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Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski

CRISES IN EDUCATION, CRISES OF EDUCATION

Glenn Rikowski, Visiting Scholar, Department of Education, Anglia Ruskin University, UK

A paper prepared for the Philosophy of Education Seminars at the University of London Institute of Education 2014-15 Programme, 22nd October 2014.

 

INTRODUCTION

The capitalist crisis of 2007-09 cast a grim shadow over social existence in developed Western nations. The fallout from the banking crash of September 2008 post-Lehman cascaded over welfare, health, social services and education provision in the form of austerity measures, the drive to cut sovereign debt levels, the erosion of workers’ living standards and vicious service cuts and taxes aimed at the poor and disadvantaged (e.g. the bedroom tax in the UK).

On the back of this maelstrom, the Journal of Education Policy (JEP) celebrated its 25th anniversary by running a special issue on ‘Education, Capitalism and the Global Crisis’ in 2010[1]. The JEP is to be congratulated on unveiling articles addressing relationships between the crisis of 2007-09 and education: it was unusual for a mainstream education journal to dedicate a whole issue to this topic. However, with the possible exception of Clarke and Newman’s (2010) contribution[2] it could be concluded that little progress has been made in understanding relations between capitalist crises and education since Madan Sarup’s classic Education, State and Crisis: A Marxist Perspective of 1982. Furthermore, there seemed to be a coy elision regarding the constitution of crisis within or of education itself. The crisis of 2007-09 was basically ‘economic’ in nature, it appears, with various spill-over effects for education: e.g. cuts in expenditure, deepening educational inequalities and rationing of access to higher education (Jones, 2010). Thus: education crisis was derivative of, and consequential upon, economic crisis. Furthermore, the economy, or the ‘economic’ system (for structuralists) is the starting point for analysis of education crisis.

The notion that an ‘education crisis’ can only ever be derivative of a capitalist economic one begs the question as to whether all crises can only ever be basically economic in nature; only ‘economic’ crises fundamentally put either the whole capitalist economy and society at risk, or, are the foundation for crises in other parts of the social system but still basically ‘economic’ in nature; thereby generating spectres of reductionism, economic determinism and crude renditions of historical materialism. On the other hand, references to ‘crisis’ litter media reports and academic outputs in relation to all kinds of topics – and there is nearly always some kind of ‘education crisis’ foregrounded by the print media. In terms of everyday usage the concept appears to have extensive legitimacy, though Gamble notes that ‘the term crisis [is] being thrown around fairly indiscriminately in everyday discourse’ (2009, p.7).[3]

It should be borne in mind that the concept of crisis can be traced back to the writings of Hippocrates (c. 460 – c. 370 B.C.) in ancient Greece, where it was used in relation to medicine, specifically indicating the turning point in the course of a disease or medical condition. In such writings as Epidemics, Book 1, Hippocrates used the concept of crisis to denote the point (the turning point) at which a patient either began to make a recovery from illness, or the disease won out and death resulted (Hippocrates, 1983). Furthermore, reading the ground-breaking work on crisis by Janet Roitman (2011 and 2014), which built on the classic text on the topic by Reinhart Koselleck (1988), indicated that an exploration of the concept of crisis beyond the economic sphere could be a worthwhile project. Maybe there could be essentially ‘education crises’ after all, and with this in view, this paper is structured into three parts, as follows.

Part 1 begins with a rudimentary outline of the concept of crisis. Madan Sarup’s (1982) classical theory of education crisis is then explored, coupled with some evidence showing that Sarup’s approach still has relevance for today (with contemporary examples drawn from the United States, Australia and England). It is demonstrated how contemporary accounts of the 2007-09 economic crisis could supplement and deepen Sarup’s account, whilst also avoiding the issue of the possibility of definitive education crises. This is followed by a brief outline and review of some work by Vincent Carpentier (2003, 2006a-b and 2009), which, although manifesting more sophistication (and much better data) as compared with Sarup’s classic work, nevertheless falls prey to subsuming education crises under economic developments. In the same context, David Blacker’s work on The Falling Rate of Learning and the Neoliberal Endgame (2013) is examined. This is an attempt to apply Marx’s notion of the tendency of the rate of profit to fall (TRPF) (via the work of Kliman, 2012) to developments in education in the United States (primarily). Blacker stamps the TRPF on contemporary education and thereby develops an original account of education crisis. Yet nevertheless, his rendering of education crisis is still derivative of economic crisis. Blacker also fails to pin down what a falling rate of learning actually is. He prefers to focus on a fall in the mass of learning and the elimination of learning, instead. These developments rest on economic, but also environmental, crisis. This first part of the paper ends with a brief critique of Crisis Fundamentalism: the notion that real, bona fide crises can only be economic ones. This is what the concept of crisis in education is concerned with.

Part 2 takes another tack: a different starting point, an alternative methodological approach. Rather than viewing education crises as flowing from economic ones, it explores the concept of education and what it is to be an ‘educated person’, and then seeks out possibilities for education crises within educational phenomena, institutions, processes and ethics. Such crises are crises of education, it is argued. The work of R.S. Peters (via Robin Barrow, 2011) is the focus here. There is an attempt to work through what an ‘education crisis’ might be on the basis of Barrow’s rendition of what he (Barrow) takes to be the four key components of Peters’ conception of the educated person. The discussion of some of the consequences of this approach is deepened through bringing the work of Janet Roitman (2011, 2014) to the keyboard. Rather than providing a history of the concept of crisis, as in Koselleck (1988), or providing a new (and improved) concept of crisis, Roitman shows the various ways in which the concept has been, and can be, put to work. Hence, Roitman’s approach to crisis is ‘put to work’ on R.S. Peters’ work on the educated person, pace Barrow. The last base in Part 2 examines the notion of ‘education for its own sake’ and what I call ‘island pedagogy’, flowing from the work of Furedi (2004a and 2009) and his followers. The argument here is that this approach to education crisis falls either into an ethics of blame or conjures up an education Colossus; a kind of Nietzschean figure with a monumental drive to learn and teach, unsullied by material interests and motivations. This approach is also basically idealist, transhistorical and sociologically naïve. It is also the flipside of Crisis Fundamentalism (education crises derive from economic ones – crises in education): quintessentially education crises can only arise within the educational sphere itself – leading to a kind of Educational Crisis Idealism (crises of education).

The Conclusion argues that we need to think about crisis in relation to education and economy in a new way: such crises are not essentially ‘education’ or ‘economic’ in nature. An anti- (rather than post-) structuralist perspective rooted in class struggle is advanced as a way forward, and neither Crisis Fundamentalism (crises in education) nor Educational Crisis Idealism (crises of education) will do. It also discusses the question of whether, and why, exploring the issue of crisis and education is a worthwhile pursuit for critical educators and theorists and for those who wish to move beyond capitalist education and society.

 

The whole paper can be downloaded at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

 

[1] Journal of Education Policy, Vol.25 No.6, November, edited by Stephen Ball, Meg Maguire and Ivor Goodson. A book based on this special 25th Anniversary was produced by the same three editors, also called Education, Capitalism and the Global Crisis, in 2012 (Ball et al, 2012) – but with some additional articles.

[2] Clarke and Newman (2010) explore the notion that crises are ‘socially constructed’ and the roles discourse and social power play in these constructions.

[3] See also: ‘Crisis is much overused in everyday discourse. 24-hour news lives by manufacturing crisis. Most of them are entirely ephemeral. Any event that is in any way out of the ordinary or where there appears to be conflict and the outcome is uncertain becomes labelled a crisis’ (Gamble, 2010, p.704).

Occupy London

Occupy London

OCCUPY DEMOCRACY

Parliament Square, 17th to 26th October

London

 

Schedule for Saturday, 25th of October

Solutions – what are the answers they don’t want you to know? What would real democracy look like? What would our ideal society look like?

9:30am Camp assembly/Whole site work

11am “How the Revolutionary Kurds of Kobane are carrying out an experiment in direct democracy” by Dilar Dirik (University of Cambridge)

12pm “The 1984/5 Miners’ Strike: the story they don’t want you to hear” by Christopher Hird (Executive Producer, Still the Enemy Within).

1pm Lunch

2pm Workshop “The Prostitute State :  How would a 21st Century Great Democratic Reform Act Tackle it?” by (Donnachadh McCarthy, former Deputy Chair Liberal Democrats, author The Prostitute State)

3pm “How to Transform our Energy System” by Jeremy Leggett (social entrepreneur)

3:30pm “The State We Need” by Michael Meacher MP

4pm Workshop “Why we need a Constitutional Convention so that the people and not the politicians can decide what goes in the UK’s convention” by Sarah Allan (Constitutional Convention Campaign)

5pm “MagnaCarta.2 and Demoractic Reform” by Jolyon Rubinstein (presenter, The Revolution Will Be Televised)

6pm Dinner

7pm Assembly: What do we want?

9pm Hannah Chutzpah (performance poet) followed by revolutionary song and dance.

 

Website: http://occupydemocracy.org.uk/2014/10/22/schedule-for-saturday-25th-of-october/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Adorno

Adorno

POLEMICS

Polemics is a book series with two central aims:
(i)  Drawing on radical, critical and political theory/philosophy to address directly the various crises which have plagued global society and capitalism in the past decade;

(ii)  To present radical critiques of and alternatives to the existing way of doing things, in a polemical but academically rigorous form.

The series will appeal to authors writing from within the tradition of radical and critical theory and political philosophy. As editor I take a broad view of what comprises critical theory, including Frankfurt school scholars, and their heirs; post-structuralist and post Marxist theorists, post operatist theorists and the many others committed to a critique of existing dominant arguments and orders. What distinguishes the series is its commitment to the publication of polemical interventions in current political and economic conditions.

Texts would be no longer than 150 pages (between 30000 and 50000 words) and appeal to an audience wider than the normal academic community, while maintaining rigorous academic standards. The model for such a form of writing is perhaps best encapsulated by Adorno’s essay “The Essay as Form.’ He describes the essay form: as a refusal to treat the given as the true; as the expression of non-identity through its form; and as an enactment of intellectual freedom without first principles. Each text should be considered as an extended essay, improper in respect of disciplinary and academic convention, but deadly serious in seeking to give voice to the unspoken, against the platitudes and certainties which delimit particular forms of order.

Many academics work with radical and/or critical theories. However there is a relative dearth of texts which uses this philosophical work polemically to address the crises confronted by contemporary societies. Authors are encouraged to make polemical interventions which lay out alternative visions, and radical critiques of the existing order. These critiques should establish their arguments from within the range of positions available to contemporary critical and radical theory, while seeking to go beyond established debates. This would entail a similar, although by no means prescriptive, model for each text: first, a violation of the normal proprieties which structure a field of vision or order; second the rearticulation of what has been challenged in different terms. This means taking a topic, an object or a field of thought, teasing out the presuppositions which configure this field, and then reconfiguring them a manner that renders the apparently obvious problematic.

Polemics: http://www.rowmaninternational.com/series/polemics

Series editor information

Dr Mark Devenney

m.devenney@brighton.ac.uk; 10-11 Pavilion Parade, School of Humanities, University of Brighton, BN29ZF.

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Critical Education / Education is Critical

Critical Education / Education is Critical

DEMOCRACY AND COLLECTIVE ACTION IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY

A message from Jeremy Gilbert

A Public Event with:

Angela McRobbie

Hilary Wainwright

Mark Fisher

Jeremy Gilbert

Neal Lawson

November 11th 2014, 6:30pm-8:30pm
Committee Room 6, House of Commons

All details and booking: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/democracy-and-collective-action-in-the-twenty-first-century-tickets-13633868267?aff=eventful%2Fr%2Feventful

‘Reclaim Modernity: Beyond Markets, Beyond Machines’ is a new pamphlet published by Compass and written by Mark Fisher and Jeremy Gilbert. A brief introduction to the pamphlet can be read here, and you can click through to short piece I wrote about the pamphlet for the Guardian website, and then to the actual document, from there:
http://jeremygilbertwriting.wordpress.com/2014/10/21/reclaim-modernity/

A related essay on UKIP, Populism and the Left is here:
https://www.opendemocracy.net/ourkingdom/jeremy-gilbert/populism-and-left-does-ukip-matter-can-democracy-be-saved
Please circulate widely
Jeremy Gilbert
http://www.jeremygilbert.org
@jemgilbert=

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

Global Capitalism

Global Capitalism

THE GLOBALISATION LECTURES

 

‘THE GLOBALISATION LECTURES’

2014-2015

Organised by the Department of Development Studies

School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS)

University of London

Convenor: Professor Gilbert Achcar

 
WORKERS IN A JUST-IN-TIME WORLD: HOW CAPITALISM IS FORGING A GLOBAL SUPPLY-CHAIN-GANG

Workers across the world are producing more goods, services, and wealth than ever, but receiving less and less of their value in return. Neoliberal polices are the enablers of this extortion, but beneath the privatisation, deregulation, and tax breaks, lies the largely hidden theft of time.  Capital today is forging a worldwide network of digitally-driven, accelerating just-in-time supply chains that push wages down and effort up for the vast majority. Trade unions have been weakened and traditional ‘collective bargaining’ undermined. Yet, resistance is on the rise and capital’s interdependent global networks more vulnerable to disruption than ever.

KIM MOODY

Long-time trade union activist, author of Workers in a Lean World and In Solidarity: Essays on Working Class Organization in the United States

Monday 27 October, 6:30pm

SOAS, Brunei Gallery Lecture Theatre

Free entrance, first come first seated

Kim Moody is the author of several books on labour and social issues including Workers in a Lean World (1997), US Labor in Trouble and Transition(2007), and In Solidarity: Essays on Working-Class Organization in the United States (2014). He has been a trade union activist and a founder and director of the publication Labor Notes in the United States. Until recently he was a senior research fellow in industrial relations at the University of Hertfordshire.

 

Next Lectures in the series (with day corrected for 2nd March):

 

Monday 1st December, 6:30pm – Brunei Gallery Lecture Theatre

GLOBALIZATION SINCE BHOPAL: THREE DECADES OF ENVIRONMENTAL DISASTER

VANDANA SHIVA

Leading member of the International Forum on Globalisation and prominent figure of the alter-globalisation movement

RAVI RAJAN

Associate Professor, Department of Environmental Studies, University of California, Santa Cruz

CO-ORGANISED WITH THE BHOPAL MEDICAL APPEAL

 

Monday 26 January, 6:30pm – Brunei Gallery Lecture Theatre

WOMEN’S RIGHTS AND THE ARAB UPRISINGS

AHLEM BELHADJ, MD

Professor of Child Psychiatry at the University of Tunis, former chair of the Tunisian Association of Democratic Women (ATFD)

 

Monday 2 March, 6:30pm – Brunei Gallery Lecture Theatre

DEVELOPMENT AND THE METABOLIC RIFT: REACTIONS TO THE CONTRADICTION

BARBARA HARRISS-WHITE

Emeritus Professor of Development Studies, Oxford University, Co-ordinator, South Asia Research Cluster, Wolfson College, Oxford
First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/soas-globalisation-lectures-27-october-workers-in-a-just-in-time-world-capitalism-and-the-supply-chain-gang

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

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Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Work & Days

Work & Days

MARXISM IN CULTURE: AUTUMN TERM SEMINARS 2014

All seminars start at 5.30. This term all seminars are held in the Large Conference Room at the Institute of Historical Research, Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU aside from the second seminar this term, which will take place at UCL and begin at 5pm.

The seminar closes at 7.30pm and retires to the bar.

 

Friday 17 October

Julian Stallabrass (The Courtauld Institute) and Dave Beech (Chelsea College of Art and Design)

‘Anti Frieze’ – An anti-celebration of Frieze week with Dave Beech and Julian Stallabrass.

Dave Beech: The Ullage of Luxury: the economics of the art fair

Julian Stallabrass: Just a Luxury Good?

Location: The Large Conference Room

 

Friday 21 November. PLEASE NOTE EARLIER START AND LOCATION

Book launch for Frances Stracey, ‘Constructed Situations: A New History of the Situationist International’ (Pluto Press)

Roundtable discussion with Briony Fer (UCL), Cadence Kinsey (UCL) and Pete Smith, followed by a drinks reception in the History of Art department at UCL.

Location and time: 5-7.30 pm at UCL – Pearson G22 Lecture Theatre.

 

Friday 28 November

Jeremy Spencer (Camberwell College of Art and Design and the Open University)

Aesthetics and Politics within Godard’s Cinema

Location: The Large Conference Room

 

Friday 12 December

Danny Hayward (Birkbeck)

Marxist Irrationality: A Cultural Prospectus and Overview

Location: The Large Conference Room

 

Organisers: Matthew Beaumont, Dave Beech, Alan Bradshaw, Warren Carter, Gail Day, Steve Edwards, Larne Abse Gogarty, Esther Leslie, David Mabb, Antigoni Memou, Chrysi Papaioannou, Nina Power, Dominic Rahtz, Pete Smith, Peter Thomas & Alberto Toscano.

For further information, please contact Larne Abse Gogarty at larne.gogarty.09@ucl.ac.uk or Chrysi Papaioannou at chrysi_p@yahoo.co.uk.
All welcome.

Marxism in Culture: www.marxisminculture.org

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/marxism-in-culture-autumn-term

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

 

Karl Marx

Karl Marx

MARX AND PHILOSOPHY REVIEW OF BOOK – OCTOBER 2014

New reviews and an updated list of books for review recently published online in the Marx and Philosophy Review of Books

 

  • Tony Mckenna on Brian S Roper, The History of Democracy
  • Malise Rosbech on Heather Brown, Marx on Gender and the Family
  • Kate Soper on Rachel Holmes’ biography of Eleanor Marx
  • Paul Blackledge on Owen Jones on The Establishment
  • Jamie Melrose on Faubion (ed.) Foucault Now
  • Tim Walters on Chris McMillan on Žižek and Communist Strategy

 

To receive notification of new reviews and comments when they appear join the Marx and Philosophy Society’s new email list or follow on facebook or twitter

Marx and Philosophy Society: http://marxandphilosophy.org.uk/society

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/marx-and-philosophy-review-of-books-8

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Childhood

Childhood

CULTURAL PLURALISM, DEMOCRACY, SOCIO-ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE, AND EDUCATION

NEW BOOK SERIES

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

 

Editors:

Paul R. Carr

Université du Québec en Outaouais

Gina Thésée

Université du Québec à Montréal !

 

International Editorial board:

Ali Abdi (University of British Columbia), Antonia Darder (Loyola Marymount University), George Dei (OISE at the University of Toronto), Walter Gershon (Kent State University), David Lefrançois (Université du Québec en Outaouais), Darren Lund (University of Calgary), Handel Kashope Wright (University of British Columbia), Peter McLaren (Chapman University), Dave Sangha (University of Northern British Columbia), Lynette Shultz (University of Alberta), Christine Sleeter (California State University Monterey Bay), Suzanne SooHoo (Chapman University), Dalene Swanson (University of Stirling), Njoke Wane (OISE at the University of Toronto), Joel Westheimer (University of Ottawa)

This book series aims to develop a field of overlapping research that crosses and integrates the domains, disciplines, subjects and themes of cultural pluralism, democracy and social justice. Each theme is taken up individually in many debates but our focus is to bring together advanced and critical analyses that transcend boundaries, languages, disciplines and theoretical and conceptual approaches. We are interested in books that can problematize cultural pluralism in relation to, with and around democracy and socio-environmental justice, especially in relation to education. Our focus on cultural pluralism is intentional, and we aim to move the debate on identity, difference and lived experience forward within a critical lens, seeking to create new, varied and meaningful discussions that go beyond the normative labels of multiculturalism and interculturalism. The literature around education for democracy that underscores political literacy, critical engagement and transformative education is also highly relevant here as is the field of social justice, which examines power relations, laws and policies, structures and experiences at myriad levels.

The guiding principles for books in this series include: critical analysis; interdisciplinary; nuanced and complexified thinking; epistemological interrogation; varied research approaches; innovation; openness to international and comparative studies. The books in this series will include case studies, comparative analyses,

and collaborations across linguistic, social, ethnic, racial, national, religious and gender boundaries, which may include empirical, conceptual and theoretical frameworks and analysis.

While not an exhaustive or exclusive list, some of the areas that will be of interest for this book series include: Migration, immigration and displacement; Identity and power; Globalization, neoliberalism and cultural pluralism; Critical epistemology; Democracy and diversity; Social justice and environmental justice; Media analyses and studies; Macrosociological studies; Political ecology; Cultural diversity; Educational change.

For more information about this series or contribution, contact the Editors Paul R. Carr (pcarr@gmail.com), Gina Thésée (ginathesee@hotmail.com) or Michel Lokhorst (michel.lokhorst@sensepublishers.com)

If you are interested in submitting a proposal please submit the following: a 500-word summary of your book proposal, including the title; focus and research questions; the connection to the book series; the theoretical and/or conceptual framework; the major themes to be explored; a draft table of contents; type of book: single author, edited, etc.; 10 keywords; a 150-word biography for each author/editor; confirmation that the contents of the book have not been published elsewhere; also include your CV.

SENSEPUBLISHERS For Wisdom and Awareness WWW.SENSEPUBLISHERS.COM

See: https://www.sensepublishers.com/media/2146-CPDS_Series_flyer_11.pdf

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Multiculturalism

Multiculturalism

RETHINKING LANGUAGE, DIVERSITY AND EDUCATION

 

Rethinking Language, Diversity, and Education

University of the Aegean (Rhodes, Greece)

May 28, 2015 – May 31, 2015

Honoring the contributions of Professor Jim Cummins (OISE/UT) and Professor Michalis Damanakis (University of Crete)

Language has complex implications for identity, communication, social integration, and education, but also for building inclusive societies and and intercultural dialogue while preserving cultural heritage.  While linguistic and cultural diversity in our classrooms and communities has the potential to enlighten and expand our understanding of both others and ourselves, it also presents challenges to the balance between coherence and pluralism in societies. Language diversity is frequently not recognized and undervalued in both mainstream society and education. Homogenizing and assimilationist educational practices and language policies still prevail around the globe at the risk of losing the ethno-linguistic vitality and wealth of non-dominant languages.

In our contemporary reality of ever expanding and compounding “multies” (multilingualism, multiculturalism, multimodality, multiliteracies, etc), how do we create pedagogical spaces that would nurture and enhance the linguistic communities and honour the cultural differences of students in the twenty-first century? What does it mean to rethink language diversity in education and how can we foster true inclusion in our increasingly linguistically diverse schools?  This gathering will bring together emerging and established researchers around the practices and policies of language diversity in education with representatives of school boards, teacher associations, policy makers community leaders, teachers, and school administrators to engage issues of linguistic and cultural diversity that have created a new ground for teaching and learning. A rethinking of the dimensions of language diversity in education  and its pedagogical imperatives in communal and global contexts will enable new direction with respect to the question of difference, social justice and pedagogy in the new millennium.

 

Conference Information

» Overview

» Call for Papers (October 8, 2014 – May 1, 2015)

» Registration

» Accommodation

» Organizers and Partners

 

Website: http://rlde.aegean.gr/ocs/index.php/RLDE/RLDE

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Heather Brown

Heather Brown

GILLIAN ROSE CONFERENCE 2015

Gillian Rose conference 2015

The ‘Gillian Rose: 20 year retrospective’ day conference will take place on Friday 9th January 2015 at Durham University’s Lindisfarne centre. Dinner will be at Durham’s business school nearby.

 

Programme:

10 – 10.45: Coffee and registration

 

10.45 – 11: Welcome and announcements

11 – 12: Andrew Brower Latz, ‘Gillian Rose and social theory’

12 – 1: Rowan Williams, ‘Gillian Rose and Hegel’

 

1 – 2.15: Lunch and coffee

 

2.15 – 3.15: Panel: Marcus Pound and Irene Lancaster

3.15 – 4.15: Peter Osborne, ‘Gillian Rose and Marxism’

 

4.15 – 4.45: Coffee and biscuits

 

4.45 – 5.45: John Milbank, ‘Gillian Rose and politics’

5.45 – 6.45: Andrew Shanks, ‘Gillian Rose and theology’

 

6.45: Close

 

The conference is now accepting further speakers.

The conference fee is £50 including lunch and refreshments.

To register please email andrew.brower-latz[at]durham.ac.uk, and send a cheque for £50, made out to ‘Durham University, Centre for Catholic Studies’, to Dr. Marcus Pound, Theology and Religion Department, Durham University, Abbey House, Palace Green, DH1 3RS.

You are welcome to join us afterwards for dinner (which is not included in the price): please let us know if you plan to attend dinner when you register.

For any further questions or to send an abstract (of no more than 300 words),  email andrew.brower-latz[at]durham.ac.uk.

See: http://beyondunknowing.wordpress.com/gillian-rose-conference-2015/ and http://theologyphilosophycentre.co.uk/2014/07/18/cfp-gillian-rose-a-retrospective/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

 

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

ANOTHER UNIVERSITY IS POSSIBLE

Annual Conference

Call for Papers: 2015 Cultural Studies Association (CSA) Conference Call for Proposals

Thirteenth Annual Meeting of the Cultural Studies Association (US)

 

Another University Is Possible: Praxis, Activism, and the Promise of Critical Pedagogy

Riverside Convention Center, Riverside, Greater Los Angeles Area, California

21-24 May, 2015

See: http://www.culturalstudiesassociation.org/conference

SUBMIT A PROPOSAL TODAY!

Important Dates:

*       September 15, 2014: Submission System Opens  NOW OPEN
*       December 15, 2014: Submissions Due
*       February 15, 2015: Notifications Sent Out
*       February 15, 2015: Early Registration Opens
*       April 15, 2015: Early Registration Ends and Late Registration Begins

The Cultural Studies Association (CSA) invites proposals from its current and future members for participation in its thirteenth annual meeting in the Riverside Convention Center, Riverside, Greater Los Angeles Area, California.

Proposals from all areas and on all topics of relevance to cultural studies are welcome, and are not limited to proposals that critically and creatively engage this year’s highlighted problematic.

This year’s theme, “Another University is Possible: Praxis, Activism, and the Promise of Critical Pedagogy,” plays on the World Social Forum’s motto, “Another World is Possible.” It expresses a commitment to the intellectual and political project of a radically different university. Moving beyond policy and pundit-driven discussions of the state and the future of higher education, we seek proposals that highlight socially-engaged scholarship and activism, and projects that explore the transformative possibilities embedded in the present. What forms and formations of research, pedagogy, praxis, and activism have emerged from the struggles being waged in, around, through, and in spite of institutions of higher education? What roles can culture, theory, imagination, and technology play in these struggles? Taking up cultural studies’ historical commitment to the interrogation of the relations among knowledge, power, and social transformation, the 2015 Cultural Studies Association conference seeks to provide an insurgent intellectual space for imagining, enacting, and mapping new forms of knowledge production and scholarly communication and community.

We are particularly interested in work that links the global neo-liberal conjuncture of higher education to local acts of collective resistance and action, and back again. We want to know more about how students, staff, faculty, administrators, and community partners are responding to the current social, legal, economic, financial, political, cultural, institutional, and intellectual challenges and possibilities: student debt as a means of financing higher education institutions; court cases that attack the history and practice of affirmative action; the rise in union activity on campuses; the re-entrenchment of the “humanities” as a division under “crisis”; the emergent emphasis on MOOCs and other online forms of education that extend the already dominant casualization of academic labor; the emergence of public and digital pedagogy and scholarship; the ambivalent politics of academic freedom; the reduction of education to vocational training and degrees to commodified credentials; the role of universities in reproducing or amplifying (rather than reducing) the social inequalities of contemporary capitalism; and the university as a site of capital accumulation and dispossession, among many other trends and tendencies.

As at previous CSA conferences, this year’s conference aims to provide multiple spaces for the cross-pollination of art, activism, pedagogy, design, and research by bringing together participants from a variety of positions inside and outside the university. While we welcome traditional academic papers and panels, we strongly encourage contributions that experiment with alternative formats and challenge the traditional disciplinary formations and exclusionary conceptions and practices of the academic.  We are particularly interested in proposals for sessions designed to document and advance existing forms of collective action or catalyze new collaborations.  We also encourage submissions from individuals working beyond the boundaries of the university: artists, activists, independent scholars, professionals, community organizers, and community college educators.

Proposals from all areas and on all topics of relevance to cultural studies are welcome, and are not limited to proposals that critically and creatively engage this year’s highlighted problematic. We welcome proposals from a range of disciplinary and topical positions, including literature, history, sociology, geography, politics, anthropology, communication(s), popular culture, cultural theory, queer studies, critical race studies, feminist studies, post-colonial studies, legal studies, science studies, media and film studies, material cultural studies, platform studies, visual art and performance studies.

About the Riverside Convention Center, Greater Los Angeles Area, California

The 2015 conference will be held at the beautiful, brand-new Riverside Convention Center, in downtown Riverside, Greater Los Angeles Area, California. The closest airport to Riverside, California, for those of you flying in, is the Ontario, CA International Airport (ONT–sometimes referred to as the LA/Ontario International Airport).  More information about the venue, the city of Riverside, and the greater Los Angeles Area is available here:

http://www.riversidecvb.com/riverside-convention-center

Riverside is a hidden gem of Southern California, less than a half hour drive from the Ontario, CA International Airport, less than an hour’s drive from LA and about 90 minutes from San Diego. With its progressive landmarks, lively downtown, many fine restaurants, galleries and museums, and its proximity to so much of Southern California’s beautiful natural scenery and cultural sites, Riverside is a truly inviting and wonderful site for our conference.

Riverside is also home to several institutions of higher learning, with nearly fifty thousand college students populating the city, Riverside breeds an overall vibe of ambitious, critical energy. Riverside’s colleges and universities include: University of California, Riverside – One of the fastest growing colleges in the nation, UC Riverside is a national leader in cutting-edge research, community collaboration, and student diversity, La Sierra University, named “the most diverse university in the western U.S.” for the past four years by U.S. News & World Report, California Baptist University, and Riverside City College.

Submission Process and Timeline

All proposals should be submitted through the CSA online system, available at www.culturalstudiesassociation.org. Submission of proposals is limited to current CSA members. See the benefits of membership and become a member at www.culturalstudiesassociation.org.

The submission system will be open by September 15, 2014. Please prepare all the materials required to propose your session according to the given directions before you begin electronic submission. Notifications of acceptance/rejection will be sent no later than February 15, 2015.

In order to be listed in the program, conference registration must be completed online before May 1, 2015. All program information – names, presentation titles, and institutional affiliations – will be based on initial conference submissions.  Please avoid lengthy presentation and session titles, use normal capitalization, and include your name and affiliations as you would like them to appear on the conference program schedule.

Important Note about Technology Requests

All sessions run for 90 minutes and will have access to basic internet connection.  However, please note that unlike previous years, only about 50% of the rooms will have access to audiovisual equipment (projector, screen, speakers, etc.). Sessions that require audio-visual space or technical equipment must request these at the time of submission.  The Program Committee will do its best to provide reasonable accommodations, but accommodations are contingent upon the availability of resources and equipment. Any technology requests should be included as a note in the body of the initial submission, with a follow up email to Michelle Fehsenfeld at contact@csalateral.org.   Please only request projectors, screens, and speakers only if you plan to use them.  The CSA will be charged for every piece of equipment we rent/request.  A limited number of laptop computers will be available upon request but participants are expected to bring their own computers.

Please note that all session organizers/submitters must be CSA members for the 2015 calendar year at the time of submission

Conference Formats

Note: While we accept individual paper proposals, we especially encourage submissions of pre-constituted sessions. We also invite proposals that engage with this conference location and its many resources.
All conference formats – papers, panels, roundtables, workshops, and seminars – are intended to encourage the presentation and discussion of projects at different stages of development and to foster intellectual exchange and collaboration. Please feel free to adapt the suggested formats or propose others in order to suit your session’s goals. If you have any questions, please address them to Michelle Fehsenfeld at: contact@csalateral.org.

PRE-CONSTITUTED PANELS: Pre-constituted panels allow a team of 3-4 individuals to present their research, work, and/or experiences, leaving 30-45 minutes of the session for questions and discussion. Panels should include 3-4 participants. Proposals for pre-constituted panels should include: the title of the panel; the name, title, affiliation, and contact information of the panel organizer; the names, titles, affiliations, and email addresses of all panelists, and a chair and/or discussant; a description of the panel’s topic (<500 words); and abstracts for each presentation (<150 words). Pre-constituted panels are preferred to individual paper submissions.

INDIVIDUAL PAPERS: Successful papers will reach several constituencies of the organization and will connect analysis to social, political, economic, or ethical questions. Proposals for papers should include: the title of the paper; the name, title, affiliation, and email address of the author; and an abstract of the 20 minute paper (<500 words). Pre-constituted panels are recommended over individual paper submissions, though we welcome both.

ROUNDTABLES: Roundtables allow a group of participants to convene with the goal of generating discussion around a shared concern. In contrast to panels, roundtables typically involve shorter position or dialogue statements (5-10 minutes) in response to questions distributed in advance by the organizer. The majority of roundtable sessions should be devoted to discussion. Roundtables are limited to no more than five participants, including the organizer. We encourage roundtables involving participants from different institutions, centers, and organizations. Proposals for roundtables should include: the title of the roundtable; the name, title, affiliation, and contact information of the roundtable organizer; the names, titles, affiliations, and email addresses of the proposed roundtable participants; and a description of the position statements, questions, or debates that will be under discussion (<500 words).

PRAXIS SESSIONS: Praxis sessions allow a facilitator or facilitating team to set an agenda, pose opening questions, and/or organize hands-on participant activities, collaborations, or skill-shares. Successful praxis sessions will be organized around a specific objective, productively engage a cultural studies audience, and orient itself towards participants with minimal knowledge of the subject matter. Sessions organized around the development of ongoing creative, artistic, and activist projects are highly encouraged. The facilitator or team is responsible for framing the session, gathering responses and results from participants, helping everyone digest them, and (where applicable) suggesting possible fora for extending the discussion. Proposals for praxis sessions should include: the title of the session; the name, title, affiliation, and contact information of the (lead) facilitator and of any co-facilitators; a brief statement explaining the session’s connection to the conference theme and describing the activities to be undertaken (<500 words). Please direct any questions about praxis sessions to Michelle Fehsenfeld atcontact@csalteral.org.

SEMINARS: Seminars are small-group (maximum 15 individuals) discussion sessions for which participants prepare in advance of the conference. In previous years, preparation has involved shared readings, pre-circulated ”position papers” by seminar leaders and/or participants, and other forms of pre-conference collaboration. We particularly invite proposals for seminars designed to advance emerging lines of inquiry and research/teaching initiatives within cultural studies broadly construed. We also invite seminars designed to generate future collaborations among conference attendees, particularly through the formation of working groups. Once a limited number of seminar topics and leaders are chosen, the seminars will be announced through the CSA’s various public email lists. Participants will contact the seminar leader(s) directly who will then inform the Program Committee who will participate in the seminar. Seminars will be marked in the conference programs as either closed to non-participants or open to all conference attendees. A limited number of seminars will be selected by the program committee, with a call for participants in the chosen seminars announced on the CSA webpage and listserv no later than 15 February 2015. Interested parties will apply directly to the seminar leader(s) for admission to the session by1 April 2015. Seminar leader(s) will be responsible for providing the program committee with a confirmed list of participants (names, affiliations, and email addresses required) for inclusion in the conference program no later than15 April 2015. Proposals for seminars should include: the title of the seminar; the name, title, affiliation, and contact information of the seminar leader(s); and a description of the issues and questions that will be raised in discussion and an overview of the work to be completed by participants in advance of the seminar (<500 words). Individuals interested in participating in (rather than leading) a seminar should consult the list of seminars and the instructions for signing up for them, to be available at the conference website by 15 February 2015. Please direct questions about seminars to seminars@csalateral.org. Please note that for them to run at the conference, seminars accepted for inclusion by the program committee must garner a minimum of 8 participants, including the seminar leader(s).

WORKING GROUP SESSIONS: All working groups have two sessions at their command. Working groups may elect to post calls on the CSA site for papers and internal submission procedures or handle the creation of their two working group sessions by other means. Working groups will facilitate the creation of two sessions drawing from, but not limited to, working group members. Working groups should create their proposals according to the specifications listed under their session format. When submitting to the conference website, working groups should select “Working Group” as their session format and include a note in the body of their submission designating the session as an official submission of the working group. Only Working Group organizers should submit Working Group session proposals through the conference submission system.  A listing of all CSA Working Groups is available here: http://www.culturalstudiesassociation.org/workinggroups

PANEL CHAIRS: We are always in need of people to serve as panel chairs. To volunteer to do so please submit your name, title, affiliation, and email address, as well as a brief list of your research interests through the conference website.

 

Registration Fees

Like our membership fees, the registration fees will be on a sliding scale: for more on this see:  http://www.culturalstudiesassociation.org/conference

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski

INSURRECTIONIST PEDAGOGIES AND THE PURSUIT OF DANGEROUS CITIZENSHIP

Insurrectionist Pedagogies and the Pursuit of Dangerous Citizenship

Professor E . Wayne Ross

University of British Columbia

The 6th Annual Mary Hepburn Lecture in Social Studies Education

Department of Educational Theory & Practice, College of Education, University of Georgia

Athens, GA

October 16, 2014

6.00-7.00pm

Lamar School of Art

Room S151

Light refreshments served at 5.30.

It is more important than ever for people to understand birthplace, nationality, documents, and platitudes are not enough to fulfil the promises of citizenship— that is, for example, freedom. Freedom and the fulfillment of its virtues are unfinished, an ongoing dynamic struggle. Too often citizenship education implies docile, conforming, spectator behavior and thought.

Contemporary conditions demand an anti-oppressive citizenship education, one that takes seriously social and economic inequalities and oppression that result from neoliberal capitalism. While we can build upon the anti-oppressive possibilities of established, officially sanctioned pedagogies, that is not enough.

This lecture will explore imaginaries that might serve as the basis for the creation of pedagogies of dangerous citizenship. The pedagogical power of dangerous citizenship, resides in its capacity to encourage us to challenge the implications of own work; to envision an education that is free and democratic to the core; and to interrogate and uncover our own well-intentioned complicity in oppressive educational and cultural practices.

See: https://www.academia.edu/8400387/Mary_Hepburn_Lecture_University_of_Georgia_October_16_2014

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

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