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Panopticon

Panopticon

CRITICAL SPACES: DISORIENTING THE TOPOLOGICAL

London Graduate School

Critical Spaces: Disorienting the Topological

A graduate conference in the critical humanities

Kingston University, London

Monday 5th January 2015

 

Keynote Speakers:

Claire Colebrook

Eyal Weizman

Eleni Ikoniadou

Fred Botting

 

Call for Papers:

“The present epoch will perhaps be above all the epoch of space.” — Michel Foucault ‘Of Other Spaces’

“Oh God! I could be bounded in a nutshell and count myself a king of infinite space.” — Hamlet

Foucault’s assertion that the present epoch will be one of space immediately evokes the temporal. Whether we consider our epoch as modern, postmodern, or as non-modern, the philosophical treatment of space has been subordinated to time. Elizabeth Grosz has suggested that philosophy could draw on architecture to consider itself as a form of building or dwelling rather than as reflection of thought, evoking the spatial already implied by Heidegger. Occupy Wall Street and other recent anti-establishment protests in Brazil and Istanbul have been defined by journalist Bernardo Gutierrez as forming ‘anew architecture of protest’, convened by networks of consensus rather than dominant groups and ideology. Current theories and practices surrounding geopolitics, metamodelling, neuroscience, cartography and choreography support this growing emphasis on spatiality – whether focusing on produced space, social space and spaces of resistance, imaginary and poetic space, psychoanalytical and embodied space, sovereign space, performative space, digital space and/or virtual space.

This conference invites interdisciplinary approaches to the spatial. In particular we are interested in how thinking spatially or spatial practices reveal and open up disruptive, subversive or minoritarian fields within already existing discourses, be they philosophical, political, cultural or aesthetic. As Foucault has done in defining heterotopias, and as Edward Soja shows us through the idea of ‘thirding as othering’, it aims to rupture not only the particularities of those discourses, but the very possibility of thought itself through challenging existing borders, boundaries, horizons, surfaces and planes. We welcome proposals from all approaches including but not limited to: New Materialisms, Non-philosophy, Philosophy and Praxis, Cultural Studies, Political Theory, Geography, Architecture, Postcolonial Theory, Feminist and Queer Theory, Literature, Visual Cultures, and Art Theory and Practice, which consider space in the broadest terms. We also welcome proposals for practice based approaches and interventions.

Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words to: lgscriticalspaces@gmail.com  by Friday 31 October 2014

At The London Graduate School blog: http://www.thelondongraduateschool.co.uk/blog/call-for-papers-critical-spaces-disorienting-the-topological/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

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Socrates

Socrates

NEW PERSDPECTIVES ON THE PROBLEM OF THE PUBLIC

A two day conference hosted by the Centre for the Study of Democracy, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Westminster.

Dates: Thursday 15 and Friday 16 May 2014
Venue: Board Room, 309 Regent Street, London

This inter-disciplinary conference brings together researchers from media, technology studies, law, sociology, planning, geography and political theory to discuss the implications of the rise of new strands of pragmatist, complexity and new materialist approaches to democracy and the public sphere. We have five keynote presentations – from Clive Barnett, Andrew Barry, Jon Coaffee, John Law and Sarah Whatmore – and four panels, discussing new perspectives on the conceptualisation of public space, the construction and emergence of publics, and the relevance of post-human, actor-network and new materialist approaches to how we might rethink the spaces and practices of the public today.

Attendance is free and refreshments will be provided. If you wish to attend please register with Eventbrite here: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/new-perspectives-on-the-problem-of-the-public-tickets-10448111583?aff=eorg

Provisional Programme:

THURSDAY 15 MAY

9.00 REGISTRATION

9.30-10.45 – KEYNOTE

John Law (Professor of Sociology, Open University)
title to be confirmed

10.45-11.00 COFFEE

11.00-12.30 – PANEL 1 – PUBLIC SPACE

Regan Koch (Department of Geography, University College, London)
Justifications of public and private: Notes from the not-quite-public spaces of underground restaurants
Manuela Kölke (independent researcher)
Ontological registers as the medium of convergence between political theory and spatial disciplines
Antonia Layard (University of Bristol Law School)
The Legal Production of Public Space (or not)
Nikolai Roskamm (Institut für Stadt- und Regionalplanung, TU Berlin, Germany)
The in-between of public space: Sitting on the fence with Hannah Arendt

12.30-1.30 – LUNCH

1.30-2.45 – KEYNOTE

Clive Barnett (Professor of Geography and Social Theory, University of Exeter)
Emergent Publics

COFFEE

3.00-4.30 – PANEL 2 – CONSTRUCTED AND EMERGENT PUBLICS

Nick Mahony and Hilde C. Stephansen (Centre for Citizenship, Identities and Governance, The Open University)
What’s at stake in Participation Now? Exploring emergent configurations of ‘the public’ in contemporary public participation
Helen Pallett (Science, Society & Sustainability group, University of East Anglia)  Producing the publics of UK science policy: public dialogue as a technology for representing, knowing and constructing publics
Yvonne Rydin and Lucy Natarajan (Bartlett School of Planning, University College, London)
Materialising public participation: community consultation within spatial planning for North Northamptonshire, England
Peer Schouten (School of Global Studies, University of Gothenburg, Sweden)
The infrastructural construction of publics: the Janus face of representation by international actors in Congo

4.30-4.45 BREAK

4.45-6.00 – KEYNOTE

Sarah Whatmore (Professor of Environment and Public Policy, University of Oxford)
Experimental Publics: Science, Democracy and the Redistribution of Expertise

RECEPTION & SPEAKERS DINNER

FRIDAY 16 MAY

10.00-11.15 KEYNOTE

Andrew Barry (Professor of Human Geography, University College, London)
Material Politics and the Reinvention of the Public

11.15-11.30 COFFEE

11.30-1.00 PANEL 3 – BEYOND THE SUBJECT

Andreas Birkbak (Department of Learning and Philosophy, Aalborg University, Denmark)
Facebook pages as ’demo versions’ of issue publics
Gwendolyn Blue (Department of Geography, University of Calgary, Canada)
Animal publics: Political subjectivity after the human subject
Ferenc Hammer (Institute for Art Theory and Media Studies, Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary)
The Hungarian Roundabout and Further Settings for the Authoritarian Subject: Technologies of Self-Governance in Everyday Practices
Jonathan Metzger (Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden)
Moose re:public – traversing the human/non-human divide in the politics of  transport infrastructure development

1.00-1.45 LUNCH

1.45-3.15 PANEL 4 – MATERIAL PUBLICS

Lindsay Bremner (Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment, University of Westminster) The Political Life of Rising Acid Mine Water
Ana Delgado and Blanca Callén (Centre for the Study of the Sciences and the Humanities, University of Bergen, Norway)
The making of obsolescence: how things become public in the age of precariousness
Michael Guggenheim, Joe Deville, Zuzana Hrdlickova (Department of Sociology, Goldsmiths, University of London)
The Megaphone and the Map: Assembling and Representing the Public in Disaster Exercises
Owain Jones (Environmental Humanities, Bath Spa University)
Is My Flesh Not Public? Thinking of bodies and ‘the public’ through water

3.15-3.30 COFFEE

3.30-4.45 KEYNOTE

Jon Coaffee (Professor in Urban Geography, University of Warwick)
Citizenship and Democracy in the City 2.0: Balancing the Quest for Resilience and the Public Interest in Urban Development

4.45-5.00 BREAK

5.00-6.00 CONCLUDING DISCUSSION
David Chandler, Professor of International Relations, Director of the Centre for the Study of Democracy, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Westminster, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW. Tel: ++44 (0)776 525 3073.
Journal Editor, Resilience: International Policies, Practices and Discourses: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/resi20
Book series Editor, Routledge Studies in Intervention and Statebuilding: http://208.254.74.79/books/series/RSIS/

Book series Editor, Routledge Advances in Democratic Theory: http://www.routledge.com/books/series/RADT/
Amazon books page: http://www.amazon.co.uk/David-Chandler/e/B001HCXV7Y/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

Personal website: http://www.davidchandler.org/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Gilles Deleuze

Gilles Deleuze

CINEMATICITY: CITY AND CINEMA AFTER DELEUZE

Call for Papers: Cinematicity: City and Cinema after Deleuze

Organizers: David B. Clarke, Marcus A. Doel, Richard G. Smith

This session of the Royal Society of Geographers & Institute of British Geographers Annual International Conference 2014, focuses on the ‘co-production’ of filmic and urban space. That term, as it features in the conference theme, relates to knowledge – proposing that ‘new encounters are disrupting conceptions of where knowledge resides.’ Engaging Deleuze’s discussions of cinema, this session questions the framing of co-production in terms of dwelling. The reciprocal presupposition of cinema and city would seem, rather, to embody a sense of becoming. Thus, Deleuze’s conceptions of the cinemas of the movement-image and time-image recall Lewis Mumford’s claim that, ‘In the city, time becomes visible.’ How does cinema think the city, and vice-versa, to generate new, transformative senses of cinematicity? Contributions exploring the connections between cinematic and urban space are invited, potentially including work on early cinema and living pictures; considerations of specific cities, films or genres; conceptions of city and cinema as spiritual automata; and a multiplicity of other creative conceptualizations of cinematicity.

Please send abstracts of no more than 200 words by 14th February to: d.b.clarke@swansea.ac.uk

Annual International Conference 2014: http://www.rgs.org/WhatsOn/ConferencesAndSeminars/Annual+International+Conference/Annual+international+conference.htm

Contact:
David B. Clarke
Centre for Urban Theory
Department of Geography
Swansea University
Swansea SA2 8PP, UK
Tel. +44(0)1792 602317
E-mail: d.b.clarke@swansea.ac.uk

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Island

The Island

ROYAL GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY & INSTITUTE OF BRITISH GEOGRAPHERS ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE 2014

Call for Papers: RGS–IBG Annual International Conference 2014, London, 26–29 August 2014

Session: Anti Production & Co. Unthinking capitalist realism (Perish the thought)
Organizers: Marcus A. Doel, David B. Clarke, and Richard G. Smith
Sponsor: History and Philosophy of Geography Research Group (HPGRG)

Expected format: Two 100-minute sessions, comprising eight 20-minute papers (inc. 5-minutes each for Q&A), and two 20-minute discussants

“It cannot be stressed enough: THERE IS NEVER ANYTHING TO PRODUCE” (Jean Baudrillard, The Ecstasy of Communication)

The advent of the term ‘co-production’ should be a cause for concern for all Left-leaning Geographers. With its conjoining of a generalized busyness on the one hand (production) and a harmonious coming together on the other hand (co-), the term’s dissimulation and occlusion of the agonistic division of labour and the expropriation of the commons seems perfectly attuned to the ideological obfuscation of capitalist realism, zombie neoliberalism, and objective violence. Since everything is supposedly produced (made to appear, manufactured, assembled, fabricated, and constructed), we are all seemingly compelled to produce together; and we are all ostensibly in it together (humans and nonhumans, producers and consumers, dead labour and living labour, and so on and so forth). Such is the fantastical and phantasmagorical meaning of ‘co-production’ – an assembling assembly, toiling away for the common good. This session will challenge this cozy, heart-warming, and peaceable notion of ‘creative togetherness’ by welcoming a return of the ideologically repressed: the dis- and the de- against the co-, and the se- and the re- against the pro- (disjointure and deconstruction; seduction and sedition; reduction and retraction; et cetera).

We would welcome papers that challenge the notion of ‘co-production,’ particularly with reference to:
* Capitalist realism
* Zombie neoliberalism
* Objective violence – symbolic and systemic
* Anti-production and general economy
* Seduction and the mirror of production
* The violence of critical theory and fatal theory
* Being forced to think otherwise
* Deconstruction and poststructuralism
* Revolutionary and counter-revolutionary theory
* Schizoanalysis and psychoanalysis
* Commonization of knowledge production
* The destruction of meaning
* Uncreative thinking
* Interpassivity and desubjectification

Please send a proposed title, an abstract (up to 200 words), and your contact details to Marcus Doel, Swansea University (m.a.doel@swansea.ac.uk), by 25th January 2014.

Marcus A. Doel, David B. Clarke, and Richard G. Smith
Centre for Urban Theory
Department of Geography
College of Science
Swansea University
Singleton Park
Swansea SA2 8PP
United Kingdom
Tel. +44(0)1792 513090
E-mail: m.a.doel@swansea.ac.uk
Twitter: @MarcusDoel

“Through the mirror of production the human species comes to consciousness in the imaginary’” (Jean Baudrillard, The Mirror of Production)

Further details about the Annual Conference can be found at <http://www.rgs.org/AC2014> and about HPGRG at: <http://hpgrg.org.uk/>.

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Shanghai

Shanghai

ANALYZING URBAN NETWORKS

CALL FOR PAPERS

Social Network Analysis (SNA), a quantitative structuralist methodology largely developed by sociologists in the 1970s that has grown into a sizeable international and inter-disciplinary research field, has – following the work of Alderson and Beckfield (2004) – begun to attract interest among those engaged in research on both world cities and urban networks per se (e.g. Alderson and Beckfield, 2007, 2010, 2012; Green, 2007; Taylor, 2006; Mould & Joel, 2010). In addition, two textbooks have been recently published to bring some of the more commonly used SNA software packages to the undergraduate urban studies classroom (Giuffre, 2013; Neal, 2013). Papers are invited which utilise a social network perspective to seek to better understand the relations, connections, networks, and co-production within and between the world’s cities. Papers could report empirical findings, theoretical and/or methodological advances, including critiques of either, specific SNA methods and results, or the inherent structuralism of SNA as a tool for researching the urban.

Please send abstracts of no more than 200 words by February 14th to r.g.smith@swan.ac.uk

Annual International Conference 2014:http://www.rgs.org/WhatsOn/ConferencesAndSeminars/Annual+International+Conference/Annual+international+conference.htm
*******************************************
Dr Richard G. Smith, PhD (Bristol)
Co-Director of the Centre for Urban Theory, Department of Geography, College of Science, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP, UK Tel. +44(0)1792 602558 Fax +44(0)1792 295955
E-mail: r.g.smith@Swansea.ac.uk
Web: http://www.swansea.ac.uk/staff/science/geography/r.g.smith/
Skype: dr.richard.g.smith

A few recent publications:

Richard G. Smith (2013) The ordinary city trap snaps back. Environment and Planning A doi:10.1068/a46284

Richard G. Smith (2013) The Ordinary City Trap. Environment and Planning A doi:10.1068/a45516

Richard G. Smith (2013) Beyond the Global City Concept and the Myth of ‘Command and Control’. International Journal of Urban and Regional Research  doi:10.1111/1468-2427.12024 [ Featured in IJURR Latest News: http://www.ijurr.org/details/news/5639821/Focus-on-political-economy-in-the-January-2014-issue-___-Let-the-debate-begin___.html ]

 

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Postcolonial

Postcolonial

RETURNING TERMS: POSTCOLONIALISM AND THE EVERYDAY IN LITERATURE, CULTURE AND DEVELOPMENT

Call for Papers

Association of American Geographers, Annual Meeting, Tampa, Florida, April 8 to April 12, 2014.
If you are interested in presenting a paper at the following session of the conference, then please email a title and abstract to Jonathan.Pugh@ncl.ac.uk

Session Title: Returning Terms: Postcolonialism and the Everyday in Literature, Culture and Development

“I must be given words to shape my name to the syllables of trees. I must be given words to refashion futures, like a healer’s hand” — Kamau Brathwaite

A key driver for Postcolonial Studies has been the desire to examine the everyday lives of people on their own terms. The matter is not, however, straightforward. A number of novelists, poets and playwrights have, for many years, reminded us that postcolonialism is the struggle against the sense that spoken and written words are not (yet) one’s own, but instead inherited second-hand from others. Authors as varied as Naipaul, Glissant, Harris, Rushdie, Walcott, Darwish and Chamoiseau have all characterised the postcolonial condition as feeling that the words that come out of one’s mouth or which have been marked upon the page have a certain illusionary and artificial quality to them because terms employed cannot (yet) be authentically articulated or received. In Walcott’s words, what will deliver the Caribbean individual “from servitude” is the forging of a language that goes “beyond mimicry, a dialect which had the force of revelation, as it invented names for things, one that finally settled on its own mode of inflection.” This is why most great postcolonial literature incessantly turns and returns to everyday life, drilling down into it, turning over its terms, seeking ways to return the everyday to us anew through new words.

Such concerns raise interesting questions for the contemporary concern with ‘the everyday’ as a category of analysis and site of resistance in social sciences and humanities more generally. Are the ways in which we are presently thinking about the everyday up to the task? Given the central concerns documented above, do postcolonial literature, culture and development suggest we should be thinking about the everyday, the ordinary, the commonplace and the mundane in other ways? This session will unite social scientists and literary scholars through an analysis of the quest for and frustrations associated with the struggle to conceptualise the everyday effectively. The session will operate at the intersections of literature, culture and development studies, thereby highlighting the parallels between art and life and the various ways both fields fold together in everyday experience.

Jon Pugh (Newcastle University).
Malachi McIntosh (CambridgeUniversity)

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Island

The Island

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ISLAND DEVELOPMENT

The IGU Commission on Islands will hold the International Conference on Island Development 2013, Penghu Archipelago, Taiwan, on October 1-5.

The over-arching theme is ‘Island Development: Local Economy, Culture, Innovation and Sustainability‘.

The aim of the conference is to bring together researchers and practitioners from academia, business, NGOs and public authorities, and to provide them with a platform to report on and discuss recent developments, achievements, experiences, research results, and initiatives related to island development.

Please see the conference website http://island.npu.edu.tw/  for details.

Please note that abstracts should be submitted by March 31.

You are very welcome to organize panels and themed sessions at the conference and to circulate cfps for panels and themed sessions.

Prof. Chang-Yi David Chang (Chair, IGU Commission on Islands; National Taiwan University, Taiwan)
Prof. Eric Clark (Vice Chair, IGU Commission on Islands; Lund University, Sweden)
Prof. Huei-Min Tsai (Executive Secretary, IGU Commission on Islands; National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan)

Local Organizing Committee
Prof. Kuo-Yuan Kao, Chair (National Penghu University, Taiwan),
Prof. Shui-Liang Yu, Vice Chair (Secretary General, National Penghu University, Taiwan)

 

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Island

HISTORY, MEMORY AND GREEN IMAGINARIES

NOW BOOKING:

History, Memory and Green Imaginaries
A symposium presented by the Centre for Research in Memory, Narrative and Histories, University of Brighton
Friday 30th November 2012
9.30am – 5.00pm
M2, Grand Parade, University of Brighton

This symposium invites reflection on the ways in which history and memory inform and shape contemporary green imaginaries. It brings together cultural theorists, historians, cultural geographers, educators and policy actors.

Keynote: ‘The problem of the past’
Alastair Bonnett, Professor of Social Geography, NewcastleUniversity

Roundtable: ‘Austerity and sustainability’
The Home Front and ‘austerity Britain’ are significant points of reference in current debates about sustainability. What kinds of possibilities and limitations follow from the use of historical resources in public debate about environmental issues?

Ayers Rock

Tim Cooper, Senior Lecturer in History, University of Exeter, ‘The limits of
history in green imaginaries’.

Victoria Johnson, Head of Climate Change and Energy, New Economics Foundation, ‘“Ration me up” and other nef projects’

James Piers Taylor, British Film Institute Documentation Editor and permaculture educator, ‘Re-member, re-vision and re-claim: using archival film to facilitate local conversations about community resilience’.

Panel: ‘Ecological history’
How can historical research inform environmental thinking? Three historians discuss this question in relation to their research and practice.

Vinita Damodaran, Senior Lecturer in South Asian History, University of Sussex, ‘“Primitive places and wild tribes”: colonial and indigenous understandings of nature in Eastern India in the nineteenth century’.

Erin Gill, environmental journalist and historian, ‘“Lost” environmental histories: the stories we’ve forgotten’.

Karin Jaschke, Senior Lecturer in Architecture, University of Brighton, ‘Historiography as process: towards an Ecological History of Architecture’.

Closing remarks: ‘Culture is natural: biosemiotics, recycling, and the evolutionary structurations of biological and cultural change’ Wendy Wheeler, Professor Emeritus of English Literature and Cultural
Inquiry, London Metropolitan University.

Registration:
This event is open to all. Please register in advance by following the link below. The registration fee is £35, or £25 for students/unaffiliated delegates, including lunch and refreshments.

Enquiries: Cheryl Roberts / cr16@brighton.ac.uk
Programme and abstracts: http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/mnh
Register: http://shop.brighton.ac.uk/

Dr Rebecca Bramall
Senior Lecturer in Media Studies
Faculty of Arts
University of Brighton
+44 (0)1273 644651
r.bramall@brighton.ac.uk
http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/staff/rebecca-bramall

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Utopia

GEOGRAPHIES OF JUSTICE

 

Announcing:
Antipode’s 3rd Institute for the Geographies of Justice (IGJ)*

*(We have jettisoned “Summer” given the Northern hemispheric bias it presents)

Antipode’s 3rd Institute for the Geographies of Justice (IGJ) will take place in Athens, Georgia, USA, May 30th-June 3rd, 2011.

Antipode’s 3rd Institute for the Geographies of Justice (IGJ) will provide an exciting opportunity to engage leading edge theoretical, methodological, and research-practice issues in the field of radical geography and social justice (both broadly defined), along with a range of associated professional and career development matters. This international meeting will be specifically designed to meet the needs of new researchers, taking the form of an intensive, interactive workshop for 25 participants. It will include facilitated discussion groups, debates and panels, training and skills development modules, and plenary sessions. Topics for the meeting will include: defining radical/critical geographies, models of engagement broadly/models of activist-scholarship specifically, interdisciplinary radical work, producing public geographies, locating the boundaries of “the geographies of justice,” the institutional cultures of radical geography, interdisciplinary dialogue and radical geography, how to teach radical geographies, publishing radical geographies and mapping the future of radical/critical geographies.

Featured plenary contributors at the Athens (2011) meeting will be:

Patrick Bond, School of Development Studies and Centre for Civil Society, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa. See: http://sds.ukzn.ac.za/default.php?2,4,35,4,0

Vinay Gidwani, Department of Geography and Institute for Global Studies, University of Minnesota. See: http://www.geog.umn.edu/people/profile.php?UID=gidwa002

Wendy Larner, School of Geographical Sciences, University of Bristol. See: http://www.bris.ac.uk/geography/staff/?PersonKey=zOFDxaAjuHkDytSFcaRhO0gQl3YyFx

Laura Pulido, Department of American Studies and Ethnicity, University of Southern California. See: http://college.usc.edu/ase/people/faculty_display.cfm?Person_ID=1003620

Nik Theodore, Center for Urban Economic Development and Department of Urban Planning and Policy,
University of Illinois at Chicago. See: http://www.urbaneconomy.org/niktheodore

Wendy Wolford, Department of Development Sociology, Cornell University. See: http://devsoc.cals.cornell.edu/cals/devsoc/people/faculty.cfm?netId=www43

The local organizer of the meeting is:

Nik Heynen, Department of Geography, University of Georgia. See: http://www.ggy.uga.edu/directory/details.php?i=220&group

Who is Eligible and How to Apply?

The Institute for the Geographies of Justice is open to doctoral students, postdoctoral researchers, and recently appointed junior faculty (normally within 3 years of appointment).

The Institute participation fee will be $200 for graduate students and $250 for faculty and postdoctoral researchers.   This fee will include your lodging for the week, a couple meals here and there and fund a reception at the end of the week.

All those wishing to attend the IGJ must complete a pre-registration form by January 31st, 2011.

Pre-registration forms are available at the two following links: http://www.antipode-online.net/docs/IGJ_2011_pre-ap.doc and http://geog.ggy.uga.edu/faculty/index.php?n=Main.Nheynen

Please fill out the form and email it to Nik Heynen at antipode.igj@gmail.com

Support for the SIGJ is being provided by:

    • Antipode: A Journal of Radical Geography: http://www.antipode-online.net/default.asp

    • The Department of Geography at the University of Georgia: http://www.ggy.uga.edu/

Further information about the Institute for the Geographies of Justice can be obtained from Nik Heynen at antipode.igj@gmail.com or nheynen@uga.edu  

Information on Athens can be found at http://www.visitathensga.com/  

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Nik Heynen
Associate Professor of Geography,
Adjunct Associate Professor of Anthropology,
Associate Director of the Center for Integrative Conservation Research 
(CICR)
University of Georgia,
GG Building, 210 Field St., Room 204,
Athens, GA 30602
Phone: (706) 542-1954 (direct)
       (706) 542-2856 (office)
Fax: (706) 542-2388
E-mail: nheynen@uga.edu
www: http://www.ggy.uga.edu/directory/details.php?i=220&group

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Global Crisis

THE GLOBAL CRISIS: RETHINKING ECONOMY AND SOCIETY

December 3–5 2010

Part of 3CT’s Economy and Society Series

• Friday, December 3, 2010
• 8:45–9:30 Breakfast & Introductory Remarks
• 9:30–12:30Panel No. 1: Understanding the Crisis Historically

• Chair: William Sewell
• David Harvey
• Duncan Foley
• Beverly Silver
• Immanuel Wallerstein
• Discussant: Moishe Postone

• 12:30–1:30 Lunch
• 1:30–4:00 Panel No. 2: The Crisis and the Global South
• Chair: Lisa Wedeen
• Vivek Chibber
• Ho-fung Hung
• Claudio Lomnitz
• Achille Mbembe
• Discussant: John Comaroff

• Saturday, December 4, 2010
• 9:00–9:30 Breakfast & Introductory Remarks
• 9:30–11:45 Panel No. 3: The Financialization of Economic Life
• Chair: Paul Cheney
• James Galbraith
• Benjamin Lee/Edward LiPuma
• Greta Krippner
• Discussant: Gary Herrigel

• 11:45–12:45 Lunch

• 12:45–3:00 Panel No. 4: Neo-liberalism as Ideology and as Policy
• Chair: Jean Comaroff
• Neil Brenner/Jamie Peck/Nik Theodore
• Peter Evans/Bill Sewell
• Saskia Sassen
• Discussant: James Sparrow

• 3:00–3:15 Coffee Break

• 3:15–5:30 Panel No. 5: Unsettled Practices: Work and Expert Knowledge
• Chair: TBA
• Michael Hardt
• Richard Sennett
• Kaushik Sunder Rajan
• Discussant: Andreas Glaeser

• Sunday, December 5, 2010

• 10:00–12:30 Roundtable: Paths to the Future

This conference has been co-sponsored by the Franke Institute for the Humanities, the Norman Wait Harris Fund, the History Department, the Anthropology Department, the Nicholson Center, the Social Sciences Division and the Political Science Department. For further information, please contact Anwen Tormey (amtormey@uchicago.edu)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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