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Frantz Fanon

Frantz Fanon

TWO TALKS ON FRANTZ FANON – BY PETER HUDIS

 

Tuesday 16th February 2016

Frantz Fanon on Race, Recognition, and Revolution: A Re-examination

Cambridge

Cambridge University

Mill Lane Lecture Room, 17:00-18:45:

Organised by the Cambridge Defend Education (CDE) and Cambridgeshire Left

See: http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/events/cambridge-uk-frantz-fanon-race-recognition-revolution-re-examination

Frantz Fanon (1926-61) is widely considered one of the most important anti-colonial theorists of the twentieth century. Today we are witnessing a resurgence of interest in his contributions to philosophy, psychology and revolutionary theory in light of such realities as persistent racial discrimination in the West, the rise of religious fundamentalism, and the social crises enveloping much of the developing world. This talk will re-examine Fanon’s contributions to ongoing debates over race, racism, and recognition in light of the intellectual sources that motivated much of his work—especially Marxist theory and Hegelian philosophy.

Peter Hudis is author of Frantz Fanon: Philosopher of the Barricades (Pluto Press, 2015) and Marx’s Concept of the Alternative to Capitalism (Brill, 2012). He has edited or co-edited numerous works, including The Power of Negativity: Selected Writings on the Dialectic of Hegel and Marx, by Raya Dunayevskaya (Lexington, 1992) and The Rosa Luxemburg Reader (Monthly Review Books, 2006). He is currently general editor of The Complete Works of Rosa Luxemburg, which will make all of her work available in 14 volumes (3 volumes have appeared so far). He is Professor of Philosophy and Humanities at Oakton Community College in the U.S.
Sunday 13th March 2016

Why Frantz Fanon Matters to Today’s Struggles Against Racism and Imperialism

6:30-8:30 PM

Westside Peace Center
3916 Sepulveda Blvd., near Venice Blvd. (Free parking in rear)
Suite 101-102, press #22 at door to get into building
Culver City (LA area)

To be followed by A PARTY CELEBRATING THE COMING OF NOWRUZ (PERSIAN NEW YEAR)

See: http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/events/los-angeles-frantz-fanon-matters-todays-struggles-racism-imperialism

 

And also a second edition of the book Marx at the Margins, by Kebin B. Anderson, is now available:

See for more at: http://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/M/bo22776846.html

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/3-talks-by-hudis-on-fanon

Peter Hudis

Peter Hudis

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

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Mike Cole

Mike Cole

RACISM: A CRITICAL ANALYSIS

A new book by Mike Cole

Paperback: 272 pages

Publisher: Pluto Press (20 Nov. 2015)

Language: English

Paperback: £17.50 from Pluto Press: http://www.plutobooks.com/display.asp?K=9780745334714

ISBN-10: 0745334717

ISBN-13: 978-0745334714

The book traces the legacy of racism across three continents, from its origins to the present day. With a wide-ranging yet closely-argued style, it brings a sophisticated neo-Marxist analysis to bear on controversial political issues.

Mike Cole tackles three countries in-depth: the United Kingdom, the United States and Australia. In the UK, he focuses on the effects of colonialism as well as looking at non-colour-coded racism, such as anti-Gipsy, Roma and Traveller racism and xeno-racism – directed at Eastern Europeans. Turning to the United States, Cole charts the dual legacies of indigenous genocide and slavery, as well as exploring anti-Latina/o and anti-Asian racism. Finally, in Australia, he interrogates the idea of ‘Terra Nullius’ and its ongoing impact on the indigenous peoples, as well as other forms of racism, such as that experienced by South Sea Islanders, anti-Asian racism, and that which targets migrants. The Pauline Hanson phenomenon is also addressed. Islamophobia, antisemitism and anti-Irish racism are also dealt with in the book, as is that aimed at asylum-seekers.

Cole demonstrates that racism is both endemic and multifaceted. This book will undoubtedly establish itself as required reading for students and other critical readers looking for a comprehensive, critical overview of the study of racism in Anglophone countries.

“Mike Cole reminds us of the histories of racism across America, Australia and the UK, at the same time urging us to re-engage with arguments about the central role of capitalism in perpetuating the most vicious of inequalities. This is an important reminder of the need to take a long view as we renew our shared struggle against the racism still scarring human lives across the globe.” (Professor Gargi Bhattacharyya, author of Tales Of Dark Skinned Women and Dangerous Brown Men)

 

About the Author:

Dr Mike Cole is Professor in Education, University of East London; and Emeritus Research Professor in Education and Equality, Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln. His latest books are Racism and Education in the UK and the US: Towards a Socialist Alternative (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011) and Critical Race Theory and Education: a Marxist Response (Palgrave Macmillan, 2009).

 

9780745334714

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Kevin Andersdon

Kevin Andersdon

RECAPTURING MARX ON GENDER, RACE AND COLONIALISM: BEYOND POST-MODERNISM AND ORTHODOX MARXISM

London Public Meeting

7.30 pm, Thursday, 5 November 2015
Cock Tavern, 23 Phoenix Road, Euston, London, NW1 1HB
(5 minute walk from Euston or Kings Cross Undergrounds)

 

Speakers:

Heather Brown, author of Marx on Gender and the Family: A Critical Study
Kevin Anderson, author of Marx at the Margins: On Nationalism, Ethnicity and Non-Western Societies
Gilbert Achcar, author of Marxism, Orientalism, Cosmopolitanism
Chairperson:
Peter Hudis, author of Frantz Fanon: Philosopher of the Barricades

 

Sponsored by the International Marxist-Humanist Organization
Further information: http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/

Karl Marx

Karl Marx

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Marx's Grave

Marx’s Grave

Policing Crises

Policing Crises

POLICING CRISES NOW!

Fourteenth Annual Meeting of the Cultural Studies Association (US)  

Villanova University, Villanova, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

2-5 June, 2016

Policing Crises Now!

SUBMIT TODAY!

The Cultural Studies Association (CSA) invites proposals from its current and future members for participation in its fourteenth annual meeting. Proposals on all topics of relevance to cultural studies are welcome, with priority given to proposals that critically and creatively engage this year’s highlighted theme.

The theme, Policing Crises Now, is prompted by and departs from the rich and diverse innovations and provocations of Policing the Crisis (1978), a groundbreaking work generated by a collective of scholars, including and facilitated by Stuart Hall. Those innovations and provocations include the collective nature of the research, the conjunctural/structural mode of analysis, the attention given to race, gender and sexuality in political-economic dynamics, as well as the analysis of intertwined statistical representations, media representations, legal proceedings and, of course, policing by police, as a response to a “crisis of hegemony.”

Taking up Policing Crises Now, in the current conjuncture, requires fresh theorization both of policing, in light, especially, of the potential elasticity of the metaphor, and of crisis in light of its diverse deployments in critical analysis, dominant political-economic practice, and popular culture. By pluralizing crises, we aim to open the scope of inquiry at this conference to include the full range of social, cultural, natural, political, and economic phenomena to which the term crisis has been attached. We also aim, under this rubric, to develop conversations engaged during our last conference about the structure of university work and employment, the ways knowledge production is constrained and enabled by austerity politics, neoliberal entrepreneurialism, the prominence of debt and risk, and the university as a site of policing of thought and political activism. It is o ur hope that this conference both builds from and enables collective knowledge production and research practices.

 

Topics that might be addressed include but are not limited to:

  • Collective research methodologies
  • Securitization, as deployed in financial and international relations/military/police contexts, and the relation between those uses
  • Risk, as deployed vis-a-vis individualized responsibility for physical danger, “at risk” populations, and as a central component of economic praxis
  • The NAACP journal, The Crisis, and its editor W.E.B. DuBois, especially their role in broadening the struggle against racial injustices
  • Debt as policing practice and/or debtor as moralized subject position
  • Financial “crises” in the US, UK, Greece, Iceland, or other specific locations
  • Precarity, its locations and impacts, ranging from the minutiae of labor contracts to its impacts on social reproduction.
  • Policing of national borders against migration/refugees (in Europe now, but also many other times and locations)
  • Identity formation s within and among historical and contemporary migrants as modes of subjection and resistance
  • Policing as a context of imperial convergence through shared strategies of rule, policy/arms transfers (i.e. U.S.-Israel), shared contexts of training.
  • Anti-Black police violence in the US (and elsewhere)
  • Media (old, new, social) representations of anti-Black police violence
  • Relation between incarceration and debt — the revival of “debtor’s prison”
  • Activisms and rebellions against policing and prisons, recently in Ferguson, Baltimore, under the rubric of Black Lives Matter as well as or in relation to long standing efforts and organizations (especially local to Villanova or Philadelphia)
  • Representational strategies and strategic representations (by the state, by artists, by activists) of violence, debt, police.
  • Restructuring of universities for increased managerial control and insecuritization of faculty, etc .
  • Campuses as a historical context of policing politicization in the name of the public; the emerging context of campus privatization and securitization; new techniques, strategies, and rationales for campus policing.
  • Renewed campus regulation of sexuality, claims of sexual vulnerability, and sexual “securitization” of students.

 

We welcome proposals from scholars contributing to cultural studies who may be located in any discipline, inter-discipline, or scholarly field. CSA aims to provide multiple and diverse spaces for the cross-pollination of art, activism, pedagogy, design, and research by bringing together participants from a variety of positions inside and outside the university. Therefore, while we welcome traditional academic papers and panels, we also encourage contributions that experiment with alternative formats and challenge the traditional disciplinary formations and exclusionary conceptions and practices of the academic (see session format options listed below).

We are particularly interested in proposals for sessions designed to document and advance existing forms of collective action or catalyze new collaborations. We encourage submissions from individuals working beyond the boundaries of the university: artists, activists, independent scholars, professionals, community organizers, and community college educators. And we invite proposals that engage with the conference location/region and its many resources.

 

Important Dates:

October 15, 2015: Submission System Opens (Membership and Registration also open — You must be a member to submit!)

February 1, 2016: Submissions Due

March 15, 2016: Notifications Sent Out

April 15, 2016: Early Registration Ends and Late Registration Begins (Registration fees increase by $50 for all categories.)

May 1, 2016: Last day to register to participate in the conference – your name will be dropped from the program if you do not register by this date.

 

LOCATION

The 2016 conference will be held at Villanova University, Villanova, PA. The closest airport is Philadelphia International Airport. Lodging options will include on-campus accommodation, and accommodation in hotels in the surrounding Villanova locale and in Center City Philadelphia–a 20 minute train ride from Villanova.

SUBMISSION PROCESS AND TIMELINE

All proposals should be submitted through the CSA online system, available at Annual Conference. Submission of proposals is limited to current CSA members. See the benefits of membership and become a member: Membership Application.

INSTITUTIONAL MEMBERSHIPS include three complimentary conference registrations annually for students. Graduate students who wish to submit proposals are strongly encouraged to speak with their Department Chair or Program Director about institutional membership and where possible, make use of the complimentary registrations. Full benefits of institutional membership are described here: http://www.culturalstudiesassociation.org/institutions.

The submission system will be open by October 15, 2015. Please prepare all the materials required to propose your session according to the given directions before you begin electronic submission. All program information – names, presentation titles, and institutional affiliations – will be based on initial conference submissions.  Please avoid lengthy presentation and session titles, use normal capitalization, and include your name and affiliations as you would like them to appear on the conference program schedule.

REGISTRATION:

In order to participate in the conference and be listed in the program, all those accepted to participate must register before May 1, 2016Register here.

TRAVEL GRANTS

CSA offers a limited number of travel grants, for which graduate and advanced undergraduate students can apply. Only those who are individual members, have been accepted to participate, and have registered for the conferenceare eligible to apply for a travel grant. Other details and criteria are listed here: http://www.culturalstudiesassociation.org/travelgrants

Important Note about Technology Requests

Accepted participants should send their technology requests to Madeline Cauterucci at madeline.cauterucci@villanova.edu and Michelle Fehsenfeld at contact@culturalstudiesassociation.org. Technology requests must be made by May 1st.

CONFERENCE FORMATS

Note: While we accept individual paper proposals, we especially encourage submissions of pre-constituted sessions. Proposals with participants from multiple institutions will be given preference.

All sessions are 90 minutes long. All conference formats are intended to encourage the presentation and discussion of projects at different stages of development and to foster intellectual exchange and collaboration. Please feel free to adapt the suggested formats or propose others in order to suit your session’s goals. If you have any questions, please address them to Michelle Fehsenfeld at: contact@culturalstudiesassociation.org

PRE-CONSTITUTED PAPER PANELS: Pre-constituted panels allow 3-4 individuals to each offer 15-20 minute presentations, leaving 30-45 minutes of the session for questions and discussion. Panels should have a chair/moderator and may have a discussant. Proposals for pre-constituted panels must include: the title of the panel; the name, title, affiliation, and contact information of the panel organizer; the names, titles, affiliations, and email addresses of all panelists, and a chair and/or discussant; a description of the panel’s topic (<500 words); and abstracts for each presentation (<150 words). Pre-constituted panels are preferred to individual paper submissions.

INDIVIDUAL PAPERS: Individuals may submit a proposal to present a 15-20 minute paper. Selected papers will be combined into panels at the discretion of the Program Committee. Individual paper proposals must include: the title of the paper; the name, title, affiliation, and email address of the author; and an abstract of the (<500 words).

ROUNDTABLES: Roundtables allow a group of participants to convene with the goal of generating discussion around a shared concern. In contrast to panels, roundtables typically involve shorter position or dialogue statements (5-10 minutes) in response to questions distributed in advance by the organizer. The majority of roundtable sessions should be devoted to discussion. Roundtables are limited to no more than five participants, including the organizer. We encourage roundtables involving participants from different institutions, centers, and organizations. Proposals for roundtables must include: the title of the roundtable; the name, title, affiliation, and contact information of the roundtable organizer; the names, titles, affiliations, and email addresses of the proposed roundtable participants; and a description of the position statements, questions, or debates that will be under discussion (<500 words).

PRAXIS SESSIONS: Praxis sessions allow a facilitator or facilitating team to set an agenda, pose opening questions, and/or organize hands-on participant activities, collaborations, or skill-shares. Successful praxis sessions will be organized around a specific objective, productively engage a cultural studies audience, and orient itself towards participants with minimal knowledge of the subject matter. Sessions organized around the development of ongoing creative, artistic, and activist projects are highly encouraged. The facilitator or team is responsible for framing the session, gathering responses and results from participants, helping everyone digest them, and (where applicable) suggesting possible fora for extending the discussion. Proposals for praxis sessions must include: the title of the session; the name, title, affiliation, and contact information the facilitators; a brief statement explaining the session’s connection to the conference theme and describing the activities to be undertaken (<500 words) and a short description of the session (<150 words) to appear in the conference program. Please direct any questions about praxis sessions to Michelle Fehsenfeld at contact@culturalstudiesassociation.org

SEMINARS: Seminars are small-group (maximum 15 individuals) discussion sessions for which participants prepare in advance of the conference. In previous years, preparation has involved shared readings, pre-circulated ”position papers” by seminar leaders and/or participants, and other forms of pre-conference collaboration. We particularly invite proposals for seminars designed to advance emerging lines of inquiry and research/teaching initiatives within cultural studies broadly construed. We also invite seminars designed to generate future collaborations among conference attendees, particularly through the formation of working groups. A limited number of seminars will be selected. Once the seminars are chosen, a call for participants in those seminars will be announced on the CSA webpage and listserv. Those who wish to participate in a particular seminar must apply the s eminar leader(s) directly by March 31, 2016. Seminar leader(s) will be responsible for providing the program committee with a confirmed list of participants (names, affiliations, and email addresses required) for inclusion in the conference program no later than May 1, 2016. Seminars will be marked in the conference programs as either closed to non-participants or open to all conference attendees. Proposals for seminars should include: the title of the seminar; the name, title, affiliation, and contact information of the seminar leader(s); and a description of the issues and questions that will be raised in discussion and an overview of the work to be completed by participants in advance of the seminar (<500 words). Individuals interested in participating in (rather than leading) a seminar should consult the list of seminars and the instructions for signing up for them, to be available on the conference website by March 1st.

Please direct questions about seminars seminars@culturalstudiesassociation.org. Please note that for them to run at the conference, seminars accepted for inclusion by the program committee must garner a minimum of 8 participants, including the seminar leader(s).

WORKING GROUP SESSIONS: CSA has a number of ongoing working groups. Working groups are encouraged to organize two sessions each. Those working groups organizing their sessions through an open call will post those call for proposals on the CSA website. If you are interested in participating in the conference through a working group, you should contact that working group directly. More information is available at: http://www.culturalstudiesassociation.org/workinggroups.

AUTHOR MEETS CRITIC SESSIONS: Author Meets Critic Sessions are designed to bring authors of recent books deemed to be important contributions to the field of cultural studies together with discussants selected to provide different viewpoints. Books published one to three years before the conference (for example, for the 2013 conference, only books published between 2010-2012 can be nominated) are eligible for nomination. Only CSA members may submit nominations.  Self-nominations are not accepted.

MAKE(R) SPACE: The Make(r) Space is a space for the collaborative and praxis driven portions of Cultural Studies – making space for art, making space for political activism, making space for new modes of knowledge exchange. It is our goal that this space will be created for those that have been historically and systemically left out of these conversations: artists, activists, poets, and other cultural critics and makers. We want to create a space that helps the CSA fulfill some of the implicit praxis portion of its goals to “create and promote an effective community of cultural studies practitioners and scholars.” Building on the poets, dancers, painters, and activists already interested in the space, we welcome proposals for exhibits, performances, workshops, skill shares, story telling, and other ways of meaning-making and art-making in the world. We especially encourage Make(r) Space submissions from i ndividuals working beyond the boundaries of the university: artists, activists, independent scholars, professionals, community organizers, contingent faculty, and community college educators. In the spirit of this year’s theme, Policing Crises Now, and building on the work done at last year’s CSA conference we will be utilizing a portion of the Make(r)Space to make space for a visual representation and discussion of debt and risk. Please email Make(r)Space submissions by February 1, 2016 to: makerspace@culturalstudiesassociation.org (Notification and registration deadlines are the same as for all conference participants.)

PANEL CHAIRS: We are always in need of people to serve as panel chairs. To volunteer to do so please submit your name, title, affiliation, and email address, as well as a brief list of your research interests through the conference website.

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/fourteenth-annual-meeting-of-the-cultural-studies-association-us-villanova-university-villanova-philadelphia-pennsylvania-2-5-june-2016

images (3)

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

1968

1968

BEFORE ‘68

Conference—”Before ’68: The Left, activism & social movements in the long 1960s”

Conference Dates: 13 and 14 February 2016

Venue: School of History, University of East Anglia, Norwich, NR4 7TJ, UK and hosted by UEA School of History in conjunction with the journal Socialist History and the Institute of Working Class History (Chicago).

The events of 1968, particularly those in France, have achieved a mythical status in both the memory and the historiography of the 1960s. For some, 1968 marked the end-point of a realignment of the European ‘New Left’. For others 1968 represented a student generation in revolt, and many of the first accounts which sought to explain the history and meaning of ’68 were written by that generation.

More recently historians have tried to demythologise ’68, looking both at less ‘glamourous’ locales and at the deeper histories of anti-colonial struggles and worker activism prior to the events of that year. The aim of this conference is to explore the diverse histories of social activism and left politics in Britain and elsewhere, and how they prepared the ground for and fed into ‘1968’.

Themes might include, but are not limited to:

  • Anti-nuclear & peace movements
    Civil Rights struggles
    The Black Power movement
    Anti-colonial politics
    The activities of the Labour movement and the ‘traditional’ Left
    The grassroots activism of the ‘New Left’
    Far Left challenges: Trotskyism & Maoism
    Campaigns around housing and the built environment
    Campaigns around race and discrimination in the workplace and housing
    Solidarity movements with struggles abroad (e.g. South Africa, Vietnam)
    Campaigns for Homosexual Equality
    Second Wave Feminism

We are seeking papers of 5,000 to 10,000 words on any aspects of left activism and social movements in the period preceding 1968 to be presented at the conference. Selected papers will be published in a special issue of the journal Socialist History. Attendance at the conference will be free of charge, but we ask that anyone wishing to attend registers in advance.

Proposals for papers and any enquiries should be submitted to Ben Jones.

Email: b.jones5@uea.ac.uk

Deadline for proposals for papers: 31 October 2015

download (3)

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/call-for-papers-before-9268-the-left-activism-social-movements-in-the-long-1960s-1

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

download (4)

Zizek

Zizek

ŽIŽEK, MIGRATION, EXCLUSION

A WORKSHOP

Thursday 19th February 2015, 3-5pm, Lecture Room 213, Brunel University, London

Irregular immigration is at the forefront of global struggles for economic opportunity, for political rights and for security. Pressed by the increasing influence of both global governing institutions and transnational corporations, along with rising cultural diversity, anxiety about the coherence of the imagined national community within Western nations has increased. This anxiety, along with the global economic downturn and concurrent rises in unemployment, is contributing to the sharpening of ideological policing of national borders, with new legislation targeting irregular immigrants and sympathy for the predicament of those immigrants falling. In turn, the plight of those driven by poverty, environmental insecurity and concerns over security to attempt to gain entry into Western nations outside of official channels has become increasingly fraught, with an estimated 2,500 migrants having drowned in the Mediterranean so far this year (as of October 2014).

For Slavoj Žižek these flows of irregular migrants exemplify a shifting of the borders of political and economic exclusion. Having identified the troubling presence of ‘new forms of apartheid’ most prominently found in the slums, sweatshops and construction projects of ‘the developing world’, this surplus of humanity is increasingly apparent on the borders of the Western world.  Arguing that this surplus is not an aberration in the development of global capitalism, but represents its ‘universal singular’ moment, Žižek suggests that as the ‘part with no part’ of the nation political community, irregular immigrants hold a uniquely disruptive presence.

This workshop brings together prominent Žižekian theorists to discuss the trauma, difficulties and radical political potential of the disruptive presence of irregular immigration and the ‘new forms of apartheid’ of the 21st century.

Speakers

Mark Devenney, University of Brighton

Heiko Feldner, University of Cardiff

Chris McMillan, Brunel University

Fabio Vighi, University of Cardiff

 

Organised by Chris McMillan. For more information, contact Chris.McMillan@brunel.ac.uk

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Marx's Grave

Marx’s Grave

CRISIS AT HOME AND ABROAD: FROM FERGUSON, MISSOURI TO THE MIDDLE EAST AND UKRAINE

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2014

6:00-8:00 PM

Westside Peace Center

3916 Sepulveda Blvd., near Venice Blvd. (free parking in rear)

Suite 101-102, press #22 at door to get into building

Culver City (LA area)

 

SPEAKERS:

Michael Pugliese, longtime Left Observer

Mansoor M., Iranian cultural worker

Hamid A., youth activist

 

We live in an age when the local and the global are intertwined as never before.  This is true not only of the groups that dominate the capitalist economic system and the state, but also of emancipatory social movements at home and abroad.

The racist police murder of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, has touched off the deepest and most sustained protests among African-Americans in years, garnering world attention.  At the same time, Israel’s attack on Gaza has given birth to a large international protest movement.  These two emancipatory movements are occurring during a global era of upheaval and revolution that is also marked by the most sustained economic crisis since the 1930s.

The year 2014 has also seen the emergence of a democratic movement in Ukraine, which has come under pressure from Russia, but also from the US-EU. We have witnessed as well the emergence of ISIS as a deeply counterrevolutionary force within the Arab uprisings, which has in turn touched off new forms of democratic resistance by the Kurds and other minorities in Iraq.

Suggested readings, mostly very short, from INTERNATIONAL MARXIST-HUMANIST webzine:

  1. Beltaigne, “Ferguson: Where to Now?”

“Stop the Israeli Invasion of Gaza!  Stop the Endless War Against the Palestinians!” Statement of the IMHO

“Tragedy in Iraq and Syria: Will It Swallow Up the Arab Revolutions?” Statement of the IMHO

Kevin Anderson, “Popular Movements and Their Contradictions: From the Arab Revolutions to Today”

 

Sponsored by the West Coast Chapter, International Marxist-Humanist Organization

More information: http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/

 

Here is URL for meeting for Facebook, Twitter, etc.

http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/events/los-angeles-crisis-home-abroad-ferguson-missouri-middle-east-ukraine

 

Join our new Facebook page: “International Marxist-Humanist Organization” https://www.facebook.com/groups/imhorg/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Dud Capitalism

Dud Capitalism

POLITICAL WEEKEND: HOSTED BY REVOLUTIONARY SOCIALISM IN THE 21st CENTURY

Political weekend: hosted by rs21

Saturday, 29 March 2014 at 11:00 – Sunday, 30 March 2014 at 17:00 (GMT)

GoldsmithsCollege, University of London

New Cross, London, SE14 6NW, United Kingdom

Book online: http://bit.ly/rs21weekend

Timetable: http://rs21.org.uk/timetable/

A weekend of discussion and debate on what it means to be a revolutionary socialist today: organised around three key panel discussions and a number of workshops. The weekend is organised by rs21, a new grouping of revolutionary socialists in Britain. This is our first major public event and we welcome participation from anyone who is interested in similar issues and has been asking similar questions.

The Panel sessions:

• Neoliberal capitalism and the state of struggle

• Marxist approaches to racism, sexism and oppression

• Revolutionary organisation and the working class

We will also be hosting a Question Time with figures from the movement including Mark Steel, Sara Bennett and Mike Gonzalez titled “How do we organise to transform the world?”

Workshops include:

• Social reproduction: what it is and why it matters

• Protest movements and united fronts today

• Shifts in reformism and reformist consciousness

• What is revolutionary leadership?

• Marxism at the margins: intersectionality and identity

• Anti-politics: responses to austerity from Occupy to Russell Brand

• How should revolutionaries organise?

• Racism, new and old

• Neoliberalism’s impact on the working class

Speakers include:

• Mark Steel Independent columnist and comedian

• Nina Power author of One Dimensional Woman

• Mike Gonzalez author of upcoming book on Venezuela

• Mireia Gargallo from the Spanish squares movement

• Neil Davidson author of How Revolutionary Were the Bourgeois Revolutions?

• Lucia Pradella from the Historical Materialism journal

• Ian Birchall biographer of Tony Cliff

• Estelle Cooch former deputy editor of the Socialist Review

• Dan Swain author of Alienation: An Introduction to Marx’s Theory

• Sara Bennett from Unite the Union executive (pc)

• Jonny Jones former deputy editor International Socialism journal

• Amy Gilligan from the National Union of Students executive

• Colin Barker author of Marxism and Social Movements

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Multiculturalism

Multiculturalism

THE MUSLIMS ARE COMING! ISLAMOPHOBIA, EXTREMISM AND THE DOMESTIC WAR ON TERROR

A new book by Arun Kundnani

A razor sharp critique of the War on Terror’s new front – the domestic terrorist – and the resulting counterterrorism structures of policing and surveillance

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AVAILABLE NOW: http://www.versobooks.com/books/1512-the-muslims-are-coming

Arun Kundnani will be taking part in a number of events across the UK to talk about his new book. See below for further details.

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Jameel Scott thought he was exercising his rights when he went to challenge an Israeli official’s lecture at Manchester University. But the teenager’s presence at the protest with fellow socialists made him the subject of police surveillance for the next two years. Counterterrorism agents visited his parents, his relatives, his school. They asked him for activists’ names and told him not to attend demonstrations. They called his mother and told her to move the family to another neighborhood. Although he doesn’t identify as Muslim, Jameel had become another face of the presumed ‘homegrown’ terrorist.

The new front in the War on Terror is the ‘homegrown enemy,’ people who have become the focus of sprawling counterterrorism structures of policing and surveillance in the United States and across the UK. Domestic surveillance has mushroomed – at least 100,000 Muslims in America have been secretly under scrutiny. British police compiled a secret suspect list of more than 8,000 al-Qaeda ‘sympathisers,’ and in another operation included almost 300 children fifteen and under among the potential extremists investigated. MI5 doubled in size in just five years. However, the official accounts of ‘radicalization’ and ‘extremism’ that underpin these policies fail to grasp the real causes of political violence. Furthermore, public debate has ignored the impacts of such surveillance on ‘suspect communities’ targeted – especially young Muslims. 

Based on several years of research and reportage, in locations across the US and the UK, and written in engrossing, precise prose, this is the first comprehensive critique of counterradicalization strategies. Arun Kundnani looks at the root of our domestic anti-terror policies to expose the anxiety, intolerance, and racism that inform them. 

ARUN KUNDNANI is an Adjunct Professor of Media, Culture, and Communication at New York University, and teaches terrorism studies at John Jay College. He has been a Visiting Fellow at Leiden University, Netherlands, an Open Society Fellow, and the Editor of the journal Race and Class. He is the author of The End of Tolerance: Racism in 21st Century Britain. He lives in New York.

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Events:

  

March 4th, University of Huddersfield

http://www.versobooks.com/events/838-the-muslims-are-coming-islamophobia-extremism-and-the-domestic-war-on-terror

 

March 5th, University of Manchester

http://www.versobooks.com/events/852-the-muslims-are-coming 

 

March 6th, Foyles, Bristol Festival of Ideas

http://www.versobooks.com/events/827-islamophobia-extremism-and-the-domestic-war-on-terror 

 

March 7th, University of Bradford  – this is a JUST West Yorkshire event, in collaboration with the Free Talha Ahsan Campaign

http://www.versobooks.com/events/837-extradition-the-question-of-citizenship-in-the-war-on-terror 

 

March 10th, Foyles, London: a conversation with Owen Jones on the riding tide of Islamophobia

http://www.versobooks.com/events/843-the-rising-tide-of-islamophobia 

 

March 12th, Goldsmiths, University of London

http://www.versobooks.com/events/825-the-muslims-are-coming-book-launch-and-discussion 

 

March 13th, Kings College London: a discussion with Liz Fekete – Executive Director of the Institute of Race Relations – on the uses of extremism in the UK

http://www.versobooks.com/events/847-the-uses-of-extremism 

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“An important and moving investigation of the costs of the ‘war on terror’ for those who have been its targets, including the thousands of innocent Muslims who have been infiltrated, entrapped, and surveilled in the search for the radicalized terrorist among us. Kundnani gives eloquent voice to the communities that have been regulated, watched, and silenced by the national security state.”  David Cole, author of Enemy Aliens: Double Standards and Constitutional Freedoms in the War on Terrorism

“A bold new look at the much discussed issue of surveillance, documenting how it impacts the communities most affected – American and British Muslims. With incisive reporting from across the US and the UK, combined with trenchant analysis, Arun Kundnani captures what it feels like to be a ‘suspect population.’”  Deepa Kumar, author of Islamophobia and the Politics of Empire

“This timely and urgent analysis carefully examines the ideologies and law enforcement strategies that undergird the domestic War on Terror. What Kundnani finds is disturbing: sweeping, specious radicalization theory and racialized assumptions about the nature of Islam drive domestic counterterrorism practices. This has had devastating consequences for the rights and liberties of Muslims and the state of constitutional protections in the US and UK.”  Jeanne Theoharis, author of The Rebellious Life of Mrs. Rosa Parks

“An incisive, scholarly, bold, and convincing critique of the never-ending ‘War on Terror,’ whose roots extend far beyond the tragedy of 9/11. An important work.”  Wajahat Ali, cohost of Al Jazeera America’s The Stream and author of The Domestic Crusaders

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Hardback Original | March 2014 | ISBN: 9781781681596 | £14.99 | $26.95 | $32.00CAN | 327 pages

Also available as an eBook | ISBN: 9781781682128

To learn more about THE MUSLIMS ARE COMING! and to purchase the book visit  http://www.versobooks.com/books/1512-the-muslims-are-coming

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Visit Verso’s website for information on our upcoming events, new reviews and publications and special offers: http://www.versobooks.com

Sign up for the Verso mailing list: https://www.versobooks.com/users/sign_up

Become a fan of Verso on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/VersoBks

And get updates on Twitter too! http://twitter.com/VersoBooks

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

 

 

 

 

Communisation

Communisation

RACISM, ANTISEMITISM AND SOCIALIST STRATEGY, 1880-1917

Call for Papers as part of the Tenth Annual Historical Materialism Conference (London, 7-10 November)

Racism, Antisemitism and Socialist Strategy, 1880 – 1917

Brendan McGeever (University of Glasgow) and Satnam Virdee (University of Glasgow)

Amidst the Long Depression and sustained rising class conflict, there emerges for the first time in history, socialist, labour and anarcho-syndicalist parties with mass working class support throughout the western world and beyond, many of whom come to be organised within the Second International – an umbrella organisation formed in 1889 to further the cause of working class emancipation. Accompanying this fin-de-siècle wave of class struggle however, is the emergence of ascendant forms of racism and antisemitism, both of which come to have a significant and structuring impact on working class consciousness and political action.

The complex and contingent ways in which the aforementioned political formations responded to the growing penetration of racist and antisemitic ideologies within the working class, but also the socialist left itself, have been largely peripheral to the concerns of historians and social scientists working on this period. That is to say, although we know much about the general capitulation to nationalism within the Second International, we know little about the specific ways in which socialist formations across Europe, and the West more broadly, theorised and practically responded to the emergent forms of racism and antisemitism that accompanied the revolutionary wave of 1880-1917.

In addressing this overlooked area, we aim more specifically to:

i. examine the nature of socialist approaches to racism and antisemitism within the working class and other oppressed classes.

ii. explore the nature and extent to which those socialist formations themselves accepted and reproduced racism and antisemitism both at the level of theory and practice.

iii. investigate the nature of socialist attempts to combat racism and antisemitism, in particular the ideas that underpinned such practice, and the currents which produced it.

iv. relate, where relevant, socialist approaches to racism and antisemitism to wider debates on the national question, imperialism and colonialism.

v. consider what such accounts reveal about Marxist theory and socialist politics, especially Marxism’s ability to grasp adequately the relationship between exploitation and oppression.

We invite paper proposals of between 300 and 400 words. Deadline: 21 May. Applicants should include the following information: name, institutional affiliation (if any) and a brief publications list.

Contacts: b.mcgeever.1@research.gla.ac.uk and satnam.virdee@glasgow.ac.uk

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Black Power

THE FIRE EVERY TIME: REFRAMING BLACK POWER ACROSS THE TWENTIETH CENTURY AND BEYOND

 

A PUBLIC HISTORY CONFERENCE AND COMMUNITY GATHERING

 

On September 21st & 22nd, 2012, the College of Charleston’s Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture will host a public history symposium and community event on the topic of “The Fire Every Time: Reframing Black Power Across the Twentieth Century and Beyond”.

 

RATIONALE

In his 1963 collection of essays, The Fire Next Time, James Baldwin reflected on the expulsion of African Americans from the “American Dream” of economic opportunity, political equality, and social belonging.   Rather than be daunted by what Baldwin called “the center of this dreadful storm, this vast confusion,” he connected the present and future struggles of Black people to their past:  “I know that what I’m asking is impossible. But in our time, as in every time, the impossible is the least that one can demand—and one is, after all, emboldened by the spectacle of human history in general, and American Negro history in particular, for it testifies to nothing less than the perpetual achievement of the impossible.”

In our contemporary age, where some have claimed the nation has achieved the “impossible” through the election of Barack Obama as the nation’s first African-American president, we ask scholars, activists, and artists to re-conceptualize the twentieth century through the lens of past, present, and future struggles for Black Power, which in the words of James Baldwin spread as a “fire” every time.

 

CONFERENCE AGENDA

The conference will feature two plenary panels, two roundtable panels, and fourteen paper presentation panels on such topics as policing, incarceration, higher education, Black arts and cultural institutions, the military, self-defense, images and iconography of the Black Panther Party, inter-racial alliances and “Rainbow” coalitions, religion, nationalism, trans-nationalism and global impact of Black Power, and film and documentary film-making.

 

PLENARY & ROUNDTABLE SPEAKERS

PLENARY Session: State of the Field
Yohuru Williams (Fairfield University), Peniel Joseph (Tufts University), Donna Murch (Rutgers University), Hasan Jeffries (The Ohio State University), Rhonda Williams (Case Western Reserve University).

PLENARY Session: Activists Then and Now
Cleveland Sellers (Voorhees College & Scholar Activist), Herman Blake (Medical University of South Carolina & Scholar Activist), Millicent Brown (Claflin University & Scholar Activist), James Campbell (Community Leader and Organizer), Osei Terry Chandler (Community Leader).

ROUNDTABLE: Reframing the Orangeburg Massacre: Protest and Police Reprisals
Cleveland Sellers (Voorhees College & Scholar Activist), Judy Richardson (Director & Former SNCC Activist), Jack Shuler (Denison University), Jack Bass (College of Charleston).

ROUNDTABLE Film Excerpt Screenings: Black Power on Film: Documentaries, Hollywood, and Filmmaking
Portia Cobb (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee), Marylou Tibaldo-Bongiorno (Director,Revolution ’67), Judy Richardson, (Former SNCC Activist & Film Director, Scarred Justice: The Orangeburg Massacre 1968).

ROUNDTABLE: The Longue Durée: Black Power from the Nineteenth Century to the 1990′s
Van Gosse (Franklin Marshall College), Deborah Gray White (Rutgers University), Curtis Austin(The OhioStateUniversity).

 

“ORANGEBURG MASSACRE”

We will also feature a special roundtable on the “Orangeburg Massacre of 1968” during which three African American students were killed by state police in Orangeburg during a civil rights protest of a segregated bowling alley.  This event was quite similar to the KentState shooting of 1971, and yet received little national media attention.  We hope to rectify the media’s lack of attention by bringing together Dr. Cleveland Sellers, a protest organizer and now president of VoorheesCollege, with two recent and noted authors on the incident, namely Jack Bass and Dr. Jack Shuler, and a documentary filmmaker, Judy Richardson, who will show her film on the Orangeburg Massacre of 1968.   This promises to be a valuable and important discussion on a pressing matter of South Carolina’s history that has dominated the history books, but not public dialogue.

POLITICAL AND COMMUNITY ACTIVISM

Although our community conference and gathering considers the history of African American politics and activism in Charleston, the Lowcountry, and beyond, we also consider how these topics have manifested in the contemporary world, a matter of pressing and national importance as the nation considers the reelection of the country’s first Black president.  Importantly, these scholars aim to create a dialogue with the audience that will think about how civil rights organizing and Black Power activism has fundamentally reshaped and broadened American democracy and citizenship for all peoples.

PUBLIC HISTORY AND COMMUNITY GATHERING

Altogether, we will bring together over 50 of the country’s top scholars on African American history and culture alongside activists and community members.  This represents a seminal gathering and a rare opportunity to create a memorable dialogue.  Far too often historians and scholars are seen as being removed from the general public and we hope to bridge that distance by creating a unique public history seminar and community gathering.  In addition to offering two-days of plenary speakers, roundtable panels, and presentations, this conference also features documentary film and a juried art exhibition. 

Please come join what will be an engaging conference and conversation.

 

For additional information contact:
Dr. Robert Chase
chasert@cofc.edu
843.953.7609

Conference Registration information

Hotel Information

 

For General Conference Information email: averyconferences@gmail.com

First published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/the-fire-every-time-reframing-black-power-across-the-twentieth-century-and-beyond-charleston-sc-21-22-september  

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Multiculturalism

THE MULTICULTURAL POLITIC

The Multicultural Politic – Launch Event

With the London Olympics on our doorstep, a wave of complaints around police racism and youth unemployment at an all time high, The Multicultural Politic is hosting a debate on the reality of multiculturalism in Britain today.

We are also using this opportunity to re-launch our blog with a new logo and a strengthened editorial team, during a two-hour plenary and debate at Goldsmiths College in south east London.

SPEAKERS include:

KEN FERO – co-founder of Migrant Media and independent film maker, notably of the 2001 documentary film INJUSTICE, detailing the struggles of those who lost their lives at the hand of the British state. 

ESTELLE DU BOULAY – Works for the independent anti-racist and community campaigning organization: Newham Monitoring Project.

ADAM ELLIOT-COOPER – Associate Editor of Ceasefire Magazine, former member of NUS Black Students’ Campaign and former youth worker

+ SPECIAL GUESTS

The event also aims to provide a forum through which different campaigns and thinkers can meet and discuss action in London and beyond, in order to defend and extend the gains made by migrant communities, sexual minority, feminist and working class movements. 

Venue: Small Hall cinema, Richard Hoggart building (main building),Goldsmiths College, New Cross, London, SE14 6NW 

Drinks & nibbles will be served.
TRANSPORT LINKS:
London overground stations New Cross Gate & New Cross (3 min walk)

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The Multicultural Politic aims to provide a forum through which people from multicultural communities can come together and explore how we can build a more fair, free, equal and democratic world. We aim to serve as an information resource, discussion space and general stimulus for debate in the British political sphere, but also in the international arena.

www.tmponline.org

Twitter:
@MultiPolitic
@justinthelibsoc
@KoosCouvee


Justin Baidoo
Co-Editor of The Multicultural Politic: http://www.tmponline.org
Twitter: @justinthelibsoc


Justin Baidoo
Editor of TMP: http://www.tmponline.org
Twitter: http://twitter.com/justinthelibsoc

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com