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PosthumanTHE MATERIALITY OF THE IMMATERIAL: ICTs AND THE DIGITAL COMMONS

Call for Papers: The Materiality of the Immaterial: ICTs and the Digital Commons

See: http://www.triple-c.at/index.php/tripleC/announcement/view/23

Special issue of tripleC: Communication, Capitalism & Critique

Online @ http://www.triple-c.at

Abstract submission deadline: January 15, 2015

Guest Editors:

Vasilis Kostakis, Ragnar Nurkse School of Innovation and Governance, Tallinn University of Technology (Estonia), P2P Lab (Greece);

Andreas Roos, Human Ecology Division, Lund University (Sweden)

With an escalating environmental crisis and an unprecedented increase of ICT diversity and use, it is more crucial than ever to understand the underlying material aspects of the ICT infrastructure.  This special issue therefore asks the question: What are the true material and socio-environmental costs of the global ICT infrastructure?

In a recent paper (Fuchs 2013) as well as in the book Digital Labour and Karl Marx (Fuchs 2014), Christian Fuchs examined the complex web of production relations and the new division of digital labour that makes possible the vast and cheap ICT infrastructure as we know it. The analysis partly revealed that ICT products and infrastructure can be said to embody slave-like and other extremely harsh conditions that perpetually force mine and assembly workers into conditions of dependency. Expanding this argument, the WWF reported (Reed and Miranda 2007) that mining in the Congo basin poses considerable threats to the local environment in the form of pollution, the loss of biodiversity, and an increased presence of business-as-usual made possible by roads and railways.  Thus ICTs can be said to be not at all immaterial because the ICT infrastructure under the given economic conditions can be said to embody as its material foundations slave-like working conditions, various class relations and undesirable environmental consequences.

At the same time, the emerging digital commons provide a new and promising platform for social developments, arguably enabled by the progressive dynamics of ICT development. These are predominantly manifested as commons-based peer production, i.e., a new mode of collaborative, social production (Benkler 2006); and grassroots digital fabrication or community-driven makerspaces, i.e., forms of bottom-up, distributed manufacturing. The most well known examples of commons-based peer production are the free/open source software projects and the free encyclopaedia Wikipedia. While these new forms of social organisation are immanent in capitalism, they also have the features to challenge these conditions in a way that might in turn transcend the dominant system (Kostakis and Bauwens 2014).

Following this dialectical framing, we would like to call for papers for a special issue of tripleC that will investigate how we can understand and balance the perils and promises of ICTs in order to make way for a just and sustainable paradigm. We seek scholarly articles and commentaries that address any of the following themes and beyond. We also welcome experimental formats, especially photo essays, which address the special issue’s theme.

Suggested themes

Papers that track, measure and/or theorise the scope of the socio-environmental impact of the ICT infrastructure.

Papers that track, measure and/or theorise surplus value as both ecological (land), social (labour) and intellectual (patent) in the context of ICTs.

Understanding the human organisation of nature in commons-based peer production.

Studies of the environmental dimensions of desktop manufacturing technologies (for example, 3D printing or CNC machines) in non-industrial modes of subsistence, e.g. eco-villages or traditional

agriculture, as well as in modern towns and mega-cities.

Suggestions for and insights into bridging understandings of the socio-economic organisation of the natural commons with the socio-economic organisation of the digital commons drawing on types of

organisations in the past and the present that are grounded in theories of the commons.

Elaboration of which theoretical approaches can be used for overcoming the conceptual separation of the categories immaterial/material in the digital commons.

 

References

Benkler, Yochai. 2006. The wealth of networks: How social production transforms markets and freedom. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Fuchs, Christian. 2014. Digital labour and Karl Marx. New York: Routledge.

Fuchs, Christian. 2013. Theorising and analysing digital labour: From global value chains to modes of production. The Political Economy of Communication 1 (2): 3-27, online at: http://www.polecom.org/index.php/polecom/article/view/19.

Kostakis, Vasilis and Michel Bauwens. 2014. Network society and future scenarios for a collaborative economy. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.

Reed, Erik and Marta Miranda. 2007. Assessment of the mining sector and infrastructure development in the congo basin region. Washington DC: World Wildlife Fund, Macroeconomics for Sustainable Development Program Office, 27, online at: http://awsassets.panda.org/downloads/congobasinmining.pdf

 

Schedule

Submission of abstracts (250-300 words) by January 15, 2015 via email to [log in to unmask]

Responses about acceptance/rejection to authors: February 15, 2015.

Selected authors will be expected to submit their full documents to tripleC via the online submission system by May 15, 2015:

http://triple-c.at/index.php/tripleC/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions

Expected publication date of the special issue: October 1, 2015.

About the journal

tripleC: Communication, Capitalism & Critique is an academic open access online journal using a non-commercial Creative Commons license. It is a journal that focuses on information society studies and studies of media, digital media, information and communication in society with a special interest in critical studies in these thematic areas. The journal has a special interest in disseminating articles that focus on the role of information in contemporary capitalist societies. For this task, articles should employ critical theories and/or empirical research inspired by critical theories and/or philosophy and ethics guided by critical thinking as well as relate the analysis to power structures and inequalities of capitalism, especially forms of stratification such as class, racist and other ideologies and capitalist patriarchy. Papers should reflect on how the presented findings contribute to the illumination of conditions that foster or hinder the advancement of a global sustainable and participatory information society. TripleC was founded in 2003 and is edited by Christian Fuchs and Marisol Sandoval.

 

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

 

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

Glenn’s article Education, Capital and the Transhuman has also recently been added to Academia, and can be found at: https://www.academia.edu/9033532/Education_Capital_and_the_Transhuman

 

Social Movments

Social Movments

RESEARCHING IN, BY AND FOR COMMUNITIES: A CONVERSATION ON KNOWLEDGE, SOCIAL MOVEMENTS AND REALLY BIG CHANGE

Researching In, By and For Communities: A Conversation on Knowledge, Social Movements and Really Big Change

Guest Speakers: Darlene E. Clover and Budd Hall

University of Edinburgh and SCUTREA Conference

November 28, 2014, 12:00-14:15

University of Edinburgh

Moray House School of Education

Details: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8CpqlADwoQlcnN2VEZYVHotY3M/view?pli=1 and http://scutrea.blogspot.co.uk/

The recent referendum in Scotland provided evidence and a reminder to those of us interested in communities, social change and knowledge of the depth of the creative knowledge generating capacities of people when they are able to focus on issues that touch their lives. Community activists, scholars, artists, politicians, small and large business folks, musicians, comedians, football players were really engaged in a remarkable series of activities that brought out what the people of Scotland care about.

This grassroots depth of knowledge creation and creativity is the transformative energy that has inspired researchers, higher education and community education practitioners and community organizations to think more about research paradigms that recognize the potential of co-creating knowledge, of the role of knowledge in social movements and the need for changes in our political and educational institutions to enlarge spaces for debating new futures.

National and international networks have arisen over the past few years in support of change, but what does it really mean?

How do we find new ways to collaborate to support the really big changes that our communities, our countries and our tired planet longs for?

This discussion will look at new forms of community university partnerships.

 

Best wishes,

Thomas Allmer

———-

Dr Thomas Allmer
Lecturer in Social Justice

University of Edinburgh
Moray House School of Education

Institute for Education, Community & Society
+44 131 651 6674
thomas.allmer@ed.ac.uk
http://allmer.uti.at

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

 

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

Norwich Cathedral

Norwich Cathedral

POSTGRADUATE RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES IN POLITICS, PUBLIC POLICY, CULTURE AND SOCIETY, AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF EAST ANGLIA

The School of Politics, Philosophy, Language and Communication Studies

University of East Anglia, Norwich, Norfolk, UK

We welcome applications from excellent candidates for our MPhil/PhD programmes and our Masters by Research.

Areas of study

We supervise topics ranging across political science and international relations.  We particularly encourage students whose research interests will complement or extend our expertise in three general areas:

Critical Global Politics:

Including foreign policy, global media, regional governance, borders, politics and religion, international security, international law, human rights and migration, theorizing global cities and global political economy

Politics and Public Policy:

Including the politics of the EU, theories of the policy process, normative and critical political theory, British political issues and ideologies, environmental policy, competition policy and regulation

Cultural Politics, Communications and Media:

Including cultural politics, media culture and identity, media events and rituals, media and globalisation, communications and media, public service broadcasting, competition policy and regulation, copyright and new business models in the creative industries, new media and society, political communication, international communication, language and politics, interculturalism, and contemporary cultural and political theory.

More details, including on how to apply, can be found at:

http://www.uea.ac.uk/political-social-international-studies/research-degrees

Funding

We invite applications for Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC)-funded doctoral studentships as partners in the Consortium for the Humanities and the Arts Southeast England (CHASE) http://www.chase.ac.uk.  CHASE will be awarding up to 75 studentships in 2015.

The Faculty will also offer up to 15 University-funded PhD studentships available to students from within or outside the EU.

More information on studentships can be found at:

http://www.uea.ac.uk/arts-humanities/graduate-school/studentships

To be considered for a studentship for October 2015 entry, the application deadline is 14 January 2015.  We advise early initial contact with potential supervisors to maximise the chance of success.

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL EDUCATION V – 2015

Analyze, Educate, Organize: Critical Education for Social and Economic Justice

ICCE V: International Conference on Critical Education

June 15 – 18, 2015, Wroclaw, Poland

Conference website: http://www.icce.uls.edu.pl/icce

The International Conference on Critical Education (ICCE), previously held in Athens (2011, 2012), Ankara (2013) and Thessaloniki (2014), is a forum for scholars, educators and activists committed to social and economic justice.  The 5th ICCE: Analyze, educate, organize. Critical education for social and economic justice will take place in the Polish city of Wroclaw from June 15 – 18, 2015.

At a time of economic crisis, when education is under siege by neoliberal capitalism, (neo)conservatism and aggressive nationalism, when teachers and academics are being proletarianized, youth criminalized, schools and universities turned into commodities, and when different forms of fundamentalism are growing, critical education, as a theory and as a movement, is gaining in relevance. International communities of critical educators build resistance to these processes and are engaged in fostering social change leading to a more just, equal and fair society.

We invite emergent/new scholars, teachers, activists as well as those more experienced to submit abstracts that explicitly engage with these issues. The languages of the conference are English and Polish. Simultaneous translation will be provided during plenary sessions and selected parallel sessions.

Please send proposals written in the English language of maximum 150 words, including your name, a title, affiliation, contact information to iisce@dsw.edu.pl by March 20, 2015 (please indicate the language in which you will present – ENG/PL).  For more information, please visit www.icce.uls.edu.pl.  If you are presenting in another language, such as Turkish, for example, you will need to provide your own translator.

Keynote Speakers

Peter McLaren (Chapman University, California, USA)

Antonia Darder (Loyola Marymount University, USA)

Joyce Canaan (Birmingham City University, UK)

Hana Cervinkova (University of Lower Silesia, Wroclaw, Poland)

Adam Chmielewski (University of Wroclaw, Poland)

Anna Dzierzgowska (Jacek Kuroń High School, Warsaw, Poland)

Panagiota Gounari (University of Massachusetts, Boston, USA)

George Grollios (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece)

Gail Edwards (Newcastle University, UK)

Dave Hill (Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford, UK)

Aygülen Kayahan Karakul (İzmir Katip Çelebi University, İzmir, Turkey)

Ravi Kumar (South Asian University, Delhi, India) (tbc)

Robert Kwaśnica (University of Lower Silesia, Wroclaw, Poland)

Piotr Laskowski (Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland)

Heidi Mirza (Goldsmiths College, University of London, London, UK)

Lilia Monzo (Chapman University, California, USA)

Ünal Özmen (Journalist/Author, Turkey)

Lotar Rasiński (University of Lower Silesia, Wroclaw, Poland)

Guy Senese (Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Arizona, USA)

Bogusław Śliwerski (Academy of Special Education, Warsaw, Poland)

Kostas Skordoulis (National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece)

Tomasz Szkudlarek (University of Gdańsk, Poland)

Paolo Vittoria (Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)

Ahmet Yildiz (Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey)

Marta Zahorska – Bugaj (University of Warsaw, Poland)

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

 

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

 

No Future

No Future

NO PRESENT: NEW ENCOUNTERS IN FRENCH AND ITALIAN THOUGHT

March 13-14, 2015

Villanova University

Keynote: Jason E. Smith

The negotiation between French and Italian activists and intellectuals in the latter part of the twentieth century (marked by 1968 in France and 1977 in Italy) opened a field of theoretical experimentation, the effects of which pose a challenge for contemporary politics. This encounter materialized through various collectives, traversing the neat intellectual and practical boundaries of the academy. Whether through the images of intellectuals in the streets or through radical activist groups extending from the Situationist International to Tiqqun, the laboratory of French and Italian thought poses a constellation of conceptual weapons that remain vital for any contestation with the state of things. These implements have been successful in intervening within contemporary struggles on the level of theory, practice, and the construction of history in the present.

Under the inheritance of this tradition, this conference invites submissions from the interstices and margins of recent French and Italian philosophy. Possible paper topics include feminist recapitulations of post-workerism, the theoretical legacy of biopolitics as it is taken up in Agamben and Esposito, and the ongoing challenges for theory and practice posed by social movements extending from Latin America to the Mediterranean in the wake of events such as Mohamed Bouazizi’s self-immolation.

Other topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Post-Althusserian philosophy
  • Decolonial challenges to eurocentric thought and strategies
  • Wages for Housework and care economies
  • Realism and contemporary cntologies
  • Re-interpretations of the Gramscian legacy
  • Philosophies of life and the problem of vitalism
  • Lacanian psychoanalysis and its heritage
  • French and Italian receptions of Spinoza, Hegel, and Marx
  • Affect theory and imagination in cultural productions (e.g. film and media)
  • Left Heideggarian reflections on community between Nancy and Agamben

 

The Philosophy Graduate Student Union at Villanova University welcomes graduate students and junior faculty to submit any of the following to be considered for our conference: paper abstracts of 250-350 words, papers of approximately 3000 words (including co-authored work) suitable for a 20 minute presentation, or proposed panels. Authors of accepted abstracts should send completed papers by March 1, 2015.

Please send submissions, prepared for blind review, by Dec. 21, 2014 to YUcont2015@gmail.com

This conference is committed to accommodating people with disabilities. Conference participants and attendees are encouraged to contact the above email address to discuss accommodations.

Villanova University (About): http://www1.villanova.edu/content/main/about.html

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

 

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

Unemployment

Unemployment

INEQUALITY

Call for Papers: American Journal of Cultural Sociology

American Journal of Cultural Sociology, Р.О. Box 208265 New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8265 Campus mail: 493 College Street

ajcs@yale.edu

Special issue on Inequality

The American Journal of Cultural Sociology plans a special issue devoted to inequality.

Inequality has come roaring back onto the public agenda, punctuated by Barack Obama’s December 2013 claim that income inequality is “a defining challenge of our time”. But if the new object of civil concern is economic, the nature of that concern remains centrally cultural.

What is the new culture structure that informs contemporary discussions about inequality? Can the new focus on inequality be conceived as a discourse? What are its narratives, codes, metaphors, and iconic representations? What is the meaning of polluted inequality that emerges? What historical narratives about equality and inequality inspire it, what myths of a gold age, what analogies to earlier dark periods? How are the new elites symbolically constructed? How do they construct themselves, their worthiness, and those on the other, less fortunate side? Is there a new “culture of inequality” that justifies contemporary stratification? How do disenfranchised economic groups narrate their own situations, as well as those on the other side? If the old working class has been decimated, are new counter-publics forming out of these dominated economic groups? The editors of AJCS would welcome papers on any of these concerns.

The deadline for paper submissions is September 1, 2015. Papers will be subject to peer review. Authors are requested to consult the instructions for authors on the journal website and to submit their contributions through our online submission system: http://www.palgrave-journals.com/ajcs/author_instructions.html

We welcome short email queries about the appropriateness of contributions to this special issue at ajcs@yale.edu. For further information on the journal and to explore its existing content, aims and scope, please visit http://www.palgrave-journals.com/ajcs/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

 

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

 

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

CONFERO: ESSAYS ON EDUCATION, PHILOSOPHY AND POLITICS

Open Call for Papers

Confero: Essays on Education, Philosophy & Politics

Confero is an interdisciplinary peer-reviewed journal focusing on issues related to education and social criticism. The journal provides a space for essayistic writing and especially encourages discussions of philosophical and political nature.

We are now inviting submissions of essays that deal with issues related to the broad scope of the journal, i.e. education and criticism.

The journal welcomes a broad range of empirical sources to explore the issue or phenomenon at hand: unconventional sources such as art works, literature, movies as well as conventional empirical material like interviews, statistics and ethnographies.

Confero publishes essays related to education written from various academic traditions, for example anthropology, literature, history, social psychology and sociology.

Confero is an open access journal, available for free to people engaged in social science research as well as a wider intellectual public. All the submission that potentially will possess the high quality required for publication, will go through a rigorous double blind peer-review process.

This open call for papers warmly welcomes contributions at any time.

The inaugural issue of Confero contains essays by such scholars as Sven-Eric LiedmanYlva HasselbergMary Lou Lou RasmussenWalter Mignolo and Ronny Ambjörnsson. To access these essays or getting further information on our submission guidelines, please visit: http://www.confero.ep.liu.se

We look forward to your submission!

The editorial team

Open Call for Papers: http://www.confero.ep.liu.se/call_for_papers.html

Confero: http://www.confero.ep.liu.se/index.asp

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski

CRISES IN EDUCATION, CRISES OF EDUCATION

Glenn Rikowski, Visiting Scholar, Department of Education, Anglia Ruskin University, UK

A paper prepared for the Philosophy of Education Seminars at the University of London Institute of Education 2014-15 Programme, 22nd October 2014.

 

INTRODUCTION

The capitalist crisis of 2007-09 cast a grim shadow over social existence in developed Western nations. The fallout from the banking crash of September 2008 post-Lehman cascaded over welfare, health, social services and education provision in the form of austerity measures, the drive to cut sovereign debt levels, the erosion of workers’ living standards and vicious service cuts and taxes aimed at the poor and disadvantaged (e.g. the bedroom tax in the UK).

On the back of this maelstrom, the Journal of Education Policy (JEP) celebrated its 25th anniversary by running a special issue on ‘Education, Capitalism and the Global Crisis’ in 2010[1]. The JEP is to be congratulated on unveiling articles addressing relationships between the crisis of 2007-09 and education: it was unusual for a mainstream education journal to dedicate a whole issue to this topic. However, with the possible exception of Clarke and Newman’s (2010) contribution[2] it could be concluded that little progress has been made in understanding relations between capitalist crises and education since Madan Sarup’s classic Education, State and Crisis: A Marxist Perspective of 1982. Furthermore, there seemed to be a coy elision regarding the constitution of crisis within or of education itself. The crisis of 2007-09 was basically ‘economic’ in nature, it appears, with various spill-over effects for education: e.g. cuts in expenditure, deepening educational inequalities and rationing of access to higher education (Jones, 2010). Thus: education crisis was derivative of, and consequential upon, economic crisis. Furthermore, the economy, or the ‘economic’ system (for structuralists) is the starting point for analysis of education crisis.

The notion that an ‘education crisis’ can only ever be derivative of a capitalist economic one begs the question as to whether all crises can only ever be basically economic in nature; only ‘economic’ crises fundamentally put either the whole capitalist economy and society at risk, or, are the foundation for crises in other parts of the social system but still basically ‘economic’ in nature; thereby generating spectres of reductionism, economic determinism and crude renditions of historical materialism. On the other hand, references to ‘crisis’ litter media reports and academic outputs in relation to all kinds of topics – and there is nearly always some kind of ‘education crisis’ foregrounded by the print media. In terms of everyday usage the concept appears to have extensive legitimacy, though Gamble notes that ‘the term crisis [is] being thrown around fairly indiscriminately in everyday discourse’ (2009, p.7).[3]

It should be borne in mind that the concept of crisis can be traced back to the writings of Hippocrates (c. 460 – c. 370 B.C.) in ancient Greece, where it was used in relation to medicine, specifically indicating the turning point in the course of a disease or medical condition. In such writings as Epidemics, Book 1, Hippocrates used the concept of crisis to denote the point (the turning point) at which a patient either began to make a recovery from illness, or the disease won out and death resulted (Hippocrates, 1983). Furthermore, reading the ground-breaking work on crisis by Janet Roitman (2011 and 2014), which built on the classic text on the topic by Reinhart Koselleck (1988), indicated that an exploration of the concept of crisis beyond the economic sphere could be a worthwhile project. Maybe there could be essentially ‘education crises’ after all, and with this in view, this paper is structured into three parts, as follows.

Part 1 begins with a rudimentary outline of the concept of crisis. Madan Sarup’s (1982) classical theory of education crisis is then explored, coupled with some evidence showing that Sarup’s approach still has relevance for today (with contemporary examples drawn from the United States, Australia and England). It is demonstrated how contemporary accounts of the 2007-09 economic crisis could supplement and deepen Sarup’s account, whilst also avoiding the issue of the possibility of definitive education crises. This is followed by a brief outline and review of some work by Vincent Carpentier (2003, 2006a-b and 2009), which, although manifesting more sophistication (and much better data) as compared with Sarup’s classic work, nevertheless falls prey to subsuming education crises under economic developments. In the same context, David Blacker’s work on The Falling Rate of Learning and the Neoliberal Endgame (2013) is examined. This is an attempt to apply Marx’s notion of the tendency of the rate of profit to fall (TRPF) (via the work of Kliman, 2012) to developments in education in the United States (primarily). Blacker stamps the TRPF on contemporary education and thereby develops an original account of education crisis. Yet nevertheless, his rendering of education crisis is still derivative of economic crisis. Blacker also fails to pin down what a falling rate of learning actually is. He prefers to focus on a fall in the mass of learning and the elimination of learning, instead. These developments rest on economic, but also environmental, crisis. This first part of the paper ends with a brief critique of Crisis Fundamentalism: the notion that real, bona fide crises can only be economic ones. This is what the concept of crisis in education is concerned with.

Part 2 takes another tack: a different starting point, an alternative methodological approach. Rather than viewing education crises as flowing from economic ones, it explores the concept of education and what it is to be an ‘educated person’, and then seeks out possibilities for education crises within educational phenomena, institutions, processes and ethics. Such crises are crises of education, it is argued. The work of R.S. Peters (via Robin Barrow, 2011) is the focus here. There is an attempt to work through what an ‘education crisis’ might be on the basis of Barrow’s rendition of what he (Barrow) takes to be the four key components of Peters’ conception of the educated person. The discussion of some of the consequences of this approach is deepened through bringing the work of Janet Roitman (2011, 2014) to the keyboard. Rather than providing a history of the concept of crisis, as in Koselleck (1988), or providing a new (and improved) concept of crisis, Roitman shows the various ways in which the concept has been, and can be, put to work. Hence, Roitman’s approach to crisis is ‘put to work’ on R.S. Peters’ work on the educated person, pace Barrow. The last base in Part 2 examines the notion of ‘education for its own sake’ and what I call ‘island pedagogy’, flowing from the work of Furedi (2004a and 2009) and his followers. The argument here is that this approach to education crisis falls either into an ethics of blame or conjures up an education Colossus; a kind of Nietzschean figure with a monumental drive to learn and teach, unsullied by material interests and motivations. This approach is also basically idealist, transhistorical and sociologically naïve. It is also the flipside of Crisis Fundamentalism (education crises derive from economic ones – crises in education): quintessentially education crises can only arise within the educational sphere itself – leading to a kind of Educational Crisis Idealism (crises of education).

The Conclusion argues that we need to think about crisis in relation to education and economy in a new way: such crises are not essentially ‘education’ or ‘economic’ in nature. An anti- (rather than post-) structuralist perspective rooted in class struggle is advanced as a way forward, and neither Crisis Fundamentalism (crises in education) nor Educational Crisis Idealism (crises of education) will do. It also discusses the question of whether, and why, exploring the issue of crisis and education is a worthwhile pursuit for critical educators and theorists and for those who wish to move beyond capitalist education and society.

 

The whole paper can be downloaded at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

 

[1] Journal of Education Policy, Vol.25 No.6, November, edited by Stephen Ball, Meg Maguire and Ivor Goodson. A book based on this special 25th Anniversary was produced by the same three editors, also called Education, Capitalism and the Global Crisis, in 2012 (Ball et al, 2012) – but with some additional articles.

[2] Clarke and Newman (2010) explore the notion that crises are ‘socially constructed’ and the roles discourse and social power play in these constructions.

[3] See also: ‘Crisis is much overused in everyday discourse. 24-hour news lives by manufacturing crisis. Most of them are entirely ephemeral. Any event that is in any way out of the ordinary or where there appears to be conflict and the outcome is uncertain becomes labelled a crisis’ (Gamble, 2010, p.704).

Occupy London

Occupy London

OCCUPY DEMOCRACY

Parliament Square, 17th to 26th October

London

 

Schedule for Saturday, 25th of October

Solutions – what are the answers they don’t want you to know? What would real democracy look like? What would our ideal society look like?

9:30am Camp assembly/Whole site work

11am “How the Revolutionary Kurds of Kobane are carrying out an experiment in direct democracy” by Dilar Dirik (University of Cambridge)

12pm “The 1984/5 Miners’ Strike: the story they don’t want you to hear” by Christopher Hird (Executive Producer, Still the Enemy Within).

1pm Lunch

2pm Workshop “The Prostitute State :  How would a 21st Century Great Democratic Reform Act Tackle it?” by (Donnachadh McCarthy, former Deputy Chair Liberal Democrats, author The Prostitute State)

3pm “How to Transform our Energy System” by Jeremy Leggett (social entrepreneur)

3:30pm “The State We Need” by Michael Meacher MP

4pm Workshop “Why we need a Constitutional Convention so that the people and not the politicians can decide what goes in the UK’s convention” by Sarah Allan (Constitutional Convention Campaign)

5pm “MagnaCarta.2 and Demoractic Reform” by Jolyon Rubinstein (presenter, The Revolution Will Be Televised)

6pm Dinner

7pm Assembly: What do we want?

9pm Hannah Chutzpah (performance poet) followed by revolutionary song and dance.

 

Website: http://occupydemocracy.org.uk/2014/10/22/schedule-for-saturday-25th-of-october/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Adorno

Adorno

POLEMICS

Polemics is a book series with two central aims:
(i)  Drawing on radical, critical and political theory/philosophy to address directly the various crises which have plagued global society and capitalism in the past decade;

(ii)  To present radical critiques of and alternatives to the existing way of doing things, in a polemical but academically rigorous form.

The series will appeal to authors writing from within the tradition of radical and critical theory and political philosophy. As editor I take a broad view of what comprises critical theory, including Frankfurt school scholars, and their heirs; post-structuralist and post Marxist theorists, post operatist theorists and the many others committed to a critique of existing dominant arguments and orders. What distinguishes the series is its commitment to the publication of polemical interventions in current political and economic conditions.

Texts would be no longer than 150 pages (between 30000 and 50000 words) and appeal to an audience wider than the normal academic community, while maintaining rigorous academic standards. The model for such a form of writing is perhaps best encapsulated by Adorno’s essay “The Essay as Form.’ He describes the essay form: as a refusal to treat the given as the true; as the expression of non-identity through its form; and as an enactment of intellectual freedom without first principles. Each text should be considered as an extended essay, improper in respect of disciplinary and academic convention, but deadly serious in seeking to give voice to the unspoken, against the platitudes and certainties which delimit particular forms of order.

Many academics work with radical and/or critical theories. However there is a relative dearth of texts which uses this philosophical work polemically to address the crises confronted by contemporary societies. Authors are encouraged to make polemical interventions which lay out alternative visions, and radical critiques of the existing order. These critiques should establish their arguments from within the range of positions available to contemporary critical and radical theory, while seeking to go beyond established debates. This would entail a similar, although by no means prescriptive, model for each text: first, a violation of the normal proprieties which structure a field of vision or order; second the rearticulation of what has been challenged in different terms. This means taking a topic, an object or a field of thought, teasing out the presuppositions which configure this field, and then reconfiguring them a manner that renders the apparently obvious problematic.

Polemics: http://www.rowmaninternational.com/series/polemics

Series editor information

Dr Mark Devenney

m.devenney@brighton.ac.uk; 10-11 Pavilion Parade, School of Humanities, University of Brighton, BN29ZF.

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Critical Education / Education is Critical

Critical Education / Education is Critical

DEMOCRACY AND COLLECTIVE ACTION IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY

A message from Jeremy Gilbert

A Public Event with:

Angela McRobbie

Hilary Wainwright

Mark Fisher

Jeremy Gilbert

Neal Lawson

November 11th 2014, 6:30pm-8:30pm
Committee Room 6, House of Commons

All details and booking: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/democracy-and-collective-action-in-the-twenty-first-century-tickets-13633868267?aff=eventful%2Fr%2Feventful

‘Reclaim Modernity: Beyond Markets, Beyond Machines’ is a new pamphlet published by Compass and written by Mark Fisher and Jeremy Gilbert. A brief introduction to the pamphlet can be read here, and you can click through to short piece I wrote about the pamphlet for the Guardian website, and then to the actual document, from there:
http://jeremygilbertwriting.wordpress.com/2014/10/21/reclaim-modernity/

A related essay on UKIP, Populism and the Left is here:
https://www.opendemocracy.net/ourkingdom/jeremy-gilbert/populism-and-left-does-ukip-matter-can-democracy-be-saved
Please circulate widely
Jeremy Gilbert
http://www.jeremygilbert.org
@jemgilbert=

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

Global Capitalism

Global Capitalism

THE GLOBALISATION LECTURES

 

‘THE GLOBALISATION LECTURES’

2014-2015

Organised by the Department of Development Studies

School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS)

University of London

Convenor: Professor Gilbert Achcar

 
WORKERS IN A JUST-IN-TIME WORLD: HOW CAPITALISM IS FORGING A GLOBAL SUPPLY-CHAIN-GANG

Workers across the world are producing more goods, services, and wealth than ever, but receiving less and less of their value in return. Neoliberal polices are the enablers of this extortion, but beneath the privatisation, deregulation, and tax breaks, lies the largely hidden theft of time.  Capital today is forging a worldwide network of digitally-driven, accelerating just-in-time supply chains that push wages down and effort up for the vast majority. Trade unions have been weakened and traditional ‘collective bargaining’ undermined. Yet, resistance is on the rise and capital’s interdependent global networks more vulnerable to disruption than ever.

KIM MOODY

Long-time trade union activist, author of Workers in a Lean World and In Solidarity: Essays on Working Class Organization in the United States

Monday 27 October, 6:30pm

SOAS, Brunei Gallery Lecture Theatre

Free entrance, first come first seated

Kim Moody is the author of several books on labour and social issues including Workers in a Lean World (1997), US Labor in Trouble and Transition(2007), and In Solidarity: Essays on Working-Class Organization in the United States (2014). He has been a trade union activist and a founder and director of the publication Labor Notes in the United States. Until recently he was a senior research fellow in industrial relations at the University of Hertfordshire.

 

Next Lectures in the series (with day corrected for 2nd March):

 

Monday 1st December, 6:30pm – Brunei Gallery Lecture Theatre

GLOBALIZATION SINCE BHOPAL: THREE DECADES OF ENVIRONMENTAL DISASTER

VANDANA SHIVA

Leading member of the International Forum on Globalisation and prominent figure of the alter-globalisation movement

RAVI RAJAN

Associate Professor, Department of Environmental Studies, University of California, Santa Cruz

CO-ORGANISED WITH THE BHOPAL MEDICAL APPEAL

 

Monday 26 January, 6:30pm – Brunei Gallery Lecture Theatre

WOMEN’S RIGHTS AND THE ARAB UPRISINGS

AHLEM BELHADJ, MD

Professor of Child Psychiatry at the University of Tunis, former chair of the Tunisian Association of Democratic Women (ATFD)

 

Monday 2 March, 6:30pm – Brunei Gallery Lecture Theatre

DEVELOPMENT AND THE METABOLIC RIFT: REACTIONS TO THE CONTRADICTION

BARBARA HARRISS-WHITE

Emeritus Professor of Development Studies, Oxford University, Co-ordinator, South Asia Research Cluster, Wolfson College, Oxford
First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/soas-globalisation-lectures-27-october-workers-in-a-just-in-time-world-capitalism-and-the-supply-chain-gang

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

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