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Education System

Education System

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION RESEARCH SEMINAR ON MARXISM, CRITICAL PEDAGOGY AND EDUCATION

Wednesday 9th July 2014 3.00pm-7.30pm

Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford, England

Department of Education

International Education Research Seminar on Marxism, Critical Pedagogy and Education

 

(Followed by social event / eating out near Chelmsford Station

Room: SAW 005 or other room (tbc)

 

Introduced by Alpesh Maisuria (University of East London, England) and Professor Dave Hill (Anglia Ruskin University, England)

 

SPEAKERS:

Dr. Ayse Elitok (Adnan Menderes University, Aydin, Turkey)`Village Institutes’ in Turkey- the development of secular education in rural Turkey and their demise in the face of landlord and religious opposition’

Dr. Tom Griffiths (Newcastle University, NSW, Australia) `Critical Education and World-Systems Analysis’

Dr. Lilia Monzo (Chapman University, Orange, California, USA) A Critical Pedagogy for Democracy: Confronting Higher Education’s Neoliberal Agenda with a Critical Latina Feminist Episteme

Dr. Paolo Vittoria (Universidade do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) Popular Education and Social Change in Latin America: another school is possible?

 

For information: paulette.luff@anglia.ac.uk or dave.hill@anglia.ac.uk

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

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Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

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International Conference on Critical Education

International Conference on Critical Education

World Crisis

World Crisis

HOW CAPITALISM SURVIVES: HISTORICAL MATERIALISM LONDON CONFERENCE 2014

How Capitalism Survives
Eleventh Annual Historical Materialism London Conference
6-9 November 2014
Vernon Square, Central London*

This year marks the first of a series of centennial commemorations and anniversaries, starting with that of the first worldwide inter-imperialist conflict. Centuries of colonialism and imperialism served as a preparatory phase for the catastrophe. Indeed, while the main parties of the Second International trampled the revolutionary socialist tradition in trench-mud, the First World War destroyed the illusion that imperialist violence could be wreaked on the colonies while leaving Europe untouched. If capital came into the world ‘dripping from head to toe, from every pore, with blood and dirt’, Marx’s analysis of ‘primitive accumulation’ has certainly not been confined to a pre-history of capital.

And yet, contrary to all expectations, despite these tremors and shocks, despite the terrifying glances into the abyss of destruction, capitalism has survived. Not only has capital muddled through; it has mutated, adapted and, by some criteria, emerged stronger than before. At the same time, however, new contradictions and crises have appeared, expanding the spaces of critique to the ecological and the ideological terrains and opening up new possibilities of revolutionary breakthrough.

In recent years, the crisis and the movements emerging in response have re-opened an opportunity to envision, and fight for, substantive alternatives. But these movements have remained fragmented and have faced increasing state repression and imperialist aggression. And the on-going crisis is now raising the stakes. It is clear that this crisis is indeed global, leading to deepening austerity in the North and undermining the conditions for sustained growth in the South. If, in the North, the ‘war on terror’ manifests itself in intensified state racism and Islamophobia, the crisis is also intensifying and bringing to the surface underlying international rivalries. The winds of war from the South are reaching Europe once again. But from the South, movements worldwide also bear witness to countless examples of struggle and resistance.

At this year’s conference, we want to explore capital’s capacity to survive in order to explore, first and foremost, how it can be overcome. We are interested in investigating contemporary geographical reconfigurations of accumulation and interrogating theories of imperialism, hegemonic succession, and capital’s tendencies towards increasing inter-state rivalries. On the other hand, we want to delve into theories and practices of class struggles, social movements and resistance which create possible alternatives to neoliberalism, crisis and war by constantly challenging the smooth reproduction of capitalism in its gendered, social, economic, political, racial, ecological, cultural and ideological dimensions. In doing so, we also want to enrich our understanding of a Marxian analysis of ‘core’ and ‘periphery’ with an analysis of current developments of Marxism in the South in general and in the BRICS economies in particular. We also hope to continue the theme on Race and Capital inaugurated last year.

We welcome abstract proposals of 200 words on these themes or any others, in all disciplines, from all continents and from all perspectives within Marxism. The deadline for proposals is 15th May 2014.

Please register your abstracts here: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/conferences/annual11/submit

Separate calls go out for the following streams: Marxism and Feminism, and Ecology and Climate Change.

* Please note that this year the conference will not be taking place at the main SOAS buildings at Thornhaugh Square.

International Conference on Critical Education

International Conference on Critical Education

 

 

 

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

 

Knowledge

Knowledge

MAKING CONNECTIONS

IDIMC 2014

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
CALL FOR ABSTRACTS
Abstract Submission Deadline: 6 June 2014
IDIMC 2014 ‘Making Connections’
International Data and Information Management Conference
17 September 2014 Loughborough, UK

http://idimc.org/

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The Centre for Information Management <http://www.lboro.ac.uk/cim&gt; at Loughborough University, in collaboration with the British Computer Society Data Management Specialist Group<http://www.bcs.org/category/17607&gt; is pleased to announce its inaugural International Data and Information Management Conference (IDIMC), taking place on 17th September 2014.

The conference will bring together researchers, managers and policy makers from academia, industry, government, commerce and the third sector. The overarching theme of this year’s conference is ‘making connections’ to reflect the interconnected nature of data, knowledge creation and information management.

The day will comprise a series of invited and contributed papers and posters and excellent networking opportunities throughout the day.

Confirmed Speakers include
Dr Mark Harrison, Director Auto-ID Lab, Distributed Information and Automation Laboratory, Institute for Manufacturing, University of Cambridge.
Professor Tom Wilson, University of Sheffield

Programme Committee
Christine L. Borgman, Presidential Chair & Professor of Information Studies, University of California
Guy Fitzgerald, Professor of Information Systems, Loughborough University
Robert Galliers, Distinguished Professor in Information Systems, Bentley University
Michael Myers, Professor of Information Systems, University of Auckland
Reijo Savolainen, Professor at the Department of Information Studies, University of Tampere
Philip Woodall, Distributed Information and Automation Laboratory, University of Cambridge

Conference theme: Making Connections
The information society and knowledge based economy rely on the organisation and retrieval of data and information; the processes associated with knowledge creation; and the knowledge required to design, develop and implement solutions that enable the exploitation of knowledge, data and information. However, it is when the contribution of these strands of important research are combined and integrated that their influence has the power to make breakthrough impacts on the information society and knowledge based economy. Therefore, the overarching theme of the conference is ‘making connections’, and we particularly encourage papers that reflect the interconnections and links between some of the key areas of interest outlined below.

Topics of interest
IDIMC welcomes submissions for oral presentations, and for posters, within, but not limited to, the following areas of data and information management:
•               Big data
•               Organisation and Information Retrieval
•               Data analytics, enterprise data and business intelligence
•               Data quality management
•               Open and linked data
•               Data integration, cloud computing and data warehousing
•               Master data management
•               Data visualization
•               Managing industrial data
•               Industrial data and information value
•               Knowledge creation
•               Knowledge management
•               Sharing information securely
•               People’s information behaviour
•               People centred design
•               Enterprise Information Management
•               Management of Information Systems
•               Information management benefits realization
•               Monitoring information management impact
•               Evaluating information management impact

•               Systems development methodologies
Accepted papers will be published in the Conference Proceedings published by LISU, Loughborough University.

Important dates
Submissions open: 5 March 2014
Submission deadline: 6 June 2014
Notification of authors: 4 July 2014
Deadline for final papers 29 August 2014
Conference: 17 September 2014

Submission process
Each proposal should be made using the submission template available from http://www.idimc.org/papers <http://www.idimc.org/papers&gt;  including details of authors/presenters, the proposal type (oral presentation or poster) and an abstract of 1,000 words. The completed form should be emailed to the Conference organisers: idimc@lboro.ac.uk<mailto:idimc@lboro.ac.uk>. All documents should be in MS Word (.doc or .docx) or PDF format. The deadline for submission of proposals is Friday 6 June 2014.

Accepted authors will be required to submit a full paper of between 3,000 and 5,000 words before the final submission date: Friday 29th August 2014.

Registration information
For all accepted papers and posters, at least one presenter must register for the conference; discounted rates will be available. Registration will open in May 2014. Please email the organisers (idimc@lboro.ac.uk <mailto:idimc@lboro.ac.uk>) to register interest and receive advance notification of registration.

Contact details
For further information, please email the conference organisers: idimc@lboro.ac.uk<mailto:idimc@lboro.ac.uk> or visit the conference website http://www.idimc.org

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Education

Education

MASS INTELLECTUALITY

CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS TO A BOOK ON ‘MASS INTELLECTUALITY: THE DEMOCRATISATION OF HIGHER EDUCATION’

Joss Winn (University of Lincoln, Senior Lecturer, Centre for Educational Research and Development) at: http://josswinn.org/2014/02/book-proposal-mass-intellectuality-the-democratisation-of-higher-education/

Through our work on the Social Science Centre, Richard Hall and I have been approached to produce a book which documents and critically analyses ‘alternative higher education’ projects in terms of their being critical responses to ‘intellectual leadership’ in mainstream higher education. The book is intended to be part of a series already agreed with Bloomsbury Academic Publishing that focuses on ‘intellectual leadership’. The series editors have encouraged us to develop a proposal for an edited volume. A brief statement about the series is:

‘Perspectives on Leadership in Higher Education’ is a research-level series comprising monographs and edited collections with an emphasis on authored books. The prime purpose of the series is to provide a forum for different and sometimes divergent perspectives on what intellectual leadership means within the context of higher education as it develops in the 21st century.

This is an invitation to attend a workshop where we aim to collectively design a book proposal that is submitted to Bloomsbury. As you can see below, we have drafted a proposal, which the series editors and their peer-reviewers have responded very positively to, but it has always been our intention to ultimately produce the book in a collaborative way with all its authors.

[UPDATE: Just to be clear: we welcome contributions from authors who are not based in the UK and can offer a perspective from outside the UK. It is our intention that the book have an international focus. Attendance at the workshop is preferred but not obligatory.]

We hope that from the workshop, a revised proposal is produced with confirmed authors and chapter summaries, which we will then submit to Bloomsbury for final approval.

We are very optimistic that it will be accepted, but of course we are at liberty to submit the proposal elsewhere if Bloomsbury decide not to go ahead with it. Either way, we are confident of getting the book published.

Hopefully, the draft proposal below is largely self-explanatory. The chapters headings are only indicative in order to get us this far. We expect a fully revised proposal to come out of the workshop with input from all authors.

If you are interested in writing a chapter for the book, you are strongly encouraged to attend the workshop. We will be seeking international contributions to the book, but would like as many authors as possible to help design the book through attendance at this workshop.

We welcome anyone who is involved with and/or working on alternative higher education projects such as free universities, transnational collectives, occupied spaces, and co-operatives for higher education. We hope that this book will provide a lasting critical analysis of recent and existing efforts to develop alternatives to mainstream higher education in the UK and elsewhere. We expect it to encompass chapters which focus on all aspects of these initiatives including, for example, governance, pedagogy, institutional form, theory, disciplinary boundaries, subjectivities: ‘academic’, ‘teacher’, ‘student’, ‘researcher’, and the role and nature of research outside of mainstream universities.

The workshop will be held on Thursday 5th June in Leicester, UK. Exact details of time and place will be sent to participants nearer the date. If you would like to attend, please email Joss Winn prior to 10th May, with a brief abstract of your anticipated contribution. This will help us get a sense of direction prior to the workshop and organise it more effectively. If you are unable to attend the workshop but would like to contribute to the book, please tell us.

 

OUTLINE:

1. Book Title and Subtitle.

‘Mass Intellectuality: The democratisation of higher education’

2. Summary

Drawing on the activism of academics and students working in, against and beyond the neo-liberal university, this book brings together for the first time, both an analysis of the crisis of higher education and the alternative forms that are emerging from its ruins.

3. Description (marketing)

Higher education in the UK and elsewhere is in crisis. The idea of the public university is under assault, and both the future of the sector and its relationship to society are being gambled. Higher education is increasingly unaffordable, its historic institutions are becoming untenable, and their purpose is resolutely instrumental. What and who have led us to this crisis? What are the alternatives? To whom do we look for leadership in revealing those alternatives?

This book brings together critical analyses of the failures of ‘intellectual leadership’ in the University, and documents on-going efforts from around the world to create alternative models for organising higher education and the production of knowledge. Its authors offer their experience and views from inside and beyond the structures of mainstream higher education, in order to reflect critically on efforts to create really existing alternatives.

The authors argue that mass higher education is at the point where it no longer reflects the needs, capacities and long-term interests of society. An alternative role and purpose is required, based upon ‘mass intellectuality’ or the real possibility of democracy in learning and the production of knowledge.

4. Key features

1. The book critiques the role of higher education and the University in developing solutions to global crises that are economic and socio-environmental. In this way it grounds an analysis of the idea that there is no alternative for higher education but to contribute to neoliberal agendas for economic growth and the marketisation of everyday life. The restrictions on the socio-cultural leadership inside the University are revealed.

2. The book describes and analyses several real, alternative forms of higher education that have emerged around the world since the ‘Great Recession’ in 2008. These alternatives emerged from worker-student occupations, from engagements in civil society, and from the co-operatives movement. These projects highlight a set of co-operative possibilities for demonstrating and negotiating new forms of political leadership related to higher learning that are against the neo-liberal university.

3. The book argues that the emergence of alternative forms of higher education, based on co-operative organising principles, points both to the failure of intellectual leadership inside the University and to the real possibility of democracy in learning and the production of knowledge. The place of ‘Mass Intellectuality’ as a form of distributed leadership that is beyond the limitations of intellectual leadership in the University will be critiqued, in order to frame social responses to the crisis.

5. Table of Contents

Chapters to be negotiated in a dedicated workshop for the book. However, examples indicative of actual content are as follows.

1. Introduction: Leadership and academic labour: the failure of intellectual leadership in Higher Education [Joss Winn and Richard Hall]

This chapter will introduce the book by offering a perspective on the different types of ‘intellectual leadership’ that exist within higher education i.e. the state, university management, and academic. It will establish a critical framework for understanding the role of each, focused upon their interrelationships, and the tensions and barriers that arise. The chapter aims to introduce and provide a review of the term ‘intellectual leadership’, and then offer a different way of conceiving it as a form of social relationship. In doing so, the authors will briefly question the role, purpose and idea of the university and ask what is it for, or rather, why is it being led? For what purpose? If there has been a failure of leadership, whom has it failed? The authors will then draw on other chapters in the book to offer further responses to these questions, which are themselves developed through the structure of the book: in; against; and beyond the university. We will review the aim of each section, how they are connected and why they point to the need for alternatives. We will address whether it is possible to define alternatives for higher education as a coherent project, and if so how can they be developed and what is the role of leadership in that process?

First section: inside the University

This section sets up the problems of intellectual leadership, historically, philosophically and politically. The co-editors suggest the following indicative areas, which will be defined at the workshop.

  • The failures of intellectual leadership: historical critique (including militarisation and financialisation)
  • The failures of intellectual leadership: philosophical critique
  • Intellectual leadership and limits of institutional structures: managerialism and corporatisation against academic freedom
  • Technology: enabling democracy or cybernetic control?
  • The recursive ‘logic’ of openness in higher education: Levelling the ivory tower?

Second section: against the University

This section documents responses to the first section, in the form of recent critical case studies from those working and studying within and outside the academy. The co-editors suggest the following indicative areas, which will be defined at the workshop.

  • Leaderless networks, education and power
  • Student intellectual leadership: models of student-academic and student-worker collaboration
  • Forms of co-operation: case studies of organisational democracy in education
  • Historical examples of leaderless organisation
  • Historical examples of resistance to intellectual leadership
  • Regional examples of alternatives: Latin America, etc.
  • A review of recent initiatives: Student as Producer, SSC, FUN, Free University Brighton, Liverpool, Ragged, P2PU, Brisbane, Edufactory, etc.

Third section: beyond the University

This section provides a critical analysis of the responses described in section two and draws out generalisable themes related to the purpose, organisation and production of higher education, in terms of the idea of Mass Intellectuality, relating it to leadership.  The co-editors suggest the following indicative areas, which will be defined at the workshop.

  • Co-operative higher education. Conversion or new institution building?
  • Other models: Open Source ‘benevolent dictator’; heroic leader; radical collegiality, co-operatives
  • Critiques of horizontalism, P2P production, forms of co-operation, radical democracy, etc.
  • Beyond/problems with/critique of ‘Student as Producer’ (Lincoln)
  • General intellect, mass intellectuality: New forms of intellectuality
  • Higher and higher education: Utopian forms of higher education
  • Intellectual leadership and local communities
  • Public intellectuals and public education

Conclusion. The role of free universities: in, against and beyond [Joss Winn and Richard Hall].

The concluding chapter will aim to synthesis key points from the book into an over-arching critical, theoretical argument based upon evidence from the preceding chapters. We will question whether the examples of alternatives to intellectual leadership inside and beyond the university are effective and whether they are prefigurative of a fundamental change in the meaning, purpose and form of higher education. We will reflect on the concept of ‘mass intellectuality’, and attempt to develop this idea in light of our critique and preceding evidence. We will attempt to identify a coherent vision for alternatives to mainstream higher education and assess the role and form of ‘intellectual leadership’.

 

6. Chapter by chapter synopsis

This needs to be determined at our workshop, but the text below is indicative.

Section one collects chapters which discuss the historical, political-economic and technological trajectory of the modern university, with a particular critical focus on the ‘imaginary futures’ of post-war higher education in the UK and elsewhere. In the context of the current social and economic crises, the chapters lay out the failures of universities and their leaders to provide an on-going and effective challenge to neo-liberalism and question why.

Section two collects chapters which focus on recent and historical attempts by students and academics to resist, reinvent and revolutionise the university from within. Looking at UK and international examples, they examine the characteristics of these efforts and assess the effectiveness of critical forms of praxis aimed against what the university has become.

Section three collects chapters which reflect critically on recent student and academic activism that goes beyond the institutional form of the university to understand higher education as a form of social relations independent of mainstream disciplines and structures. They examine several inter-related and complementary forms of practice as well as reflecting critically on their own practice.

 

7. Indicative Submission date

  • Workshop to define content and structure in 5th June 2014
  • First draft of all chapters by October/November 2014.
  • Peer-review of chapters completed by February/March 2015.
  • Final draft chapters to co-editors by May/June 2015.
  • Manuscript delivered by September 2015.

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

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Kshama Sawant

Kshama Sawant

ANGELA DAVIS, HARRY BELAFONTE, CORNEL WEST, KSHAMA SAWANT, AMY GOODMAN, DAVID HARVEY, AND STANLEY ARONOWITZ TO SPEAK AT LEFT FORUM 2014

Left Forum 2014

May 30th – June 1st

John Jay College of Criminal Justice, The City University of New York

524 West 59th Street New York, NY, 10019

Left Forum is the largest annual conference in the United States of the broad spectrum of left and progressive intellectuals, activists, organizations and the interested public. Each year thousands of conference participants come together in New York City to discuss pressing local, national and global issues; to better understand commonalities and differences, and alternatives to current predicaments; or to share ideas to help build social movements to transform the world. This year’s theme is “Reform and/or Revolution: Imagining a World with Transformative Justice.” Panels can be proposed until the deadline of April 27th.

 

Propose a panel or workshop

http://www.leftforum.org/panels/instructions

 

Download Call for panels

http://www.leftforum.org/content/left-forum-2014-conference-theme

 

2014 Theme

http://www.leftforum.org/content/left-forum-2014-conference-theme
Left Forum Newsletter

http://www.leftforum.org/files/newsletter/Left-Forum-Newsletter-2013.pdf
Register for the conference here

http://www.leftforum.org/sites/all/modules/civicrm/extern/url.php?u=126823&qid=418374

 

Left Forum: www.leftforum.org

David Harvey

David Harvey

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Education

Education

WORLD CONGRESS ON EDUCATION 2014 (WCE-2014)

Call for Papers, Extended Abstracts, Posters, Workshops and Tutorials!
===============
World Congress on Education (WCE-2014)
Organised by the University of South Africa (UNISA)
September 15 – 17, 2014,
Nelspruit, Pretoria, South Africa
www.worldconedu.org
===============
The WCE is an international refereed conference dedicated to the advancement of the theory and practices in education. The WCE promotes collaborative excellence between academicians and professionals from Education. The aim of WCE is to provide an opportunity for academicians and professionals from various educational fields with cross disciplinary interests to bridge the knowledge gap, promote research esteem and the evolution of pedagogy. The WCE-2014 invites research papers that encompass conceptual analysis, design implementation and performance evaluation.

The topics in WCE-2014 include but are not confined to the following areas:
*Accessible World*

  • Aging and Disability
  • Augmentative and Alternative Communications (AAC)
  • Assessment and Early intervention
  • Baby Boomers
  • Building and Sustaining an Inclusive Community
  • Cognitive Disabilities
  • Curriculum Adaptation and Modification
  • Deaf and Hard of Hearing Developmental
  • Disabilities Disability and Diversity
  • E-Accessibility
  • Human Rights/Disability Rights
  • Legal Issues (Legislative and Policy)
  • Learning Disabilities
  • Living In(ter)dependently
  • Support Services
  • Postsecondary Education
  • Public Health, Diversity and Disability
  • Resiliency Across the Lifespan
  • Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
  • Study Skills Development
  • Sustainable Environment
  • Climate Change

*Adult Education*

  • Competitive Skills
  • Continuing Education
  • Higher Education
  • Adult education
  • Vocational Education
  • Transferring Disciplines

*Art Education*

  • Music Education
  • Writing Education
  • Imaginative Education
  • Language Education
  • History

*Business Education*

  • Educational Administration
  • Human Resource Development
  • Academic Advising and Counselling
  • Education Policy and Leadership
  • Industrial Cooperation
  • Life-long Learning Experiences
  • Workplace Learning and Collaborative Learning
  • Work Employability
  • Educational Institution Government Partnership
  • Patent Registration and Technology Transfer
  • University Spin-Off Companies

*Course Management* 

  • Accreditation and Quality Assurance
  • Academic Experiences and Best Practice Contributions
  • Copyright
  • Digital Libraries and Repositories
  • Digital Rights Management
  • Evaluation and Assessment
  • E-content Management and Development
  • E-content Management and Development. Open Content
  • e-Portfolios
  • Grading Methods
  • Knowledge Management
  • Quality processes at National and International level
  • Security and Data Protection
  • Student Selection Criteria in Interdisciplinary Studies
  • User-Generated Content

*Curriculum, Research and Development* 

  • Acoustics in Education Environment
  • APD/Listening
  • Counsellor Education
  • Courses, Tutorials and Labs
  • Curriculum Design
  • ESL/TESL
  • Bullying
  • Social Networking
  • Study Abroad Programmes
  • Faculty Development
  • Distance Learning: Assessment, Methods and Technologies
  • Teaching and Learning Experiences in Engineering Education

*Educational Foundations*

  • Early Childhood Education
  • Elementary Education
  • Geographical Education
  • Health Education
  • Home Education
  • Rural Education
  • Science Education
  • Secondary Education
  • Second life Educators
  • Social Studies Education
  • Special Education

*Interaction and Cultural Models of Disability* 

  • Adaptive Transportation
  • Augmented and Alternative Communication
  • Gerontechnology
  • Healthcare Specialists
  • Hospitality and Tourism
  • Labor Market Integration
  • Medical Experts
  • Sport, Fitness and Leisure
  • Special Educational Centres
  • Social Innovation and E-Service Delivery
  • Social Workers
  • Student and Adults with Disabilities
  • Usability and Ergonomics

*Learning / Teaching Methodologies and Assessment* 

  • Simulated Communities and Online Mentoring
  • e-Testing and new Test Theories
  • Supervising and Managing Student Projects
  • Pedagogy Enhancement with e-Learning
  • Educating the Educators
  • Immersive Learning
  • Blended Learning
  • Computer-Aided Assessment
  • Metrics and Performance Measurement
  • Assessment Software Tools
  • Assessment Methods in Blended Learning Environments

*Global Issues In Education and Research*

  • Education, Research and Globalization
  • Barriers to Learning (ethnicity, age, psychosocial factors, …)
  • Women and Minorities in Science and Technology
  • Indigenous and Diversity Issues
  • Government Policy issues
  • Organizational, Legal and Financial Aspects
  • Digital Divide
  • Increasing Affordability and Access to the Internet
  • Ethical issues in Education
  • Intellectual Property Rights and Plagiarism

 

Important dates:

* Research Paper, Extended Abstract, Case Study, Work in Progress and

* Report Submission Deadline: June 01, 2014

* Notification of Paper, Extended Abstract, Case Study, Work in Progress and Report Acceptance Date: June 15, 2014

* Final Paper Submission Deadline for Conference Proceedings Publication: August 01, 2014

* Workshop Proposal Submission Deadline: June 25, 2014

* Notification of Workshop Proposal Acceptance/Rejection: July 05, 2014

* Poster/Demo Proposal Submission: June 25, 2014

* Notification of Poster/Demo Acceptance: July 05, 2014

* Participant(s) Registration (Open): April 01, 2014

* Early Bird Registration: February 01 to June 30, 2014

* Late Bird Registration: July 01 to August 15, 2014

* Conference Dates: September 15 – 17, 2014

 

For further information please visit WCE-2014 at: www.worldconedu.org

International Conference on Critical Education

International Conference on Critical Education

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

 

 

ICCE IV

ICCE IV

SECOND BIENNIAL UNIVERSITY OF NORTHAMPTON LIBRARY AND LEARNING SERVICES CONFERENCE

The second biennial University of Northampton Library and Learning Services Conference takes place on Wednesday 18 June 2014 at Sunley Conference Centre. See bumper programme below.

Library and Learning Services sit at the heart of the student experience supporting, enhancing and contributing to the teaching, learning and research activities of the University.

The aims of this conference are to raise awareness of the formal and informal research activity that underpins our work in Library and Learning Services; to showcase our most innovative practice, and to receive feedback on potential areas for development.

The conference will feature a keynote address from Professor Charles Oppenheim, recently appointed Visiting Professor to Library and Learning Services, and will be packed with new ideas to inform practice, advance teaching and learning pedagogy and engage with innovative technologies.

Who should attend? The conference will be of interest to librarians and learning professionals with an interest in research-informed practice.

Cost:  £30.00 inc VAT

More information: Visit our conference blog at: http://mypad.northampton.ac.uk/llsconferences/

Booking: Please contact Jonas House for information on booking, travel and accommodation:  jonas.house@northampton.ac.uk

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

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Imperialism

Imperialism

‘REAL WORLD WAR ONE’ FREESCHOOL

Sunday 18 May

11.30am-5.30pm at No.88 Fleet Street, EC4 1DH (Blackfriars tube)

 

Sessions on:

WW1’s relevance today and why capitalism needs war

Mutinies, women’s protests and revolutions

Countering Cameron’s WW1 commemorations

Putin, Ukraine and war today?

 

Please check this website in May for confirmation of the final programme: therealww1.wordpress.com

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Heathwood Institute & Press

Heathwood Institute & Press

BEYOND CAPITALISM: CRITICAL THEORY FOR RADICAL DEMOCRACY

Open Call for Papers

Heathwood Press: An Independent Critical Organisation for Social Progress

Call for Papers: We are seeking contributions from a diversity of authors and researchers concerning discussions on post-capitalist society and the development of radical (participatory) democratic alternatives. This project is broad in scope, and we welcome papers and articles from across all disciplines: from economics and law to education, social sciences and the environment. We prefer works that directly emphasize an interdisciplinary approach and express an understanding of the aims of our critical theoretical project. One example of a proposal already received is a paper on 21st Century critical theory and radical (participatory) grassroots politics. Another example is a project that aims to establish a fundamental critique of violence in education, with a mind toward a foundational alternative philosophy of education.

Papers will be published online.

Before contacting us, please familiarize yourself with our project and past publications: http://www.heathwoodpress.com/advancing-frankfurt-school-critical-theory/

To contact us about this open call, please write to: enquiries[at]heathwoodpress.com

‘Beyond Capitalism’ Call: http://www.heathwoodpress.com/open-call-for-papers-beyond-capitalism-critical-theory-for-radical-democracy/

Heathwood Institute & Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Philosophy

Philosophy

FORMALISM AND THE REAL: ONTOLOGY AND THE SUBJECT

Pittsburgh Summer Symposium in Contemporary Philosophy

Duquesne University

Department of Philosophy

Pittsburgh, PA

 

Call for Applications

We are pleased to announce the 2014 Pittsburgh Summer Symposium in Contemporary Philosophy, held at Duquesne University. Details for the program are as follows:

 

Formalism and the Real: Ontology, Politics, and the Subject

August 4–8, 2014

 

(Optional Participants’ Conference, August 2-3)

 

“The real can only be inscribed on the basis of an impasse of formalization.”  — Jacques Lacan, Seminar XX 

 

“We need a theory of the pass of the real, in the breach opened up by formalization. Here, the real is no longeronly what can be lacking from its place, but what passes through by force.” — Alain Badiou, Theory of the Subject 

 

Seminar Leaders:

Prof. Bruno Bosteels (Cornell University)Prof. Tom Eyers (Duquesne University)

Prof. Paul Livingston (University of New Mexico)

 

Course Description:

Philosophy in the twenty-first century has seen an extensive reconsideration of formalistic methodologies and theoretical structures. This is heavily influenced by the formalism developed by a number of mid-twentieth century French thinkers who rejected humanist philosophies of experience or consciousness typified by dominant forms of existentialism and phenomenology. Insights derived from Marxism, Freudianism, and philosophy of science were argued to undermine central tenets of the latter, including the priority of description and the emphasis on first-person experiences. Rather, stress was placed on the priority of construction, an emphasis on the concept, and a rethinking of the nature of knowledge and the object of science. The recent history of formalist approaches is framed in important ways by Louis Althusser and Jacques Lacan. As is well known, Althusser rejected historicist and humanist readings of Marx in favor of a structuralist approach, which was amenable to the conception of science developed bythinkers like Jean Cavaillès, Gaston Bachelard, and Georges Canguilhem. Simultaneously, Lacan rejected ego-psychological readings of Freud, forming interpretive, theoretical, and clinical bases for psychoanalysis that drew on Ferdinand de Saussure’s structuralist linguistics and Claude Levi-Strauss’s structuralist anthropology. This led him to a methodological formalism, particularly when addressing the Real and the psycho-dynamics in which it is involved. The presence of Althusser and Lacan at the École Normale Supériere during this time formed the intellectual milieu in which students such as Alain Badiou, Jacques-Alain Miller, Étienne Balibar, and Jacques Rancière would begin to develop their own thought. An important forum for this was the journal the Cahiers pour l’Analyse (1966-69). The current project to translate itinto English has prompted a surge in research related to these themes. In the Cahiers, efforts were made to reconcile Marxist politics with a Lacanian account of the subject. Lacan’s notion of the Real was essential to this and, along with the other elements of his thought, came to be developed by Badiou to address political and ontological domains.

More recently, formalism in philosophy has expanded to address issues beyond these origins. For instance, formalistic reconstructions of Heideggerian and Husserlian thought have proved intensely productive and have problematized the opposition of philosophies of the concept to phenomenological philosophies. Moreover, recent efforts to address questions in aesthetics and politics with formal approaches has further expanded the boundaries of formalism’s theoretical scope. Paul Livingston’s book, The Politics of Logic: Badiou, Wittgenstein, and the Consequences of Formalism, examines the landscape of political criticism and change given the results and paradoxes of 20th century projects of formalization in mathematics and logic. Following this, his current project focuses on Heidegger’s philosophy, and will re-examine our inherited notions of sense and truth. After writing a book on Lacan’s concept of the Real, Tom

Eyers has analyzed the intellectual foundations of structuralism in 1930s and 1940s French epistemology and philosophy of science. He is presently writing a book entitled Speculative Formalism: The Poetics of Form in Literature, Science, and Philosophy which will bring that work to bear on poetics and literary theory. In addition to translating Badiou’s Theory of the Subject and Wittgenstein’s Antiphilosophy, Bruno Bosteels has devoted numerous books to Badiou and issues in political thought. In his recentMarx and Freud in Latin America: Politics, Psychoanalysis, and Religion in Times of Terror, Bosteels investigates ways art and literature provide insight into processes of subjectification at the core of Marxist and psychoanalytic concerns. This summer symposium will bring together interested graduate students, postdoctoral students, and junior faculty for a week of discussion, lecture, and close textual study. Together, we will pursue questions regarding formalism and its relation to the Real in contemporary ontology, politics, and theories of the subject and their consequences for understanding knowledge, history, state, language, art, and literature. Lacanian and Badiouian thought will form a key theoretical backdrop. Yet, we expect our studies will include work by a number of other figures, including Plato, Marx, Nietzsche, Frege, Freud, Heidegger, Wittgenstein, Lautman, Bachelard,Canguilhem, Althusser, Deleuze, Derrida, Macherey, Milller, Butler, Jameson, Žižek, Hägglund, and Malabou.

All texts and discussion will be in English.

Application:

We invite current graduate students, postdoctoral students, and junior faculty in philosophy orrelated disciplines to submit an application composed of a C.V. and a short letter of intent (500words maximum) to pghsummersymposium2014@gmail.com.

The deadline for applications is Friday, April 25th, 2014.

We expect to respond with notifications regarding acceptance to the symposium by Thursday, May 1st, 2014 to help facilitate summer plans. The seminar will be limited to 30-40 participants. For more information as it becomes available, we have created a website for the symposium: http://pghsummersymposium6.wix.com/pghsummersymp2014

Participants’ Conference (August 2–3):

In order to facilitate a further exchange of ideas and research, a participants’ conference will be held the weekend before the seminar begins. Applicants who receive notice of acceptance as participants will be asked – if interested – to submit an abstract of up to 500 words on any theme related to the topic of the seminar. The participants’ conference will take place on Saturday and Sunday, August 2-3, 2014.

Financial Information:

There will be a $200 registration fee for each participant of the seminar. This money will be used for event expenses like a conference dinner, celebration, daily coffee, etc. Please note that participants will be responsible for arranging their own housing as well as financing most of theirown meals for the duration of the symposium. However, with respect to lodging, we expect alimited number of arrangements with graduate students will be available on a first come, first serve basis.

Organizers:

James Bahoh, Dept. of Philosophy, Duquesne University, bahohj@duq.edu

Martin Krahn, Dept. of Philosophy, Duquesne University, krahnm@duq.edu

Jacob Greenstine, Dept. of Philosophy, Duquesne University, greenstinea@duq.edu

Dave Mesing, Dept. of Philosophy, Villanova University, dmesing@villanova.edu

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Welfare State

Welfare State

BRIGHTON NUT CONFERENCE: HOW SHOULD WE REMEMBER AND TEACH ABOUT THE WAR?

Brighton National Union of Teachers

Speakers:

Seamus Milne (Guardian),

Lindsey German (Stop the War),

Andy Stone (Defend School History).

 

 

Sunday 20th April, 8pm, Mercure, Kings Road, Brighton

See: http://noglory.org/index.php/10-no-glory-in-war-events?start=6

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

ICCE IV

ICCE IV

Crisis in Ukraine

Crisis in Ukraine

STOP THE WAR PUBLIC MEETING ON UKRAINE

Ukraine:  What is Behind the Crisis?

6.30pm, Tuesday 15 April

The Wesley Hotel, Euston Street, London, NW1 2EZ
The crisis in the Ukraine continues, with tensions between the big powers growing day by day. There are several factors militating against war in the immediate future, including Russia’s nuclear arsenal and trade links with EU countries. But as the establishment think-tank Stratfor has argued, it would be naive to rule out a conflagration.

Already NATO air drills are taking place over the Baltics, and the UK and US are sending extra jets to patrol the skies. Poland has requested 10,000 NATO troops to be stationed on its territory and MPs in Kiev have voted to hold joint military exercises with NATO. In the medium to long term, NATO is looking at establishing permanent military bases in Ukraine.

Read Stop the War’s statement on the crisis in Ukraine

Stop the War Coalition | office@stopwar.org.uk | 020 7561 4830

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

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