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Antonio Gramsci

Antonio Gramsci

PHILOSOPHY, POLITICS, AND HISTORY IN THE THOUGHT OF GRAMSCI

PAST AND PRESENT.
Philosophy, Politics, and History in the Thought of Gramsci
International Conference
18-19 June 2015
King’s College London (Strand Campus*)

See: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/europeanstudies/events.aspx
This International Conference on the thought of Antonio Gramsci will bring together a new generation of 45 scholars from 16 countries working on Gramscian themes in order to engage closely with his writings.

The events includes 16 panels discussing themes such as “Neoliberalism as Passive Revolution?”, “Culture, Literature and (Anti)Colonialism”, “Gramsci’s Philosophy and the Marxian Legacy”.

Keynote speeches from established scholars include Fabio Frosini (Urbino) on “Time and Revolution in Gramsci’s Prison Notebooks”, Alex Loftus (KCL) on “Gramsci and Geography”, and Peter Thomas (Brunel) on “We Good Subalterns: Gramsci’s Theory of Political Modernity”, as well as a round-table discussion on: “Past or Present: To what degree are Gramsci’s concepts still relevant today?”

The event will also include contributions and chairing from: Derek Boothman (Bologna) | Carl Levy (Goldsmiths) | Magnus Ryner (KCL) | Cosimo Zene (SOAS) | Anne Showstack Sassoon (Birkbeck) | Leila Simona Talani (KCL) | Stathis Kouvelakis (KCL) | Alex Callinicos (KCL) | Sonita Sarker (Macalester, USA) | Alessandro Carlucci (Oxford)

The organising committee would like to draw your attention to the conference blog (http://www.gramsciconference2015.blogspot.co.uk), where you can find the official conference poster and a detailed programme of the conference.

The conference is open to all, however registration is essential if you would like to attend.

To register, please send an email to: gramsciconference2015@gmail.com

Cordially,
The Past and Present Organising Committee
Francesca Antonini, Aaron Bernstein, Lorenzo Fusaro and Robert Jackson

Supported by:
Department of European Studies, King’s College London
Department of Geography, King’s College London
International Gramsci Society
International Gramsci Society – Italia
Ghilarza Summer School – Scuola internazionale di studi gramsciani
Área de investigación Sociedad y Acumulación Capitalista, UAM – A., México

*Venue map: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/campuslife/campuses/strand/Strand.aspx

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

The Black Rock

The Black Rock

DECOLONIZING THE MIND SUMMER SCHOOL

What is the Decolonizing The Mind Summer School?

From July 19th – July 31st the first edition of the Decolonizing The Mind Summer School will be held in Amsterdam.

The DTM Summer School is an intensive two-week course on the subject of Decolonizing The Mind. The course takes on two interrelated topics:

  • The theoretical framework and methodology of Decolonizing The Mind (knowledge production and the mechanisms of colonizing the mind).
  • Decolonial thinking and the discourse of liberation in social movements in different regions of the world.

 

What is the program?

In the two weeks there are ten sessions (morning lectures and afternoon interactive sessions) devoted to the following topics:

Session 1: Sandew Hira, director of the International Institute for Scientific Research in Holland, gives an overview of decolonial thinking in the last few decades in the academia (postcolonial studies, national liberation discourses, ethnic studies etc.) and the methodology of developing a theoretical framework for DTM based on decolonial concepts.

Session 2: Professor Sabelo J. Ndlovu-Gatsheni, Professor and Head of the Archie Mafeje Research Institute at the University of South Africa, takes on the issue of nationalism and anti-colonial struggles in Southern Africa, including the question of land.

Session 3: Roberto Hernández, lecturer at the San Diego State University in California USA, deals with the persistence and resurgence of indigenous movements, knowledges and practices, which will be the basis for a rethinking of social struggles over land, natural resources and cultural renewal.

Session 4: Stephen Small, professor in the Department of History at the University of Amsterdam, and Associate Professor of African American Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, will go into the different discourses in the Civil Rights Movement in America.

Session 5: Jaya Mehta, senior economist and an activist associated with the Joshi-Adhikari Institute for Social Studies in India, traces the development path traversed by India and China in the transformation from predominantly agrarian economies to industrialised countries that are well integrated into the world economy. She focuses on the philosophy behind the policies of different actors.

Session 6: Abulkasim Al-Jaberi, journalist and activist in Holland, analyzes the effect of the US invasion of Iraq in relation to the historic events unfolding today including the Arab spring and the emergence of ISIS.

Session 7: Arzu Merali, head of the research section of the Islamic Human Rights Commission in London UK, highlights the rise of Islamic political movements in Iran and Turkey – two key players in the Middle East – in their successes and failures.

Session 8: Jeanne Henriquez, independent scholar and activist from Curacao in the Caribbean, deals with the legacy of slavery in the Caribbean and the new social movements associated with it including the movement for pan-Africanism and reparations.

Session 9: Selim Nadi, member of the first decolonial party in France – Parti des Indigènes de la République – goes into the process that Western Europe is going through of a painful confronting with its colonial past right in the heart of the empire. European societies now have to deal with a new generation of young activists who are trying to politicize the postcolonial situation of their countries.

Session 10: Sandew Hira and Ramon Grosfoguel, are giving a lecture in the form of a debate on two discourse of liberation: Marxism and decolonial thinking. They take into account the analysis of the different regional experiences as have been covered in the previous lectures.

 

Other information

The Decolonizing The Mind Summer School is organized by the International Institute of Scientific Research (IISR) headed by director Sandew Hira.

The fee for the Summer School is € 1,000.

If paid before April 1st 2015, then the fee is € 900.

This fee does not include lodging, food and transport.

Download the full 16-page brochure here: http://www.decolonizingthemind.org/download/DTMSM2015Brochure.pdf

Download the application form here: http://www.decolonizingthemind.org/download/DTMSM2015ApplicationForm.doc.

Website: http://www.decolonizingthemind.org

Contact email: info@decolonizingthemind.org

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/first-edition-of-the-decolonizing-the-mind-summer-school-in-amsterdam-july-2015

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

We Are the Crisis

We Are the Crisis

MARXISM AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS: QUO VADIS?

Call for Papers

Marxism and International Relations Theory: Quo Vadis?

Call for papers for the 9th Pan-European Conference on International Relations

23–26 September 2015, Giardini Naxos, Italy

Marxist thought, along with other dissident approaches, has long constituted a critical source from which crucial interventions into the mainstream theorising in International Relations (IR) have been launched. While in recent years, significant theoretical contributions—ranging from the discussions of ‘new imperialism’ to uneven development and financialisation—have reinforced Marxist frameworks with a broader analytical palette, the disciplinary position of ‘Marxist IR’ as a sub-configuration of IR theory has been challenged by a number of internal critics. Contesting the status of Marxist IR as an antidote to the shortcomings of the mainstream approaches, these sympathetic critics have argued that Marxist IR has failed ‘to develop any adequate critical theory of the political’ (Davenport 2013: 28) and is need of ‘a realist moment’ to bolster its explanatory power (Callinicos 2007: 542). Similarly, some of the most important recent attempts at theorising ‘the international’ have been shaped by a tendency to engage with and adopt the parameters in which neorealism defines the conditions for a unified international theory (Rosenberg 2013). Others, while recognising the contributions of the strong infusion between Marxist IR and historical sociology, have challenged the tendency to focus ‘on the importance in and of themselves of the historical antecedents of contemporary societies’ and tasked the scholars with interrogating ‘the way in which contemporary societies bear the imprint of such historical developments’ (Bruff 2010: 621).

The panel aims to provide a space to engage with these issues, take stock with contemporary theorising in Marxist IR and discuss new research avenues. Possible topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • The role of the Marxist critique in IR and the relationship between Marxism and the mainstream approaches.
  • The promises and limits of the emergent theoretical developments in Marxist IR, such as Political Marxism, Marxist Geopolitics and Uneven and Combined Development.
  • The interactions between Marxism(s) and feminist, postcolonial and anarchist approaches in IR.

Please submit your abstracts (max. 300 words) to Sébastien Rioux(rioux.sebastien@gmail.com) and Cemal Burak Tansel(burak.tansel@nottingham.ac.uk) by 7 January 2015.

For more information, please visitwww.paneuropeanconference.org.

References

Bruff, I. (2010) ‘European Varieties of Capitalism and the International’,European Journal of International Relations, 16(4): 615–638.

Callinicos, A. (2007) ‘Does Capitalism Need the State System?’, Cambridge Review of International Affairs, 20(4): 533–549.

Davenport, A. (2013) ‘Marxism in IR: Condemned to a Realist Fate?’, European Journal of International Relations, 19(1): 27–48.

Rosenberg, J. (2013) ‘Kenneth Waltz and Leon Trotsky: Anarchy in the Mirror of Uneven and Combined Development’, International Politics, 50(2): 183–230.

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Feminism

Feminism

REFLECTIONS ON DISPOSSESSION: CRITICAL FEMINISMS

24-25th October 2014

Senate and Court Room, Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU

Presenters and Interlocutors: Rafeef Ziadah, Sara Farris, Denise Ferreira da Silva, Davina Bhandar, Alyosha Goldstein, Nirmal Puwar, Eddie Bruce-Jones, Jon Goldberg-Hiller, Jordana Rosenberg, Brenna Bhandar, Nadine El-Enany, Leena Kumarappan, Sarah Lamble, Feyzi Ismail, Charmane Elliot, Leticia Sabsay and others

This two-day symposium explores the relationship between the material, cultural, psychic and symbolic dimensions and effects of dispossession. Building on a range of critical feminisms, the papers, collective discussions and keynote addresses will take forward and build on the rich and dynamic traditions of black, indigenous and post-colonial feminisms, queer theory and materialist feminisms. Themes include: migrant women workers and European nationalism; indigenous dispossession of land, labour and status in Canada, Hawai’i, and Palestine; sexual subjects and propriety; affect, emotion and the production of racial subjects; and much more…

Keynote Speakers: Avery Gordon and Patricia Tuitt

Registration essential

Waged 2 day ticket £30 (lunch included on 24th)

SOAS Staff, students and activists free

Book now at store.soas.ac.uk

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/reflections-on-dispossession-critical-feminisms-24-25th-october-2014-london

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

PRAKTYKA TEORETYCZNA (THEORETICAL PRACTICE) – CALL FOR PAPERS

Praktyka Teoretyczna: http://www.praktykateoretyczna.pl/

This Call for Papers is for the Introduction section, known as “Varia” in the fourth issue of “Theoretical Practice”. “Varia” will be concerned with unsolicited texts, interesting research topics and interventions that do not fit into the thematic nature of the issue. “Varia” will then become a permanent feature of the journal.

We encourage you to submit to the Editor scientific articles in the area of broad leftist thought and engaged research practice, in writing that is clear, and is in tune with the practical-theoretical perspective of the journal (with particular emphasis on Marxist thought, as well as, among others, biopolitics, poststructuralism, posthumanism, postcolonial studies, gender, queer, urban, animal research or higher education).

This invitation is permanent and is not associated with any particular deadline for submitting articles. The authors and the author must, however, reckon with the fact that the potential publication will depend on the normal mode of publishing in the magazine.

The volume of the article (written in Polish or English) can not exceed 40 thousand characters (including spaces and footnotes, please refer to the other guidelines in the section for authors ). Each of the texts is subject to technical editing and double-substantive editorial. Those articles that undergo the process of positive evaluation will be peer reviewed by two anonymous reviewers, independent and non-editorial, who have expertise in the field and relevant research interests. The review process will be ‘double blind’. An article that will pass through this procedure successfully will then be published in one of the numbers thematic magazines.

Call for Papers (with Polish-English translation facility): http://www.praktykateoretyczna.pl/call-for-papers/call-for-papers-varia/

 

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‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The New Left Book Club: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2014/01/05/the-new-left-book-club-call-for-papers/

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Postcolonial

Postcolonial

RETURNING TERMS: POSTCOLONIALISM AND THE EVERYDAY IN LITERATURE, CULTURE AND DEVELOPMENT

Call for Papers

Association of American Geographers, Annual Meeting, Tampa, Florida, April 8 to April 12, 2014.
If you are interested in presenting a paper at the following session of the conference, then please email a title and abstract to Jonathan.Pugh@ncl.ac.uk

Session Title: Returning Terms: Postcolonialism and the Everyday in Literature, Culture and Development

“I must be given words to shape my name to the syllables of trees. I must be given words to refashion futures, like a healer’s hand” — Kamau Brathwaite

A key driver for Postcolonial Studies has been the desire to examine the everyday lives of people on their own terms. The matter is not, however, straightforward. A number of novelists, poets and playwrights have, for many years, reminded us that postcolonialism is the struggle against the sense that spoken and written words are not (yet) one’s own, but instead inherited second-hand from others. Authors as varied as Naipaul, Glissant, Harris, Rushdie, Walcott, Darwish and Chamoiseau have all characterised the postcolonial condition as feeling that the words that come out of one’s mouth or which have been marked upon the page have a certain illusionary and artificial quality to them because terms employed cannot (yet) be authentically articulated or received. In Walcott’s words, what will deliver the Caribbean individual “from servitude” is the forging of a language that goes “beyond mimicry, a dialect which had the force of revelation, as it invented names for things, one that finally settled on its own mode of inflection.” This is why most great postcolonial literature incessantly turns and returns to everyday life, drilling down into it, turning over its terms, seeking ways to return the everyday to us anew through new words.

Such concerns raise interesting questions for the contemporary concern with ‘the everyday’ as a category of analysis and site of resistance in social sciences and humanities more generally. Are the ways in which we are presently thinking about the everyday up to the task? Given the central concerns documented above, do postcolonial literature, culture and development suggest we should be thinking about the everyday, the ordinary, the commonplace and the mundane in other ways? This session will unite social scientists and literary scholars through an analysis of the quest for and frustrations associated with the struggle to conceptualise the everyday effectively. The session will operate at the intersections of literature, culture and development studies, thereby highlighting the parallels between art and life and the various ways both fields fold together in everyday experience.

Jon Pugh (Newcastle University).
Malachi McIntosh (CambridgeUniversity)

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Postcolonial

Postcolonial

POSTCOLONIAL THEORY AND THE SPECTRE OF CAPITAL

Vivek Chibber, Professor of Sociology at New York University (NYU) and the author of Locked in Place: State-Building and Late Industrialization in India (2003), will present his new book at SOAS on: Thursday 17 October, 7pm, SOAS main building, DLT (G2).

Chair: Gilbert Achcar, Development Studies

From the book’s back cover:

Postcolonial theory has become enormously influential as a framework for understanding the Global South. It is also a school of thought popular because of its rejection of the supposedly universalizing categories of the Enlightenment. In this devastating critique, mounted on behalf of the radical Enlightenment tradition, Vivek Chibber offers the most comprehensive response yet to postcolonial theory. Focusing on the hugely popular Subaltern Studies project, Chibber shows that its foundational arguments are based on a series of analytical and historical misapprehensions. He demonstrates that it is possible to affirm a universalizing theory without succumbing to Eurocentrism or reductionism.

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/postcolonial-theory-and-the-spectre-of-capital-with-vivek-chibber-soas-17-october

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Postcolonial

Postcolonial

POSTCOLONIAL THEORY AND THE SPECTER OF CAPITAL

By Vivek Chibber

———————–

Published April 2013

———————–

A provocative intellectual assault on the Subalternists’ foundational work.

Postcolonial theory has become enormously influential as a framework for understanding the Global South. It is also a school of thought popular because of its rejection of the supposedly universalizing categories of the Enlightenment. In this devastating critique, mounted on behalf of the radical Enlightenment tradition, Vivek Chibber offers the most comprehensive response yet to postcolonial theory. Focusing on the hugely popular Subaltern Studies project, Chibber shows that its foundational arguments are based on a series of analytical and historical misapprehensions. He demonstrates that it is possible to affirm a universalizing theory without succumbing to Eurocentrism or reductionism.

POSTCOLONIAL THEORY AND THE SPECTER OF CAPITAL promises to be a historical milestone in contemporary social theory.

———————–

“With its focus on cultural identities and mixtures, postcolonial theory ignored the larger context of capitalist relations and thus limited its scope to Western academia where it excelled in the game of growing and profiting from the liberal guilt feeling. Chibber’s book simply sets the record straight, bringing postcolonialism down from cultural heights to where it belongs, into the very heart of global capitalist processes. The book we were all waiting for, a burst of fresh air dispelling the stale aroma of pseudo-radical academic establishment.” – Slavoj Žižek

“In this scrupulous and perceptive analysis, Vivek Chibber successfully shows that the ‘universalizing categories of Enlightenment thought’ emerge unscathed from the criticisms of postcolonial theorists. He shows further that—perhaps ironically—Subaltern Studies greatly underestimates the role of subaltern agency in bringing about the transformations that they attribute to the European bourgeoisie. Chibber’s analysis also provides a very valuable account of the actual historical sociology of modern European development, of Indian peasant mobilization and activism, and much else. It is a very significant contribution.” – Noam Chomsky

“In this outstanding work—a model of clarity in its architecture and argumentation—key theorists of the ‘Subaltern’ and of postcoloniality have met their most formidable interlocutor and critic yet. Chibber’s critique of postcolonial theory and the historical sociological studies associated with it is, at the same time, a vigorous and welcome defense of the enduring value of certain Enlightenment universals as an analytical framework to both understand and radically change the world we live in.” – Achin Vanaik

“Vivek Chibber has written a stunning critique of postcolonial theory as represented by the Subaltern Studies school. While eschewing all polemics, he shows that their project is undermined by their paradoxical acceptance of an essentially liberal-Whig interpretation of the bourgeois revolutions and capitalist development in the West, which provides the foundation for their fundamental assertion of the difference of the East. Through a series of painstaking empirical and conceptual studies Chibber proceeds to overturn the central pillars of the Subalternists’ framework, while sustaining the credibility of Enlightenment theories. It is a bravura performance that cannot help but shake up our intellectual and political landscape.” – Robert Brenner

“POSTCOLONIAL THEORY AND THE SPECTER OF CAPITAL is a must-read book for students of comparative politics and social theory. Vivek Chibber presents a forceful challenge to the Subaltern Studies school and to postcolonial theory more broadly. Arguing with great clarity, Chibber raises fundamental objections to their ideas about capitalism, power, and agency, and presents an alternative account of these ideas. Most fundamentally, he rejects the fundamental division between ‘East and West’ associated with postcolonial theory and defends the ‘universalizing categories of Enlightenment thought.’ This is a major contribution that is bound to reshape debate on these important issues.” – Joshua Cohen

“In this book, Vivek Chibber has carried out a thoroughgoing dissection of Subaltern Studies. Like a highly skilled anatomist, he lays bare the skeleton, the nervous system, the arteries and veins of this school … In the process the reader is also exposed to the nitty-gritty of a materialist historiography.” – Amiya Kumar Bagchi

———————–

Not Even Marxist? Paul M. Heideman examines Chris Taylor’s critique of Vivek Chibber:

http://www.versobooks.com/blogs/1297-not-even-marxist-paul-m-heideman-examines-chris-taylor-s-critique-of-vivek-chibber

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/new-from-verso-postcolonial-theory-and-the-specter-of-capital-by-vivek-chibber

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Anarchism

Anarchism

ANARCHISTS, MARXISTS, AND NATIONALISTS IN THE COLONIAL AND POSTCOLONIAL WORLD, 1870s-1940s: ANTAGONISMS, SOLIDARITIES, AND SYNTHESES

CALL FOR PAPERS

EUROPEAN SOCIAL SCIENCE HISTORY CONFERENCE (ESSHC) 2013

From its inception in the First International, the anarchist and syndicalist movement played a significant role in the colonial and post-colonial world as an influential force in revolutionary, national liberation, and anti-imperialist movements. While this role has received increasing attention in a growing scholarship, the literature remains underdeveloped and rather limited. The intersections between anarchism and syndicalism, and other Left oppositional currents, including Marxist and nationalist movements, are understudied and lack systematic examination especially with respect to the global South. Such intersections provide an important index of anarchist and syndicalist influence by drawing attention to their role in larger coalitions as well as their imprint on other movements and ideologies; conversely, to properly understand the history of other Left and labor currents it is necessary to take into account their interactions with anarchism and syndicalism. These interactions assumed a wide range of forms:  although historical antagonisms between anarchism and Marxism often shaped their relations, there were also many instances of solidarity and collaboration; while anarchism generally opposed nationalism in principle, it cooperated with a surprising number of nationalist movements; finally, anarchism and syndicalism contributed key elements to a broad spectrum of oppositional currents that reflected syncretic ideologies, organizational forms, and practices.

We invite papers that examine examples of antagonisms, solidarities, and syntheses between anarchism and syndicalism on one hand, and Marxist and nationalist currents on the other. The papers should address historical movements, rather than intellectual history, narrowly conceived; they should analyze intersections, not parallels or apparent similarities between different currents; and explore the complex relations and overlaps between anarchist, Marxist, and nationalist movements. Case studies should focus on the colonial and post-colonial world (Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean).

Possible lines of enquiry include interactions in the following areas:
– national liberation and anti-colonial struggles
– anti-imperialist networks and alliances
– agrarian struggles
– international labor solidarity, trade unionism, as well as activities in state-run unions
– struggles against colonial and neo-colonial racial oppression
– interracial, multiethnic, local/diasporic solidarities
– student and worker alliances
– underground networks and struggles

This CFP is for two planned panels to be held at the European Social Science History Conference in Vienna, Austria, April 23-26, 2014.

Please send abstracts (250 words) to the panel organizers, Steven Hirsch (shirsch@artsci.wustl.edu) or Lucien van der Walt (l.vanderwalt@ru.ac.za) by March 1, 2013.

 

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-esshc-2014-panels-anarchists-marxists-and-nationalists-in-the-colonial-and-postcolonial-world-1870s-1940s-antagonisms-solidarities-and-syntheses

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Postcolonial

STRUGGLES, STRATEGIES AND ANALYSIS OF ANTICOLONIAL AND POSTCOLONIAL SOCIAL MOVEMENTS

Interface Journal – http://www.interfacejournal.net

Special issue editors: Aziz Choudry, Lesley Wood, Mandisi Majavu

REMINDER:- Deadline 1 November 2012

Scholars of empire (e.g. Ananya Roy 2005 & Derek Gregory 2004) point out that the “colonial present” is not only the initial moment of the colonial encounter, but also the constant manufacturing of ‘democracies’, ‘freedoms’, economies and histories in a manner that advances the goals of empire even long after empire has supposedly withdrawn from the colony. Raghavan (1990), for example, described economic globalization through the GATT (now the WTO) as ‘recolonization’ of the nominally independent states of the global South.

While anticolonial and postcolonial movements are the subject of a rich body of thought and sites of significant knowledge production in themselves, challenges to the conceptual accuracy and appropriateness of the widely-used terms ‘postcolonialism’ and ‘postcolonial’ also come from Indigenous scholars and activists (L.T. Smith, 1999; Venne, 2004; M.Jackson, 2004, 2007; Coulthard; 2011; Watson, 2008; A.Smith, 2005) and critical race feminists (Thobani, 2007) based in settler colonial states such Australia, Canada, Aotearoa/New Zealand and the USA. 

This special issue of the open-access, online, copyleft academic/activist journal Interface: a Journal for and about Social Movements (http://www.interfacejournal.net/) links anticolonial and postcolonial accounts of movements and their praxis to resist the ‘colonial present’ that is embodied in state policies, intergovernmental institutions, processes and agreements such as the World Bank, IMF, and WTO, domestic and global capital.and indeed in some cases, NGOs and ‘civil society’ movements themselves. 

The editors are seeking papers that examine the praxis and the politics of anticolonial and postcolonial movements. How are the ideas of Fanon, Cabral, Cesaire and other activist/intellectuals relevant to movements today in continuing struggles for self-determination, justice and liberation, and against the co-optation of independence struggles by domestic elites and contemporary forms of colonial violence and imperialism? How do these movements conceptualise feminism? Do middle class activists, NGOs and academics have a role to play in these movements, and popular struggles in present-day, or formerly colonized territories? 

Papers may question the meaning of postcolonialism, anticolonialism or decolonization and its relevance/implications for organizing. How do analyses of colonialism and practices towards decolonization inform contemporary struggles in different contexts? Contributors are encouraged to explore regional and historical and other contextual differences in the way that these movements have developed. 

General submissions

As in all issues of Interface, we will accept submissions on topics that are not related to the special theme of the issue, but that emerge from or focus on movements around the world and the immense amount of knowledge that they generate. Such general submissions should contribute to the journal’s mission as a tool to help our movements learn from each other’s struggles, by developing analyses from specific movement processes and experiences that can be translated into a form useful for other movements.

In this context, we welcome contributions by movement participants and academics who are developing movement-relevant theory and research. Our goal is to include material that can be used in a range of ways by movements – in terms of its content, its language, its purpose and its form. We thus seek work in a range of different formats, such as conventional articles, review essays, facilitated discussions and interviews, action notes, teaching notes, key documents and analysis, book reviews — and beyond. Both activist and academic peers review research contributions, and other material is sympathetically edited by peers. The editorial process generally is geared towards assisting authors to find ways of expressing their understanding, so that we all can be heard across geographical, social and political distances.

We can accept material in Afrikaans, Arabic, Catalan, Croatian, Danish, English, French, German, Hebrew, Hungarian, Italian, Latvian, Maltese, Norwegian, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish and Zulu. Please see our editorial contacts page for details of who to submit to.

Deadline and contact details

The deadline for initial submissions to this issue, to be published May 2013, is November 1 2012. For details of how to submit to Interface, please see the “Guidelines for contributors” on our website. All manuscripts, whether on the special theme or other topics, should be sent to the appropriate regional editor, listed on our contacts page. Submission templates are available online via the guidelines page.

 

Published first in: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-struggles-strategies-and-analysis-of-anticolonial-and-postcolonial-social-movements-deadline-1-november

 

**END**

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Karl Marx

RETHINKING MARXISM 2013

CALL FOR PAPERS

Rethinking Marxism 2013: Surplus, Solidarity, Sufficiency

RETHINKING MARXISM: a journal of economics, culture & society is pleased to announce its 8th international conference, to be held at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst on 19-22 September 2013.

RETHINKING MARXISM’s seven previous international conferences have each attracted more than 1000 students, scholars, and activists. They have included keynote addresses and plenary sessions, formal papers, roundtables, workshops, art exhibitions, screenings, performances, and activist discussions.

Among the confirmed keynote events for Rethinking Marxism 2013: SURPLUS, SOLIDARITY, SUFFICIENCY are Katherine Gibson giving the inaugural Julie Graham Memorial Lecture, a series of panels engaging with and celebrating the different aspects of the work of Steve Resnick and Richard Wolff and an installation of the late artist Susan Kleckner’s work at Greenham Common Women’s Peace Camp, along with a series of conversations and film screening organized by Susan Jahoda and Jesal Kapadia.

In 2013, 5 years into the greatest economic and social depression since the Great Depression, and 4 years after the last international conference convened, we want to invite participants to explore and interrogate three keywords: SURPLUS, SOLIDARITY and SUFFICIENCY. We find these keywords to be particularly useful in critically engaging with our historical conjuncture from different perspectives. Needless to say, fellow participants who would like to bring in other concerns, other concepts, other debates and engagements into the mix should definitely feel free to do so. Our international conferences have always functioned as pluralistic and open platforms that represent the vast richness of the Marxian tradition. When we propose these keywords, we only intend them as possible provocations for scrutiny and invitations for engagement.

The keyword SURPLUS, as in surplus labor (whether it takes the capitalist value-form or the various non-capitalist forms in our contemporary economies) and surplus laborers (especially with skyrocketing unemployment), enables us to approach the causes, consequences and solutions to the current economic crisis by deploying Marxian vocabularies and frameworks. The keyword SOLIDARITY, on the other hand, makes possible reflections on how to do things differently—together, collectively, communally, whether it is the organization of a democratically run workplace, a journal, a conference, a neighborhood association, a political party, a social movement, an international solidarity effort, or a revolutionary insurgence. And finally, the keyword SUFFICIENCY opens to investigation the bipolar convulsions of growth (fetishism) and austerity, various logics of invidious (over-)consumption, and the ecological and social destruction unleashed by the acephalous and endless movement of the circuits of capital.

Rather than uncritically endorsing these keywords, we would like them to be both utilized and rethought in investigating the current economic and ecological crises and articulating new revolutionary imaginaries and vocabularies that will enable the work of enacting communism here and now.

For more information on the proposed theme, visit: http://www.rethinkingmarxism.org/sss

We encourage, however, scholars and students in all disciplines, activists and artists working in areas that intersect with Marxism to submit proposals on themes other than those proposed above. Participants can present in areas such as critical race theory, feminism, political economy, anarchist studies, cultural and literary studies, art and art criticism, literature and literary studies, queer theory, working-class and labor studies, postcolonial studies, geography and urban studies, psychoanalysis, social and natural sciences, philosophy, history, and around issues of class, race, ethnicity, nationality, gender, sexuality, and disability. Historical analyses are especially welcome.

In addition to three plenary sessions, an art installation and screenings, there will be concurrent panels, workshops, and cultural events. We invite the submission of organized sessions that follow traditional or non-traditional formats (such as workshops, roundtables, and dialogue among and between presenters and audience) as well as individual presentations. Anyone engaging with Marxism in any discipline or form of activism is encouraged to submit paper and panel proposals. We also welcome video, poetry, performance, and all other modes of presentation and cultural expression.

SUBMISSION OF PROPOSALS

Proposals for papers, films, or other formats should include:
* Paper title
* Presenter’s name and contact information (mail, email, phone, affiliations)
* Brief abstract (no more than 200 words)
* Technology/spacial requirements for the presentation

Proposals for panels should include:
* Panel title
* Name, contact information, and paper title for each presenter
* Brief abstract (no more than 200 words) explaining the panel’s focus
* Brief abstract for each paper (no more than 200 words)
* Names and contact information for any discussant(s) or respondent(s)
* Technology required by the presenters
* Title, contact, and address for any sponsoring organization or journal

If your paper or panel proposal is intended for the track on the work of Steve Resnick and Rick Wolff, please indicate this in your submission.

The appropriate preregistration fee must be paid with all proposal submissions. Unfortunately, any proposal not accompanied by the appropriate preregistration fee cannot be considered. Proposals that are not accepted will have their preregistration fees returned in full. If you are submitting a proposal for an entire panel, please make sure the preregistration fee for all members of the panel is paid.

The deadline for proposal submission is July 1, 2013.

Submissions should be sent to Vincent Lyon-Callo at Vincent.lyon-callo@wmich.edu.

To submit a proposal and to pay the preregistration fee, follow the instructions on the conference website: http://www.rethinkingmarxism.org/RM2013

REGISTRATION RATES

______ Regular Rate $125

______ Low-Income Rate $60

PUBLICATIONS

Selected papers, poems, art, and other forms of presentation from the conference may be published in RETHINKING MARXISM and/or in separate edited volumes of contributions.

VENDORS AND ADVERTISEMENTS

Literature tables and display areas are available to groups, vendors, and publishers at reasonable rates. Ad space in the conference program is also available at reasonable rates. All ads must be camera-ready.

ORGANIZERS & SPONSORS

This conference is organized by a committee composed of the members of Association for Economic and Social Analysis and the editorial board of Rethinking Marxism and sponsored by Association for Economic and Social Analysis (AESA) and Rethinking Marxism.

For more information, visit the conference website: http://www.rethinkingmarxism.org/RM2013

All inquiries concerning the conference can be addressed to Vincent Lyon-Callo at Vincent.lyon-callo@wmich.edu.

 

Originally published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-rethinking-marxism-2013-surplus-solidarity-sufficiency-amherst-ma-19-22-sept-2013

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

 

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

 

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com 

 

 

Peter Mayo

POSTCOLONIAL DIRECTIONS IN EDUCATION

FOCUS AND SCOPE

Postcolonial Directions in Education is a peer reviewed open access journal produced twice a year. It is a scholarly journal intended to foster further understanding, advancement and reshaping of the field of postcolonial education.

We welcome articles that contribute to advancing the field. As indicated in the Editorial for the inaugural issue, the purview of this journal is broad enough to encompass a variety of disciplinary approaches, including but not confined to the following: sociological, anthropological, historical and social psychological approaches.

The areas embraced include anti-racist education, decolonizing education, critical multiculturalism, critical racism theory, direct colonial experiences in education and their legacies for present day educational structures and practice, educational experiences reflecting the culture and ‘imagination’ of empire, the impact of neoliberalism / globalisation / structural adjustment programmes on education, colonial curricula and subaltern alternatives, education and liberation movements, challenging hegemonic languages, the promotion of local literacies and linguistic diversity, neo-colonial education and identity construction, colonialism and the construction of patriarchy, canon and canonicity, Indigenous knowledges , supranational bodies and their educational frameworks, north-south and east-west relations in education, the politics of representation, unlearning colonial stereotypes, internal colonialism and education, Cultural hybridity and learning  in  postcolonial contexts, education and the politics of dislocation, biographies / autobiographies reflecting the above themes, deconstruction of colonial narratives of civilization within educational contexts.

Once again the field cannot be exhausted.

 

See Postcolonial Directions in Education at: http://www.um.edu.mt/pde/index.php/pde1/index

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski