Skip navigation

Tag Archives: Critique

 

Andrew Kliman

Andrew Kliman

CRITIQUE OF POLITICAL ECONOMY – (COPE): VOLUME 1 NOW OUT

Editors: Andrew Kliman and Alan Freeman

 

The editors have now made the first volume of Critique of Political Economy accessible to the public online.

 

See Volume 1 (from September 2011) at: http://copejournal.com/critique-of-political-economy-vol-1/

 

You can also see papers from the International Working Group on Value Theory (IWGVT) at the same site, see: http://copejournal.com/iwgvt-papers/

 

The COPE / IWGVT website is currently under construction, and more material will uploaded there in the weeks ahead, see: http://copejournal.com/

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Advertisements
Mike Cole

Mike Cole

RACISM: A CRITICAL ANALYSIS

A new book by Mike Cole

Paperback: 272 pages

Publisher: Pluto Press (20 Nov. 2015)

Language: English

Paperback: £17.50 from Pluto Press: http://www.plutobooks.com/display.asp?K=9780745334714

ISBN-10: 0745334717

ISBN-13: 978-0745334714

The book traces the legacy of racism across three continents, from its origins to the present day. With a wide-ranging yet closely-argued style, it brings a sophisticated neo-Marxist analysis to bear on controversial political issues.

Mike Cole tackles three countries in-depth: the United Kingdom, the United States and Australia. In the UK, he focuses on the effects of colonialism as well as looking at non-colour-coded racism, such as anti-Gipsy, Roma and Traveller racism and xeno-racism – directed at Eastern Europeans. Turning to the United States, Cole charts the dual legacies of indigenous genocide and slavery, as well as exploring anti-Latina/o and anti-Asian racism. Finally, in Australia, he interrogates the idea of ‘Terra Nullius’ and its ongoing impact on the indigenous peoples, as well as other forms of racism, such as that experienced by South Sea Islanders, anti-Asian racism, and that which targets migrants. The Pauline Hanson phenomenon is also addressed. Islamophobia, antisemitism and anti-Irish racism are also dealt with in the book, as is that aimed at asylum-seekers.

Cole demonstrates that racism is both endemic and multifaceted. This book will undoubtedly establish itself as required reading for students and other critical readers looking for a comprehensive, critical overview of the study of racism in Anglophone countries.

“Mike Cole reminds us of the histories of racism across America, Australia and the UK, at the same time urging us to re-engage with arguments about the central role of capitalism in perpetuating the most vicious of inequalities. This is an important reminder of the need to take a long view as we renew our shared struggle against the racism still scarring human lives across the globe.” (Professor Gargi Bhattacharyya, author of Tales Of Dark Skinned Women and Dangerous Brown Men)

 

About the Author:

Dr Mike Cole is Professor in Education, University of East London; and Emeritus Research Professor in Education and Equality, Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln. His latest books are Racism and Education in the UK and the US: Towards a Socialist Alternative (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011) and Critical Race Theory and Education: a Marxist Response (Palgrave Macmillan, 2009).

 

9780745334714

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

download (4)CONTRADICTIONS: A JOURNAL FOR CRITICAL THOUGHT

Call for Papers
A New Journal
Kontradikce /Contradictions: A Journal for Critical Thought

We are seeking submissions of scholarly articles and theoretical essays that skirt the disciplinary boundaries of political philosophy, social theory, and cultural critique. This peer-reviewed journal, based in Prague, aims to critically revive and update Central and Eastern European traditions of radical thought, bringing them to bear on the historical present and bringing them into international discussions of the theoretical problems involved in emancipatory social change.

The journal is therefore especially interested in 1) articles that delve into the often overlooked or forgotten history of radical left thought in our part of the world and assess this legacy’s contemporary significance; 2) articles that describe and develop related and parallel traditions of thought originating in other regions, bringing these traditions into conversation with the traditions of Central and Eastern Europe; 3) articles that analyze Soviet-type societies and their troubled relationship to historical and contemporary movements for social emancipation; and 4) articles that critically engage with the ideological assumptions and social conditions of “post-communism,” that is, of the discursive association of the communist project with Soviet-type societies and, thus, with a “failed” and irretrievable past.

With these thematic problems in mind, we ask what specific contributions to critical social theory can arise out of the post-Communist experience—that is, out of the historical conflation of communism (the idea and project) with Communism (the party and party-run states) and the subsequent de-legitimation of the former along with the latter. Our focus is thus both geographically specific and global, as we aim to bring together the specific intellectual legacy of those parts of Europe formerly under Communist Party rule with w orldwide reflections of the “fall” of communism as a leading political and intellectual force. Out of this situation, we ask what new visions can emerge.

The journal will be published once a year as a double issue in multilingual format, with one part in English and one part in Czech and Slovak. Submissions are welcome in any of these three languages (English, Czech, or Slovak).

The first issue, with a submission deadline of October 31, 2015, will focus thematically on assessing the current moment and the state of critical social—and in particular Marxist—thought a quarter century after the fall of governments in Central and Eastern Europe that officially sanctioned Marxism while also constraining its development as a tradition of social critique. Submissions are encouraged, but not required, to take this focus into account.

Articles are welcome in the following categories:

· “Studies” and “essays”: These may be articles of a more or less traditional academic character, but with an emphasis on the social significance of the material presented and on original and provocative argumentation. But we also welcome more essayistic contributions that break with some of the conventions of scholarly form. We are interested in rigorously theoretical essays, works of high scholarly value but which might not find a place in other scholarly journals. In this kind of writing, insightful generalization and shrewd observation will be given more weight than an exhaustive accounting for “existing literature” or a detailed description of research methodology. In other words, we have in mind essays that continue in the genre of most classic works in the modern history of ideas, from Rousseau’s Discourses through Benjamin’s “Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction” and Karel Kosík’s Dialectics of the Concrete. More traditionally scholarly articles should be about 4000-9000 words long. Essays can range from 3000 to 10,000 words.

· “Translations” and “materials”: Here we include important contributions to Central/Eastern European social thought that can be brought to international attention in English translation; internationally important works in new Czech or Slovak translations; and previously unpublished or long-unavailable “materials,” accompanied by annotation that presents the materials’ significance to contemporary readers (these may be submitted in English, Czech, or Slovak). 3000-10,000 words.

· “Reviews” of recent publications in critical social thought. Reviews may be brief (500-2000 words) or may constitute longer “review studies” (2000-5000 words).

Send all submissions to jgrimfeinberg@gmail.com.
Further information available on www.facebook.com/kontradikce.
First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/new-journal-contradictions

images

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Paulo Freire

Paulo Freire

CRITICAL KNOWLEDGE AND PRAXIS

ANGLIA RUSKIN SEMINAR

May 13th 2015, 3.30-6.30pm.

Marconi Building room 104, Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford Campus.

Critical Knowledge and Praxis

The seminar will explore the fate of critical knowledge and praxis and how it might have a role in progressive politics and revolutionary struggles against current injustices created and exacerbated by the violence of capitalist abstractions: Money, the State and its other institutional forms, e.g. the neoliberal university.

A key issue for the seminar will be the extent to which it is possible to operate as a critical scholar within a neo-liberal university, and to what extent it is necessary to develop other social institutions to carry through with the implications that form the substance of our work.

Reading

Amsler, S. (2014) For feminist consciousness in the academy, Special Issue on Materialist Feminisms against Neoliberalism, Politics and Culture. Sarah’s new book ‘The Education of Radical Democracy‘ will be published in April.

Neary, M. (2014) ‘Making with the University of the Future: pleasure and pedagogy in higher and higher education’.  In: J. Lea (Ed.) (2015) Enhancing Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: engaging with the dimensions of practice. Maidenhead: Open University Press.

Winn, J. (2015) The co-operative university: Labour, property and pedagogyPower and Education, 7 (1).

See: http://josswinn.org/2015/03/anglia-ruskin-seminar-critical-knowledge-and-praxis/

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

Herbert Marcuse

Herbert Marcuse

PRAXIS AND CRITIQUE: LIBERATION, PEDAGOGY, AND THE UNIVERSITY

International Herbert Marcuse Society Sixth Biennial Conference

Praxis and Critique: Liberation, Pedagogy, and the University

12-15 November 2015, Salisbury University (Salisbury, Maryland, USA)

 

CALL FOR PAPERS: Abstracts due May 20, 2015

 

In recent years, the problems and contradictions intrinsic to capitalist society have resulted in a number of manifest, seemingly permanent, crises. Many researchers, academics, and activists have seized on the urgency of recent coalescing crises—from environmental degradation to economic inequality, political instability to social unraveling, and beyond—in an attempt to ameliorate and analyze the consequences of these dilapidated social relations. The work of Herbert Marcuse aims to radically re-envision social relations via critical theory as a way to formulate a praxis of liberation. However, if we live in a society, as Marcuse puts it, “without negation,” how shall this critical rationality be cultivated?

The International Herbert Marcuse Society seeks papers for the 2015 biennial conference, “Praxis and Critique: Liberation, Pedagogy, and the University,” that address the broad pedagogical concerns of cultivating emancipatory rationality. Faculty, independent scholars, activists, artists, and others are invited to submit papers. Papers may want to address, but are certainly not limited to, the following problematics:

  • What role can and should critical pedagogy play in today’s institutions of higher education? Given Marcuse’s emphasis on praxis, critical pedagogy cannot be limited to classroom space in universities – how can a critical rationality translate into programs of activism, agitation, and organization?
  • How is the work of Marcuse, the Frankfurt School, and/or critical theory generally relevant to the current context of political, social, economic, and cultural struggles?
  • What is the meaning of praxis and critique today? Do Marcuse’s contemporary interlocutors help us refine, understand, recast, or critique visions of a critical rationality?
  • What can we learn from activists and scholars from a wide range of critical theories, dealing with liberation in areas such as critical race theory, intersectionality, LGBTQIA studies, disability studies, and postcolonial theory?
  • How does Marcuse’s critical theory provide a lens through which to assess the current condition of advanced industrial society?

Student participation is also encouraged. The conference organizers are particularly interested in encouraging undergraduate and graduate student participation. To this end, we encourage faculty to teach related or special topics classes in fall 2015 and to bring students of all levels to the conference. Undergraduate students are invited to present papers in special concurrent sessions. Undergraduate and graduate students will also have the opportunity to submit conference papers for publication to special conference editions.

This conference is an interdisciplinary, multimedia engagement with the many dimensions of Herbert Marcuse’s work. So, in addition to the presentation of papers, the conference will also present artistic work.

Artistic Presentations:

The Salisbury University Gallery will present two related exhibitions.

The first is “Versprechen, dass es anders sein kann” (Promises that it can be different) by painter Antje Wichtrey.
Salisbury University Gallery Director, Elizabeth Kauffman, will curate the second exhibition.

For more information, contact the conference organizers:

Dr. Sarah Surak (smsurak@salisbury.edu) and Dr. Robert Kirsch (rekirsch@salisbury.edu)

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Teaching Marx

Teaching Marx

KAPITAL IDEAS: ANALYSIS, CRITIQUE, PRAXIS

Society for Socialist Studies

Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences

June 2 – 5, 2015, University of Ottawa

http://www.socialiststudies.ca

Kapital Ideas: analysis, critique, praxis

Kapital Ideas are theories and analyses that help point us toward a better world through critique of the unequal, violent and exploitative one we now inhabit. They take inspiration from the author of Das Kapital, though they range widely over many issues which include ecology and political economy, gender and sexuality, colonization and imperialism, communication and popular struggles, but also movements and parties, hegemony and counter-hegemony, governance and globalization and, of course, class struggle and transformation.  Kapital Ideas are interventions that contribute to what Marx, in 1843, called the ‘self-clarification of the struggles and wishes of the age’.  In an era of deepening crisis and proliferating struggles, of grave threats and new possibilities, the need for these ideas, and for the praxis they can inform, could not be more acute.

 

Keynote Speaker

Himani Bannerji, York University, Toronto

Marx’s critique of ideology: its uses and abuses

 

Call for Papers

Our current Call for Papers, which lists sessions that are accepting paper proposals, is available HERE: http://socialiststudies.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/2015CallForPapers-2_19Dec14.pdf . Abstracts (maximum of 100 words) for paper proposals should be submitted before Saturday, January 31, 2015.

To submit an abstract, please click HERE: http://conferences.uvic.ca/index.php/sss/sss2015 . You will be directed to our OpenConference website.

 

We hope to see you in Ottawa!

Bill Carroll, Jean Chapman and Elaine Coburn

SSS 2015 Programme Co-chairs

rosa1919@uvic.ca

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/call-for-papers-deadline-jan-31-society-for-socialist-studies-2015-conference-kapital-ideas-analysis-critique-praxis-june-2-5

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

PosthumanTHE MATERIALITY OF THE IMMATERIAL: ICTs AND THE DIGITAL COMMONS

Call for Papers: The Materiality of the Immaterial: ICTs and the Digital Commons

See: http://www.triple-c.at/index.php/tripleC/announcement/view/23

Special issue of tripleC: Communication, Capitalism & Critique

Online @ http://www.triple-c.at

Abstract submission deadline: January 15, 2015

Guest Editors:

Vasilis Kostakis, Ragnar Nurkse School of Innovation and Governance, Tallinn University of Technology (Estonia), P2P Lab (Greece);

Andreas Roos, Human Ecology Division, Lund University (Sweden)

With an escalating environmental crisis and an unprecedented increase of ICT diversity and use, it is more crucial than ever to understand the underlying material aspects of the ICT infrastructure.  This special issue therefore asks the question: What are the true material and socio-environmental costs of the global ICT infrastructure?

In a recent paper (Fuchs 2013) as well as in the book Digital Labour and Karl Marx (Fuchs 2014), Christian Fuchs examined the complex web of production relations and the new division of digital labour that makes possible the vast and cheap ICT infrastructure as we know it. The analysis partly revealed that ICT products and infrastructure can be said to embody slave-like and other extremely harsh conditions that perpetually force mine and assembly workers into conditions of dependency. Expanding this argument, the WWF reported (Reed and Miranda 2007) that mining in the Congo basin poses considerable threats to the local environment in the form of pollution, the loss of biodiversity, and an increased presence of business-as-usual made possible by roads and railways.  Thus ICTs can be said to be not at all immaterial because the ICT infrastructure under the given economic conditions can be said to embody as its material foundations slave-like working conditions, various class relations and undesirable environmental consequences.

At the same time, the emerging digital commons provide a new and promising platform for social developments, arguably enabled by the progressive dynamics of ICT development. These are predominantly manifested as commons-based peer production, i.e., a new mode of collaborative, social production (Benkler 2006); and grassroots digital fabrication or community-driven makerspaces, i.e., forms of bottom-up, distributed manufacturing. The most well known examples of commons-based peer production are the free/open source software projects and the free encyclopaedia Wikipedia. While these new forms of social organisation are immanent in capitalism, they also have the features to challenge these conditions in a way that might in turn transcend the dominant system (Kostakis and Bauwens 2014).

Following this dialectical framing, we would like to call for papers for a special issue of tripleC that will investigate how we can understand and balance the perils and promises of ICTs in order to make way for a just and sustainable paradigm. We seek scholarly articles and commentaries that address any of the following themes and beyond. We also welcome experimental formats, especially photo essays, which address the special issue’s theme.

Suggested themes

Papers that track, measure and/or theorise the scope of the socio-environmental impact of the ICT infrastructure.

Papers that track, measure and/or theorise surplus value as both ecological (land), social (labour) and intellectual (patent) in the context of ICTs.

Understanding the human organisation of nature in commons-based peer production.

Studies of the environmental dimensions of desktop manufacturing technologies (for example, 3D printing or CNC machines) in non-industrial modes of subsistence, e.g. eco-villages or traditional

agriculture, as well as in modern towns and mega-cities.

Suggestions for and insights into bridging understandings of the socio-economic organisation of the natural commons with the socio-economic organisation of the digital commons drawing on types of

organisations in the past and the present that are grounded in theories of the commons.

Elaboration of which theoretical approaches can be used for overcoming the conceptual separation of the categories immaterial/material in the digital commons.

 

References

Benkler, Yochai. 2006. The wealth of networks: How social production transforms markets and freedom. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Fuchs, Christian. 2014. Digital labour and Karl Marx. New York: Routledge.

Fuchs, Christian. 2013. Theorising and analysing digital labour: From global value chains to modes of production. The Political Economy of Communication 1 (2): 3-27, online at: http://www.polecom.org/index.php/polecom/article/view/19.

Kostakis, Vasilis and Michel Bauwens. 2014. Network society and future scenarios for a collaborative economy. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.

Reed, Erik and Marta Miranda. 2007. Assessment of the mining sector and infrastructure development in the congo basin region. Washington DC: World Wildlife Fund, Macroeconomics for Sustainable Development Program Office, 27, online at: http://awsassets.panda.org/downloads/congobasinmining.pdf

 

Schedule

Submission of abstracts (250-300 words) by January 15, 2015 via email to [log in to unmask]

Responses about acceptance/rejection to authors: February 15, 2015.

Selected authors will be expected to submit their full documents to tripleC via the online submission system by May 15, 2015:

http://triple-c.at/index.php/tripleC/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions

Expected publication date of the special issue: October 1, 2015.

About the journal

tripleC: Communication, Capitalism & Critique is an academic open access online journal using a non-commercial Creative Commons license. It is a journal that focuses on information society studies and studies of media, digital media, information and communication in society with a special interest in critical studies in these thematic areas. The journal has a special interest in disseminating articles that focus on the role of information in contemporary capitalist societies. For this task, articles should employ critical theories and/or empirical research inspired by critical theories and/or philosophy and ethics guided by critical thinking as well as relate the analysis to power structures and inequalities of capitalism, especially forms of stratification such as class, racist and other ideologies and capitalist patriarchy. Papers should reflect on how the presented findings contribute to the illumination of conditions that foster or hinder the advancement of a global sustainable and participatory information society. TripleC was founded in 2003 and is edited by Christian Fuchs and Marisol Sandoval.

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

 

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

Glenn’s article Education, Capital and the Transhuman has also recently been added to Academia, and can be found at: https://www.academia.edu/9033532/Education_Capital_and_the_Transhuman

 

Critique

Critique

CRISIS AND CRITIQUE: SPECIAL ISSUE, VOL.I ISSUE II, 2014

CRISIS & CRITIQUE: http://materializmidialektik.org/crisis-and-critique-n-2/

CRISIS & CRITIQUE SPECIAL ISSUE VOLUME I / ISSUE II, 2014

Edited by Acheronta Movebo

EDITORS Agon Hamza Frank Ruda

 

CRISIS & CRITIQUE Editorial Board is:

Henrik Jøker Bjerre, Aaron Schuster, Adrian Johnston, Joan Copjec, Robert Pfaller, Frank Ruda, Gabriel Tupinambá, Sead Zimeri, Fabio Vighi, Benjamin Noys, Roland Boer

 

ACHERONTA MOVEBO Editorial Board is:

Sina Badiei, Srdjan Cvjetićanin, Oguz Erdin, Chrysantho Figueiredo, Agon Hamza, Martin López, Fernando Marcelino, Duane Rousselle, Ehren Stuff, Gabriel Tupinambá, Daniel Tutt, Bree Wooten, Yuan Yao

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Editorial note (p.4)

Toward a New Thinking of the Absolute (p.6)

Politics, Subjectivity and Cosmological Antinomy: Kant, Badiou and Žižek (p.14)

Discontent, Suffering and Symptom: Reading Lacanian Diagnostics through Amerindian Perspectivism (p.33)

Psychoanalysisas labor: an impossible profession and the Marxist conception of labor (p.49)

The 21st Century Dawns with a Chance (p.61)

Entlassen. Remarks on Hegel, Sacrifice and Liberation (p.71)

Real Abstraction and the Autonomization of Value (p.84)

Serialism as Simulacrum (p.95)

What is missing / what is coming  (p.101)

The Analysis and the Presentation of Marc Lachièze-Rey’s ‘Travelling in the Time: The Modern Physics and the Temporality’ (p.109)

 

Crisis

Crisis

Editorial Note

The texts comprise a special edition of Crisis and Critique, created by the editors of a different journal project, entitled Acheronta Movebo which is still in its infancy. This latter project, which began about 7 months ago, is comprised of a few students and researchers whose aim was to construct a Freudian journal which was not strictly psychoanalytic, but makes use of the Freudian categories in politics and philosophy as well. As we began to receive submissions from various authors, we decided that Acheronta had not sufficiently distinguished itself from other journals with similar commitments, most notably this one, to warrant its own existence. Although the topics covered in this issue are perhaps of a more variegated nature, we believe that they essentially fit into the structure and platform of Crisis and Critique better than our own project.

In this sense, our decision to move our first issue under the banner of a different journal is very practical – we simply think that one good journal devoted to Marxist critique is good enough, and that there is no need to further divide an already fragile field. By consolidating with Crisis and Critique, we are also motivating a question regarding our future plans – how should Acheronta Movebo move forward? The present letter from the editor is an inquiry into this situation – we hope that by outlin ing the facts of our project, what we aimed to do, and why we thought our end product did not fit the idea, we can engage ourselves and others to re think our mode of work.

The texts offered here were to be divided into two “camps” – Rings (which are modeled after Zizek’s productive engagement with the borromean knotting of psychoanalysis, philosophy, and ideology) and Conditions (which are further divided into Badiou’s “main” truth procedures – politics, art, science and love). Our thesis (and if you affirm this, we consider you one of us) is that this split between the two thinkers orients the entirety of philosophy today. Their differing perspectives on the same issues is well documented, but it is not enough to simply “choose” one or the other – it is not a matter of dividing their readers into the same two camps as the thinkers themselves. Rather, we conceive of their disagree ment as an example of what the Left should be capable of today – internal dissension (about the role of the State, about the nature of the New, and about the unconscious) which supports, rather than detracts from, our solidarity.

We have also come to realize that the primary marker of distinction for our project should be the novelty maintained in the way we work with our authors, which unfortunately was not upheld this time around. A platform that supports the “contradictions among the people” requires that we engage the authors by confronting their texts with certain naïve questions about their positions. Namely, we want to ask our authors those questions which would make their point clear for ourselves – and ᆳself. The current texts are the product of intelligent thinkers, and for that reason, they ought to be met with the incomprehension of an engaged student.

Our first attempt was that of a standard Call for Papers – but we soon found that there were certain obstacles inherent to the openness of this request – first and foremost, the lack of submissions, but also the vagueness of the criteria we used to judge whether a text was properly “Zizekian” or “Badiouian”.

In that vein, here is an excerpt from the original editorial note which was planned:

“The goal of this journal is to establish, by means of a self-referring movement, a field of study which can be properly named as Badiouian and Zizekian. This effort requires us to go beyond the work of the thinkers themselves, to expand it in as many dimensions as possible. It is not our job to dissect and disseminate their work, but rather to begin new projects that inherit the problems they’ve posed to us. The first problem ᆳtending a thinker’s work actually betray it most fully? It is a sure sign that one is among the left when the charge of “revisionism” is raised, but as the masters have shown us, it is only in rendering this charge undecidable that we make progress. What we need is to acquire the capacity to betray with honesty, to make use of what we grasp as the real contradictions of previous thought. In that sense, the division of the journal into two sections – Rings and Conditions – is a perfect fit for the task. If Badiou ’s thesis that truth is always the outcome of certain procedures (and that philosophy must maintain itself upon those procedures) is true, then we can only go as far as our grasp of these procedures (e.g. love, politics, art and science). If Zizek’s thesis that one must close the internal gap of cynicism before one can subvert the existing ideology is true, then we must train ourselves to take the Freudian unconscious seriously. In short, we must confront the contradictions posed by Badiou and Zizek’s respective edifices by establishing our own practice of them. This means to question, as they do, the ontological and ethical premises of the various situations which constitute our time – not simply to satisfy a vain understanding, but so that we may intervene in these situations with boldness.“

We essentially failed in our first attempt to actualize the above points, for reasons that were mostly based on our own inexperience, but also on the inherent problems of the field we are involved in. Our failure confirms for us that this project (Acheronta Movebo) cannot do without the close proximity between the editorial team and the authors of the journal. We rarely contacted the authors to make major changes to their texts or to ask for clarifications – a task which is quite difficult when faced with authors of such erudition – and we didn’t ask ourselves what sort of new criteria would be required to authorize any such changes in the first place. We think that our project should be more devoted to establishing the Zizekian and Badiouian field of study rather than being a format for celebrating already established figures.

Additionally, we found that good contributions to the “Conditions” section were especially sparse. Though there is a relatively large community of thinkers who engage with Badiou’s work, we could not find many who would write with enough proximity on the truth procedures. Thus, we are today lacking a platform to engage with what is new, and – following Badiou – this contributes to an overall degradation of philosophy. Certain questions, then, have to be confronted. What would be the proper text on love, for example? How would our texts on science be distinguished from those of other formats, and what would compel a scientist to publish with us given other options?

The reasons for “transplanting” our first texts to C&C became clear when we realized that it is genetically identical with AM (in the sense of having similar authors, political and philosophical positions), but without the extraneous structure we are imposing on ourselves. We hope that this decision stands as one of those few examples of the Left “unionizing” rather than dividing in the face of common obstacles, and we affirm our commitment to a new presentation of AM’s idea, one that has learned from the concrete experience of its first attempt.

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/new-issue-of-crisis-critique

Crisis

Crisis

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Modernism

Modernism

MARXISM AND THE CRITIQUE OF VALUE

The editorial board of Mediations is pleased to announce the publication of our latest dossier, Marxism and the Critique of Value.

This double issue is being published simultaneously as a book, which can be downloaded as a free PDF from M-C-M′ (http://www.mcmprime.com) and which is also available in paperback (ISBN 978-0989549707).

Consisting of some 400 pages of new translations from the German-language Wertkritik tendency, Marxism and the Critique of Value presents a landmark effort to complete the critique of the value-form begun by Marx.

The full text can, as always, be accessed at mediationsjournal.org, where it is accompanied by book reviews by Roberto Schwarz, Josh Robinson, Barbara Foley and Kanishka Chowdhury, and Matthew Moraghan.

 

DOSSIER: MARXISM AND THE CRITIQUE OF VALUE

Mediations: Journal of the Marxist Literary Group

Volume 27, Nos. 1-2 Fall/Spring 2013-14

 

Editors’ Note

 

Norbert Trenkle: Value and Crisis: Basic Questions

Norbert Trenkle tackles fundamental questions posed by the critique of value. How does it differ from other Marxisms? What are the consequences of the critique of value for the category of labor and for the labor theory of value? What is its relationship to socialism as an economic project? What is the relationship between the value-form and capitalist crisis? Can the critique of capitalism still be undertaken from the standpoint of labor?

 

Robert Kurz: The Crisis of Exchange Value: Science as Productivity, Productive Labor, and Capitalist Reproduction

As long as value is allowed to hold sway as an element of second nature, the Left will not be able adequately to understand the developments in the productive forces that characterized the twentieth century. Robert Kurz lays out the fundamental coordinates that tie the critique of value to the theory of crisis.

 

Claus Peter Ortlieb: A Contradiction between Matter and Form: On the Significance of the Production of Relative Surplus Value in the Dynamic of Terminal Crisis

Building on the insights of Capital I, and dispatching common liberal misunderstandings of those insights, Claus Peter Ortlieb makes the case for what mainstream economists euphemistically call “secular stagnation”: that is, an economic crisis that cannot be resolved by economic means.

 

Roswitha Scholz: Patriarchy and Commodity Society: Gender without the Body

Can there be a feminist materialism that does not rely on the fundamentally anti-Marxist materialism of the body? What is the relationship between capitalism, patriarchy, and feminist deconstruction? Roswitha Scholz introduces the concept of “value-dissociation,” under which capitalist societies necessarily consign labor that does not valorize capital — but that is nonetheless essential to its production and reproduction — to a subordinate, feminized zone.

 

Norbert Trenkle: The Rise and Fall of the Working Man: Towards a Critique of Modern Masculinity

In order to be able to understand the current economic crisis in particular and the emergence and development of capitalism in general, Norbert Trenkle argues, it is necessary to account for capitalism’s gendered social dimension. What can the connection between modern masculinity and the logic of modern labor tell us about the current crisis and the relation between capitalist form and its corresponding social structures?

 

Ernst Lohoff: Off Limits, Out of Control: Commodity Society and Resistance in the Age of

Deregulation and Denationalization

Despite all violent disagreements, mainstream Left and Right agree that what is at stake is the role of the state: is it “off limits” or “out of control”? But what if the role of the state — as with the flight to finance — is epiphenomenal to an underlying crisis-process? What are the possible political responses? Ernst Lohoff argues that rather than a rearguard defense of the state, the slogan of free access could organize a plausible Left project.

 

Robert Kurz: World Power and World Money: The Economic Function of the U.S. Military Machine within Global Capitalism and the Background of the New Financial Crisis

In an article written in the initial stages of the 2007-8 financial crisis, Robert Kurz traces its origins to the Reaganite policy of “weaponized Kenyesianism” that stabilized the world dollar economy and established the dominant flows of debt and goods that would persist until the onset of the crisis: phenomena that are generally recognized on the Left as well as on the Right only in inverted form.

 

Norbert Trenkle: Struggle without Classes: Why There Is No Resurgence of the Proletariat in the Currently Unfolding Capitalist Crisis

Class struggle played a historically indispensable role in the constitution of the working class as a subject conscious of its pursuit of a social mission. But can a class subject point to a future beyond capitalist social relations today? Is “declassing” a mere appearance? Or, on the contrary, do contemporary attempts to think struggle in class terms, no matter how sublimated, diguised, misrecognized, or sophisticated, lead up a blind alley?

 

Ernst Lohoff: Violence as the Order of Things and the Logic of Annihilation

How, after the end of the Cold War and the universalization of a supposedly pacifying market logic, are we to understand contemporary violence? The answer, suggests Ernst Lohoff, lies in the emergence of modern subjectivity and its origins in the Englightemnent: origins deeply bound up in the emergence of the value-form.

 

Robert Kurz: The Nightmare of Freedom: The Foundations of “Western Values” and the Helplessness of Critique

Are freedom and equality Left values? Certainly they inform historical Marxism and anarchism as much as liberalism. But what if the concepts themselves are bound up with the logic of the market? What if freedom is only a naked function of the valorization process — a moment in capital’s self-mediation — that is, of universal unfreedom? Utopias of circulation, of markets without money, suddenly look wildly implausible.

 

Karl-Heinz Lewed: Curtains for Universalism: Islamism as Fundamentalism in Modern Social Form

In most writing about political Islam — even from the Left — it is understood, even where a vulgar “clash of civilizations” thesis is rejected, to be fundamentally other to Western social and political forms. Karl-Heinz Lewed argues that political Islam is nothing other than a form of appearance of a general world crisis, one which makes its first appearance in the failed modernizations of the Third World. Political Islam is one attempt to resolve an impasse central to the Enlightenment mobilization of the dialectic of universal and particular: a dialectic which itself owes its historical resonance to the emergence of the value form.

 

Robert Kurz: On the Current Global Economic Crisis: Questions and Answers

How can we understand the current global economic crisis? What can we expect to happen in the next few years? How will this crisis force us to rethink critique, the nature of global social movements, and concepts such as revolution? For Robert Kurz, the critique of value is at the same time an analysis of the crisis, and the analysis of the crisis is of necessity a critique of value.

 

Robert Kurz: The Ontological Break: Before the Beginning of a Different World History

The debate over globalization seems to have reached a moment of exhaustion. Why? The process underlying globalization is, if anything, still in its initial stages. The endpoint we have reached is rather a categorical one: the exhaustion of an entire universe of historical concepts, which, argues Robert Kurz, we now have to learn to do without.

 

 

BOOK REVIEWS

Roberto Schwarz reviews Robert Kurz’s The Collapse of Modernization

Josh Robinson reviews Ernst Lohoff’s and Norbert Trenkle’s The Great Devaluation

Barbara Foley and Kanishka Chowdhury review Kevin B. Anderson’s Marx at the Margins

Matthew Moraghan reviews Arundhati Roy’s Walking with the Comrades

 

Mediations: Journal of the Marxist Literacy Grouphttp://www.mediationsjournal.org/

First published in: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/mediations-27.1-2-marxism-and-the-critique-of-value

 

**END**

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Crisis

Crisis

CRITIQUE TODAY

Call for Papers

http://materializmidialektik.org/category/revistajournal/

Editors: Frank Ruda & Agon Hamza

The International journal of political philosophy, Crisis and Critique, announces a call for papers for its second issue, which will be devoted to the notion of critique today.

To criticize, in the original Greek meaning (krinein), is the act of drawing a line of demarcation. Such a critical act introduced with the same move a hierarchy between the two sides of this very line. Thus, to criticize meant to decide for and to give preference to one of two sides of a choice that was constituted by the very act of criticism. To criticize thus also implied the very emphasize of a choice that would not have existed without the critique.

In 1858 Karl Marx wrote to Lasalle that his Capital is “at once an exposé [Darstellung] and, by the same token, a critique of the system.” Today it is a widely shared contention that a concept of critique through presentation and Darstellung, any critique of political economy has to be either renewed such that it is still apt to perform its peculiar criticism of the contemporary world or that it has to be revamped such that its unhindered actuality comes to the fore.

These two takes on the notion of critique – and there are many possible others – provide sufficient ground to raise a banal but obvious question: where does one stand today with regard to critique? The second issue of Crisis and Critique seeks to address this question with regard to philosophy and political practice, contemporary critical analysis of capitalism and its structural effects.

In this issue, we want to address questions such as:

–      critique as a negative activity: a negative determination of certain activities, practices, orientation in thinking
–      critique as an overcoming of the limits of the possibilities imposed by contemporary forms of capitalism
–      critique of ideology versus discourse analysis
–      renewals of critique and critiques of critique
–      the return to Marx via return to the critique of political economy

Articles should be sent in English. The maximal length is 9000-10.000 words.

Submissions should be sent to: editor@materializmidialektik.org

The deadline for submission is May 30, 2014

ISSN 2311-5475

See: http://materializmidialektik.org/category/revistajournal/

 

**END**

Critique

Critique

 

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

 

Imperialism

Imperialism

CRITIQUE CONFERENCE 2014: IMPERIALISM AND WAR

11 & 12 April 2014

Thai Theatre, New Academic Building,

London School of Economics, WC2A 3LJ

To mark the 100th anniversary of the First World War, Critique is looking for conference papers around the topic of imperialism and war

We propose including the whole gamut of causes and consequences, given the extra-ordinary nature of the First World War, its mindless cruelty and destructiveness, on the one hand, but the fantastic explosion of working class revolution throughout Europe on the other. The ruling class was bent on compelling its citizens to fight to the last man, for a cause which disappeared into the mist. Imperialism, which most see as a crucial underlying cause of the war, continues down to the present and conceptions of imperialism, even as applicable to the War of 1914-18, have been developed and discussed.

Confirmed speakers include: Bob Brenner, Mick Cox and Hillel Ticktin

More information: http://www.critiquejournal.net

To propose a paper, contact: gkfa02@udcf.gla.ac.uk

 

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

The New Left Book Club: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2014/01/05/the-new-left-book-club-call-for-papers/

Critical Education

Critical Education

LONDON CONFERENCE IN CRITICAL THOUGHT 2014

CALL FOR PAPERS: London Conference in Critical Thought 2014, 27th–28th June, Goldsmiths, University of London

CFP dead­line: 10 March 2014

LCCT 2014 Call for pa­pers (pdf)

The third an­nual London Conference in Critical Thought (LCCT) will offer a space for an in­ter­dis­cip­linary ex­change of ideas for scholars who work with crit­ical tra­di­tions and con­cerns. It aims to provide op­por­tun­ities for those who fre­quently find them­selves at the mar­gins of their de­part­ment or dis­cip­line to en­gage with other scholars who share the­or­et­ical ap­proaches and interests.

Central to the vision of the con­fer­ence is an inter-​institutional, non-​hierarchal, and ac­cess­ible event that makes a par­tic­ular ef­fort to em­brace emer­gent thought and the par­ti­cip­a­tion of emer­ging aca­demics, fos­tering new av­enues for critically-​oriented schol­ar­ship and collaboration.

The con­fer­ence is di­vided into them­atic streams, each co­ordin­ated by dif­ferent re­searchers and with sep­arate calls for pa­pers, in­cluded in this doc­u­ment. We wel­come paper pro­posals that re­spond to the par­tic­ular streams below. In ad­di­tion, pa­pers may be pro­posed as part of a gen­eral stream, i.e. with no spe­cific stream in mind. Spanning a range of broad themes, these streams provide the im­petus for new points of dia­logue. Read the full call for pa­pers here.

Topics:

Aesthetic Refusals: Oppositional Citizenship and Public Culture

Conceptions and Practices of Critical Pedagogy

Critical Approaches to Care Relationships

(Dis)orders of Migration

Dissenting Methods: Engaging Legacies of the Past, Defining Critical Futures

‘en­titled’

‘everyday polit­ical’

How Does One Think Difference?

Legal Critique: Positions, Negotiations and Strategies

Moving Through the Intersection? Interrogating Categories and Postintersectional Politics

Philosophy and Critical Thought Inside and Outside The University

Pragmatism and Critical Traditions

Sounding the Counterfactual: Hyperstition and Audial Futurities

Strategies of Silence

Street Level: Towards a Critical Discourse on Urban Aesthetics

Subjects in Space(s): Navigating Multiplicity

The Critical Brain

The Human After Anthropocentrism? Life. Matter. Being.

Time Discipline

What is the Question of Critique?

 

Please send paper/​presentation pro­posals with the rel­evant stream in­dic­ated in the sub­ject line to paper-​subs@​londoncritical.​org. Submissions should be no more than 250 words and should be re­ceived by the 10thMarch 2014.

Participation is free (though re­gis­tra­tion will be required)

lon​don​crit​ical​.org /​/​inquiries@​londoncritical.​org /​/​@londoncritical

LCCT Website: http://londoncritical.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/LCCT-2014-Call-for-Papers.pdf

 

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo   

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski