

The Showroom, 63 Penfold Street, London NW8 8PQ

Tel. 020 7724 4300

Sarah Pierce’s The Artist Talks, co-commissioned by Book Works and The Showroom for Again, A Time Machine, extracts and fabricates the momentary gestures, fleeting asides, verbal punctums and playful interruptions that often disturb the conviction of an apparent ‘finished’ work or the flow of a prepared speech.

Drawing from a range of references including interviews with students from Bard College, the Brechtian chorus and the poet Rainer Maria Rilke’s lectures on the work of Auguste Rodin, Pierce restages the talk as a choreographed event – an assemblage of actions and objects that attempts to disrupt finality of an artwork through both invention and deferral.

The Artist Talks is joined by work from previous stages of Again, A Time Machine, including live readings from All the Stories by Dora Garcia, Jonathan Monk’s A Poster Project, Book Works’ moving image and sound archive compiled by Karen Di Franco and James Brook, and Make the Living Look Dead, a fictional archive of material formed by interventions and additions by a selection of Book Works’ artists.

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Time

THE REVOLUTION OF TIME IN A TIME OF REVOLUTION

Call For Papers
As editors of a book proposal accepted for publication by Cambridge Scholar Publishing, we announce a call for submissions to a collection of essays exploring the connection between concepts of time and social change. The volume will have a strong focus on interdisciplinarity, the fusion of theory with practice, and presenting possibilities for ways in which the consideration of alternative notions of time could bring about social change. Thus it is not only practical philosophy papers that we invite, but also contributions from fields such as literary studies, media studies, cultural studies, gender studies, postcolonial studies, sociology and political science.

The Revolution of Time in a Time of Revolution
The year 2011 marked a global turn in acts and ideas about revolution. Western culture and media categorized uprisings in Egypt, Libya, Yemen and other nations as “the Arab Spring.” Yet revolution does not take part only on the national stage: radical social change is constantly being called for globally on the levels of gender, race and class, reflecting a future-oriented view of time that aims to change the thrust of history.

Merely looking into the future is itself a limited way of evaluating approaches through which we can create a more just society. Philosophers have long critiqued the patriarchal, linear notion of time reflected in national narratives and teleological worldviews, which often function only to reinforce the status quo. Marx himself calls for an end to temporal limitations, while Negri considers the possibilities of kairos time, and Deleuze and Guattari the importance of becoming, expanding into Agamben’s and Benjamin’s notions of messianic time.

Time is thus not simply socially constructed notions of linear clock time and teleological conceptions of history, but rather time is an encounter that differs according to human experience. Julia Kristeva’s work on women’s time, for example, outlines the cyclical temporalities and specific subjectivities unique to women, while Robert Levine suggests that climate can have an effect on the pace of life in  various countries, although postcolonial writers have critiqued this perspective as at least uninformed if not racist. Literary, postcolonial and media studies conceive time as something that can be reversed or stopped altogether, portraying history as plural and emphasising the subversive and oppressive facets of time ideologies. 

Nations are held together by popular conceptions of shared times which often function to exclude minorities and repress their actual histories, while class antagonisms are partly characterised through ideas of productive time and leisure time.

The breaking and rupture of such a standardized conception of time which remains that of Western Modernity is the task of the essays being collected in this work, seeking “to brush history against the grain” as Benjamin would have it. Non-Western belief systems have also put forward alternative conceptions of time. Indigenous cosmologies, for instance, portray time as cyclical, while Buddhism separates time into tiny moments or even offers possibilities of transcending time. Literary, postcolonial and media studies conceive time as something that can be reversed or stopped altogether, portraying history as plural and emphasising the subversive and oppressive facets of time ideologies.

The Revolution of Time in a Time of Revolution is interested in the intersection between theory and practice, including case studies that consider ways in which ideologies of time and alternative temporalities can be useful for solving conflicts and overcoming stereotypes created around questions of gender, race, ethnicity and socio-economic inequality. Time-perception is often used as a tool for marginalisation, but the alternative temporalities of the subaltern may also provide a way out of current restrictive policies around the world. The focus of the collection will be on time as an element of radical activism: how can visions of the future and the past, embodied time, untimely time, protest time and political time be implemented both theoretically and practically in order to change the way in which time functions as a vital element of social, political and cultural revolution?

As a thread that connects human life on so many levels, time is at once both subtle and dominating, reminding us that the moment of change must be seized before time itself, our creation, escapes us, or that to enact change we must escape or recreate time, or do something totally new with time. There has never been a better time to consider how both ancient and modern, philosophical and aboriginal conceptions of time and temporality might be employed in a quest to reconcile alternative  histories, and to bring about radical social change.

Please email expressions of interest in the form of an abstract (up to 500 words) with “Time and Revolution book proposal” in the subject line, as an attachment to Cecile Lawrence at (clawren1@binghamton.edu) by the 8th of January 2012, with a c.c. to Natalie Churn at messiahy@hotmail.comand, Christian Garland atchristiangarland@hotmail.com

Please send your completed submission as a Microsoft Word document by Sunday, the 31st of January 2012.

Contributions should be written in Times New Roman and follow the Chicago referencing style or we won’t consider them. Authors of accepted papers will receive a short guide to the specific Chicago method to be used for references. If your article includes images, please let us know in advance. Papers should be no more than 3,000  words in English or approximately 20 double spaced pages, inclusive of notes and bibliography, prepared for anonymous review, must be the original work of the author, and previously unpublished. Please also include a brief biographical statement of no more than 50 words.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.
Co-editors Cecile Lawrence, Natalie Churn and Christian Garland.
https://sites.google.com/site/timeandrevolutionbookproject/

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski