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North Atlantic Oscillation

North Atlantic Oscillation

AFTER 2015: DEVELOPMENT AND ITS ALTERNATIVES

British Academy Conference, September 2014 – British Academy

10 & 11 September 2015

Convenor: Dr Clive Gabay, Queen Mary, University of London

James C Scott (Weapons of the Weak, Seeing like a State, The Art of not being Governed, Two Cheers for Anarchism), along with a number of other influential scholars and activists, will be addressing a conference in London on 10th and 11th September 2014. Further details of the conference and registration are here: http://www.britac.ac.uk/events/2014/After_2015_Development_and_its_Alternatives.cfm

The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) will expire in 2015, with mixed results. This conference takes a social and political perspective on why development fails, and how local knowledge might inform a post-MDG environment more sensitive to those structurally disadvantaged by the global economy. Within mainstream debates there has been little room for the developmental alternatives lived by people in conditions of poverty and thus no space for exploring more critical and alternative paradigms of development to the orthodox neoliberal-MDG paradigm. This conference brings together leading critical scholars on development, and activists from the global anti-poverty, buen vivir and degrowth movements.

Speakers include:

Dr Kate Bedford, University of Kent
Amitabh Behar, Global Call to Action Against Poverty
Dr Carl Death, University of Manchester
Professor David Hulme, University of Manchester
Dr Wendy Harcourt, International Institute for Social Studies
Dr Sophie Harman, Queen Mary University of London
Dr Nora Mckeon, Building Global Democracy
Professor Philip McMichael, Cornell University
Professor Ashwani Saith, International Institute for Social Studies
Professor James C Scott, Yale University
Professor Frances Stewart, University of Oxford
Bob Thomson, Degrowth/Decroissance Canada
Dr Karen Tucker, University of Bristol
Jan Vandemoortele, former director of the Poverty Group at the United Nations Development Programme
Dr Heloise Weber, University of Queensland
Dr Aram Ziai, University of Kessel
Carlos Zorrilla, Defensa y Conservacion Ecologica de Intag

Please click here for a copy of the current programme.

Catering

Refreshments and lunch will be provided on both days, together with conference documentation.
Vegetarian options will be provided for lunch. If you have any other special dietary requirements please contact us in advance on events@britac.ac.uk

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Samir Amin

Samir Amin

SAMIR AMIN: SIX DECADES OF DEVELOPMENT DEBATE

Seminars with the renowned Egyptian economist Samir Amin, which took place on 25 and 26 April at SOAS, University of London, are now available online.

The seminars (with links to the film) include:

The Deployment of the Bandung Project (1955 – 1970)

Neoliberalism and the Decline of the Bandung Project (1975 – 2000)

The Second Wave of the Rise of the South; the Emerging Countries (as of 2000)

Professor Samir Amin is Director of the Third World Forum (Dakar, Senegal). He is one of the most prominent theorists of the political economy of development and global accumulation as well as one of the best-known analysts of Arab and African economies.

Organiser Professor Gilbert Achcar commented: “The Department of Development Studies at SOAS was delighted to host these three lectures by Professor Samir Amin, one of the best-known names in the field, a thinker who emerged since the 1960s as a major and most prominent contributor to the study of development and to the debates on North-South relations.”

To view the seminars please click on the individual links above.

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/samir-amin-six-decades-of-development-debate

 

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Island

The Island

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ISLAND DEVELOPMENT

The IGU Commission on Islands will hold the International Conference on Island Development 2013, Penghu Archipelago, Taiwan, on October 1-5.

The over-arching theme is ‘Island Development: Local Economy, Culture, Innovation and Sustainability‘.

The aim of the conference is to bring together researchers and practitioners from academia, business, NGOs and public authorities, and to provide them with a platform to report on and discuss recent developments, achievements, experiences, research results, and initiatives related to island development.

Please see the conference website http://island.npu.edu.tw/  for details.

Please note that abstracts should be submitted by March 31.

You are very welcome to organize panels and themed sessions at the conference and to circulate cfps for panels and themed sessions.

Prof. Chang-Yi David Chang (Chair, IGU Commission on Islands; National Taiwan University, Taiwan)
Prof. Eric Clark (Vice Chair, IGU Commission on Islands; Lund University, Sweden)
Prof. Huei-Min Tsai (Executive Secretary, IGU Commission on Islands; National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan)

Local Organizing Committee
Prof. Kuo-Yuan Kao, Chair (National Penghu University, Taiwan),
Prof. Shui-Liang Yu, Vice Chair (Secretary General, National Penghu University, Taiwan)

 

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Clive Harber

EDUCATION, DEMOCRACY AND DEVELOPMENT

Education, Democracy and Development: Does education contribute to democratisation in developing countries?

A new book by CLIVE HARBER & VUSI MNCUBE

Symposium Books

2012 paperback 190 pages US$48.00
ISBN 978-1-873927-71-7

 
DUE IN STOCK OCTOBER 22  

Click here to view further information and to order this book

Education is often seen as the key agency in international development and poverty reduction. Frequently the emphasis is on the economic and social role of education in development. This book, on the other hand, is unusual in explicitly examining the political role of education in development. In particular, it sets out the theories, evidence and arguments concerning the potential and actual relationships between education and democracy and critically explores the contradictory role of formal education in both supporting and hindering democratic political development. A key theme of the book is the importance of considering the type and nature of the education actually provided and experienced – what goes on inside the ‘black box’ of education? Currently in developing countries and elsewhere this is often at odds with democratic principles but the book also provides many examples of successful democratic practice in schools in developing countries as well as discussing a detailed case study of South Africa where democratic change in education is a key aspect of the policy agenda.  

Contents

Preface

CHAPTER 1 Politics, Democracy and Political Development
Politics and Democracy; The Idea of Development; Political Development Theory; Democracy as Development; Conclusion

CHAPTER 2 Education, Democracy and Political Development
Education and Politics; Education and Democracy; Education and Democracy: is there any evidence?; Conclusion

CHAPTER 3 Education for Democracy?
Introduction; What Does a Democratic School Look Like?; India: Neel Bagh School and Sumavanam School; Ecuador: the Pestalozzi School; UNICEF Child Friendly Schools; Education Policy; Leadership, Management and Pupil Voice in Decision-Making in Schools; Curriculum, Learning and Teaching; Teacher Education and Professional Identity; Initial Teacher Education; In-service Teacher Education; Action Research and Reflective Practice in In-service Teacher Education; Taught Programmes in Education for Democratic Citizenship; Assessment; School Inspection: a case study; Conclusion

CHAPTER 4 Obstacles to Greater Democracy in Education
Introduction; The Bureaucratic Legacy in Schools in Developing Countries; The Authoritarian Legacy; Whole School Organisation, Ethos and Culture; School Discipline and Corporal Punishment; Classroom Methods and Assessment; Teacher Education; Politics, Resources and Culture; Conclusion

CHAPTER 5 The Roles of Education in Relation to Political Development: South Africa as a case study
Introduction: development goals for education in post-apartheid South Africa; Modernisation or Disorganisation?; Democracy and Peace or Authoritarianism and Violence?; A Democratic Curriculum?; Democratic Structures: school governing bodies; Continuing Non-Democratic Features of South African Education; Contradictions and Tensions in Post-apartheid Education and Development; Conclusion

CHAPTER 6 Democratic Educational Change?

References; Notes on the authors

 

Related titles

Languages and Education in Africa: a comparative and transdisciplinary analysis BIRGIT BROCK-UTNE & INGSE SKATTUM

Research and Evaluation for Educational Development: learning from the PRISM experience in Kenya MICHAEL CROSSLEY, ANDREW HERRIOT, JUDITH WAUDO, MIRIAM MWIROTSI, KEITH HOLMES & MAGDALLEN JUMA

Teacher Education in Sub-Saharan Africa: closer perspectives ROSARII GRIFFIN

State of Transition: post-apartheid educational reform in South Africa CLIVE HARBER

The Changing Landscape of Education in Africa: quality, equality and democracy DAVID JOHNSON

Globalisation, Enterprise and Knowledge: education, training and development in Africa KENNETH KING & SIMON McGRATH

Developing Schools for Democracy in Europe: an example of trans-European co-operation in education JOHN SAYER

Learning Democracy and Citizenship: international experiences MICHELE SCHWEISFURTH & LYNN DAVIES, CLIVE HARBER

Teachers, Democratisation and Educational Reform in Russia and South Africa MICHELE SCHWEISFURTH

Political and Citizenship Education: international perspectives STEPHANIE WILDE

 

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Peace

JOURNAL OF RESEARCH IN PEACE, GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT – AUGUST 2012 ISSUE

Journal of Research in Peace, Gender and Development (Formerly, Journal of Peace, Gender and Development Studies JPGDS) http://www.interesjournals.org/JRPGD

Introducing ‘Journal of Research in Peace, Gender and Development (JRPGD) (ISSN: 2251-0036).

I am pleased to inform you that the August  2012  issue of the Journal of Research in Peace, Gender and Development is out. You can view this issue with the link below: http://www.interesjournals.org/JRPGD/Contents/2012%20Contents/August.htm

The Journal of Research in Peace, Gender and Development (JRPGD) is a multidisciplinary peer-reviewed journal that is published monthly by International Research Journals (http://www.interesjournals.org/JRPGD/index.htm/). JRPGD is dedicated to increasing the depth of the subject across disciplines with the ultimate aim of expanding knowledge of the subject.

Editors and reviewers

JRPGD is seeking energetic, qualified and high profile researchers to join its editorial team as editors, subeditors or reviewers. Kindly send your resume to: jrpgd@interesjournals.org

Call for Research Articles

JRPGD will cover all areas of the subject. The journal welcomes the submission of manuscripts that meet the general criteria of significance and scientific excellence, and will publish:

•    Original articles in basic and applied research
•    Case studies
•    Critical reviews, surveys, opinions, commentaries and essays

We invite you to submit your manuscript(s) to: jrpgd@interesjournals.org for publication. Our objective is to inform authors of the decision on their manuscript(s) within four weeks of submission. Following acceptance, a paper will normally be published in the next issue. Guide to authors and other details are available on our website; http://www.interesjournals.org/JRPGD/index.htm

JRPGD IS AN OPEN ACCESS JOURNAL

One key request of researchers across the world is unrestricted access to research publications. Open access gives a worldwide audience larger than that of any subscription-based journal and thus increases the visibility and impact of published works. It also enhances indexing, retrieval power and eliminates the need for permissions to reproduce and distribute content. JRPGD is fully committed to the Open Access Initiative and will provide free access to all articles as soon as they are published.

Best regards,
Eghele Akwavbiokpene
Editorial Assistant,
Journal of Research in Peace, Gender and Development (JRPGD)
E-mail: jrpgds@interesjournals.org or jrpgd@interesjournals.org
http://www.interesjournals.org/JRPGD

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Peace

JOURNAL OF RESEARCH IN PEACE, GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT

Journal of Research in Peace, Gender and Development (Formerly, Journal of Peace, Gender and Development Studies JPGDS)

http://www.interesjournals.org/JRPGD

Introducing the Journal of Research in Peace, Gender and Development (JRPGD) (ISSN: 2251-0036).

Dear Colleague

I am pleased to inform you that the April 2012 issue of the Journal of Research in Peace, Gender and Development is out. You can view this issue with the link below:

http://www.interesjournals.org/JRPGD/Contents/2012%20Contents/April.htm

The Journal of Research in Peace, Gender and Development (JRPGD) is a multidisciplinary peer-reviewed journal that is published monthly by International Research Journals (http://www.interesjournals.org/JRPGD/index.htm/). JRPGD is dedicated to increasing the depth of the subject across disciplines with the ultimate aim of expanding knowledge of the subject.

Editors and Reviewers

JRPGD is seeking energetic, qualified and high profile researchers to join its editorial team as editors, subeditors or reviewers. Kindly send your resume to: jrpgd@interesjournals.org

Call for Research Articles

JRPGD will cover all areas of the subject. The journal welcomes the submission of manuscripts that meet the general criteria of significance and scientific excellence, and will publish:

* Original articles in basic and applied research
* Case studies
* Critical reviews, surveys, opinions, commentaries and essays

We invite you to submit your manuscript(s) to: jrpgd@interesjournals.org for publication. Our objective is to inform authors of the decision on their manuscript(s) within four weeks of submission. Following acceptance, a paper will normally be published in the next issue. Guide to authors and other details are available on our website: http://www.interesjournals.org/JRPGD/index.htm

JRPGD IS AN OPEN ACCESS JOURNAL

One key request of researchers across the world is unrestricted access to research publications. Open access gives a worldwide audience larger than that of any subscription-based journal and thus increases the visibility and impact of published works. It also enhances indexing, retrieval power and eliminates the need for permissions to reproduce and distribute content. JRPGD is fully committed to the Open Access Initiative and will provide free access to all articles as soon as they are published.

Best regards
Eghele Akwavbiokpene
Editorial Assistant,
Journal of Research in Peace, Gender and Development (JRPGD)
E-mail: jrpgds@interesjournals.org or jrpgd@interesjournals.org
http://www.interesjournals.org/JRPGD

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

 

Work

Work

MSc IN LABOUR, SOCIAL MOVEMENTS AND DEVELOPMENT

MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development

SOAS, University of London

This new programme is concerned with labour conditions and relations, social movements of labour and their contributions to development processes and changes in the Global South.

 It is the first MSc programme of its kind in the UK dedicated to Labour, Social Movements and Development. Students will have the opportunity to experience policy-making and labour campaigns in practice. They will participate in our interactive sessions to devise policies; and design and implement regional, national and international labour campaigns.

The MSc draws on the expertise of staff in the Department of Development Studies, specialising in Latin America, Africa and Asia. It benefits from our contacts within the field, including with NGOs and international organisations.

The MSc degree will focus on:

  • Labour process and organisations in the South
  • A comparative history of labour and social movements in countries such asChina,Korea,India,South Africa, Brazil and the Middle East
  • The impact of neoliberalism and globalisation on workers in the South 
  • Informalisation of labour, casualisation and precarious work
  • Feminisation of labour
  • Forced labour and child labour 
  • Rural labour, migrant labour and labour in Export Processing Zones
  • Household and reproductive labour
  • The International Labour Organisation, international labour standards and decent work
  • Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives, codes of conduct and anti-sweatshop campaigning
  • Theories and practices of local, national and international labour campaigns

For further information please visit the following link: http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/msc-labour-social-movements-and-development/

**END**

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Global Economy

THE GLOBALISED ECONOMY

‘THE GLOBALISATION LECTURES’
Winter 2012
Organised by the Department of Development Studies
School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS)
University of London
Convenor: Professor Gilbert Achcar

INCLUSION AND PARTICIPATION: A NEW AGENDA FOR THE GLOBALISED ECONOMY

HEINER FLASSBECK
Director on Globalization and Development Strategies, UNCTAD

Wednesday 1st February, 6:30pm
SOAS, Brunei Gallery Lecture Theatre
Free entrance, no booking, first come first seated

Heiner Flassbeck obtained a Ph.D. in Economics from the Free University, Berlin in July 1987, and was appointed honorary professor at the University of Hamburg in 2005. He worked successively at the German Council of Economic Experts, Wiesbaden from 1976 until 1980, the Federal Ministry of Economics, Bonn until January 1986, the German Institute for Economic Research (DIW), Berlin, between 1988 and 1998.

Dr. Flassbeck was State Secretary (Vice Minister) at the Federal Ministry of Finance, Bonn, from October 1998 to April 1999 when Oskar Lafontaine was Minister of Finance. He joined UNCTAD in 2000, where he heads since 2003 the Division on Globalisation and Development Strategies. He is the principal author of the team preparing UNCTAD’s Trade and Development Report.

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Utopia

DEVELOPMENT WITHIN OR AGAINST CAPITALISM

Development Within or Against Capitalism: A Critical Engagement with Amartya Sen’s ‘Development as Freedom’.

Ben Selwyn (University of Sussex)

Date: 29 November 2011,

Time: 5:00 PM

Venue: School of Oriental and African Studies, Russell Square: Room: G50
University of London
Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square,
London WC1H 0XG
Tel: +44 (0)20 7637 2388

Ben Selwyn is the author of ‘Liberty Limited? A Sympathetic Re-Engagement with Amartya Sen’s Development as Freedom’. In Economic and Political Weekly. September 10, 2011 Vol.xlvI No.37

 

*****

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Capitalism

UNEVEN AND COMBINED DEVELOPMENT AND CONTEMPORARY WORLD POLITICS

Dear Colleague,

I am pleased to announce that Queen Mary’s Centre for the Study of Global Security and Development will be hosting a symposium on ‘Uneven and Combined Development and Contemporary World Politics’ on Wednesday, Februaury 9, 2011 between 2-6pm.

The programme is below. If you wish to attend please contact Rick Saull – r.g.saull@qmul.ac.uk – in advance of the symposium.

Regards,
Rick Saull
Director, Queen Mary, Centre for the Study of Global Security and
Development

Symposium on UNEVEN AND COMBINED DEVELOPMENT AND CONTEMPORARY WORLD POLITICS

Wednesday, February 9, 2-6pm (room Arts G.02), Queen Mary, Mile End Campus, London, E1 4NS

Programme/Presenters

Session 1, 2.00pm – 3.30pm

Alex Anievas (Cambridge)
‘Origins and Extensions of Uneven and Combined Development in the History and Theory of International Relations: The Case of the First World War’ This paper aims to contribute to recent debates on ‘international historical sociology’ specifically regarding the potential utility of Leon Trotsky’s concept of uneven and combined development (U&CD) in advancing a theory of modern inter-state conflict. The paper first re-examines recent debates over the theoretical status of U&CD considering, in particular, the various socio-historical and spatial registers covered by the idea as deployed by the different positions within the debates. Considering the possible benefits and pitfalls of stretching the concept to a generalized theory of ‘the international’ throughout history, the paper argues that a central challenge remains. This regards the development of a sufficiently historically-differentiated conception of ‘unevenness’ and ‘combination’-one capable of theorizing the radical historical disjuncture represented by the international relations of capitalist modernity while nonetheless capturing aspects of inter-societal relations common to all historical epochs and thus forming a crucial causal element in the transition to capitalism itself. Developing such a perspective, a theory of U&CD could take up John Hobson’s (and others) charges of ‘Euro-centricism’ with a more historically-sensitive interpretation of the internationally-pressurized multiple paths to capitalist modernity and their crucial ‘feed-back’ effects in restructuring processes of inter-state competition. Drawing on and further contributing to the theory, the second half of the paper sketches an alternative approach to the causes of the First World War distinctively combining ‘geopolitical’ and ‘sociological’ modes of explanations into a single framework. This highlights how the necessarily variegated character of interactive socio-historical development explains the inter-state rivalries leading to war. Contextualizing the sources of conflict within the broad developmental tendencies of the Long Nineteenth century (1789-1914) and their particular articulation during the immediate pre-war juncture, the paper aims further develop the theory of U&CD in and through the rich empirical terrain of the pre-war period thereby providing a much needed empirical contribution to recent debates.

Ben Selwyn (Sussex)
‘Trotsky, Gerschenkron and the Political Economy of Late Capitalist Development’
The study of late capitalist development is often characterised as a battle between protagonists of market-led vs state-led development. For the latter position, Alexander Gerschenkron looms large, as one of the most significant theorists of state-led development under conditions of relative backwardness. There are striking similarities between Gerschenkron’s explication of the advantages of backwardness and Trotsky’s concept of uneven and combined development and the privilege of backwardness. (These similarities have been commented upon often but rarely subject to closer comparison): Indeed, both men share a common problematic – the comprehension of how economically backward countries could skip stages of development in order to join the ranks of economically advanced countries. This paper compares their conception of this problematic and illustrates how in a number of areas the two are complementary. These are: Their rejection of unilinear patterns of capitalist development, their appreciation of the role of states and institutions in facilitating late development, and their understanding of development as a disruptive social process.  However, in crucial areas the two diverge. These are: Their comprehension of international economic and political relations, the role and position of labour in late development, and ultimately, the potential for late capitalist development to unleash social upheavals and further, non-capitalist transformations. Overall, I suggest how Trotsky and Gerschenkron’s approaches can complement each other, but that ultimately they represent fundamentally opposed approaches to human development.

Coffee Break, 3.30pm – 4.00pm

Session Two, 4.00pm – 6.00pm

Mick Dunford (Sussex)
‘Combined and Uneven Development: A Geographical Perspective’

John Hobson (Sheffield)
‘What’s at Stake in the Neo-Trotskyist Debate? Towards a Non-Eurocentric Historical Sociology of Uneven and Combined Development’
This piece seeks to advance what is being termed ‘third wave historical sociology of IR’ (HSIR). In particular I consider how a third-wave ‘non-Eurocentric’ HSIR could be developed by entering into the extant internecine debate that is raging within the newly emergent neo-Trotskyist school of HSIR. At one extreme lies Justin Rosenberg who argues that the concept of uneven and combined development (U&CD) should be historically generalised while the majority position insists that U&CD is specific only to the modern capitalist era (e.g., Ashman, Davidson, Allinson and Anievas). Here I provide some support for the Rosenberg position, by arguing that failure to historically generalise the concept beyond modern capitalism leads into the cul-de-sac of Eurocentrism. As a counter, I spend the majority of the piece sketching the outlines of a non-Eurocentric theory of U&CD by considering the ‘rise of the West’ as a case of a late-developing civilization; and in the process sketching the basis for an adequate third-wave non-Eurocentric HSIR.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Global Economy

THE POLITICS OF LABOUR AND DEVELOPMENT

The Global Labour University is pleased to announce a call for papers for the 2011 conference on “The Politics of Labour and Development” to be held in Johannesburg, South Africa from September 28 to 30, 2011.

The global economic crisis has had a particularly hard-hitting impact on working people, their families and communities throughout the world. What is more, they also face an environmental crisis that is closely linked to the economic crisis. Together, these crises have intensified the dispossession of the commons (including both local resources and public goods such as health and education), the informalisation of labour, unemployment, national and global social inequality, and the “slummification” of cities.  Declining biodiversity, climate change and pollution are evidence of the impact of the crisis on the planet itself. Environmental degradation threatens viable livelihoods and endangers public health. Meanwhile the market imperatives get defining power over daily life, business interests tighten their stranglehold on the state logic and power is transferred to supranational institutions with limited democratic accountability, simultaneously narrowing electoral choices, and increasingly restrictions on protest.

Labour, as a key social force of the excluded majority, has a crucial role to play in countering the destructive logics of capitalism.  The politics of labour is about altering the balance of power away from capital and unelected bureaucracies toward labour and broader society.  The politics of labour is also about overcoming the multiple relations of power and oppression, including the economic, political, gender, ethnic and cultural, that contributes to and reproduce the power of the few and the subordination of the many. This has the
following dimensions:

1)      The workplace imperative: Labour’s attempts to reverse the declining wage share and extract as much of the social surplus created through mobilisation for higher wages and better working conditions, as can be seen in the recent strike wave in South Africa and other parts of the world. This is especially important as rising inequality has devastating effects on society, as more and more people are pushed to margins of production and consumption patterns.  For example, this includes issues of the distribution of productivity growth, minimum wages and basic income grants as well as policy issues of taxation and redistribution.

2)      New forms of power or leverage: With rising unemployment and increasing numbers of workers pushed into precarious forms of work, traditional sources of power are eroded, but new forms of power are being explored, often by the most marginalized and sectors traditionally ignored by labour movements.  Labour’s links to other social forces is crucial here.  This also raises questions about who constitutes the working class, with wider understandings of labour increasingly finding salience in innovative movements around the world.  The development of transnational linkages and networks is also an important dimension to the development of new forms of power and leverage.

3)      The policy imperative: Labour’s attempts, often in alliance with other groups in civil society, to pressure governments to  increase the social wage (public health, education, transport, housing, etc.), increase employment and change economic (and slowly environmental) policy accordingly.  For example, what would a “green new deal” look like? We also encourage papers that look at the conversion of industrial production into alternative forms of production and consumption as well as papers looking at ecological issues.

What are the most effective ways to develop pro-working class policy? Corporatism seems to have spread, rather than declined, in the neo-liberal era: what is its balance sheet?

4)      Political parties, alliances and trade union organizations, and political power: Labour’s attempts to directly alter the balance of state power, either

a.      through alliances with ruling political parties,

b.      through the reorganization of trade union organizations and strategies,

c.      through the development of alternative organizations and alliances with other movements in civil society, or

d.      through building movements that refuse to participate in the state, but are willing to pressure it for reforms.

This raises questions about the role of labour—as a reforming force, as a legitimating function that hinders more radical challenges to state power, or as a central actor in building an alternative to the destructive logic of capitalist development.  The nature of political alliances and forms of mobilizing are vital issues that are being experimented on in various regions of the world (e.g., many movements in Latin America, South Korean marginalized workers, etc.). It also raises questions about international approaches to global governance.

5)      The economic imperative. Within the neoliberal framework, competitiveness becomes more aggressive and self-destructing through currency manipulation, quantitative easing, wage dumping, trade barriers, devaluation etc. Is there space for economic policy nationally and internationally that avoids the disadvantages of a competitive race to the bottom or a retreat in isolated economic nationalism?

6)      Alternative forms of production, consumption and redistribution: This raises questions about what are alternative forms of production and consumption.  For example, worker cooperatives, microcredit / microfinance projects (including its problems for informal sector workers), local agricultural production, and solidarity economy alternatives have emerged around the world.

We welcome submissions for papers on any of these themes.  While we  encourage submission of papers that broadly fit into the themes, we will also consider papers that do not fit directly into one of the themes as long as they address the broad focus of the conference. The GLU encourages policy orientated research and therefore welcomes submissions that not only analyses the problem, but also offer some policy initiatives and solutions for debate.

Please send a one page abstract (which includes your methodological approach) by January 30, 2011 to Pulane Ditlhake at Glu.SouthAfrica@wits.ac.za  and Michelle Williams at michelle.williams@wits.ac.za

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Global Crisis

Global Crisis

THE GLOBAL CRISIS AND AFRICA: STRUGGLES FOR ALTERNATIVES

 

Rosa Luxemburg Foundation

Call for contributions

CONFERENCE on The Global Crisis and Africa: Struggles for Alternatives

A conference organised by the Rosa Luxemburg Foundation in cooperation with its partners in Africa

To be held in Johannesburg, South Africa from 19-21 November 2009

While the current world economic crisis in its complexity is unprecedented, crises are inherent to capitalism and more often than not the South has borne the brunt of these crises. For the first time in history however a crisis in the financial markets and its repercussions in the real economy have coincided and mingled with a socioecological crisis which stand to seriously affect the basic living conditions of mankind. Emerging from the financial crisis in the US, it has been raging through the G8 countries and is now extending its impact to all corners of the world, including Africa.

Much can and will be said about the negative effects of the crisis on Africa; however the conference will approach it from the angle of the search and struggle for alternatives. What different alternative responses have been or are being developed; for example an Ecological Solidarity Economy, Economy of the Commons, Ecological Socialism, Marxist instead of Keynesian concepts, a different global financial system? What struggles are being fought already and how can we better link these struggles in pursuit of such alternatives?

The conference will be structured along these lines:
1. Which basic tenets have to be changed?
2. Spaces of alternatives & sites of struggle
3. Linking struggles

The conference aims at linking the local, national and global quest for alternatives by social movements, NGOs, trade unions, political parties both in North and South and other global actors.

While we want to offer enough space for different issues and interests of the respective participants the focus during the conference itself will be on crucial, overarching problems with the ultimate aim of developing common strategic perspectives for the left in both South and North.

The conference will bring together contributions from union, social movement and NGO activists as well as academics. Participants are therefore kindly invited to send in contributions on any of following themes:
* the impact of the present crisis (e.g. in the areas of food production and food prices, energy, climate, trade/production, debt and development aid); * responses by various stakeholders in both North and South; * overall utopian views like an economy of the commons, climate justice, food security, de-globalisation; * critical analysis of reactions to the crisis like the G-20, the UN Stiglitz Commission, the EU EPA negotiations, the New Green Deal, the new role of the BRIC states.

Contributions might be traditional academic papers, but any other forms (statements, petitions, video, audio etc.) are more than welcome. Registered participants will be informed about the detailed programme in due course.

Registration and offering of contributions are requested before 25th October 2009.

For more information please contact the office of the Rosa Luxemburg Foundation in Johannesburg, South Africa by e-mail: esther@rosalux.co.za or jos@rosalux.co.za or at the Berlin Office: hopfmann@rosalux.de.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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