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Category Archives: Social Media

Information

Information

CREATIVE COMMONS AND EDUCATION – ARE WE THERE YET?
A UKSG event

Website: http://www.uksg.org/webinars/creativecommons
Date: Tuesday 9 June 2015
Time: 1400 BST
Duration: 45 minutes including Q&A (up to 60 minutes maximum if there is sufficient demand for an extended Q&A)

Speaker:
Joscelyn Upendran, Co-founder of Zilpa

Join Joscelyn for a look at Creative Commons licences, their impact and use in education.
This is a free webinar and open to all. If you are interested, but unable to join the live event, please register anyway as a recording will be made available to all who register.

For more information and to register, please visit http://www.uksg.org/webinars/creativecommons

Feedback from May’s webinar: “Open Access is a complex and potentially very contentious area, e.g. academic freedom to publish.  So amongst all the conflicting mandates and policies it was really useful to have the institutional role so clearly delineated – and an action plan to follow up on.” – Candace Guite, University of Stirling
92% of survey respondents would recommend May’s webinar.

Thank you for your attention. I do hope you can join us.
Maria
Maria Campbell
Digital Communications Associate, UKSG
E: maria@uksg.org
UKSG webinars: www.uksg.org/webinars

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

A World To Win

A World To Win

DEMOCRACY AND CITIZENSHIP

A WORLD TO WIN

This Monday evening, March 9th, starting at 7.00 pm, we have a critical webinar concerning Democracy and Citizenship, coming just two months before the general election.

It discusses how we can become active citizens and make democracy work for us.

The presenter, Cormac Russell, lectured for eight years on active citizenship and democracy at the National College of Ireland.

There is no charge for taking part.

Here’s the link:

Try to log is about five minutes before the webinar starts and you can test the link right now.

Please make every effort to partake and feel free to pass on this information to all your contacts.

 

Visit awtw network at: http://aworldtowin.ning.com/?xg_source=msg_mes_network

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

PosthumanTHE MATERIALITY OF THE IMMATERIAL: ICTs AND THE DIGITAL COMMONS

Call for Papers: The Materiality of the Immaterial: ICTs and the Digital Commons

See: http://www.triple-c.at/index.php/tripleC/announcement/view/23

Special issue of tripleC: Communication, Capitalism & Critique

Online @ http://www.triple-c.at

Abstract submission deadline: January 15, 2015

Guest Editors:

Vasilis Kostakis, Ragnar Nurkse School of Innovation and Governance, Tallinn University of Technology (Estonia), P2P Lab (Greece);

Andreas Roos, Human Ecology Division, Lund University (Sweden)

With an escalating environmental crisis and an unprecedented increase of ICT diversity and use, it is more crucial than ever to understand the underlying material aspects of the ICT infrastructure.  This special issue therefore asks the question: What are the true material and socio-environmental costs of the global ICT infrastructure?

In a recent paper (Fuchs 2013) as well as in the book Digital Labour and Karl Marx (Fuchs 2014), Christian Fuchs examined the complex web of production relations and the new division of digital labour that makes possible the vast and cheap ICT infrastructure as we know it. The analysis partly revealed that ICT products and infrastructure can be said to embody slave-like and other extremely harsh conditions that perpetually force mine and assembly workers into conditions of dependency. Expanding this argument, the WWF reported (Reed and Miranda 2007) that mining in the Congo basin poses considerable threats to the local environment in the form of pollution, the loss of biodiversity, and an increased presence of business-as-usual made possible by roads and railways.  Thus ICTs can be said to be not at all immaterial because the ICT infrastructure under the given economic conditions can be said to embody as its material foundations slave-like working conditions, various class relations and undesirable environmental consequences.

At the same time, the emerging digital commons provide a new and promising platform for social developments, arguably enabled by the progressive dynamics of ICT development. These are predominantly manifested as commons-based peer production, i.e., a new mode of collaborative, social production (Benkler 2006); and grassroots digital fabrication or community-driven makerspaces, i.e., forms of bottom-up, distributed manufacturing. The most well known examples of commons-based peer production are the free/open source software projects and the free encyclopaedia Wikipedia. While these new forms of social organisation are immanent in capitalism, they also have the features to challenge these conditions in a way that might in turn transcend the dominant system (Kostakis and Bauwens 2014).

Following this dialectical framing, we would like to call for papers for a special issue of tripleC that will investigate how we can understand and balance the perils and promises of ICTs in order to make way for a just and sustainable paradigm. We seek scholarly articles and commentaries that address any of the following themes and beyond. We also welcome experimental formats, especially photo essays, which address the special issue’s theme.

Suggested themes

Papers that track, measure and/or theorise the scope of the socio-environmental impact of the ICT infrastructure.

Papers that track, measure and/or theorise surplus value as both ecological (land), social (labour) and intellectual (patent) in the context of ICTs.

Understanding the human organisation of nature in commons-based peer production.

Studies of the environmental dimensions of desktop manufacturing technologies (for example, 3D printing or CNC machines) in non-industrial modes of subsistence, e.g. eco-villages or traditional

agriculture, as well as in modern towns and mega-cities.

Suggestions for and insights into bridging understandings of the socio-economic organisation of the natural commons with the socio-economic organisation of the digital commons drawing on types of

organisations in the past and the present that are grounded in theories of the commons.

Elaboration of which theoretical approaches can be used for overcoming the conceptual separation of the categories immaterial/material in the digital commons.

 

References

Benkler, Yochai. 2006. The wealth of networks: How social production transforms markets and freedom. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Fuchs, Christian. 2014. Digital labour and Karl Marx. New York: Routledge.

Fuchs, Christian. 2013. Theorising and analysing digital labour: From global value chains to modes of production. The Political Economy of Communication 1 (2): 3-27, online at: http://www.polecom.org/index.php/polecom/article/view/19.

Kostakis, Vasilis and Michel Bauwens. 2014. Network society and future scenarios for a collaborative economy. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.

Reed, Erik and Marta Miranda. 2007. Assessment of the mining sector and infrastructure development in the congo basin region. Washington DC: World Wildlife Fund, Macroeconomics for Sustainable Development Program Office, 27, online at: http://awsassets.panda.org/downloads/congobasinmining.pdf

 

Schedule

Submission of abstracts (250-300 words) by January 15, 2015 via email to [log in to unmask]

Responses about acceptance/rejection to authors: February 15, 2015.

Selected authors will be expected to submit their full documents to tripleC via the online submission system by May 15, 2015:

http://triple-c.at/index.php/tripleC/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions

Expected publication date of the special issue: October 1, 2015.

About the journal

tripleC: Communication, Capitalism & Critique is an academic open access online journal using a non-commercial Creative Commons license. It is a journal that focuses on information society studies and studies of media, digital media, information and communication in society with a special interest in critical studies in these thematic areas. The journal has a special interest in disseminating articles that focus on the role of information in contemporary capitalist societies. For this task, articles should employ critical theories and/or empirical research inspired by critical theories and/or philosophy and ethics guided by critical thinking as well as relate the analysis to power structures and inequalities of capitalism, especially forms of stratification such as class, racist and other ideologies and capitalist patriarchy. Papers should reflect on how the presented findings contribute to the illumination of conditions that foster or hinder the advancement of a global sustainable and participatory information society. TripleC was founded in 2003 and is edited by Christian Fuchs and Marisol Sandoval.

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

 

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

Glenn’s article Education, Capital and the Transhuman has also recently been added to Academia, and can be found at: https://www.academia.edu/9033532/Education_Capital_and_the_Transhuman

 

Knowledge

Knowledge

iFUTURES

Following the success of last year’s inaugural event, iFutures, a one-day conference organised by doctoral students for doctoral students in the Information Science community returns on Tuesday, July 22nd, at the University of Sheffield.

The theme of the 2014 conference is “Research into Practice.”

Our keynote speakers are:

Dr. David Bawden
Professor of Information Science, City University, London,

Dr. Mounia Lalmas
Principal Research Scientist, Yahoo! Labs

The event will include the presentation of student research papers, workshops on issues relating to research dissemination and impact, and student poster and Pecha Kucha sessions. More details, including a tentative programme for the day, can be found on the conference website: http://ifutures.group.shef.ac.uk/

We are inviting the following types of submissions:
a) Papers: Intended as a means of introducing your current research in a 15 minute presentation followed by 5 minutes for questions and answers. Abstracts should be no more than 500 words; final papers should be no more than 1500 words.
b) Posters: Display your research for discussion with fellow PhD students. Abstracts should be no more than 300 words; final papers are optional (no more than 1000 words).
c) Pecha Kucha Presentations: How do you envision your research, or IS research in general, impacting or influencing society? You have 20 slides lasting 20 seconds each to address this question. For more information about the Pecha Kucha format, see http://www.pechakucha.org/

Abstracts should be no more than 300 words; final papers are optional (no more than 1000 words).

Authors are requested to submit abstracts by Friday, May 14th. Abstracts are being reviewed by a panel of PhD students, and accepted submissions will be notified by Monday 26th May.  Successful authors of papers will be invited to submit a short paper of up to 1500 words, for publication in our open access conference proceedings. Poster and Pecha Kucha presenters will also have the option of submitting a paper for publication.

To begin the submissions process, go to:
https://conferencepapers.shef.ac.uk/index.php/iFutures/if2014/about/submissions
N.B. When creating a profile please be sure to tick “Author” at the bottom of the registration page. Once you have created a profile, clicking on the User Home tab will allow you to begin a New Submission.

We hope that the conference will offer you a valuable opportunity to gain conference presenting experience, network with your peers from other institutions, and get feedback on your work in an encouraging environment.

For more information please contact the iFutures team (ifutures@sheffield.ac.uk).

Registration is also open http://ifutures.group.shef.ac.uk/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

PROTEST IN A DIGITAL AGE

Wednesday 7th May 2014, 7.30

Bishopsgate Institute

230 Bishopsgate

London EC2M 4QH

See: http://www.bishopsgate.org.uk/event/451/Troublemakers?—Protest-in-a-Digital-Age?&Keyword=troublemakers&TypeID=

This is part of the ‘Troublemakers?’ series of events, see: http://www.bishopsgate.org.uk/Events/Troublemakers

Social media has changed the way people organise and demonstrate creating new types of fast-moving protest groups and challenges for the authorities. From the Arab Spring to the London riots, UK Uncut and Occupy tell us their experience of policing and public responses while experts explain the challenges faced by those who seek to control the movements.

Speakers include Symon Hill (author of Digital Revolutions: Activism in the Internet Age), Jamie Bartlett (Head of the Violence and Extremism Programme and the Centre for the Analysis of Social Media at Demos) plus representatives from Occupy and UK Uncut. The event will be chaired by the Ian Dunt (politics.co.uk).

Cost £9 / £7 concession (*A postage fee of £1 applies for sending out tickets booked online or over the telephone)

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Christmas Time

Christmas Time

FOURTH INTERNATIONAL CULTURAL DIFFERENCE AND SOCIAL SOLIDARITY NETWORK CONFERENCE

4th International Conference

Cultural Difference and Social Solidarity Network

Differences, Solidarities and Digital Technologies

Hosted by

Middle East Technical University

Northern Cyprus Campus

Tuesday, 1 July through Friday, 4 July, 2014

The 4th International Conference of the Cultural Difference and Social Solidarity Network aims to examine the influence of the spread and growth of digital technology on constructions, concepts, and perceptions of difference and solidarity. By “digital technology” we mean any combination of electronic devices and digital communication including the devices themselves (from smart phones to servers), software and applications, and communication networks. Approximately two thirds of the world’s population (according to the World Bank) has limited access to digital technologies, yet the remaining one third of the population who use these technologies are arguably reshaping concepts of difference and solidarity that have broad implications for all people, their social and cultural institutions, the environment, economic systems, etc. As an example of an area of contested solidarity and difference within that one third of global users, are the broad claims from academia, the market, and digital technology proponents regarding the use of digital technology and devices to promote solidarities, virtual and real, and create an easing of difference through democratizing constructs such as increased access to the internet and communication devices. Contrary arguments assert that solidarities in a virtual world are not possible; that the democratizing effect of the internet, or even wireless service, is an illusion constructed by large corporations that control many of the on-ramps and consumer interfaces of the web in neoliberal societies; and that the growth of use of digital technologies creates new differences and increasingly solidifies existing ones.

This conference seeks to provide a space for scholars to take stock of the present global context and share knowledge – specific or general, empirical or theoretical, with a view to develop and explore the possible ways of understanding the impact of digital technologies on differences and solidarities. The conference is intended to be interdisciplinary and welcomes papers from scholars whose research crosses traditional disciplinary boundaries. Papers and panels are sought for presentation at parallel sessions where each paper will have a strict maximum of 20 minutes presentation time on panels of 2 papers with 25 minutes per paper discussion time.

Initial starting points for paper topics on the 2014 conference theme are listed below. We will also consider papers on themes from previous conferences and/or previous participants who have on-going research on broader areas of difference and solidarity. All papers/presentations should in some way connect to, or address, Cultural Difference and Social Solidarity:

Social media:

Identity

Economy

Politics

Law

War

Governments

Revolutions

Displacement

Sex

Bullying

Religion

Technology and hegemonies

 

Academia and technology:

New disciplines e.g. Digital humanities

Academic freedom

Discrimination

Discourse

Exploitation

Inclusive/exclusive methodologies

 

Electronic production:

Mining, manufacture, distribution, retail

E-waste

Passive and active digital media

Ethics and digital technology

Art and Culture

Digital geography

Digital nativism

New media subjectivity

Gaming

Digital literacy

Epistemology

Experience

 

These themes are not exhaustive and the organizers will consider other papers relevant to the conference subject of Digital Technologies and Cultural Difference and Social Solidarity. We expect to publish a post-conference edited book, derived from the papers presented and organized around themes that reveal themselves during the conference.

There will be two keynote plenary sessions with speakers to be announced. Reflecting the conference theme in the context of the conference venue, one of these sessions will focus on aspects of these themes in Cyprus.

Abstracts may be submitted anytime until March 31, 2014

Notification of abstract acceptances and rejections is on a rolling basis (within 3 weeks of submission)

Online conference registration open from March 17, 2014 to May 30, 2014

Conference Fees to be paid by May 30, 2014

The conference language is English and all papers and presentations should be in English.

The conference fee is 395 Euros (295 Euros for post-grad students and non-participants).

This fee includes:

Registration:

Transfers to and from ErcanAirport in the TurkishRepublic of Northern Cyprus to METU-NCC Campus

4 nights at Campus Guest House with breakfast

4 lunches

2 Sunset Dinners (all drinks included)

1 Dinner Banquet (non-alcoholic drinks included)

Guided Historic/Cultural Excursion

Abstracts of no more than 350 words may be submitted online only, to: http://www.differenceandsolidarity.org/

For any questions or concerns please see our website, including the FAQ page, or contact the conference organizers at the email address below.

Conference Organisers:

Scott H. Boyd

Middle EastTechnicalUniversity – Northern Cyprus Campus

Paul Reynolds

EdgeHillUniversity

info@differenceandsolidarity.org

Digitisation Perspectives

Digitisation Perspectives

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Shanghai

Shanghai

ANALYZING URBAN NETWORKS

CALL FOR PAPERS

Social Network Analysis (SNA), a quantitative structuralist methodology largely developed by sociologists in the 1970s that has grown into a sizeable international and inter-disciplinary research field, has – following the work of Alderson and Beckfield (2004) – begun to attract interest among those engaged in research on both world cities and urban networks per se (e.g. Alderson and Beckfield, 2007, 2010, 2012; Green, 2007; Taylor, 2006; Mould & Joel, 2010). In addition, two textbooks have been recently published to bring some of the more commonly used SNA software packages to the undergraduate urban studies classroom (Giuffre, 2013; Neal, 2013). Papers are invited which utilise a social network perspective to seek to better understand the relations, connections, networks, and co-production within and between the world’s cities. Papers could report empirical findings, theoretical and/or methodological advances, including critiques of either, specific SNA methods and results, or the inherent structuralism of SNA as a tool for researching the urban.

Please send abstracts of no more than 200 words by February 14th to r.g.smith@swan.ac.uk

Annual International Conference 2014:http://www.rgs.org/WhatsOn/ConferencesAndSeminars/Annual+International+Conference/Annual+international+conference.htm
*******************************************
Dr Richard G. Smith, PhD (Bristol)
Co-Director of the Centre for Urban Theory, Department of Geography, College of Science, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP, UK Tel. +44(0)1792 602558 Fax +44(0)1792 295955
E-mail: r.g.smith@Swansea.ac.uk
Web: http://www.swansea.ac.uk/staff/science/geography/r.g.smith/
Skype: dr.richard.g.smith

A few recent publications:

Richard G. Smith (2013) The ordinary city trap snaps back. Environment and Planning A doi:10.1068/a46284

Richard G. Smith (2013) The Ordinary City Trap. Environment and Planning A doi:10.1068/a45516

Richard G. Smith (2013) Beyond the Global City Concept and the Myth of ‘Command and Control’. International Journal of Urban and Regional Research  doi:10.1111/1468-2427.12024 [ Featured in IJURR Latest News: http://www.ijurr.org/details/news/5639821/Focus-on-political-economy-in-the-January-2014-issue-___-Let-the-debate-begin___.html ]

 

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Digitisation Perspectives

Digitisation Perspectives

THE DIGITAL STUDENT EXPERIENCE

The Digital Student Experience: Exploring the role of technology on the student experience

Society for Research into Higher Education

Date – Friday 15 November 2013

Venue – SRHE, 73 Collier Street, LondonN1 9BE

Network – Student Experience/Digital University

This event has been put together by the SRHE Student Experience Network and the Digital University Network. We will be exploring the role of technology on the student experience, with a focus on research that has engaged students and investigates their experiences.

Draft programme:

11:00am: Coffee and registration
11:30am: Introduction
11:45am: Jeremy Segrott, Cardiff University, ‘Connecting academic writers – the #Acwri Twitter group’.
12:30pm: Lunch
1:30pm: Melissa Highton, University of Oxford, ‘Researching the Digital Student Experience of Oxford University’
2:15pm: Eve Stirling, University of Sheffield, ‘Stories from Facebook’
3:00pm: Panel with questions from Twitter
3:30pm: Tea and close

‘Connecting academic writers – the #Acwri Twitter group’:

This presentation discusses our experience of developing #Acwri – a Twitter-based support network that aims to identify common challenges in the writing process; enable participants to reflect on their own practice as writers; and share strategies for effective writing.  Acwri ‘meets’ on Twitter fortnightly, using synchronous tweets (messages) and a keyword (#acwri – short for academic writing), enabling anyone with a Twitter account to follow and/participate. 

Jeremy Segrott is a research fellow in public health based in the DECIPHer Research Centre at Cardiff University His research focuses on the role of family relationships and parenting in the prevention of alcohol misuse by young people, and the effectiveness of family and school-based prevention programmes. 

‘Researching the Digital Student Experience of Oxford University’:

In 2011 researchers at Oxford University undertook a study of the student digital experience within the University in an attempt to identify technologies which appropriately support Oxford’s traditional teaching methods, graduate skills expectations, and the social dimension of student life. The purpose of the study was to inform institutional decision-making and to understand how current technologies, systems and services are perceived and experienced by students and staff.

Melissa Highton is Director of Academic IT at Oxford University. She is responsible for developing use of technology in learning and teaching across the university and maintaining Oxford’s world-class reputation in the areas of IT support for learning, teaching and research.  She leads service delivery and projects in Academic IT to meet the needs of lecturers and researchers in furthering the strategic goals of the University.

‘Stories from Facebook’

Facebook is ubiquitous in many of the lives of young undergraduate students. Research in this area shows that Facebook is a key tool in being a student (Selwyn, 2009), both through social support and supporting academic study. The focus of Eve’s research is exploring the realities of social media use by undergraduates. Specifically their use of Facebook in the first-year transition to university. She did this through a mixed method two-phase approach of large-scale questionnaires (n=685) and a longitudinal connective ethnography (n=6), across Facebook and the university campus. The findings are presented in six narrative stories of my Facebook friends at key moments across the academic year. Drawing on this data she presents two contrasting themes – “this Uni is run on Facebook” and “disconnection (I don’t want to be here, anymore)” to explore the role of technology and specifically Facebook, on the student experience.

Eve Stirling currently undertaking an ESRC funded PhD researching first year undergraduates’ usage of Facebook in their transition into university life. Her research interests include technology and higher education (HE), the use of social media in HE and the pedagogical impacts of these. She is also interested in design thinking and its influence on the research process, ethnographic research methods and the influence of space and time on the student experience. She is a member of IRis, Interdisciplinary Research in Socio-Digital Worlds and the Centre for the Study of New Literacies at The University of Sheffield. She is senior Lecturer in Design at SheffieldHallamUniversity.

Reserve a place at thus event: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/

 Note: Unless otherwise stated SRHE events are free to members, there is a charge of £45 for non-members.

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski 

Fear of a Blank Planet

Fear of a Blank Planet

DISTRIBUTED INTIMACIES

Banff Research in Culture 2014

Summer Research Residency

Program Dates: May 26, 2014 – June 13, 2014

Application Deadline: December 2, 2013

Application and Program Info: http://www.banffcentre.ca/programs/program.aspx?id=1394

Faculty: Lauren BerlantFrancisco CamachoWendy Hui Kyong Chun

Intimacy describes our relations with those people, places, creatures, and things to which we feel the deepest, most powerful or most abiding connections. The multiple ways in which we experience intimacy today draw attention to the complex patterning of closeness and distance that has always unconsciously structured our cultural, social and political practices. There have long been forms of distant intimacy—staying ‘in touch’ via the drama of epistolary exchanges or through sound waves emanating from a telephone—but recent technological developments, increased travel, the expansion of migration and immigration, and instantaneous virtual communication are fundamentally reshaping our understanding and experience of the proximity of bodies, sentiments, and ideas. Social networking and the democratization of modes of communication and media have had a profound significance for the experience of community, collectivity, and affinities; at every level, from the family to the nation, our sense of belonging is being redefined in ways that affect our daily experience but remain difficult to comprehend. 

One can see evidence of the new distribution of intimacy everywhere: in the immediacy of a rock concert, one witnesses people en masse recording the spectacle for friends not present; on public transit around the world, passengers make connections to different elsewheres via newspapers, music, text messages, and mobile phone calls; and in political protests (as evidenced by the Arab Spring and recent dissent in Turkey), which have been reshaped by the use of technologies that are, for a new generation, part and parcel of everyday life. Intimacies of friendship, collectivity, love and belonging are being substantially redefined through the devices in our hands and a global infrastructure that supports instantaneous sharing.

Banff Research in Culture (BRiC) 2014 will investigate the cultural, social, and political repercussions of “distributed intimacies”—the processes and outcomes of new forms of mediation that have reshaped how we relate to one another, imagine ourselves as parts of groups, and constitute communities. Given the fractal character of our subjectivity—the ways in which we are necessarily the outcome of networks of intersubjective relations, experiences, and concepts—how are our intimacies constituted by the ways we live? What are the modes and machines by which intimacies are distributed, and what determines their intensities? How does the global distribution of goods, ideas and affects across oceans and continents shape forms of intimacy, belonging and community? What forms of intimacy feel inescapable? What impedes intimacy from flourishing? Are local scenes and forms of collectivity (e.g., non-traditional families, polyamory, activist movements, alternative forms of political practice) enabled by new forms of distributed intimacies? In what ways do contemporary cultural and art practices participate in the distribution of intimacy? To what extent are our intimacies segmented, remote-controlled, and apportioned, and can we redefine these distributions without lapsing into a nostalgic primitivism? Finally, what does distributed intimacy imply for social change as well as for the politics of shaping one’s own self in relation to others?

We look forward to receiving compelling and original project proposals from thinkers and creators working on a wide range of projects.

Imre Szeman

Canada Research Chair in Cultural Studies

Killam Annual Professor

Professor of English, Film Studies and Sociology

University of Alberta

www.crcculturalstudies.ca

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Information Technology

Information Technology

THIRD WORLD CONFERENCE ON EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY RESEARCHES

Call for Abstracts

Sentido Zeynep Golf & Spa Resort and Hotel

Belek, Antalya, Turkey

7 – 9th November 2013

 

Abstract Submission Deadline: 30th September 2013

President: Profgessor Dr. Servet Bayram

Further detail on Website: http://wctr.org

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

All that is Solid for Glenn Rikowski: https://rikowski.wordpress.com

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Information Technology

Information Technology

E-LEARNING AND DIGITAL MEDIA – VOLUME 10 NUMBER 2 (2013)

Just published at: www.wwwords.co.uk/elea/content/pdfs/10/issue10_2.asp

E-LEARNING AND DIGITAL MEDIA
Volume 10 Number 2 2013     ISSN 2042-7530

SPECIAL ISSUE

Exploring the Educational Potential of Open Educational Resources
Guest Editors: MARKUS DEIMANN & NORM FRIESEN

CONTENTS: 

Markus Deimann & Norm Friesen. Introduction. Exploring the Educational Potential of Open Educational Resources OPEN ACCESS

Stefanie Panke & Tina Seufert. What’s Educational about Open Educational Resources? Different Theoretical Lenses for Conceptualizing Learning with Open Educational Resources

Cheryl Hodgkinson-Williams & Michael Paskevicius. ‘It’s Not Their Job to Share Content’: a case study of the role of senior students in adapting teaching materials as open educational resources at the University of Cape Town

Glenda Cox. Researching Resistance to Open Educational Resource Contribution: an activity theory approach

Melody M. Terras, Judith Ramsay & Elizabeth Boyle. Learning and Open Educational Resources: a psychological perspective

Sandra Peter & Lesley Farrell. From Learning in Coffee Houses to Learning with Open Educational Resources

Markus Deimann. Open Education and Bildung as Kindred Spirits

Norm Friesen & Judith Murray. ‘Open Learning 2.0’? Aligning Student, Teacher and Content for Openness in Education

 

INTERVIEWS

Daniel Araya. Thinking Forward: Theo Gray and the Future of the Book

Daniel Araya. Interview with Jiang Qiping
 

Access to the full texts of articles is restricted to those who have a Personal subscription, or those whose institution has a Library subscription.

PERSONAL SUBSCRIPTION Subscription to the 2013 issues (this includes access to ALL past issues) is available to private individuals at a cost of US$50.00. If you wish to subscribe you may do so immediately at www.wwwords.co.uk/subscribeELEA.asp

LIBRARY SUBSCRIPTION (institution-wide access) If you are working within an institution that maintains a Library, please urge your Librarian to take out a subscription so that we can provide unrestricted access throughout your institution. Details of Library subscription rates and access control arrangements can be found at www.symposium-journals.co.uk/prices.html

CALL FOR PAPERS For all editorial matters, including articles offered for publication, please contact the Editor, Professor Michael A. Peters: mpeters@waikato.ac.nz

In the event of problems concerning subscription, or difficulty in gaining access to the journal articles on the website, please email the publishers: support@symposium-journals.co.uk

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Information

Information

SCIENCE AND INFORMATION CONFERENCE 2013

Science and Information (SAI) Conference 2013

October 7-9, 2013 | LondonUK

More info at www.conference.thesai.org
============

Science and Information (SAI) Conference, technically co-sponsored by IEEE is a premier venue for researchers and industry practitioners to share their new ideas, original research results and practical development experiences from Computer Science, Electronics and Communication related areas.

The conference will be held over three days, with paper presentations from the international community of authors, including presentations from keynote speakers and state-of-the-art lectures. SAI Conference 2013 will be held in London, a vibrant and historical city which is home to multiple academic institutions and where visitors can enjoy a variety of activities and entertainment!

Some of the key recent updates about SAI Conference 2013:

Latest video at http://youtu.be/KeSyo6tZkx0 (Technology, People and You @ Science and Information(SAI) Conference 2013)

Publication support by Springer: Springer to publish modified versions of best papers originating at SAI Conference: http://thesai.org/SAIConference2013/CallforPapers   

Professor Kevin Warwick to deliver the opening keynote at SAI Conference 2013; and many more invited talks at: http://thesai.org/SAIConference2013/Speakers  

The conference is Technically Co-Sponsored by 4 IEEE units, check: http://thesai.org/SAIConference2013/Sponsors

Workshop on “Cloud Computing Issues and Trends” to be held in conjunction with SAI Conference 2013. http://thesai.org/SAIConference2013/CCIT

SAI Conference 2013 to be held at Thistle, London Heathrow. It is one of the few hotels located near to the country’s premier international airport. As the closest off-site hotel to Terminal 5, and less than two miles to Terminals 1 & 3, the hotel is perfectly located for access to and from the airport. http://thesai.org/SAIConference2013/Venue  

Conference Dates: October 7-9, 2013

The submission system is accessible through the following link:  http://thesai.org/SAIConference2013/Submit. Submission of Manuscripts can also be done by email at conference@thesai.org. Please consider submitting your research work at the most dynamic event of 2013; and kindly circulate this e-mail among your colleagues and students.

Participants can register for the conference at : http://thesai.org/SAIConference2013/Register

Hope to see you at SAI Conference 2013!

Check out the Conference Page on Facebook!!!

Warm Regards,

Conference Manager

Science and Information Conference 2013

www.conference.thesai.org | conference@thesai.org

www.facebook.com/SAIConference | www.youtube.com/SAIConference

 

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski