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Biopolitics

Biopolitics

BIOPOLITICS

Call for Papers

Journal Pléyade

ISSN 0718-655x / Online ISSN 0719-3696

Nº 17 January-June, 2016

Special Edition on Biopolitics

Since Foucault’s initial work on “biopolitics”, the relation between life and politics has become of increasing significance in the contemporary debate in philosophy and in the social sciences. As an area of research and as a concept, biopolitics has received diverse and at times opposed applications in the works of Antonio Negri, Roberto Esposito, Giorgio Agamben, Nikolas Rose, among others. This year the journal Pléyade intends to dedicate a dossier on biopolitics with the aim of analyzing both the exploitation and administration of biological life as a form of power, and of proposing alternative conceptions of politics that allow biological life to escape or resist its domination. We are interested in receiving contributions that address both modalities of biopolitics from a variety of disciplinary points of view.

 

This dossier invites authors to make contributions in the different areas on biopolitics and biopower in the contemporary thought. Along these lines, the proposed themes could include:

– Debates in contemporary thought on life and politics

– New perspectives on Michel Foucault and biopolitics

– Italian Theory and biopolitics

– Biopolitics and neoliberalism

– Biopolitics and totalitarianism

– Origines of biopolitics in the history of philosophy

– Affirmative biopolitics

– Biopolitics and new materialism

 

Guest Editor:

Vanessa Lemm, Head of the School of Humanities and Languages, University of New

South Wales UNSW, Australia.

Reception until: December 30, 2015

Languages: English or Spanish

Publication date: June 2016

Send articles to: revistapleyade@caip.cl

Manuscripts will be evaluated by double blind refereeing

bIOdownload

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

images (2)

images (24)BIOTECHNOLOGY, BIOPOLITICS & BIOCAPITAL

Friday October 23, 2015

2.30 – 6.00 pm

216 Asa Briggs Hall

Richmond University

17 Andsell Street, London, W8 5BN

Advances in our ability to make circulate, to intervene and to enhance biological functions have meant that the realm of culture now involves the transformation and commodification of ‘nature’ at its most elemental and molecular levels. This workshop interrogates changing understandings of ‘life’, the human, and the natural in the context of these and related developments in biotechnology, biopolitics and bio-capital.

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Benoît Dillet (Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies) ‘Automation, Desire and Capital’

Alexander R. Wilson (Aarhus University) ‘Chronopolitics, Biotechnology, and the Post-Human Narrative’

Danielle Sands (Royal Holloway) ‘Gaia, Gender, and the Anthropocene’

Paul Rekret (Richmond) ‘Cogito Ergo Habum’

 

All welcome.

 

Please register at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/biotechnology-biopolitics-biocapital-tickets-18625940690

For enquiries contact Paul Rekret rekretp@richmond.ac.uk

Part of the ‘Living in the Anthropocene: Rethinking the Nature/Culture Divide’ Workshop Series: http://rethinkingtheanthropocene.blogspot.co.uk/

images (23)

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

BIOdownload

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

PRAKTYKA TEORETYCZNA (THEORETICAL PRACTICE) – CALL FOR PAPERS

Praktyka Teoretyczna: http://www.praktykateoretyczna.pl/

This Call for Papers is for the Introduction section, known as “Varia” in the fourth issue of “Theoretical Practice”. “Varia” will be concerned with unsolicited texts, interesting research topics and interventions that do not fit into the thematic nature of the issue. “Varia” will then become a permanent feature of the journal.

We encourage you to submit to the Editor scientific articles in the area of broad leftist thought and engaged research practice, in writing that is clear, and is in tune with the practical-theoretical perspective of the journal (with particular emphasis on Marxist thought, as well as, among others, biopolitics, poststructuralism, posthumanism, postcolonial studies, gender, queer, urban, animal research or higher education).

This invitation is permanent and is not associated with any particular deadline for submitting articles. The authors and the author must, however, reckon with the fact that the potential publication will depend on the normal mode of publishing in the magazine.

The volume of the article (written in Polish or English) can not exceed 40 thousand characters (including spaces and footnotes, please refer to the other guidelines in the section for authors ). Each of the texts is subject to technical editing and double-substantive editorial. Those articles that undergo the process of positive evaluation will be peer reviewed by two anonymous reviewers, independent and non-editorial, who have expertise in the field and relevant research interests. The review process will be ‘double blind’. An article that will pass through this procedure successfully will then be published in one of the numbers thematic magazines.

Call for Papers (with Polish-English translation facility): http://www.praktykateoretyczna.pl/call-for-papers/call-for-papers-varia/

 

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The New Left Book Club: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2014/01/05/the-new-left-book-club-call-for-papers/

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Marxism Against Postmodernism in Educational Theory

Marxism Against Postmodernism in Educational Theory

POLICY FUTURES IN EDUCATION: VOLUME 11 NUMBER 1 (2013)

Now available at: www.wwwords.co.uk/pfie/content/pdfs/11/issue11_1.asp

POLICY FUTURES IN EDUCATION
Volume 11 Number 1 2013, ISSN 1478-2103

CONTENTS:

Enma Campozano Aviles & Maarten Simons. To be Accountable in Neoliberal Times: an exploration of educational policy in Ecuador

Iris Haapanen. Three Methods of Enhancing Global Educational Awareness for Future Teachers

Kirti Joshi, Kavita Mehra, Suman Govil & Nitu Singh. Biotechnology Education in India: an overview

Reijo Kupiainen. Dissolving the School Space: young people’s media production in and outside of school

Alexander Means. Creativity and the Biopolitical Commons in Secondary and Higher Education

Maria Nikolakaki. Pedagogical Systems and the Construction of the Primary School Teacher in the Teachers’ Training Institution (Didaskalio) in Greece (1830 1933): issues of power and governmentality

Johan Nordensvard. Using Political Metaphors to Understand Educational Policy in Developing Countries: the case of Ghana and informal communities

Erdal Toprakçı, Serkan Buldur, Ebru Bozpolat, Gülçin Oflaz, İclal Dağdeviren & Ersin Türe. The Philosophy of Turkish National and Higher Education

Lynley Tulloch. On Science, Ecology and Environmentalism
Access to the full texts of current articles is restricted to those who have a Personal subscription, or those whose institution has a Library subscription. Articles older than three years are open access.

PLEASE NOTE: to accommodate the increasing flow of quality papers this journal will expand to 8 numbers per volume/year as from Volume 12, 2014.

PERSONAL SUBSCRIPTION (single user access) Subscription to the January-December 2013 issues (including full access to ALL back numbers), is available to individuals at a cost of US$54.00. If you wish to subscribe you may do so immediately at www.wwwords.co.uk/subscribePFIE.asp

LIBRARY SUBSCRIPTION (institution-wide access) If you are working within an institution that maintains a Library, please urge them to purchase a Library subscription so access is provided throughout your institution; full details for libraries can be found: www.symposium-journals.co.uk/prices.html

For all editorial matters, including articles offered for publication, please contact the Editor, Professor Michael A. Peters: mpeters@waikato.ac.nz

In the event of problems concerning a subscription, or difficulty in gaining access to the articles, please contact the publishers: support@symposium-journals.co.uk

 

*****

Glenn Rikowski and Ruth Rikowski have a number of articles in Policy Futures in Education. These include:

Rikowski, Ruth (2003) Value – the Life Blood of Capitalism: knowledge is the current key, Policy Futures in Education, Vol.1 No.1, pp.160-178 http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pdf/viewpdf.asp?j=pfie&vol=1&issue=1&year=2003&article=9_Rikowski_PFIE_1_1&id=195.93.21.68

Rikowski, Glenn (2004) Marx and the Education of the Future, Policy Futures in Education, Vol.2 Nos. 3 & 4, pp.565-577, online at: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pdf/viewpdf.asp?j=pfie&vol=2&issue=3&year=2004&article=10_Rikowski_PFEO_2_3-4_web&id=195.93.21.71

Rikowski, Ruth (2006) A Marxist Analysis of the World Trade Organisation’s Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights, Policy Futures in Education, Vol.4 No.4: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pdf/viewpdf.asp?j=pfie&vol=4&issue=4&year=2006&article=7_Rikowski_PFIE_4_4_web&id=205.188.117.66

Rikowski, Ruth (2008) Review Essay: ‘On Marx: An introduction to the revolutionary intellect of Karl Marx’, by Paula Allman, Policy Futures in Education,Vol.6 No.5, pp.653-661: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pdf/validate.asp?j=pfie&vol=6&issue=5&year=2008&article=11_Rikowski_PFIE_6_5_web

 

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Capitalism in Crisis

FINANCE AND THE REALIZATION OF VALUE IN THE “SOCIAL FACTORY”

Call for Papers: Association of American Geographers ( AAG ) Annual Meeting 2013, Los Angeles April 9 -13th

Finance and the Realization of Value in the “Social Factory”

Co-organized by Mark Kear (Simon Fraser University) and Lana Swartz (University of Southern California)

Session Overview

This session explores the changing role of money and finance in the realization of value outside traditional sites of production, and through social processes and activities not historically associated with value production. Over the last three decades geographers have documented dramatic transformations in the nature of labor in affluent capitalist states. These transformations have been attended by a growth in insecure, casualized, and irregular employment; a blurring of work and non-work time as well as a rise in the prominence of “entrepreneurial,” “affective,” “creative” and “immaterial” labour. Italian autonomists (e.g. Hardt and Negri 2010, Marazzi 2011, Vecellone 2007) argue that these shifts in the nature of work have dispersed and decentralized the valorization process to a point where ‘the whole society is placed at the disposal of profit’ (Negri, 1989: 79 cited in Gill and Pratt 2007) – turning society into a “social factory” for the production of value. This “real subsumption of society under capital,” however, creates challenges for the regulation of productive processes and the realization of value created beyond the “factory gate.”

With these challenges in mind, we hope to explore how innovations in payments systems, banking, financial analytics and credit scoring products as well as other financial apparatuses (e.g. loan products, mobile apps, transaction services, etc.) enable the capitalization and regulation of diffuse value producing activity (in the home, online, etc.), and help capture surpluses produced through such activity. According to Hardt and Negri (2009: 289) “only finance is able to oversee and compel the flexibility, mobility and precariousness of biopolitical labor-power;” however, the specific financial devices (Muniesa, Millo and Callon 2007) and mechanisms through which everyday activities and forms of sociality are rendered sources of economic value remain largely unstudied.

The current efforts of financial institutions, state regulators and consumer advocates to build a more “inclusive” financial system, develop new products, and harness new data sources, promise to produce new “spaces” into which financial markets can expand and “empower” the excluded. Some of these efforts lay new infrastructures of value transfer and production, while others work to privatize and “ride the rails” of public systems (Maurer 2012). We hope this session will facilitate a rewarding and critical discussion about this post-subprime crisis future of financialization – its vectors, contradictions, geographies, and targets for resistance.

Possible paper topics and themes include:

– Money and payment infrastructures

– Financial empowerment, financial inclusion and financial citizenship

– Behavioral finance, financial education and financial subject formation

– Geographies of transactional finance

– Biocapitalism / cognitive capitalism

– South-to-north policy transfer / finance and the “bottom of the pyramid”

– Asset-based welfare and neoliberalization

– Mobile banking and prepaid cards

– Finance and precarity

– Financial ethnography

– Consumer finance, social protection and personal responsibility

– Finance and class

– Resistance to financialization

– Finance and the commons

– Financial reform

– Finance and measurement (e.g. data, scoring, and risk)

– Finance and social capital

– Debtor-creditor relations

– Finance and philanthrocapitalism

Submissions need not be limited to these suggestions; we welcome abstracts with expansive interpretations of these topics and themes.

Please send proposed titles and abstracts of up to 250 words to Mark Kear ( mkear@sfu.ca ) and Lana Swartz ( dswartz@usc.edu ) by October 1st , 2012.

References

Gill, R., & Pratt, A. (2008). In the Social Factory? Immaterial Labour, Precariousness and Cultural Work. Theory Culture and Society , 25 (7-8), 1–30.
Marazzi, C. (2011). The Violence of Financial Capitalism . Los Angeles: Semiotext(e).
Maurer, B. (2012). Mobile Money: Communication, Consumption and Change in the Payments Space. Journal of Development Studies , 48 (5), 589–604.
Muniesa, F., Millo, Y., & Callon, M. (2007). An introduction to market devices. Socialogical Review , 55 (2), 1–12.
Negri, A., & Hardt, M. (2009). Commonwealth . Cambridge: Belknap Press of Harvard Press.
Vercellone, C. (2007). From Formal Subsumption to General Intellect: Elements for a Marxist Reading of the Thesis of Cognitive Capitalism. Historical Materialism , 15 (1), 13–36.

First published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/2nd-cfp-aag-2013-la-9-13-april-finance-and-the-realization-of-value-in-the-social-factory

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Werner Bonefeld

STUDIES IN SOCIAL AND POLITICAL THOUGHT ANNUAL CONFERENCE – POWER AND RESISTANCE

June 15-16, 2012
University of Sussex, Brighton

Keynote Speakers:
Werner Bonefeld (York)
Alberto Toscano (Goldsmiths)

While governments around the world have initiated austerity measures on a grand scale and have even been ousted in favour of technocratic administrations, pockets of sustained resistance continue to manifest themselves. Whether it is the populist Occupy movement, ultra-left theorists of Communisation, anti-cuts protesters, or even the rioters who took to the streets of London and beyond, the struggle against the apparent status quo continues. When taken in the light of the Arab Spring, questions must be asked in regards to the relationship between resistance and revolution. These movements managed to turn a tide of resistance into a force for revolution. Is this a paradigm-shift in the way this relationship must be thought?

Alongside these movements and despite the optimism generated by them, the power of the governments to crush, de-legitimise, and ignore opposition appears to remain. Some critics blame a lack of coherent message and agenda; others say that the forces of opposition are not dealing with the reality of the situation. This critique, however, does not have the last word. These forms of resistance, in their many guises, challenge the state’s belief that it has a monopoly on reality. They challenge the very legitimacy of the state to disseminate the status quo and, therefore, represent a radical alternative even if they do not, or cannot, dictate what the alternative may be. What role do the concepts of power and resistance play in our analysis of the current situation? Do they require a reassessment or does the contemporary conjuncture simply represent a reassertion of the same old forces in a different guise?

Power is one of the core concepts of social and political thought. Yet there is plenty of disagreement about what is, how it functions and how it should be contested. Our present conjuncture is witnessing many different manifestations of power and resistance. However, there is a lack of serious theoretical engagement with the current situation. We are seeking papers that engage theoretically with the current situation, and which emphasise the central roles of the concepts of power and resistance. Possible theoretical frameworks include, but are not limited to, theories of biopolitics, instrumental reason, critical theory, post-colonialism, discourse and democratic theory, structuralism and post-structuralism, recognition, soft-power, hegemony, world-systems, sovereignty, legality, and legitimacy.

Programme:

Day 1: June 15, 2012 (All talks unless otherwise noted will be held in Fulton 107)

9-10 – Registration

10-1045 – Gianandrea Manfredi (Sussex), Understanding the structural form of resistance and the processes by which resistant social spaces are negated

1045-1130 – Jeffery Nicholas (Providence College/CASEP London Metropolitan University), Reason, Resistance and Revolution: Occupy’s Nascent Democratic Practice

1130-1215 – Svenja Bromberg (Goldsmiths), A critique of Badiou’s and Ranciere’s notion of emancipation

1215-1315 – Lunch

1315-1400 – Khafiz Tapdygovich Kerimov (American University in Bulgaria), From Epistemic Violence to Respecting the Differend: The Fate of Eurocentrism in the Discourse of Human Sciences

1400-1445 – Marta Resmini (KU Leuven), Participation as Surveillance? Counter-democracy versus Governmentality

1445-1515 – Coffee Break

1515-1600 – Alastair Gray (Sussex), Activity Without Purpose: Parrhesia, The Unsayable and The Riots

1600-1645 – Zoe Sutherland (Sussex) & Rob Lucas (Independent Researcher) – A Theory of Current Struggles

1645-1700 – Coffee Break

1700-1900 – Keynote: Werner Bonefeld (York) (Fulton Lecture Theatre A)

Day 2: June 16, 2012 (All talks unless otherwise noted will be held in Fulton 102)

1045-1145 – Registration

1145-1230 – Sarit Larry (Boston College), The Status of Vagueness: Mythical Events and the Israeli Social Justice Movement

1230-1315 – Mehmet Erol (York), Bringing Class Back In: The case of Tekel Resistance in Turkey

1315-1430 – Lunch

1430-1515 – Torsten Menge (Georgetown Univesity), A deflationary conception of social power

1515-1600 – Sarah Burton (University of Cambridge), Reimagining Resistance: misrule and the place of the fantastic in John Holloway’s anti-power

1600-1645 – Jorge Ollero Perán & Fernando Garcia-Quero (University of Granada), Can ethics be conceived as an economic institution? An interdisciplinary approach to the critique of neoliberal ethics

1645-1700 – Coffee Break

1700-1900 – Keynote: Alberto Toscano (Goldsmiths) (Arts A1)

Please email ssptconference2012@gmail.com to register and check http://ssptjournal.wordpress.com for more information. There will be a £15 conference fee (£7.50 for one-day) payable in cash on the day to help cover expenses.

 

*****END*****

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Aesthetics

THE ANOMIE OF THE EARTH

Call for Papers

The Universityof North Carolina at Chapel Hill, May 3-5, 2012 @ The Institute for the Arts and Humanities/Global Education Center

In collaboration with the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor and NWO

The conference The Anomie of the Earth is a follow-up to the Post/autonomy conference held in Amsterdam in May 2011.

While the Post/autonomy meeting focused on the European dissemination of autonomist thought, the second conference will build on its American location and explore a plurality of notions and practices of cultural-political autonomy. Though privileging the context of North and South America, the conference will also address European, African and Asian perspectives.

A presupposition of the conference is that what Carl Schmitt has defined as the Western “nomos of the Earth” – i.e. the political, legal, and spatial configuration of a Euro-Atlantic modern global order – is currently being shaken by intense endogenous and exogenous forces. By discussing the potentials and limits of autonomy/autonomia within our actual conjuncture, the conference will address the emerging nomos and its new constellations of life and knowledge.

More specifically, the conference will thematize the intersections of autonomy/autonomia with four lines of research that have reframed current debates in the humanities and social sciences:

* Radical conceptualizations of life, labor, sovereignty, borders, precarity, migrations, communities and commons, multitude;

* Spatial, affective, ethical and ecological forms of resistance to neoliberal capitalism;

* Critical trends taking place at the edges of contemporary epistemologies; such as vitalisms, geo-philosophies, biopolitics, political anthropologies, new materialisms, political ontologies and ecologies, subaltern studies, embodiment and emergence theories;

* Decolonial studies and new theorizations of post-capitalist, non-liberal and non-statist modes of knowledge and political practice; decolonial feminisms.

These broad themes should be focalized through a specific engagement with autonomy/autonomia.

We welcome the submission of papers in English. Accepted papers will be posted online on the conference website (http://postautonomia.org/). For the panels, speakers will be asked to make short (10-15 minutes) presentations addressing the main topics of their papers.

Please send your paper, together with a short abstract, by March 1 to the.anomie.of.the.earth@gmail.com. Given the limited size of the conference, only a small number of papers will be accepted. Conference organizers will send acceptance notifications by March 21.

For further information, please contact the.anomie.of.the.earth@gmail.com

This conference is the second of a series within the project Precarity and Post-autonomia: the Global Heritage funded by NWO (Dutch Organisation for Scientific Research).
Confirmed Participants

Giuseppe Bianco (University of Warwick/CIEPFC)

Jodi A. Byrd (University of Illinois)

Gustavo Esteva (Universidad de la Tierra)

Silvia Federici (Hofstra University)

Michael Hardt (Duke University)

Catherine Walsh (Universidad Simon Bolivar)

Gareth Williams (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor)

And the planning committee:
Federico Luisetti, John Pickles, Wilson Kaiser (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill), Vincenzo Binetti (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor)

in collaboration with, at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill: Samuel Amago, Yusuf Al-Bulushi, Emilio del Valle Escalante, Mark Driscoll, Arturo Escobar, Diana Marcela Gomez Correal, Lawrence Grossberg, Michal Osterweil, Michael Palm, Alvaro Reyes

and the NWO partners: Frans-Willem Korsten (Leiden University/Erasmus University Rotterdam), Joost de Bloois (University of Amsterdam), Silvia Contarini (Université Paris Ouest, Nanterre La Défense), Monica Jansen (Utrecht University)

Sponsors

NWO, Department of Romance Languages and Literatures (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor), and the Center for Global Initiatives, Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, Center for European Studies, The Institute for the Arts and Humanities, The Institute for the Study of the Americas, Department of Geography, Program in Comparative Literature, Department of Anthropology, Department of Communication Studies, Cultural Studies@UNC (UNC-Chapel Hill), Department of Romance Studies (Duke University)

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

System of a Down

FUELING CULTURE: ENERGY, HISTORY, POLITICS

CALL FOR PAPERS

Resource depletion and anxiety are not new, nor is the paralyzing knowledge that a particular form of energy is harmful or unsustainable.  How has our relation to energy changed over time? What differences do specific energy sources make to human values and politics ? How have changing energy resources transformed culture?

This collection of scholarly essays, brief reflections, and info blurbs will focus on intersections between energy, history, and a range of cultural formations, including literature, film, art, digital media, and popular culture. We will include essays that touch on a wide range of energy resources (dung, wood/charcoal, coal, tallow, plant oils, whale oil, kerosene, petroleum, natural gas, nuclear, biofuels, solar, wind, wave, steam, and human energy). We also plan to include essays on energy resources like electricity (which circulates as a secondary form of energy generated by wood, coal, etc). We are also curious about dams as projects of decolonization and modernization.

We hope for broad geographic scope in this collection, with attention to place-specific concerns and the spatial relations entailed in different forms of energy use, including what Fernando Coronil has called the “international division of nature.” If the shift from wood to coal allowed for massive increases in energy consumption with less land/woodlots devoted to energy production, as Timothy Mitchell argues, what other shifts in scale are important for thinking about the history of energy formations? As Laurie Shannon argues in a PMLA essay on tallow, the shift from energy produced within the household to modes of energy sourced elsewhere suggests that questions of scale are central for thinking about energy. Ken Hiltner’s argument that pollution increases with the changing spatial concentration of urbanLondonsuggests the urgency of contemplating energy in relation to scale in earlier periods. Is it possible that all forms of energy are “dirty” when scaled up to meet demand?

The question of periodization is crucial to this project. How do we periodize cultural production around material resources that have been unread or elided by critics? How do questions of energy become legible in moments of crisis? What is the role of energy scarcity and profligacy? The role of an “energy unconscious” delieates one mode of analysis, as does the simultaneity of different modes of energy resources. Thus periodization is not a simple matter. Consider Dipesh Chakrabarty’s attention to the coincidence of the age of Enlightenment and the Anthropocene, Mitchell’s comparison of wood, coal, oil and the forms of social and political organization they entail, and Michael Pollan’s account of the shift from the sun and fossil fuels in the industrialization of food.

In addition to periodization, we’re interested in essays that explore methodology: protocols of reading that are attuned to questions of energy (or its absence) within a given text. How do we read for energy in relation to the sociology and materiality of literary production and distribution? How do we identify cultural forms that are particularly attuned to these questions? How does energy put pressure on literary and cultural forms? Does genre look different when we think about energy?

We hope to gather writing that is multiply interdisciplinary, drawing on insights from political economy, political ecology, environmental history, eco-criticism, postcolonial and globalization studies, materialisms old and new, including thing theory and actor network theory.

 

March 15, 2012 for abstracts

December 1, 2012 for essays

Length:  6000 words

 

(As indicated above, in addition to research essays we are interested in including shorter pieces related to any of the issues explored in this collection).

Send Copies to:

Imre Szeman: imre@ualberta.ca

Jennifer Wenzel: jawenzel@umich.edu

Patsy Yaeger: pyaeger@umich.edu

 

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

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Revolt

NEGATIVE COSMOPOLITANISMS: ABJECTION, POWER, AND BIOPOLITICS 

Negative Cosmopolitanisms: Abjection, Power, and Biopolitics
University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada, 11-13 October 2012

Organizers: Terri Tomsky (University of Alberta), Eddy Kent (University of Alberta), Imre Szeman (University of Alberta)

Keynote Speakers:

Timothy Brennan (University of Minnesota)
Pheng Cheah (University of California, Berkeley)
Sneja Gunew (University of British Columbia)
Peter Nyers (McMaster University)

This interdisciplinary conference seeks to explore the array of negative cosmopolitanisms operating today—all those ways in which cosmopolitan subjects are still stigmatized, disempowered, excluded, and denied. Against the superficial liberal celebration of cosmopolitan diversity in the world today, negative cosmopolitanism instead reveals experiences of rupture, exile, oppression, and imperialism. The conference will bring researchers together to explore the histories and constitution of cosmopolitanism past and present, with the aim of better understanding the complex experience of power today.

Though cosmopolitanism is often thought of as a positive form of “world citizenship”, this conference is interested in the way cosmopolitanism can signify disenfranchisement. Globalization’s economic asymmetries and the biopolitical management of modern states create cosmopolitan abjections: in the circulation of outsourced prisoners, with the deportation of sick migrants, in the extraordinary rendition of enemy combatants, with the worldwide flows of migrant and trafficked workers, and so on. The conference will engage the invisible presence of this “negative cosmopolitanism” for the Western middle-class and its liberal pundits. It will open up considerations of negative cosmopolitanism, exploring ideas around an imperial cosmopolis, slum or ghetto cosmopolitanisms, finance capitalism, piracy as it pertains both to material and intellectual property, and so on.

Despite its long history, the status of the negative cosmopolitan assumes a new importance in the aftermath of globalization, not only within discourses about universal human rights but also in the infrastructures built to shuttle people, things, and ideas around the world. We therefore aim to understand the role of the nation-state in refuting or resolving this problematic subjectivity. But we must also account for the influence of internationalism, workers’ unions, women’s movements, NGOs, and religious organizations. Some of this theorizing is obviously not new, but it needs to be rearticulated in a context in which idealistic misconceptions of cosmopolitanism still dominate.

We invite theoretical and historical contributions to these and related topics. Themes you may wish to consider include (but are not limited to):

* The history and/or representations of cosmopolitanism
* Slum- or ghetto-based cosmopolitanisms
* Imperial cosmopolitanism (e.g. the military complex, the War on Terror)
* Labor and Internationalism
* Community or the Commons
* Piracy
* Trafficking, dislocation, border-crossing
* State sovereignty/state vulnerability/ the penal state
* Communication and information technologies, new media
* Biopolitics
* Religious movements
* Feminism
 
Proposals shall consist of an abstract of 350-500 words and a one-page CV.

 

Please send your applications to Dr. Terri Tomsky <tomsky@ualberta.ca> by 21 October 2011.

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Antonio Negri

BIOPOLITICS OF THE COMMONS

Call for papers to the Colloquium “Biopolitics of the Commons”
Institute for Humanities and Faculty of Social Science and History
Diego Portales University
Santiago-Chile
Thursday, October 27th 2011, 15.00 – 20.30 hrs.

The commons has emerged as one of the key concepts around which social, political and cultural demands are being articulated and theorized today. Harkening back to the displacement of people from shared communal spaces and their transformation from public into private property – a central act in the development of European capitalism in the 18th and 19th centuries — the commons insists on the fundamentally shared character of social life: that everything from language to education, from nature to our genetic inheritance, belongs irreducibly to all of us; to a living which is, in that sense, always ours.

Moreover, in a national and global conjuncture, where the private seems to appropriate everything that is collective, this symposium will explore which are the possible answers given by the contemporary political theory to the so called “accumulation by dispossession”, based on the approaches of Antonio Negri, Giorgio Agamben, Roberto Esposito, Jean-Luc Nancy and Étienne Balibar, among others.

To this end, we invite scholars who would be interested in participate in this event, to submit an abstract of 300 words (in Spanish or English) by the August 30th, 2011to the professors Ricardo Camargo (ricardo.camargo@udp.cl) and Miguel Vatter (miguel.vatter@udp.cl) There will be a selection of the submitted proposals. The accepted applicants should send the complete paper at least two weeks before of the symposium’s date.

This symposium will count with the presence and participation of Antonio Negri, one of the most prominent political thinkers of our time. Professor Negri has been involved in developing a theoretical approach not only to the notion of the commons, but also to the notions of Empire, Multitude, Intellectual Labor, among others theoretical categories, all of which are embodied in his recent trilogy, co-authored with Michael Hardt: Empire, Multitude and Commonwealth.
The symposium will be closed with an open lecture given by Professor Negri.
 

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Richard Alpert

RADICAL FOUCAULT EXPANDED! AN INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

September 8th – 9th, Universityof East London(Docklands Campus)
Centre for Cultural Studies Research, University of East London
http://culturalstudiesresearch.org/?p=591

Following the  superb international response to our initial call for papers, we have decided to expand the  event into a two-day conference. This has opened up a very limited amount of space for further contributions. Abstracts of no more than 350 words are invited, to arrive no later than Sunday May 8th 201.

The publication of Michel Foucault’s Lectures at the Collège de France, 1983-84 in English will be complete in April 2011 and his first Collège de France lecture course, La Volunté de Savoir will be published for the first time in February. The Centre for Cultural Studies Research at the University of East London is holding a an international conference which will re-assess Foucault’s contribution to radical thought and the application of his ideas to contemporary politics. What does it mean to draw on Foucault as a resource for radical politics, and how are we to understand the politics which implicitly informs his work?

Many commentators today would seem to claim Foucault as  the theorist of a politics which eschews all utopian ambition in favour of a certain governmental pragmatism, while others would claim him for a rigorous but ultimately rather simple libertarianism: can either of these positions ever be adequate to the radicalism of Foucault’s  analyses? Does it matter?

What is the significance of Foucault’s ideas of ‘governmentality’ and ‘biopolitics’ in understanding his later oeuvre and its implications; do either of these terms deserve to carry the weight attributed to them by some commentators? What is the ongoing relevance of Foucault’s account of disciplinarity: is, it, as Lazzarato has claimed, a historical category no longer fully applicable to contemporary forms of power?

How can Foucauldian ideas be brought bear on the analysis of austerity politics? Is there a role for Foucault’s ideas in formulating effective resistance to the increasing erosion of civil liberties that operates both within countries and across state boundaries? Can the notion of bio-power account for contemporary forms of racism? How can Foucauldian epistemology enable an understanding of the biopolitics of contemporary scientific discourse?

Confirmed Keynotes:
Stuart Elden, Professor in the Department of Geography, Durham University.
Mark Kelly, Lecturer in Philosophy, Middlesex University.

Subjects may include, but are not limited to:
Foucauldian thought and contemporary subjectivation
Foucault and other thinkers
Governmentality and everyday life
Strategic discourses of war and terror
New technologies of the self
Foucault and new forms of resistance
Heterotopias  now and in the future
Foucault and the erosion of the state
Disciplinary society and the society of control
Foucault, British politics and the ‘big society’
Foucault, post-Fordism and post-democracy

Email abstracts to Jeremy Gilbert (j.gilbert@uel.ac.uk) and Debra Benita Shaw (d.shaw@uel.ac.uk)

Registration will cost £110.00 per delegate (including lunch, not including accommodation or dinner) for both days. A day-rate of 65.00 will be available, but delegates will be strongly encouraged to attend on both days, and the organisers cannot promise to accommodate requests to present on a particular day.

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

All that is Solid for Glenn Rikowski: https://rikowski.wordpress.com

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com