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Tag Archives: Human Geography

Modernism

Modernism

HOUSING: CRITICAL FUTURES

Housing – Critical Futures – an international program of conferences and events is launched for 2015-16.

AN OPEN CALL for two Inaugural Events:

CONFERENCE – OPEN CALL: http://architecturemps.com/housing-critical-perspective/

08-09 April 2015

FILM SCREENINGS & DEBATE: http://architecturemps.com/h-cfl-filmdebate/

10 January 2015

EVENTS involve:
Patrick Keiler. Independent Filmmaker. Dilapidated Dwelling – film screening.
Avi Friedman. Architect / Housing Specialist. TBC. McGill University, Canada.
Loretta Lees. Human Geographer. University of Leicester
Luciana Berger, MP. Shadow Minister for Public Health, UK.

PRESENTATION Options:
1. Conference Presentations (20 minutes)
2. Written Papers (3,000 words for e-book; 5,000 for journal publication and print) *
3. Alternatives – Pecha Kucha talks; short film screenings; photographic essays etc.
4. In-person and virtual presentations (via Skype, etc.) are welcome.

CONFERENCE Key Dates:
12 December 2014: Abstract Submissions
20 December 2014: Abstract Feedback
20 March 2015: Full Paper Submissions (where applicable)
08-09 April 2015. Conference

OVERALL PROGRAM: http://architecturemps.com/housing-critical-futures/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

 

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

 

Glenn Rikowski’s article, Education, Capital and the Transhuman – can also now be found at Academia: https://www.academia.edu/9033532/Education_Capital_and_the_Transhuman

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Panopticon

Panopticon

CRITICAL SPACES: DISORIENTING THE TOPOLOGICAL

London Graduate School

Critical Spaces: Disorienting the Topological

A graduate conference in the critical humanities

Kingston University, London

Monday 5th January 2015

 

Keynote Speakers:

Claire Colebrook

Eyal Weizman

Eleni Ikoniadou

Fred Botting

 

Call for Papers:

“The present epoch will perhaps be above all the epoch of space.” — Michel Foucault ‘Of Other Spaces’

“Oh God! I could be bounded in a nutshell and count myself a king of infinite space.” — Hamlet

Foucault’s assertion that the present epoch will be one of space immediately evokes the temporal. Whether we consider our epoch as modern, postmodern, or as non-modern, the philosophical treatment of space has been subordinated to time. Elizabeth Grosz has suggested that philosophy could draw on architecture to consider itself as a form of building or dwelling rather than as reflection of thought, evoking the spatial already implied by Heidegger. Occupy Wall Street and other recent anti-establishment protests in Brazil and Istanbul have been defined by journalist Bernardo Gutierrez as forming ‘anew architecture of protest’, convened by networks of consensus rather than dominant groups and ideology. Current theories and practices surrounding geopolitics, metamodelling, neuroscience, cartography and choreography support this growing emphasis on spatiality – whether focusing on produced space, social space and spaces of resistance, imaginary and poetic space, psychoanalytical and embodied space, sovereign space, performative space, digital space and/or virtual space.

This conference invites interdisciplinary approaches to the spatial. In particular we are interested in how thinking spatially or spatial practices reveal and open up disruptive, subversive or minoritarian fields within already existing discourses, be they philosophical, political, cultural or aesthetic. As Foucault has done in defining heterotopias, and as Edward Soja shows us through the idea of ‘thirding as othering’, it aims to rupture not only the particularities of those discourses, but the very possibility of thought itself through challenging existing borders, boundaries, horizons, surfaces and planes. We welcome proposals from all approaches including but not limited to: New Materialisms, Non-philosophy, Philosophy and Praxis, Cultural Studies, Political Theory, Geography, Architecture, Postcolonial Theory, Feminist and Queer Theory, Literature, Visual Cultures, and Art Theory and Practice, which consider space in the broadest terms. We also welcome proposals for practice based approaches and interventions.

Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words to: lgscriticalspaces@gmail.com  by Friday 31 October 2014

At The London Graduate School blog: http://www.thelondongraduateschool.co.uk/blog/call-for-papers-critical-spaces-disorienting-the-topological/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Modernism

Modernism

CRITICAL GEOGRAPHIES OF URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE – FINAL CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS

A two-day conference and open discussion organised by the Urban Geography Research Group (UGRG) of the RGS-IBG.

6-7 November 2014

The Bartlett School of Planning, University College London

 

Call for Contributions

This year’s UGRG Conference will explore the relationship between critical urban theory and infrastructure. Critical urbanism may be defined by Brenner et al (2009: 179) as concerned:

(a) to analyze the systemic, yet historically specific, intersections between capitalism and urbanization processes;

(b) to examine the changing balance of social forces, power relations, sociospatial inequalities and political-institutional arrangements;

(c) to expose marginalizations and injustices that are inscribed and naturalized within existing urban configurations;

(d) to decipher the contradictions, crisis tendencies and lines of potential or actual conflict within contemporary cities, and on this basis;

(e) to demarcate and to politicize possibilities for more progressive, socially just, emancipatory and sustainable formations of urban life.

 

Since the publication of Splintering Urbanism (Graham and Marvin, 2001), there has been a heightened focus on employing critical urbanist perspectives to study the fundamental issues of urban infrastructure, of who gets what infrastructure and where? This includes work on the assemblage and effects of different types of infrastructure including water, waste and other metabolic systems (Gandy 2002; Marvin and Medd 2006; Nikolas et al 2006), traffic and city streets (Hamilton-Baillie 2008; Buiter 2008) motorways and flyovers (Harris 2013; Merriman 2007; Norton 2008), various forms of public transportation (Butcher 2011), cycling (Aldred 2012) and airports (Guller and Guller 2003; McNeill 2010). Emerging research has highlighted the particular materialities of different infrastructure systems as they sustain and disrupt the circulations that constitute urban life (Amin and Thrift 2002; Gandy 2004; Latham and McCormack 2004; Hommels 2005). It has also examined practices of dwelling and experiences of inhabiting infrastructural systems as particular kinds of public spaces (Bissell 2010, 2014; Koch and Latham 2014; McIlvenny 2010; Sheller and Urry 2003; Wilson 2012).

Such work has demonstrated the exercise of social and political power through infrastructural provisioning, and the challenges of governance which might bring about more inclusive and democratic forms of urban infrastructure (Boudreau et al 2009; McFarlane and Rutherford 2008; Spinney 2010; Swyngedouw 2005).

Much work remains, however, in exploring the key dynamics through which infrastructure structures and restructures urban spaces. In particular, the UGRG is keen to hear from scholars working on topics and theoretical perspectives which include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • state versus private provision, management and maintenance of infrastructure
  • dynamics of access and exclusion
  • privatization of key urban infrastructure
  • Global North and Global South standards and models of infrastructure provision
  • comparative studies of infrastructural provision and innovation
  • policy mobility and the circulation of ‘best practice’
  • dwelling and inhabitation within infrastructural spaces
  • new imperatives of sustainability, austerity and resilience agendas
  • innovations ranging from micro-scale to regional master-planning

Papers are welcom from researchers at any stage of their careers (including doctoral students). We will also be holding a ‘pecha-kucha’ session as we did in 2012.

Abstracts of approx 200 words should be emailed to ugrg2014@gmail.com  by Friday 19 September 2014 (tomorrow).

Please contact Luke Binns (luke.binns@gmail.com) and Gabriel Silvestre (gabriel.silvestre.11@ucl.ac.uk) if you have any questions. We look forward to hearing from you!

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Socrates

Socrates

NEW PERSDPECTIVES ON THE PROBLEM OF THE PUBLIC

A two day conference hosted by the Centre for the Study of Democracy, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Westminster.

Dates: Thursday 15 and Friday 16 May 2014
Venue: Board Room, 309 Regent Street, London

This inter-disciplinary conference brings together researchers from media, technology studies, law, sociology, planning, geography and political theory to discuss the implications of the rise of new strands of pragmatist, complexity and new materialist approaches to democracy and the public sphere. We have five keynote presentations – from Clive Barnett, Andrew Barry, Jon Coaffee, John Law and Sarah Whatmore – and four panels, discussing new perspectives on the conceptualisation of public space, the construction and emergence of publics, and the relevance of post-human, actor-network and new materialist approaches to how we might rethink the spaces and practices of the public today.

Attendance is free and refreshments will be provided. If you wish to attend please register with Eventbrite here: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/new-perspectives-on-the-problem-of-the-public-tickets-10448111583?aff=eorg

Provisional Programme:

THURSDAY 15 MAY

9.00 REGISTRATION

9.30-10.45 – KEYNOTE

John Law (Professor of Sociology, Open University)
title to be confirmed

10.45-11.00 COFFEE

11.00-12.30 – PANEL 1 – PUBLIC SPACE

Regan Koch (Department of Geography, University College, London)
Justifications of public and private: Notes from the not-quite-public spaces of underground restaurants
Manuela Kölke (independent researcher)
Ontological registers as the medium of convergence between political theory and spatial disciplines
Antonia Layard (University of Bristol Law School)
The Legal Production of Public Space (or not)
Nikolai Roskamm (Institut für Stadt- und Regionalplanung, TU Berlin, Germany)
The in-between of public space: Sitting on the fence with Hannah Arendt

12.30-1.30 – LUNCH

1.30-2.45 – KEYNOTE

Clive Barnett (Professor of Geography and Social Theory, University of Exeter)
Emergent Publics

COFFEE

3.00-4.30 – PANEL 2 – CONSTRUCTED AND EMERGENT PUBLICS

Nick Mahony and Hilde C. Stephansen (Centre for Citizenship, Identities and Governance, The Open University)
What’s at stake in Participation Now? Exploring emergent configurations of ‘the public’ in contemporary public participation
Helen Pallett (Science, Society & Sustainability group, University of East Anglia)  Producing the publics of UK science policy: public dialogue as a technology for representing, knowing and constructing publics
Yvonne Rydin and Lucy Natarajan (Bartlett School of Planning, University College, London)
Materialising public participation: community consultation within spatial planning for North Northamptonshire, England
Peer Schouten (School of Global Studies, University of Gothenburg, Sweden)
The infrastructural construction of publics: the Janus face of representation by international actors in Congo

4.30-4.45 BREAK

4.45-6.00 – KEYNOTE

Sarah Whatmore (Professor of Environment and Public Policy, University of Oxford)
Experimental Publics: Science, Democracy and the Redistribution of Expertise

RECEPTION & SPEAKERS DINNER

FRIDAY 16 MAY

10.00-11.15 KEYNOTE

Andrew Barry (Professor of Human Geography, University College, London)
Material Politics and the Reinvention of the Public

11.15-11.30 COFFEE

11.30-1.00 PANEL 3 – BEYOND THE SUBJECT

Andreas Birkbak (Department of Learning and Philosophy, Aalborg University, Denmark)
Facebook pages as ’demo versions’ of issue publics
Gwendolyn Blue (Department of Geography, University of Calgary, Canada)
Animal publics: Political subjectivity after the human subject
Ferenc Hammer (Institute for Art Theory and Media Studies, Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary)
The Hungarian Roundabout and Further Settings for the Authoritarian Subject: Technologies of Self-Governance in Everyday Practices
Jonathan Metzger (Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden)
Moose re:public – traversing the human/non-human divide in the politics of  transport infrastructure development

1.00-1.45 LUNCH

1.45-3.15 PANEL 4 – MATERIAL PUBLICS

Lindsay Bremner (Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment, University of Westminster) The Political Life of Rising Acid Mine Water
Ana Delgado and Blanca Callén (Centre for the Study of the Sciences and the Humanities, University of Bergen, Norway)
The making of obsolescence: how things become public in the age of precariousness
Michael Guggenheim, Joe Deville, Zuzana Hrdlickova (Department of Sociology, Goldsmiths, University of London)
The Megaphone and the Map: Assembling and Representing the Public in Disaster Exercises
Owain Jones (Environmental Humanities, Bath Spa University)
Is My Flesh Not Public? Thinking of bodies and ‘the public’ through water

3.15-3.30 COFFEE

3.30-4.45 KEYNOTE

Jon Coaffee (Professor in Urban Geography, University of Warwick)
Citizenship and Democracy in the City 2.0: Balancing the Quest for Resilience and the Public Interest in Urban Development

4.45-5.00 BREAK

5.00-6.00 CONCLUDING DISCUSSION
David Chandler, Professor of International Relations, Director of the Centre for the Study of Democracy, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Westminster, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW. Tel: ++44 (0)776 525 3073.
Journal Editor, Resilience: International Policies, Practices and Discourses: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/resi20
Book series Editor, Routledge Studies in Intervention and Statebuilding: http://208.254.74.79/books/series/RSIS/

Book series Editor, Routledge Advances in Democratic Theory: http://www.routledge.com/books/series/RADT/
Amazon books page: http://www.amazon.co.uk/David-Chandler/e/B001HCXV7Y/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

Personal website: http://www.davidchandler.org/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

The Island

The Island

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ISLAND DEVELOPMENT

The IGU Commission on Islands will hold the International Conference on Island Development 2013, Penghu Archipelago, Taiwan, on October 1-5.

The over-arching theme is ‘Island Development: Local Economy, Culture, Innovation and Sustainability‘.

The aim of the conference is to bring together researchers and practitioners from academia, business, NGOs and public authorities, and to provide them with a platform to report on and discuss recent developments, achievements, experiences, research results, and initiatives related to island development.

Please see the conference website http://island.npu.edu.tw/  for details.

Please note that abstracts should be submitted by March 31.

You are very welcome to organize panels and themed sessions at the conference and to circulate cfps for panels and themed sessions.

Prof. Chang-Yi David Chang (Chair, IGU Commission on Islands; National Taiwan University, Taiwan)
Prof. Eric Clark (Vice Chair, IGU Commission on Islands; Lund University, Sweden)
Prof. Huei-Min Tsai (Executive Secretary, IGU Commission on Islands; National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan)

Local Organizing Committee
Prof. Kuo-Yuan Kao, Chair (National Penghu University, Taiwan),
Prof. Shui-Liang Yu, Vice Chair (Secretary General, National Penghu University, Taiwan)

 

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Global Economy

Global Economy

GEPGRAPHIES OF LABOR

CALL FOR PAPERS

GEOGRAPHIES OF LABOR

35th Annual North American Labor History Conference

October 24-26, 2013

Wayne State University

Detroit, Michigan

The Program Committee of the North American Labor History Conference invites proposals for sessions, papers, and roundtables on “Geographies of Labor” for our thirty-fifth annual meeting.

Over the last several centuries, transformations in technology and in economic, social, political, and cultural practices have created new spatial regimes within and across geographic boundaries.  Whether negotiating the changes around them or taking advantage of new possibilities to shape alternatives, workers have been central to remapping this emergent environment.

Inspired by the “spatial turn” in the social sciences, this conference will explore the myriad ways in which workers have interacted with a variety of geographic categories.  We welcome projects that seek to understand these interactions through a number of lenses, including, but not limited to: empire, globalization, uneven development, mobility, and migration/immigration at the transnational, national and/or local level.  We invite proposals from a wide variety of disciplines, especially history, geography, sociology, anthropology, economics, political science, and cultural studies.

Submissions of proposals for papers, panels, and roundtables should include a one paragraph abstract and a brief biographical statement per each participant by March 29, 2013 to:

Professor Francis Shor, Coordinator

North American Labor History Conference

Department of History

WayneStateUniversity

3157 FacultyAdministrationBuilding

Detroit, MI48202

Phone: 313-577-9325; Fax: 313-577-6987

Email: nalhc@wayne.edu

First published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-geographies-of-labor-wayne-state-university-detroit-24-26-october

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Aesthetics

Aesthetics

ROYAL GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY ANNUAL CONFERENCE

LONDON, August 2013

Artists and Gentrification at the Urban Frontier: Questioning the Causes, Consequences and Validity of the Artist-Gentrification Correlation

The purported relationship between artists and gentrification has a significant and long-standing presence in the urban literature, much of it supporting the notion that where artists go, fashion, money and commerce inevitably follow (Evans & Shaw, 2004). From the Latin Quarter and Montmartre of C.19th Paris (Norton, 2004), Greenwich Village in the inter-war period (in Graña, 1990), to New York’s SoHo (Zukin, 1982) or London’s East End (Green, 2001) in more recent times, artists’ arrival in previously marginal and often oppositional environments is seen to precede increased property prices, displacement of extant communities, and an upgrading of the symbolic landscape to mesh with an altogether different class of citizen. But how inevitable and inexorable is this process? Has there perhaps been under-reporting or under-emphasis of cases where the activities of artists have instead lead to increased marginality via, for example, further disinvestment, depopulation and/or physical decline? Alternatively, might too little attention have been paid to the workings of artist-gentrification interrelationships in non-Western or less high profile contexts? Must the arrival of artists signal an impending taming and reclaiming of the urban frontier, or are alternative outcomes possible?

If, however, this idea of artist-led gentrification should indeed be shown to hold water, then we are interested in the mechanisms through which it takes place; and how artists’ roles might be usefully conceived and appraised. For example, are portrayals of artists as gentrification victims (e.g. Ley, 1996) tenable, or is the active agent characterization (e.g. Deutsche & Ryan, 1987) more apt, in light of the by now heightened (self)awareness of artists’ allegedly catalytic function? Might artists’ attempts to challenge the forces of gentrification and secure alternative outcomes (Vivant 2010) offer a way out of this victim versus perpetrator framing? Should intent (or lack thereof) to gentrify have a bearing on how the effects of their presence are judged? Or could it be that urban-oriented academia under-appreciates the policy view which tends to highlight the positives of gentrification and suggests artists embrace rather than disown their role in the process? Indeed, has artists’ participation in the widespread rollout of ‘staged’ or ‘policy-led’ gentrification and regeneration (e.g. Atkinson and Easthope 2009) engendered a reformulation of previously popular conceptions of the artist as being opposed to, yet paradoxically implicated in, dominant models of capitalist urban development?

We welcome papers which interrogate alleged artist-gentrification interrelationships from a variety of perspectives and geographical contexts, and which might address but are not limited to the following:

·         To what extent might the idea of gentrification as an almost inevitable outcome of artists’ engagement with the urban frontier be challenged by theoretical or empirical advances?

·         Artists have been portrayed as ‘stormtroopers’ of gentrification, in what ways have local communities resisted artist-related gentrification and how successful have they been?

·         How have artists, perhaps in conjunction with local communities, challenged the idea or process of gentrification and how successful have they been?

·         Who are the ‘winners’ and ‘losers’ in the artist-led gentrification game? To what extent might artists be accurately portrayed as gentrification victims, agents, or champions of alternative outcomes?

·         How has the framing of artists’ social identities and roles been affected by the spread of ‘staged’ or ‘policy-led’ gentrification/regeneration models?

 

Please send abstracts to session convenors Luke Binns or Viktoria Vona:  luke.binns@gmail.comviktoria.vona@kcl.ac.uk, by February 4th

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

 

 

The Island

HISTORY, MEMORY AND GREEN IMAGINARIES

NOW BOOKING:

History, Memory and Green Imaginaries
A symposium presented by the Centre for Research in Memory, Narrative and Histories, University of Brighton
Friday 30th November 2012
9.30am – 5.00pm
M2, Grand Parade, University of Brighton

This symposium invites reflection on the ways in which history and memory inform and shape contemporary green imaginaries. It brings together cultural theorists, historians, cultural geographers, educators and policy actors.

Keynote: ‘The problem of the past’
Alastair Bonnett, Professor of Social Geography, NewcastleUniversity

Roundtable: ‘Austerity and sustainability’
The Home Front and ‘austerity Britain’ are significant points of reference in current debates about sustainability. What kinds of possibilities and limitations follow from the use of historical resources in public debate about environmental issues?

Ayers Rock

Tim Cooper, Senior Lecturer in History, University of Exeter, ‘The limits of
history in green imaginaries’.

Victoria Johnson, Head of Climate Change and Energy, New Economics Foundation, ‘“Ration me up” and other nef projects’

James Piers Taylor, British Film Institute Documentation Editor and permaculture educator, ‘Re-member, re-vision and re-claim: using archival film to facilitate local conversations about community resilience’.

Panel: ‘Ecological history’
How can historical research inform environmental thinking? Three historians discuss this question in relation to their research and practice.

Vinita Damodaran, Senior Lecturer in South Asian History, University of Sussex, ‘“Primitive places and wild tribes”: colonial and indigenous understandings of nature in Eastern India in the nineteenth century’.

Erin Gill, environmental journalist and historian, ‘“Lost” environmental histories: the stories we’ve forgotten’.

Karin Jaschke, Senior Lecturer in Architecture, University of Brighton, ‘Historiography as process: towards an Ecological History of Architecture’.

Closing remarks: ‘Culture is natural: biosemiotics, recycling, and the evolutionary structurations of biological and cultural change’ Wendy Wheeler, Professor Emeritus of English Literature and Cultural
Inquiry, London Metropolitan University.

Registration:
This event is open to all. Please register in advance by following the link below. The registration fee is £35, or £25 for students/unaffiliated delegates, including lunch and refreshments.

Enquiries: Cheryl Roberts / cr16@brighton.ac.uk
Programme and abstracts: http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/mnh
Register: http://shop.brighton.ac.uk/

Dr Rebecca Bramall
Senior Lecturer in Media Studies
Faculty of Arts
University of Brighton
+44 (0)1273 644651
r.bramall@brighton.ac.uk
http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/staff/rebecca-bramall

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Eric Hobsbawm

HISTORY, MEMORY AND GREEN IMAGINARIES – A SYMPOSIUM

History, Memory and Green Imaginaries

A symposium presented by the Centre for Research in Memory, Narrative and Histories, University of Brighton
Friday 30th November 2012
9.30am – 5.00pm
M2, Grand Parade, University of Brighton

This symposium invites reflection on the ways in which history and memory inform and shape contemporary green imaginaries. It brings together cultural theorists, historians, cultural geographers, educators and policy actors.

Keynote: ‘The problem of the past’
Alastair Bonnett, Professor of Social Geography, Newcastle University

Roundtable: ‘Austerity and Sustainability’
The Home Front and ‘austerity Britain’ are significant points of reference in current debates about sustainability. What kinds of possibilities and limitations follow from the use of historical resources in public debate about environmental issues?

Tim Cooper, Senior Lecturer in History, University of Exeter, ‘The limits of history in green imaginaries’.
Victoria Johnson, Head of Climate Change and Energy, New Economics Foundation, ‘“Ration me up” and other nef projects’
James Piers Taylor, British Film Institute Documentation Editor and permaculture educator, ‘Re-member, re-vision and re-claim: using archival film to facilitate local conversations about community resilience’.

Panel: ‘Ecological history’
How can historical research inform environmental thinking? Three historians discuss this question in relation to their research and practice.

Vinita Damodaran, Senior Lecturer in South Asian History, University of Sussex, ‘“Primitive places and wild tribes”: colonial and indigenous understandings of nature in Eastern India in the nineteenth century’.
Erin Gill, environmental journalist and historian, ‘“Lost” environmental histories: the stories we’ve forgotten’.
Karin Jaschke, Senior Lecturer in Architecture, University of Brighton, ‘Historiography as process: towards an Ecological History of Architecture’.

Closing remarks: ‘Culture is natural: biosemiotics, recycling, and the evolutionary structurations of biological and cultural change’
Wendy Wheeler, Professor Emeritus of English Literature and Cultural Inquiry, London Metropolitan University.

Registration:
This event is open to all. Please register in advance by following the link below. The registration fee is £35, or £25 for students/unaffiliated delegates, including lunch and refreshments. The deadline for registration is 23rd November 2012.

Enquiries: Cheryl Roberts / cr16@brighton.ac.uk
More information and abstracts:
http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/research/centre-for-research-in-memory-narrative-and-histories/events/archive/symposium-history,-memory-and-green-imaginaries
Register:
http://shop.brighton.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&catid=11&modid=2&prodid=99&deptid=3&prodvarid=0

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Bonuses for Some

OPPOSITIONS

Oppositions: An Interdisciplinary Postgraduate Conference

28th and 29th September 2012 

University of Salford 

This conference seeks to explore ideas of opposition through the full range of disciplines in the arts, media, and social sciences. In the context of the current crisis of capitalism, there are many examples of the forms ‘opposition’ can take: the Tea Party in the United States, the rise of fascist groups, campaigns run via new technologies and social media, religious fundamentalisms, and general strikes in Greece. Though it carries radical overtones, ‘opposition’ in itself is not tied to any particular dogma, left or right. 

We invite papers that explore the value and values of opposition as a position to be adopted by individuals or groups. We welcome proposals for papers from postgraduates that engage with any aspect of opposition. 

These could include, but are by no means limited to: the ‘culture industry’ and alternative youth cultures; opposition parties within parliamentary politics; grass-roots activism; the history and future of the labour movement; hegemony; Foucauldian ‘resistance’ and its limits; radical pedagogies and the role of the University; community and class; the aesthetic value of non-mainstream or outsider art; aesthetic oppositions such as contrapuntal music or bricolage; and the formation of creole or pidgin languages. 

Papers are welcome from fields such as politics, literature, philosophy, anthropology, religions and theology, geography, sociology, history, classics, translation studies, linguistics and social linguistics, visual and screen studies, new media and communication studies, and the performing arts. Interdisciplinary papers are very welcome. Keynote speakers TBC. 

Abstracts of 250 words are invited for presentations of 20 minutes. Proposals for performances, screenings etc. are also accepted. The conference intends to publish an edited volume of the best papers presented.

Send abstracts to oppositionsconference[at]gmail.com by 6 July 2012.

Oppositions: http://call-for-papers.sas.upenn.edu/node/46251

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‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

ANTIPODE FOUNDATION SCHOLAR-ACTIVIST PROJECT AWARDS

The Foundation expects to allocate each successful application up to £10,000 (or equivalent) to support collaborations between academics, non-academics and activists (from NGOs, think tanks, social movements, or community grassroots organisations, for example) which further radical analyses of geographical issues and engender the development of a new and better society. The Awards are aimed at promoting programmes of action-research, participation and engagement, cooperation and co-enquiry, and more publicly-focused forms of geographical investigation.

See http://antipodefoundation.org/scholar-activist-project-awards/ for more.

Antipode Foundation Regional Workshop Awards

The Foundation expects to allocate each successful application up to £10,000 (or equivalent) to fund events (including conferences, workshops, seminar series, summer schools and action research meetings) which further radical analyses of geographical issues and engender the development of a new and better society.

See: http://antipodefoundation.org/regional-workshop-awards/ for more.

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Applications for this first round of awards must be in by 30 June 2012. Forms are available from and should be returned to Andy Kent (antipode@live.co.uk), who is more than happy to answer any questions you might have.

Antipode Foundation: http://antipodefoundation.org/

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‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Space

TAKING UP SPACE

Call for Papers

Here are the details: Taking up Space Cultural Studies Postgraduate Event 25th – 26th June 2012, Goldsmiths College, University of London 

This is a one / two day conference exploring the meaning and understanding of space in its physical manifestations as well as in its discursive forms; through which identity, meaning, value and authority can be mapped in particular ways.

We cannot avoid space. It is inevitable. The ways in which we understand ourselves, others and the world around us implies some notion of space. Our sense of self and society is worked through and is contained in space: culture does not only take place, but also creates it “making symbolic use of its objects” (Lefebvre).

To what degree does our conception of space change when we understand ourselves as self-enclosed or permeable beings? Can art and performance therefore mediate the relationship between the self, objects and environment? “The activities of travel, journey and navigation fabricate the social world as well as reveal it” (Caroline Knowles).

The space of the streets has become the site of dis-order and territory has become a prime issue for understanding contemporary social tensions. The recent riots in the UK brought into the forefront questions such as who owns space, how we can use this as a place for resistance and what notions of space are currently active in shaping and operating the socially constructed body. The possession of a categorized space can be considered in line with homelessness as a dislocation of the public and private, attesting to the multi-dimensionality of space and both the potentials and restrictions embodied in it.

The upcoming Olympics also signify the difficulties facing spaces contesting belonging and struggle. Questions of locality and identity are important, inciting questions of nationalism and tourism, paramount to the formation of cultural identity. In turn, the Occupy movement and one year anniversary ofTahrir Squarereinstates the need to define sacred and everyday space and the potentials in multiple usages of place. This conference will ask how can we negotiate the historicisation of memory? The aim of this conference is to rethink how space is interacted with and reconfigured in different mediums as a site for action as well as containment. If we cannot avoid space how can this be used to further an understanding of self or curtail ideas of autonomy? How are we embodied by space and embodying it at the same time? In what ways can space be used as a site for artistic and political development and how does the contemporary world and being become through the spatial? We welcome proposals for papers, discussions, short film, dance, performances, workshops and other engagements and activities engaging among others with the different ways of being in space.

Topics, experiences, understandings and possibilities might include but are not restricted to: • Temporality and embodiment • Knowledge and materiality • Interaction between objects and self • Memory/ history/ time • Bodies and public and private • Restrictions and exclusions • Performance / realm of aesthetics • Identity/ territory / alienation • Subversive potential – resistance / containment 

Abstracts/ proposals of 300-500 words should be sent to takingupspace2012@gmail.com by 15th March 2012. 

Program will be confirmed mid-April. 

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‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub,Bangor, northWales)  

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski