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Modernism

Modernism

CRITICAL GEOGRAPHIES OF URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE – FINAL CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS

A two-day conference and open discussion organised by the Urban Geography Research Group (UGRG) of the RGS-IBG.

6-7 November 2014

The Bartlett School of Planning, University College London

 

Call for Contributions

This year’s UGRG Conference will explore the relationship between critical urban theory and infrastructure. Critical urbanism may be defined by Brenner et al (2009: 179) as concerned:

(a) to analyze the systemic, yet historically specific, intersections between capitalism and urbanization processes;

(b) to examine the changing balance of social forces, power relations, sociospatial inequalities and political-institutional arrangements;

(c) to expose marginalizations and injustices that are inscribed and naturalized within existing urban configurations;

(d) to decipher the contradictions, crisis tendencies and lines of potential or actual conflict within contemporary cities, and on this basis;

(e) to demarcate and to politicize possibilities for more progressive, socially just, emancipatory and sustainable formations of urban life.

 

Since the publication of Splintering Urbanism (Graham and Marvin, 2001), there has been a heightened focus on employing critical urbanist perspectives to study the fundamental issues of urban infrastructure, of who gets what infrastructure and where? This includes work on the assemblage and effects of different types of infrastructure including water, waste and other metabolic systems (Gandy 2002; Marvin and Medd 2006; Nikolas et al 2006), traffic and city streets (Hamilton-Baillie 2008; Buiter 2008) motorways and flyovers (Harris 2013; Merriman 2007; Norton 2008), various forms of public transportation (Butcher 2011), cycling (Aldred 2012) and airports (Guller and Guller 2003; McNeill 2010). Emerging research has highlighted the particular materialities of different infrastructure systems as they sustain and disrupt the circulations that constitute urban life (Amin and Thrift 2002; Gandy 2004; Latham and McCormack 2004; Hommels 2005). It has also examined practices of dwelling and experiences of inhabiting infrastructural systems as particular kinds of public spaces (Bissell 2010, 2014; Koch and Latham 2014; McIlvenny 2010; Sheller and Urry 2003; Wilson 2012).

Such work has demonstrated the exercise of social and political power through infrastructural provisioning, and the challenges of governance which might bring about more inclusive and democratic forms of urban infrastructure (Boudreau et al 2009; McFarlane and Rutherford 2008; Spinney 2010; Swyngedouw 2005).

Much work remains, however, in exploring the key dynamics through which infrastructure structures and restructures urban spaces. In particular, the UGRG is keen to hear from scholars working on topics and theoretical perspectives which include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • state versus private provision, management and maintenance of infrastructure
  • dynamics of access and exclusion
  • privatization of key urban infrastructure
  • Global North and Global South standards and models of infrastructure provision
  • comparative studies of infrastructural provision and innovation
  • policy mobility and the circulation of ‘best practice’
  • dwelling and inhabitation within infrastructural spaces
  • new imperatives of sustainability, austerity and resilience agendas
  • innovations ranging from micro-scale to regional master-planning

Papers are welcom from researchers at any stage of their careers (including doctoral students). We will also be holding a ‘pecha-kucha’ session as we did in 2012.

Abstracts of approx 200 words should be emailed to ugrg2014@gmail.com  by Friday 19 September 2014 (tomorrow).

Please contact Luke Binns (luke.binns@gmail.com) and Gabriel Silvestre (gabriel.silvestre.11@ucl.ac.uk) if you have any questions. We look forward to hearing from you!

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Gilles Deleuze

Gilles Deleuze

CINEMATICITY: CITY AND CINEMA AFTER DELEUZE

Call for Papers: Cinematicity: City and Cinema after Deleuze

Organizers: David B. Clarke, Marcus A. Doel, Richard G. Smith

This session of the Royal Society of Geographers & Institute of British Geographers Annual International Conference 2014, focuses on the ‘co-production’ of filmic and urban space. That term, as it features in the conference theme, relates to knowledge – proposing that ‘new encounters are disrupting conceptions of where knowledge resides.’ Engaging Deleuze’s discussions of cinema, this session questions the framing of co-production in terms of dwelling. The reciprocal presupposition of cinema and city would seem, rather, to embody a sense of becoming. Thus, Deleuze’s conceptions of the cinemas of the movement-image and time-image recall Lewis Mumford’s claim that, ‘In the city, time becomes visible.’ How does cinema think the city, and vice-versa, to generate new, transformative senses of cinematicity? Contributions exploring the connections between cinematic and urban space are invited, potentially including work on early cinema and living pictures; considerations of specific cities, films or genres; conceptions of city and cinema as spiritual automata; and a multiplicity of other creative conceptualizations of cinematicity.

Please send abstracts of no more than 200 words by 14th February to: d.b.clarke@swansea.ac.uk

Annual International Conference 2014: http://www.rgs.org/WhatsOn/ConferencesAndSeminars/Annual+International+Conference/Annual+international+conference.htm

Contact:
David B. Clarke
Centre for Urban Theory
Department of Geography
Swansea University
Swansea SA2 8PP, UK
Tel. +44(0)1792 602317
E-mail: d.b.clarke@swansea.ac.uk

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Island

The Island

ROYAL GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY & INSTITUTE OF BRITISH GEOGRAPHERS ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE 2014

Call for Papers: RGS–IBG Annual International Conference 2014, London, 26–29 August 2014

Session: Anti Production & Co. Unthinking capitalist realism (Perish the thought)
Organizers: Marcus A. Doel, David B. Clarke, and Richard G. Smith
Sponsor: History and Philosophy of Geography Research Group (HPGRG)

Expected format: Two 100-minute sessions, comprising eight 20-minute papers (inc. 5-minutes each for Q&A), and two 20-minute discussants

“It cannot be stressed enough: THERE IS NEVER ANYTHING TO PRODUCE” (Jean Baudrillard, The Ecstasy of Communication)

The advent of the term ‘co-production’ should be a cause for concern for all Left-leaning Geographers. With its conjoining of a generalized busyness on the one hand (production) and a harmonious coming together on the other hand (co-), the term’s dissimulation and occlusion of the agonistic division of labour and the expropriation of the commons seems perfectly attuned to the ideological obfuscation of capitalist realism, zombie neoliberalism, and objective violence. Since everything is supposedly produced (made to appear, manufactured, assembled, fabricated, and constructed), we are all seemingly compelled to produce together; and we are all ostensibly in it together (humans and nonhumans, producers and consumers, dead labour and living labour, and so on and so forth). Such is the fantastical and phantasmagorical meaning of ‘co-production’ – an assembling assembly, toiling away for the common good. This session will challenge this cozy, heart-warming, and peaceable notion of ‘creative togetherness’ by welcoming a return of the ideologically repressed: the dis- and the de- against the co-, and the se- and the re- against the pro- (disjointure and deconstruction; seduction and sedition; reduction and retraction; et cetera).

We would welcome papers that challenge the notion of ‘co-production,’ particularly with reference to:
* Capitalist realism
* Zombie neoliberalism
* Objective violence – symbolic and systemic
* Anti-production and general economy
* Seduction and the mirror of production
* The violence of critical theory and fatal theory
* Being forced to think otherwise
* Deconstruction and poststructuralism
* Revolutionary and counter-revolutionary theory
* Schizoanalysis and psychoanalysis
* Commonization of knowledge production
* The destruction of meaning
* Uncreative thinking
* Interpassivity and desubjectification

Please send a proposed title, an abstract (up to 200 words), and your contact details to Marcus Doel, Swansea University (m.a.doel@swansea.ac.uk), by 25th January 2014.

Marcus A. Doel, David B. Clarke, and Richard G. Smith
Centre for Urban Theory
Department of Geography
College of Science
Swansea University
Singleton Park
Swansea SA2 8PP
United Kingdom
Tel. +44(0)1792 513090
E-mail: m.a.doel@swansea.ac.uk
Twitter: @MarcusDoel

“Through the mirror of production the human species comes to consciousness in the imaginary’” (Jean Baudrillard, The Mirror of Production)

Further details about the Annual Conference can be found at <http://www.rgs.org/AC2014> and about HPGRG at: <http://hpgrg.org.uk/>.

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Postcolonial

Postcolonial

RETURNING TERMS: POSTCOLONIALISM AND THE EVERYDAY IN LITERATURE, CULTURE AND DEVELOPMENT

Call for Papers

Association of American Geographers, Annual Meeting, Tampa, Florida, April 8 to April 12, 2014.
If you are interested in presenting a paper at the following session of the conference, then please email a title and abstract to Jonathan.Pugh@ncl.ac.uk

Session Title: Returning Terms: Postcolonialism and the Everyday in Literature, Culture and Development

“I must be given words to shape my name to the syllables of trees. I must be given words to refashion futures, like a healer’s hand” — Kamau Brathwaite

A key driver for Postcolonial Studies has been the desire to examine the everyday lives of people on their own terms. The matter is not, however, straightforward. A number of novelists, poets and playwrights have, for many years, reminded us that postcolonialism is the struggle against the sense that spoken and written words are not (yet) one’s own, but instead inherited second-hand from others. Authors as varied as Naipaul, Glissant, Harris, Rushdie, Walcott, Darwish and Chamoiseau have all characterised the postcolonial condition as feeling that the words that come out of one’s mouth or which have been marked upon the page have a certain illusionary and artificial quality to them because terms employed cannot (yet) be authentically articulated or received. In Walcott’s words, what will deliver the Caribbean individual “from servitude” is the forging of a language that goes “beyond mimicry, a dialect which had the force of revelation, as it invented names for things, one that finally settled on its own mode of inflection.” This is why most great postcolonial literature incessantly turns and returns to everyday life, drilling down into it, turning over its terms, seeking ways to return the everyday to us anew through new words.

Such concerns raise interesting questions for the contemporary concern with ‘the everyday’ as a category of analysis and site of resistance in social sciences and humanities more generally. Are the ways in which we are presently thinking about the everyday up to the task? Given the central concerns documented above, do postcolonial literature, culture and development suggest we should be thinking about the everyday, the ordinary, the commonplace and the mundane in other ways? This session will unite social scientists and literary scholars through an analysis of the quest for and frustrations associated with the struggle to conceptualise the everyday effectively. The session will operate at the intersections of literature, culture and development studies, thereby highlighting the parallels between art and life and the various ways both fields fold together in everyday experience.

Jon Pugh (Newcastle University).
Malachi McIntosh (CambridgeUniversity)

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Global Economy

Global Economy

GEPGRAPHIES OF LABOR

CALL FOR PAPERS

GEOGRAPHIES OF LABOR

35th Annual North American Labor History Conference

October 24-26, 2013

Wayne State University

Detroit, Michigan

The Program Committee of the North American Labor History Conference invites proposals for sessions, papers, and roundtables on “Geographies of Labor” for our thirty-fifth annual meeting.

Over the last several centuries, transformations in technology and in economic, social, political, and cultural practices have created new spatial regimes within and across geographic boundaries.  Whether negotiating the changes around them or taking advantage of new possibilities to shape alternatives, workers have been central to remapping this emergent environment.

Inspired by the “spatial turn” in the social sciences, this conference will explore the myriad ways in which workers have interacted with a variety of geographic categories.  We welcome projects that seek to understand these interactions through a number of lenses, including, but not limited to: empire, globalization, uneven development, mobility, and migration/immigration at the transnational, national and/or local level.  We invite proposals from a wide variety of disciplines, especially history, geography, sociology, anthropology, economics, political science, and cultural studies.

Submissions of proposals for papers, panels, and roundtables should include a one paragraph abstract and a brief biographical statement per each participant by March 29, 2013 to:

Professor Francis Shor, Coordinator

North American Labor History Conference

Department of History

WayneStateUniversity

3157 FacultyAdministrationBuilding

Detroit, MI48202

Phone: 313-577-9325; Fax: 313-577-6987

Email: nalhc@wayne.edu

First published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-geographies-of-labor-wayne-state-university-detroit-24-26-october

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Aesthetics

Aesthetics

ROYAL GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY ANNUAL CONFERENCE

LONDON, August 2013

Artists and Gentrification at the Urban Frontier: Questioning the Causes, Consequences and Validity of the Artist-Gentrification Correlation

The purported relationship between artists and gentrification has a significant and long-standing presence in the urban literature, much of it supporting the notion that where artists go, fashion, money and commerce inevitably follow (Evans & Shaw, 2004). From the Latin Quarter and Montmartre of C.19th Paris (Norton, 2004), Greenwich Village in the inter-war period (in Graña, 1990), to New York’s SoHo (Zukin, 1982) or London’s East End (Green, 2001) in more recent times, artists’ arrival in previously marginal and often oppositional environments is seen to precede increased property prices, displacement of extant communities, and an upgrading of the symbolic landscape to mesh with an altogether different class of citizen. But how inevitable and inexorable is this process? Has there perhaps been under-reporting or under-emphasis of cases where the activities of artists have instead lead to increased marginality via, for example, further disinvestment, depopulation and/or physical decline? Alternatively, might too little attention have been paid to the workings of artist-gentrification interrelationships in non-Western or less high profile contexts? Must the arrival of artists signal an impending taming and reclaiming of the urban frontier, or are alternative outcomes possible?

If, however, this idea of artist-led gentrification should indeed be shown to hold water, then we are interested in the mechanisms through which it takes place; and how artists’ roles might be usefully conceived and appraised. For example, are portrayals of artists as gentrification victims (e.g. Ley, 1996) tenable, or is the active agent characterization (e.g. Deutsche & Ryan, 1987) more apt, in light of the by now heightened (self)awareness of artists’ allegedly catalytic function? Might artists’ attempts to challenge the forces of gentrification and secure alternative outcomes (Vivant 2010) offer a way out of this victim versus perpetrator framing? Should intent (or lack thereof) to gentrify have a bearing on how the effects of their presence are judged? Or could it be that urban-oriented academia under-appreciates the policy view which tends to highlight the positives of gentrification and suggests artists embrace rather than disown their role in the process? Indeed, has artists’ participation in the widespread rollout of ‘staged’ or ‘policy-led’ gentrification and regeneration (e.g. Atkinson and Easthope 2009) engendered a reformulation of previously popular conceptions of the artist as being opposed to, yet paradoxically implicated in, dominant models of capitalist urban development?

We welcome papers which interrogate alleged artist-gentrification interrelationships from a variety of perspectives and geographical contexts, and which might address but are not limited to the following:

·         To what extent might the idea of gentrification as an almost inevitable outcome of artists’ engagement with the urban frontier be challenged by theoretical or empirical advances?

·         Artists have been portrayed as ‘stormtroopers’ of gentrification, in what ways have local communities resisted artist-related gentrification and how successful have they been?

·         How have artists, perhaps in conjunction with local communities, challenged the idea or process of gentrification and how successful have they been?

·         Who are the ‘winners’ and ‘losers’ in the artist-led gentrification game? To what extent might artists be accurately portrayed as gentrification victims, agents, or champions of alternative outcomes?

·         How has the framing of artists’ social identities and roles been affected by the spread of ‘staged’ or ‘policy-led’ gentrification/regeneration models?

 

Please send abstracts to session convenors Luke Binns or Viktoria Vona:  luke.binns@gmail.comviktoria.vona@kcl.ac.uk, by February 4th

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

 

 

Utopia

Utopia

CREATING WORLDS: THE AFFECTIVE SPACES OF EXPERIENTIAL POLITICS

Final call for participants: 

Creating worlds: The affective spaces of experimental politics

Monday 14 January, 2013
Royal Holloway, Bedford Square, 2 Gower Street, WC1E 6DP.
10am-5pm
Facilitated by Anja Kanngieser and Jenny Pickerall.

This event seeks to bring together those exploring questions of how we live within, formulate, create and antagonise, spaces and places of politics: public and private, macro-political and micro-political. It is specifically interested in inviting conversation about spaces in which self-organisation occur, whereby people come together in some sort of common articulation. Moreover, what is of key interest is the ‘how’: how people come together in what kinds of spaces and places; what forces and desires inform these collective spaces, and how they are sustained; how spaces and subjects are processually entangled; how social reproduction occurs – the lines of class, gender, race, ability; and the ways spaces are differentiated, that is to say, how boundaries are performed. 

Rather than marking topographies of conventional ‘radical’ political sites, such as social centres, camps, protests, assemblies, allotments, workplaces, bookstores, what might be uncovered are the more messy affective and relational threads that run though them, and also far beyond them, and how we might even begin to apprehend and engage with them.

There will be three roundtables on the themes of:

Spatiality and affect with Kye Askins, Harriet Hawkins and Paul Simpson. Facilitated by Anna Feigenbaum

Spatiality and organisation (social reproduction) with Tim Cresswell, Jane Wills and Nazima Kadir. Facilitated by Fabian Frenzel

Spatiality and politics with Adam Ramadan, Andy Davies and Uri Gordon. Facilitated by Gavin Brown.

Please submit a short (200 word) statement by 15 December 2012 on why you would like to attend when registering your interest toanja.kanngieser@rhul.ac.uk. Attendance is limited to 30 people. 

Some travel funding is available for unwaged/ underwaged participants.

This event is part of a series associated with the Protest Camps: Experiments in Alternative Worlds projecthttp://protestcamps.org/ and is funded by an ESRC Postdoctoral Fellowship with Royal Holloway, University of London.

http://www.transversalgeographies.org

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

 

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com 

 

The Individuality Pr♥test: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/transcontinental/the-individuality-prtest

I Love Transcontinental: http://ihearttranscontinental.blogspot.co.uk/

 

 

Space

RGS-IBG Annual International Conference 2012

C A L L   F O R   S E S S I O N S

The Urban Geography Research Group (UGRG) is pleased to announce its call for sessions for the RGS-IBG Annual International Conference 2012 to take place in Edinburgh, on Tuesday 3rd-Thursday 5th July 2012. The conference chair is Chris Philo (Universityof Glasgow) and the theme is Security of Geography/ Geography of Security. For further info please see: www.rgs.org/ac2012

UGRG encourages submissions that are urban in focus, that are innovative and exciting, and that connect to the conference theme and/or the aims of the Urban Geography Research Group. For further info on the UGRG please see our new and exciting website: http://www.urban-geography.org.uk . Benefits of Research Group sponsorship include promotion for your session, help in managing timetabling clashes for parallel sessions, and opportunity to apply for registration fee waiver for certain categories of guests.

Individuals or groups who would like to propose a session for UGRG sponsorship are invited to submit a session proposal by emailing luke.binns@gmail.com before November 30, 2011.

 

To be considered for sponsorship, please include:

* The session title and abstract (max 400 words),

* The name(s) and affiliation(s) of the session convenor(s), and

* The format the session is going to take (paper session, panel discussion, etc.).

 

As usual, each session will be 1 hour 40 minutes in length. The format can range from paper or poster sessions, panel discussions to practitioner forums. Sessions usually consist of five 20 minute papers (with time included in each for questions) or four 20 minute papers with discussion / questions at the end. If you plan to propose an alternative format, please indicate this in the session proposal.

Convenors will be notified as to whether or not their session will be sponsored by UGRG by early December 2011.

Please bear in mind the change of location and earlier date for this year’s Annual Conference. If you have any further questions regarding this call, contact Luke Binns: luke.binns@gmail.com

We look forward to hearing from you!
Luke Binns
PhD Candidate
Dublin Institute of Technology
Room 213, DIT Mountjoy Square,
Dublin 1,Ireland

 

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski