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Tag Archives: Youth Unemployment

Faith Agostinone-Wilson

Faith Agostinone-Wilson

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 30th JULY 2013

EVENTS

AERC (ADULT EDUCATION RESEARCH CONFERENCE) 2014 CALL FOR PROPOSALS

June 5-7, 2014
Harrisburg, PA
Pre-Conferences on June 4, 2014

Paper Proposals: Papers are reports of completed research and will be published in the conference proceedings. There are three categories for papers: (a) empirical research, (b) model or theory development, and (c) theorizing from the literature. The time allotted for each session is 50 minutes. Audience participation, as a principle of adult education, is stressed.

Symposium Proposals: A symposium presents diverse or conflicting perspectives on a compelling topic or issue that is or should be of concern to adult education practitioners. A symposium should NOT be merely a presentation of a related set of papers. Symposia will be published in the conference proceedings. The time allotted for each session is 90 minutes.
Audience participation is encouraged.

Deadline for receipt of proposals is September 23, 2013. Send proposals via email as an attachment to aerc2014@yahoo.com.

For more details go to the AERC website at http://adulterc.org/

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MAKING THE YOUTH COUNT IN CANADA’S FUTURE: THE STRUGGLE OF YOUNG WORKERS IN THE AGE OF AUSTERITY AND NEOLIBERAL GLOBALIZATION

August 3, 2013
United Steelworkers’ Hall
25 Cecil Street, Toronto
Registration fee is $15 (includes meals and conference materials)

In Ontario, youth unemployment is at 16.2% as of March 2013. As the province with the highest tuition fees in the country, ballooning student debt coupled by a labour market characterised by the general decline of secure and meaningful full-time jobs, the youth have little choice but to accept ‘flexible/contractual’ jobs, often in the low-wage sector, despite high levels of educational attainment.

As part of the Congress of Progressive Filipino Canadians (CPFC), the Filipino Canadian Youth Alliance/Ugnayan Ng Kabataang Pilipino sa Canada–Ontario (FCYA/UKPC-ON) cannot accept a future or fate that can only be left up to the fluctuations of the market economy. For FCYA/UKPC-ON, it is imperative that we expose and oppose the current neoliberal agenda and all its manifestations here in Canada to counter the attacks being imposed on us, and make the youth count in Canada’s future.

Registration for this conference is now available online: http://www.magkaisacentre.org/2013/04/18/maketheyouthcount/

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WORKERS’ HISTORY OF SPADINA

Workers’ History of Spadina Heritage Toronto walk.
Jul 31, 6:30 pm; Aug 11, 10:30 am.
Free/pwyc. Location provided upon registration
Pre-register at http://www.heritagetoronto.org

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SOCIAL PLANNING TORONTO FORUM – ORGANIZING FOR CHANGE: CONNECTING THE EVERYDAY WITH POLICY CHANGE INITIATIVES

Thursday, August 22
9:30am-11:30am
Social Planning Toronto
Suite 1001, 2 Carlton Street, Toronto

There is a growing need for the social service sector to engage in policy change initiatives. As the gap between the rich and poor increases and the austerity agenda requires the community to do more with less, concerted effort must be made to address both immediate adversities, as well as the structural and systemic issues that create them.

Join us at our Member Forum to explore ways of connecting daily occurrences with policy change initiatives, and the presentation of new SPT report entitled “Linking Community Organizing with Policy Change Initiatives: Implications for Future Community Practice in Toronto”.

Guest Speakers:
– Kuni Kamizaki, author of Linking community organizing with policy change initiatives
– Rob Howarth, Executive Director, Toronto Neighbourhood Centres
– Deena Ladd, Coordinator, Workers Action Centre

Registration: Visit http://augustmemberforum-eorg.eventbrite.ca/ or contact Sharma Queiser at squeiser@socialplanningtoronto.org or 416-351-0095 ext.227.

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NEWS & VIEWS

WALMART TRIES—AND FAILS BADLY—TO PUSH BACK AGAINST WORKERS’ AWFUL STORIES

By Laura Clawson, Daily Kos Labor

Walmart is not happy. After Gawker’s Hamilton Nolan posted stories emailed in by Walmart workers, the company put up a post on an internal website asking current employees to send Nolan cheery stories of how amazing and wonderful it is to work at Walmart. While some people complied, others responded directly to the boss’s request, on the Walmart employee website, with comments like:

“Sadly, the Gawker stories match my Walmart experience.”
(http://gawker.com/wal-mart-employees-rip-the-company-on-its-own-internal-755057616)

The initial stories, by the way, included reports of rats and health violations, sexual harassment, and, of course, low pay and unpredictable part-time scheduling (http://gawker.com/and-now-a-few-more-stories-from-wal-mart-employees-721527870).
And that’s what Walmart workers are saying directly to the company, on an internal website, matches their experiences.

All of this is happening against the backdrop of Walmart’s threats to pull out of Washington, D.C., if the city follows through on instituting a $12.50 wage for workers at stores with more than $1 billion annual corporate sales and more than 75,000 square feet. The city council passed the Large Retailer Accountability Act with just short of a veto-proof majority, and Mayor Vincent Gray has hinted he might veto the ordinance. Urge Mayor Gray to give big box workers a living wage (http://campaigns.dailykos.com/p/dia/action3/common/public/?action_KEY=472).

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CAMPAIGN TO RAISE THE MINIMUM WAGE!

Ontario workers are struggling to get by working 2 or 3 low paying jobs. No one should work full time and yet still live in poverty.

The minimum wage has been frozen at $10.25 for three years. It’s time for an increase!

We need a minimum wage of $14 in 2013 to bring workers and their families 10% above the poverty line – and a commitment to annual cost-of-living adjustments.

Contact us at raisetheminimumwage@gmail.com to get connected to local actions, or to get support to start-up a minimum wage campaign in your community.

Follow actions and updates from across Ontario by liking the Raise the Minimum Wage facebook page here: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Campaign-to-Raise-the-Minimum-Wage/376591935781724?ref=hl

The Campaign to Raise the Minimum Wage is coordinated by ACORN, Freedom 90, Mennonite New Life Centre, OCAP, Ontario Campaign 2000, Parkdale Community Legal Services, Put Food in the Budget, Social Planning Toronto, Toronto and York Region Labour Council and the Workers’ Action Centre.

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STUDENT DEBT AND THE AMERICAN DREAM: INTERVIEW WITH SAM GINDIN

By Álvaro Guzmán Bastida, The Bullet

This interview is part of a larger piece on the student debt crisis in America the author wrote as an assignment for one of his classes at the Graduate School of Journalism at Columbia University. The piece offers a longform, narrative, character-driven tale of three indebted students and how being in debt jeopardizes their personal development, their career prospects and their ability to pursue their dreams and even be free. Following them throughout the process of getting loans, accumulating debt and meeting (or not meeting) payments, the article gives the whole story and history of student debt: its political and financial ramifications, the consequences it has on students and society as a whole and the different approaches to tackling the crisis.

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/847.php

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BARISTAS RISE UP IN HALIFAX

From RankAndFile.ca

The low wage service sector is one of the most difficult sectors for workers to form unions.  The small workplaces’ lack of union tradition, high staff turnover and aggressive anti-union managers and owners in the sector have meant that most unions have stayed away from organizing places such as coffee shops.

In Halifax, Nova Scotia coffee shop workers at several workplaces have started to come together to try to transform the low wage, precarious work of baristas into something better by forming unions with the Service Employees International Union Local 2. Organizing in this sector is necessary if the union movement is to remain vibrant and relevant.

Read more: http://rankandfile.ca/2013/07/18/baristas-rise-up-in-halifax/

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NURSES AT RISK: EXPLORING GENDER AND RACE IN WORKPLACE ILLNESS, INJURY AND VIOLENCE

The webinar recording is now online! View the webinar here (55 minutes): https://cwhn.adobeconnect.com/_a844234029/p8dc7coyiks/?launcher=false&fcsContent=true&pbMode=normal

Moderated by Prof. Pat Armstrong, York University Sociology and Women’s Studies

Presented by Prof. Jacqueline Choiniere and Prof. Judith MacDonnell, York University School of Nursing

Introduced by Anne Rochon Ford, Canadian Women’s Health Network’s Executive Director

Canadian nurses face mounting workplace health and safety problems. Reports detailing precarious employment, work-related illness, injury, disability and violence are multiplying.

In this webinar, Jacqueline Choiniere and Judith MacDonnell explore findings from two stages of their qualitative research for the SSHRC-funded project, Nurses at risk: Exploring gender and race in workplace illness, injury and violence, (Pat Armstrong, PI, with Co-Investigators Hugh Armstrong, Jacqueline Choiniere, Tamara Daly, Walter Giesbrecht and Judith MacDonnell).

Informed by a feminist political economy lens, researchers were concerned that despite this growing evidence, there was a paucity of analysis linking these problems to broader social and political structures, including gender, race, ethnicity, and the changes in how nurses’ work is organized.

They discuss interviews with key informants who illustrate the everyday and complex nature of the violence that diversely-situated nurses face, and focus specifically on nurses working in the mental health sector.

By attending to the ways that intersections of gendered, racialized and neoliberal dynamics reproduce social inequality, these findings point to the importance of addressing not only individual nurses’ experiences of violence in order to create effective support, but also the structural violence that underpins the conditions and environments in which nurses work.

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Article: Credit Where Credit is Due in Non-Credit Adult Education

By Mike Newman

The author sings the praises of non-credit adult education, and enlists a number of philosophers to help in the chorus. He examines the motives people might have for enrolling in non-credit courses, and makes the following claims: that good non-credit adult education can give us a purpose, provide some order in our unpredictable lives, encourage us to reason freely, nurture our consciousness, foster a civil society, protect valuable elements of our lifeworld, and teach us to assert ourselves.

(Michael Newman writes about adult education and social and political action.)

Read the article: http://concept.lib.ed.ac.uk/index.php/Concept/article/view/235

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JOBS/INTERNSHIPS

TRAINING & EDUCATION COORDINATOR, THE BROADBENT INSTITUTE

The Broadbent Institute is a national non-profit organization, based in Ottawa and Toronto, which is dedicated to developing and supporting individuals, organizations and policies that advance a progressive vision of compassionate citizenship.

Position Summary & Core Expectations

The Broadbent Institute is seeking a highly-organized and good-humoured Training & Education Coordinator located in Montreal or Quebec City to execute the logistics of a national training and education program for the organization.

Responsibilities

Working with the Director of Training & Education, support the delivery of a training program focused on furthering democratic engagement, deepening political literacy, and training a new generation of progressive leaders. The program will involve the development of new curriculum, the creation of on-line delivery tools, and the organization of events across the country.

For more info: http://rankandfile.ca/2013/07/17/job-posting-training-education-coordinator-the-broadbent-institute/

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ANDREW JACKSON PROGRESSIVE ECONOMICS INTERNSHIP

A joint internship with the Alternative Federal Budget and the Growing Gap Project (Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives-CCPA)

About the Alternative Federal Budget

The Alternative Federal Budget (AFB) is one of the CCPA’s longest running projects, now entering its 20th year. It consists of 27 chapters written by over 90 contributors. Each chapter examines a different federal issue and progressive policy prescription for each. All policy recommendations are fully costed and paid for within a larger macro-economic framework. The implications of AFB measures on the federal debt, deficit and employment are also determined.

About the Growing Gap Project

The Growing Gap team tracks the changing nature of Canada’s economy, work and income trends, and policies that help or worsen the problem of income inequality. The research to date has been clear: Governments have a strong role to play in implementing policies that help keep a lid on growing inequality, to make sure Canada’s economy works for everyone, not just a privileged few.

The CCPA is an independent, non-partisan research institute concerned with social, economic and environmental justice. For more information, visit http://www.policyalternatives.ca

Job Responsibilities

– Research and review relevant academic and policy literature concerning income inequality in Canada;
– Organize meetings with various AFB writers and contributors;
– Review individual AFB chapters and the macro-economic framework;
– Assist with other data analysis and report writing, as required. Some of this will be generic research assistance to David Macdonald.

For more info and to apply: http://rankandfile.ca/2013/07/23/andrew-jackson-progressive-economics-internship/

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NETWORK ORGANIZER AT LEADING CHANGE NETWORK

The Leading Change Network is a global community of practice of some 100 organizers, researchers and educators. Initiated by Marshall Ganz, Harvard Kennedy School, and others, its purpose is to support its participants in developing the leadership, building the organizational capacity, and improving the ability of democratic organizing to meet the critical challenges of our times. At present, for example, participants in 11 countries work on topics that range from immigration reform, human rights, gender equity, and economic justice to climate change, public health, and domestic violence. The demand, however, far exceeds our current capacity to respond, indicated by a growing data base of over 2000 interested persons in more 25 countries who would like to engage with us. The purpose of our search is to find a person who can enable us to respond.

We seek a proactive, creative and “well organized” online organizer to work with a diverse leadership team to build the network, grow the network, and manage network infrastructure (database, web site, social media, etc.)

For more info and to apply: http://www.leadingchangenetwork.com

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LABOR EDUCATOR, UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA

The Labor Education Service (LES) at the University of Minnesota is seeking a full-time labor educator to join our teaching staff.

Job responsibilities include leading labor education courses for working adults, designing customized curriculum, and coordinating and implementing educational programs, often in collaboration with other staff.  The position requires teaching expertise using diverse methodologies, substantial experience with labor unions and organizing, and effectiveness at relating with a wide variety of worker organizations.

Duties include:
– Developing, teaching, and administering labor education courses and programs for a variety of unions and related organizations throughout the state of Minnesota.
– Designing and developing curriculum and course materials, with particular attention to the changing needs and growing diversity of the labor movement.
– Collaborating with LES staff and others on program development and coordination, including conferences and special events.
– Fostering and maintaining productive relationships with labor organizations and other community groups committed to economic and social justice.

Application Deadline: August 23, 2013

How to apply:
All applicants must apply online through the University of Minnesota website at https://employment.umn.edu/applicants/jsp/shared/Welcome_css.jsp
Applications must include a letter of interest, a resume or CV, and names and contact information for three references.

Questions? Email Mary at LES@umn.edu or phone the LES office, 612-624-5020.

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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education. For more information about this project, visit http://www.apcol.ca

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Precarious Education

Precarious Education

PRECARIAT

Call for Papers: ‘Precariat’

Global Discourse: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Current Affairs and Applied Contemporary Thought
Volume 3: Issue 3: January/February 2014

In his recent work, Guy Standing has identified a new class which has emerged from neo-liberal restructuring with, he argues, the revolutionary potential to change the world: the precariat. This is ‘a class-in-the-making, internally divided into angry and bitter factions’ consisting of ‘a multitude of insecure people, living bits-and-pieces lives, in and out of short-term jobs, without a narrative of occupational development, including millions of frustrated educated youth who do not like what they see before them, millions of women abused in oppressive labour, growing numbers of criminalised tagged for life, millions being categorised as “disabled” and migrants in their hundreds of millions around the world. They are denizens; they have a more restricted range of social, cultural, political and economic rights than citizens around them’.

In this issue, we wish to explore the nature, shape and context of precariat, evaluating the internal consistency and applications of the concept. Among others, we welcome submissions examining the following topics in relation to precariat:

–          changes in the sociology of social classes

–          the relationship between precariat and multitude

–          means by which precariat might become a ‘class for itself’

–          cultural diversity and conflict (including through engagement with Samuel Huntington and Dieter Senghaas)

–          place, migration and globalization

–          forms of resistance

–          intergenerational transmission of poverty and the making of the precariat

–          Universal Basic Income

–          democracy, participation and representation

 

Building upon previous symposia with the likes of Noam Chomsky, Andrew Linklater and Cynthia Weber, the issue will contain review symposium with Guy Standing, who will respond to reviews of his recent The Precariat: The New Dangerous Class, and Mark Purcell, who will respond to reviews of his The Down-Deep Delight of Democracy.

Submission deadlines

Abstracts: May 20th 2013

Full articles of around 8,000 words (solicited on the basis of review of abstracts): August 18th 2013

Publication: January/February 2014

UK REF Considerations: Papers can appear online as soon as they are accepted and processed. However, we will be able to accommodate the wishes of authors to delay publication until the beginning of 2014 because they wish their papers to be included in the 2014- REF.

Instructions for authors:

http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=rgld20&page=instructions#.UX-WG8qSJHo

Further details: http://www.tandfonline.com/rgld (previous website: http://global-discourse.com)

Editor contact details: matthew.johnson@york.ac.uk

Journal Aims and Scope

Global Discourse is an interdisciplinary, problem-oriented journal of applied contemporary thought operating at the intersection of politics, international relations, sociology and social policy. The journal’s scope is broad, encouraging interrogation of current affairs with regard to core questions of distributive justice, wellbeing, cultural diversity, autonomy, sovereignty, security and recognition. Rejecting the notion that publication is the final stage in the research process, Global Discourse seeks to foster discussion and debate between often artificially isolated disciplines and paradigms, with responses to articles encouraged and conversations continued across issues. The journal features a mix of full-length articles, each accompanied by one or more replies, shorter essays, rapid replies, discussion pieces and book review symposia, typically consisting of three reviews and a reply by the author/s. With an international advisory editorial board consisting of experienced, highly-cited academics, Global Discourse welcomes submissions from and on any region. Authors are encouraged to explore the international dimensions and implications of their work. With a mix of themed and general issues, symposia are periodically deployed to examine topics as they emerge.

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Intern Nation

INTERN NATION

NEW IN PAPERBACK:

‘INTERN NATION: HOW TO EARN NOTHING AND LEARN LITTLE IN THE BRAVE NEW ECONOMY’

By ROSS PERLIN

Published: 1st May 2012

 

The first no-holds-barred expose of the exploitative world of internships

Millions of young people – and increasingly some not-so-young people – now work as interns. They famously shuttle coffee in a thousand magazine offices, legislative backrooms, and Hollywood studios, but they also deliver aid inAfghanistan, map the human genome, and pick up garbage. Intern Nation is the first exposé of the exploitative world of internships. In this witty, astonishing, and serious investigative work, ROSS PERLIN profiles fellow interns, talks to academics and professionals about what unleashed this phenomenon, and explains why the intern boom is perverting workplace practices around the world.

The hardcover publication of this book precipitated a torrent of media coverage in theUSandUK, and Perlin has added an entirely new afterword describing the growing focus on this woefully underreported story. Insightful and humorous, INTERN NATION will transform the way we think about the culture of work.

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Praise for INTERN NATION:

    “Perlin’s attempt to understand internships as a symptom of wider trends in the economy … makes the book such a fascinating read.”

–      SPECTATOR

http://www.spectator.co.uk/books/7044593/part_2/empty-lines-on-a-cv-.thtml

 

    “A book that offers landmark coverage of its topic.”

    – Andrew Ross, LONDON REVIEW OF BOOKS

http://www.lrb.co.uk/v33/n10/andrew-ross/a-capitalists-dream

 

    “A portrait of how white-collar work is changing … thought-provoking and at times jaw-dropping – almost a companion volume to Naomi Klein’s celebrated 2000 exposé of modern sweatshops, No Logo.”

    – Andy Beckett, GUARDIAN

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/may/08/intern-nation-ross-perlin-review

 

    “A compelling investigation of a trend that threatens to destroy “what’s left of the ordered world of training, hard work and fair compensation” … Full of restrained force and wit, this is a valuable book on a subject that demands attention.”

–      OBSERVER

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/may/15/intern-nation-ross-perlin-review

 

    “[An] eye-opening, welcome exposé.”

    – SUNDAY TIMES

 

    “Organizations inAmericasave $2 billion a year by not paying interns a minimum wage, writes Ross Perlin in INTERN NATION.”

    – ECONOMIST

http://www.economist.com/node/18586856?story_id 586856 

 

    “Well-researched and timely.”

–      DAILY TELEGRAPH

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/bookreviews/8552716/Intern-Nation-by-Ross-Perlin-review.html

 

    “[E]ye-opening … The book tackles a sprawling topic with earnestness and flair.”

    -Katy Waldman,WASHINGTON POST

 

    “Perlin … has an eye for polemical effectiveness.”

    – TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT

 

     “A serious and extremely well-written text that offers sophisticated historical material about the origins of internship and its impact on the individuals concerned, the firms that use it and the world of work more generally.”

    -CaryL. Cooper, TIMES HIGHER EDUCATION

 

    “Perlin contends that most internships are illegal, according to the Fair Labor and Standards Act, stripping people who are employees in all but name of workers’ rights.”

–      NEW YORKER

http://www.newyorker.com/arts/reviews/brieflynoted/2011/05/16/110516crbn_brieflynoted1

 

 “‘Interns built the pyramids’, the great magazine The Baffler once declared. And that was just the beginning of their labors, as Ross Perlin demonstrates in this fascinating and overdue exposé of the wage labor without wages, the resumé-building servitude, at the heart of contemporary capitalism.”

–      Benjamin Kunkel, a founding editor of N+1 and author of the novel INDECISION

    “This vigorous and persuasive book … argues that the fundamental issue is the growing contingency of the global workforce.”

–      Roger D. Hodge, BOOKFORUM

http://www.bookforum.com/inprint/018_02/7802

    “A timely book addressing the exploitation of the nation’s younger workforce under the guise of the ‘internship model.'”

    – Most Anticipated Books of Spring 2011, HUFFINGTON POST

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Ross Perlin is a graduate of STANFORD, SOAS, AND CAMBRIDGE, AND HAS WRITTEN FOR, THE NEW YORK TIMES, TIME MAGAZINE, LAPHAM’S QUARTERLY, GUARDIAN, DAILY MAIL and OPEN DEMOCRACY. He is researching disappearing languages inChina.

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ISBN: 9781844678839 / $14.95 / £9.99 / $18.50CAN/ Paperback / 286 pages

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For more information about INTERN NATION, or to buy the book visit: http://www.versobooks.com/books/1112-intern-nation

 

**END**

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski 

 

Lost Generation

Lost Generation

WHY YOUNG PEOPLE CAN’T GET THE JOBS THEY WANT AND THE EDUCATION THEY NEED

New free-to-view E-book 

Martin Allen and Patrick Ainley       

Download here:  e-book -why young people….

Or go to Radicaled: Rethinking Education, Economy and Society at: http://radicaled.wordpress.com/   

Already referred to as a ‘Lost Generation’, after almost two years of Coalition government, young people now have even less to look forward to and are likely to end up worse off than their parents. This publication builds on, develops and updates arguments from our book Lost Generation? New strategies for youth and education (2010) and, in particular, those in our previous e-pamphlet Why young people can’t get the jobs they want (2011)

A paper version is also available @ £3 per copy, contact mar.all@btinternet.com to order.

**END**

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Austerity

17th WORKSHOP ON ALTERNATIVE ECONOMIC POLICY IN EUROPE

Call for Papers for the annual conference of the EuroMemo Group in September 2011 in Vienna
Working Group of European Economists for an Alternative Economic Policy in Europe

Call for Papers for the 17th Workshop on Alternative Economic Policy in Europe:
European Integration at the Crossroads: Deepening or Disintegration?
16-18 September 2011 at the C3-Center for International Development in Vienna/Austria

Dear colleagues
This year’s EuroMemo Group conference will be held in Vienna from 16-18 September 2011.
The conference will open on the afternoon of Friday, 16 September with the customary plenary on the State of theUnion.

We are pleased to announce the two key speakers:
The Political State of the Union, Birgit Mahnkopf (Berlin School of Economics and Law)
The Economic State of the Union, Ozlem Onaran (Middlesex University, London)

We would like to invite you to attend the conference and to submit proposals for papers for one of the four workshops shown below. These should address the key themes of EU policy in each area.

Workshop 1: Austerity policies – Coordinator: Marica Frangakis

Austerity policies are being imposed in a number of EU member states, most notably in the euro area periphery and in Central and Eastern Europe. This workshop aims to examine developments in specific countries, giving special emphasis to the degradation of social protection systems and of labour market institutions, and the implications for youth unemployment and the organization of old-age security.

Workshop 2: The future of the eurozone – Coordinator: Trevor Evans

Developments of the past year raise the danger of a disintegration of the eurozone.  As some members states struggle to deal with rising levels of public and private debt, the EU has promoted new governance measures that look set to exacerbate the situation. Contributions are invited that address macroeconomic imbalances, debt and the banking crisis, monetary policy and the role of the ECB, the European Stability Mechanism, and the Pact for the Euro.
Workshop 3: The EU and the world – Coordinator: Werner Raza
Developments in neighbouring Mediterranean countries highlight just one of the international challenges faced by the EU. This workshop seeks papers that address the issues of migration, trade policy, EU development policies, as well as, more generally, the role of the EU in global governance, in particular the G20.

Workshop 4: Energy, climate change and sustainability, after Fukushima– Coord.: Frieder O. Wolf
The crisis in Japan dramatically focused public attention on the pressing urgency for a fundamental change in energy policy. Papers are invited that will address the challenge of developing policies that promote social, economic and environmental sustainability.

Proposals for papers together with a short abstract (maximum 250 words) should be submitted by 30 June. If accepted, completed papers should be submitted by 1 September.

If you would like to participate in the workshop, please copy the registration form below into an email and reply by the 30 June 2011 to euromemo@uni-bremen.de indicating:
– that you would like to participate and
– whether you wish to offer a paper for one of the workshops.

Please note that there will be a conference fee collected at the venue (20 Euro / 10 Euro for students).

The C3-Center for International Development http://www.centrum3.at/start_en.htm is located in the centre of Vienna, close to the “Altes AKH”-campus of the University of Vienna. Information sheets with details about travel arrangements and hotel bookings are attached. A contingent of rooms has been reserved at three hotels in Vienna. Please use the attached form to make your own bookings. Please be aware that early booking is strongly recommended to secure a room at one of the hotels.

We look forward to seeing you in Vienna!
Best wishes,
for the EuroMemo Group

Werner Raza, Wlodzimierz Dymarski, Miren Etxezarreta, Trevor Evans, Marica Frangakis, John Grahl, Jacques Mazier, Mahmood Messkoub, Catherine Sifakis, Frieder Otto Wolf, Diana Wehlau

European Economists for an Alternative Economic Policy in Europe
EuroMemo Group
E-Mail  >>  euromemo@uni-bremen.de
Internet  >>  http://www.euromemo.eu

EuroMemo Group at Facebook
The EuroMemo Group has launched a EuroMemo Facebook page. Stay up to date with latest news on activities of the EuroMemo Group and link up with supporters of the group from all over Europe. Simply click the “Like” button and use this page to start networking. To view the page, click here: http://www.facebook.com/pages/EuroMemo-Group/176017092438968?v=wall.

EuroMemo Group-Newsletter
If you would like to receive the newsletter of the EuroMemo Group or if you wish to cancel your subscription, please visit the website of the EuroMemo Group here: http://www.euromemo.eu/information_and_support/index.html.

Registration form for the 17th Workshop on Alternative Economic Policy in Europe
(please reply to euromemo@uni-bremen.de by 30 June 2011)
Yes, I intend to participate in the 17th Workshop on Alternative Economic Policy in Europe
(16-18 September 2010 in Vienna)

First Name:

Last Name:

Institution:

Address:

Telephone:

e-mail:

Yes, I wish  to contribute a paper

Title of the Paper:

For the Saturday-morning Workshop on:

Abstract (max. 250 words):

*****

– EuroMemo Group – http://www.euromemo.eu

 

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Lost Generation

WHY YOUNG PEOPLE CAN’T GET THE JOBS THEY WANT AND WHAT CAN BE DONE ABOUT IT

By Martin Allen and Patrick Ainley

The current generation of young people are the most qualified but the most underemployed generation ever. Meanwhile, a third of men and a fifth of women between the ages of 20-34 still live with their parents – in most cases because they cannot afford otherwise.

This e-booklet explains why so many young people are unable of get the jobs and the lives that they want. It challenges claims about the growth of the ‘knowledge economy’ and questions the legitimacy of education programmes designed to ‘raise standards’. With the new Coalition government and most policy makers offering almost nothing, save ‘apprenticeships without jobs’ for the masses and ‘internships’ for ‘the squeezed middle’, the pamphlet offers some preliminary proposals to start addressing the problem.

Available as free download from Radicaled: Rethinking education, economy and society: http://radicaled.wordpress.com/

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

THE REVOLT OF A GENERATION

Revolt

Euro-Mediterranean Happening on Education, Welfare and New Political Practices
Rome, May 12th – 13th

In the last two years we have participated and assisted with extraordinary movements that have fought for a quality education, for labour rights and new welfare against the austerity politics of the European Union. The wild demonstrations, picket lines and strikes, the university occupations and the turmoil of theMediterranean signal a generational revolt and the necessity of a new social pact that involves all those subjects that stand up for their rights and refuse to be blackmailed.

The huge strikes last autumn inFranceshowed us the possibility of creating an intergenerational alliance, as blockades of production and circulation of goods constitute different aspects of a common struggle. InRome, as inLondon, the Book Block was a collective political practice able to speak out about the dismantling of public universities and processes of deskilling. At the same time, the revolts of Maghreb-Mashrek demonstrate how the construction of a future is tightly bound to both the radical claim for democracy and with the necessity of freedom from the parasitic and corrupt power that commands over our lives, universities, schools and workplaces.

The recent revolts and movements have crossed national and European borders as well as the limits imposed on education and mobility by Bologna Process to clash with the failure of a strategy we have always opposed. The struggles of these months have indicated that the possibility of radical change can only become concrete through the alliance among the different actors of labour and education, through common and transnational practices guided by those whom put their own bodies and knowledge.

We hope to give a common meaning to this new space redefined by the conflicts in which the crises open new possibilities to create an “other” future. It is for this reason that we want to initiate an open debate about the common projects we want to build together, starting in Romeon 12 and 13th May 2011.

Program

[ Thursday 12th May ]
6 p.m. – Department of Philosophy, Villa Mirafiori

Opening workshop – with:
Mouhamed Ali Oueled Itaief Student of the “École des beaux-arts” in Tunis
Youad Ben Rejeb Université Femministe
Trifi Bassem Forum des jeunes pour la citoyenneté et la créativité (FJCC)
Mondher Abidi Union Diplomées Chomeurs
Wissem Sghaier UGET Union General Etudiant Tunisi
Tim Uncut UK
Maham Hashni SOAS
Mark Bergfeld Education Activist Network
Rita Maestre Fernandez Juventud sin futuro

Annalisa Cannito AgMigrationUndAntirassismus
Tatiana Kai- Browne Plattform Geschichtspolitik

7 p.m.

Aperitive – Global video session #1
Contributions from education revolt – Book Bloc videos and photos

[ Friday 13th May ]

10 a.m. – Department of Political Science, University “La Sapienza”
Conflictual knowledge: from Europe to Mediterranean area

3 p.m. – Department of Literature, University “La Sapienza”
Education, Welfare and Precariousness

5 p.m. – Department of Literature, University “La Sapienza”
Labour, income and democracy against the crisis
With Fiom’ general secretary Maurizio Landini and members of tunisian General Union UGTT.

8 p.m. – ESC (via dei Volsci, 159)

Global video session #2

Contributions and interviews from Maghreb – Mashrek’ revolts

Follow Live-Streaming on: http://www.unicommon.org

READ THE PROGRAM IN FRENCH AND ARABIC

***
http://www.unicommon.org
http://www.coordinamentouniversitario.it

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Education Crisis

HIGHER EDUCATION AS A PUBLIC GOOD: CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES

SRHE Higher Education Theory Group Seminar

Higher Education as a Public Good: Critical Perspectives

Monday 4 July –Tuesday 5 July 2011

New College, Oxford

The Society for Research into Higher Education Theory Group invites you to participate in a 2-day symposium examining issues underlying the concept of higher education as a public good. This is a topic much discussed in the light of recent policy developments in the UK and in many other countries. The seminar will explore its theoretical underpinnings from several disciplinary perspectives. There will be inputs from keynote speakers and participative discussions on the issues raised. The main speakers will each produce a short synopsis of their contribution for participants to consider in advance of the seminar. It is intended to prepare a book for publication based on the seminar proceedings.

Keynote Speakers:

Nick Barr: Professor of Public Economics. LSE London

Bob Cowen: Emeritus Professor of Education. IOE London

David Dill: Emeritus Professor of Public Policy. University of North Carolina

Jon Nixon: Honorary Professor.University of Sheffield

Paul Standish: Professor of Philosophy of Education. IOE London

Registration

This symposium will take place at New College Oxford and the fee of £125 (£155 for non members of SRHE) covers the cost of accommodation for one night in ensuite rooms and all meals, including dinner in the College on Monday evening. Rooms at the College are limited so delegates are advised to make an early registration to attend this symposium.

The closing date for bookings is 4 June 2011.

To attend this event please e-mail: Nicola Manches (nmanches@srhe.ac.uk) to reserve your place and arrange payment. Please address all enquiries about this or other SRHE events to Nicola Manches at the SRHE Offices.

Society for Research into Higher Education, 44 Bedford Row, London WC1R  4LL, Tel +44 (0) 20 7447 2525, Fax +44 (0) 20 7447 2526, http://www.srhe.ac.uk

***END***

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Student Rebellion

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 3rd APRIL 2011

EVENTS

CANADIAN ASSOCIATION FOR PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT (CAPLA) FALL FOCUS WORKSHOP AND AGM

November 13 -15, 2011
One King West Hotel
Toronto, Ontario

The significance of our conference venue at One King West (formerly the Dominion Bank Building) has provided the inspiration to consider the recognition of prior learning (RPL) as an investment in the future. Recognizing prior learning (RPL) pays big dividends for people, communities, organizations and countries. Managing one’s own knowledge assets is vital in an ever-changing labour market. Cashing in on what people know and can do is important to employers and to the future prosperity of Canadians and newcomers.

Sponsorship: CAPLA is looking for individuals and organizations who are able to provide financial support to assist with the costs associated with this important event. Please contact us at 1-613-860-1747 or capla@agendamanagers.com to hear more.

Attention Presenters! We are looking for innovative practices, current research, new trends, international programs and service delivery models that contribute to our understanding and overall effectiveness of prior learning assessment and recognition (PLAR) and qualification recognition (QR). If you would like to be a presenter, please send a 100 word description to the Conference Secretariat at CAPLA@agendamanagers.com or call 1-877-731-1333 or 1-902-422-1886 by April 30.

Conference registration fees start at $379. Additional details and program updates can be found on the CAPLA website at http://www.capla.ca or by calling the Conference Secretariat at 1-877-731-1333.

+++++

READNEX POETRY SQUAD, PRESENTED BY BARRIO NUEVO

April 15, 2011
9 pm
Blue Moon Pub
725 Queen St. East, Toronto

Description: “Since the emergence, disappearance, and resurgence of The Last Poets, no other group of young stanza-kickers have come about and made a significant impact in the music world. Thankfully the ReadNex Poetry Squad has decided to fill this void.”

+++++

MINING AND RESISTANCE IN CENTRAL AMERICA: CANADIAN CORPORATIONS AT WAR AGAINST RIGHTS OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES

April 10
2 p.m. – 4 p.m.
OISE, 252 Bloor Street West, Room 5150
Toronto
No Registration. Everyone welcome.

Presenters: Juan Carlos Jimenez, Megan Cotton-Kinch, organizers in the Mining Injustice Solidarity Network.

Canadian mining companies are continuing to contaminate water, poison land and tear apart communities in Central America. In El Salvador, the government has ruled that metal mining would fatally pollute the rivers needed for agriculture, but the country itself is now being sued for $77 million under a free trade agreement. In Guatemala, Mayan communities are fighting back through community-controlled referendums, but face the imposition of martial law. In Honduras, the Canadian government was one of the first to legitimize a bloody military coup, which replaced a left-leaning government with one more friendly to mining interests.

Organizers from Mining Injustice Solidarity Network will present on how Canada is complicit in intimidation, assassinations, anti-environmental lawsuits and military coups and how we in Canada can join in solidarity with the struggle for justice.

Readings: http://www.miningwatch.ca/en/corporate-rights-over-human-rights-canadian-mining-central-america

Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q20YxkM-CGI

+++++

BOOK LAUNCH – MEDIA MEDIOCRITY: HOW THE TELEVISION MAKES US STOOPID!

April 16, 2011
4:00pm – 6:00pm
Another Story Bookshop
315 Roncesvalles Ave
Toronto, ON

Meteorologist, TV/film producer, university lecturer, writer, broadcaster and general media expert, Richard Zurawski is coming to the store to lead a discussion about how the media is failing to keep us informed.

Why do so many people still deny the “hypothesis” of global climate change? All but a few rogue scientists agree that we have a crisis on our hands, but all we get from TV and news media are debates in the form of sound bites… Why are we denying the voices of those experts in favor of politicians and pundits? So get up off the couch and let’s have a discussion (with an expert) face to
face!

+++++

REBEL FILMS – MADE IN DAGENHAM

Friday, April 8
7 p.m.
OISE, 252 Bloor St. West, Room 2-212
St. George Subway Station
Everyone welcome. $4 donation requested.

Made in Dagenham 2010, 113 minutes. In 1968, the Ford auto factory in Dagenham was one of the largest single private employers in the United Kingdom. In addition to the thousands of male employees, there are also 187 underpaid women machinists who primarily assemble the car seat upholstery in poor working conditions. Dissatisfied, the women fight for a better deal. However, Rita O’Grady learns that there is a larger issue in this dispute: that women are paid an appalling fraction of the men’s wages for the same work across the board on the sole basis of their sex. Refusing to tolerate this inequality any longer, O’Grady leads a strike by her fellow machinists for equal pay for equal work. What follows would test the patience of all involved in a grinding labour and political struggle that ultimately would advance the cause of women’s rights around the world. Marie Clarke Walker, Canadian Labour Congress Executive V.P., will lead off a discussion on the film.

Please visit: http://www.socialistaction-canada.blogspot.com or call 416 – 535-8779.

+++++

SOCIAL ECONOMY CENTRE – MANAGING HUMAN RESOURCES IN NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS CERTIFICATE

With Kunle Akingbola (University of Toronto / Toronto Rehab)

Human resources are not only the core asset of community organizations; such organizations cannot replace their human capital with investment in physical capital. Coupled with the pressure to be efficient and strategic, maximizing human capital is essential to achieving organizations goals. This
certificate program is designed to strengthen human resource management and leadership competencies by helping managers to acquire tools and resources to enhance leadership skills, manage organizational change and gain knowledge around effective compensation.

* Change Management – April 21
* Compensation and Benefits – May 27

9:30 am-4:00 pm
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), University of Toronto
252 Bloor Street West, Toronto (St. George subway station)
         
Cost: $140 + HST.  A limited number of spaces are available to students at a discounted rate. Discount for those registering for more than one workshop, or for more than one person registering from the same organization.

To Register: Access the online registration form at http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/FY65KMM or contact Lisa White at secworkshops@gmail.com, or 416-978-0022.

Kunle Akingola is a Human Resources Manager/Consultant and Adjunct Professor at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto with extensive experience in both the non-profit and corporate sector

+++++

NEWS & VIEWS

RACE, CLASS STRUGGLE AND ORGANIZED LABOUR IN THE “AGE OF WISCONSIN”

By Ajamu Nangwaya, Linchpin

…The racialized section of the United States’ working-class has been bearing the brunt of the racist, sexist and capitalist battering of the welfare state structures since the 1980s without much sympathy from their white working-class counterparts…But predominantly-white Wisconsin is up in arms when the chicken comes home to roost in their own backyard! Martin Luther King was quite right when he declared, “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly.” We can only hope that white workers come to realize that white supremacist beliefs and practices only weaken the working-class – to the advantage of the small capitalist elite.

Read more: http://linchpin.ca/content/left/Race-class-struggle-organized-labour-%E2%80%9CAge-Wisconsin%E2%80%9D

+++++

BILL 150: ATTACK ON PUBLIC SECTOR UNIONS

By Herman Rosenfeld, BASICSnews

By the end of March, the Ontario Liberal government of Dalton McGuinty will have passed Bill 150. It declares the TTC to be an essential service and denies Toronto public transit workers – members of the Amalgamated Transit Workers Union (ATU) Local 113 – the right to strike.

The attack on the transit workers was one of the first things that the newly elected right-wing populist Mayor of Toronto did this winter. Building on the memory of a short transit stoppage and the municipal workers strike from a couple of summers ago, Ford saw this as part of his plans to demonize public sector workers as a way of isolating all unions and weakening the collective gains of working people.

Read more: http://basicsnews.ca/?p=2918

+++++

INVITATION TO JOIN LATIN AMERICAN RESEARCHERS OF ONTARIO (LARO)

The Latin American Researchers of Ontario (LARO), a recently formed non-profit association, is extending a warm invitation to individuals and organizations to join its membership and collective work.

The organization aims to promote research on Latin America and Latin Americans in Ontario. It hopes to provide an inclusive and interdisciplinary space for individuals who share an interest in the production and dissemination of written, oral, visual, and other knowledge and who define themselves and/or their work as Latin American.

In an effort to challenge elitist tendencies, the organization seeks give priority and visibility to grassroots research and to question prevalent forms of inequality.

Members will have the opportunity to share their work, knowledge, experiences and ideas with other members and constructively learn from each other. As a new organization, LARO is open to the incorporation of new ideas, visions, and projects.

For more information, we invite you to visit our website: http://www.latinamericanresearchers.com/

If you wish to become a LARO member and/or receive information from us, please click the link below to our contact page and send us your contact information, including your research interest, and let us know if you would like your name to appear in the public members’ list: http://www.latinamericanresearchers.com/contact.html.

+++++

A PRIMER ON CLASS STRUGGLE

By Michael Schwalbe, Common Dreams

When we study Marx in my graduate social theory course, it never fails that at least one student will say (approximately), “Class struggle didn’t escalate in the way Marx expected. In modern capitalist societies class struggle has disappeared. So isn’t it clear that Marx was wrong and his ideas are of little value today?”

Read more: http://www.commondreams.org/view/2011/03/31-4

+++++

MAKING IT COUNT – CCPA’S (CANADIAN CENTRE FOR POLICY ALTERNATIVES) FEDERAL ELECTION BLOG

The CCPA has launched a federal election blog to bring you expert analysis on the issues that will—or should—define the election.

Making It Count features timely commentary from CCPA staff and research associates, who will be weighing in everything from the economy and federal finances to the social and environmental challenges facing our country.

Read more: http://federalelectionblog.ca/

+++++
(END)
++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++

ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Education on Trial

UniCOMMON: THE REBELLION OF LIVING KNOWLEDGE

An extraordinary season of struggle, beyond Uniriot

Uniriot has been several things: the will to compose different political cultures, the desire of conflict and the innovation inside and against the university reformed by the Bologna Process. The attempt of building up a new experimentation outside of any reassuring identity, but creating a new network able to change and being changed by the richness of discussions and the unquestionable reality of the struggle that cross us.

Uniriot.org has been a great platform, a useful tool for the challenge we issued five years ago: not only a showcase of our ideas, but a crossroads of different experiences and projects, new narrations of struggle, communication about the transformations of the university and our research. We have been trying to carry this challenge forward since the movement of 2005, when we created Uniriot, through our experience inside the European struggles during the AntiCPE movement in France, Bologna Burns in Wien and Madrid, until the anomalous wave of 2008 and the incredible autumn we lived in 2010.

We have been profoundly changed during these extraordinary months, together with students, precarious workers and researchers that have passionately animated and continuously organized the struggles of the last year. As we cannot be the same, we close the experience of Uniriot and launch a new political constituent process to live up to our time and the transformations required by the struggles. A new challenge!

The Rebellion of Living Knowledge: UniCommon

UniCommon moves its first step in an era of crisis and austerity: the education reforms enacted without any public funding inside the framework of the failure of the Bologna Process and, at the same time, its extension outside Europe as a tool of exploitation of transnational living knowledge; the dismissal of the public university and the de-qualification of high school education, the massive youth unemployment, precarity and the absence of any future for a whole generation inside and outside the academy.

In this landscape, movements shouted firmly the shelter of public university against cuts, rising tuition fees, free research labor and debt loan, not as mere defence of the extant, but as a strategic field to claim quality of knowledge and free education against any rhetorical meritocracy. Self-education has been our political disposition, focused on the struggle for a qualified and critical knowledge, a device of organization that we are going to practice; our aim is to focus on the transformations of researchers’ status in the era of delegitimization of research work and the peer-review system. Militant research is our collective tool to understand and to map the transformations of the present; self-education is our device beyond the public/private dichotomy to make our university!

UniCommon wants to switch the nexus between education and precarity, creating a new social constituent deal within the new composition of labor, a democratic reappropriation of welfare against private plunders and feudal academic power. We have learnt that where there is a capital relation, there is exploitation of toil, passions, words and knowledge; where there is globalized cognitive capitalism so there is a parasitic power that robs our body, our life.

The European and north-African movements of the last autumn have taught us that the claim for welfare against poverty and rights against exploitation are strictly connected to the claim for democracy and freedom against power and its corruption. Students who have animated the revolts of last years, thousands of precarious and young unemployed took up the book shields to defend their lives: a rioting generation reclaiming knowledge, free access and circulation, income and new welfare, democracy and freedom of choice above our body.

UniCommon is born within the practice of Book Bloc, a common tool of defence, a production of imaginary to express our desire. We have created those book shields as an attempt of combining radicalism and people’s support; the challenge of our time is to build up a wild experimentation, widespread and radical at the same time, to step over the crisis and the failed utopia of cognitive capitalism. The Book Bloc is a transnational practice, against any fixed identity and outside any representation of conflict, it is our defence within the democracy of turmoil!

The failure of Bologna Process does not mean the end of exploitation of our knowledge, on the contrary the crisis deepens the capitalistc command over our body; at the same time, the struggles have showed us their powerful capacity of creating connections despite borders, sharing common projects and practices, shaping a different future where free knowledge, income, rights and citizenship are not just a privilege.

UniCommon is a new compass oriented by self-education, created by the wild demos that blocked the circulation of commodities; it is a device defended by the transnational Book Bloc inside a European space definitely twisted by the Mediterranean revolts, the margins that break into the center to overturn it.

Moreover, Unicommon is a network of communication and political organization, a web platform that will work as a place of information and communication of struggles from high school to the academy, a space of connection among experiences of self-education and autonomous collectives of research. UniCommon.org is a new website inside the 2.0 web time: video as a tool of enquiring and mapping transformations, photos as the continuous effort of imaging the fuzzy movement of our demos and discussions, audios as a precise opinion of different voices, augmented reality to shape and multiply our world.

UniCommon starts from La Sapienza University within a day of large discussions to make a public analysis of the past autumn and to imagine the spring that lies ahead.

Meet you in the struggles, to create the future and subvert the present; to make the university of the common!

°°°°°

Program 24.03.2011

Create the Future, Subvert the Present

10:30 a.m. College of Philosophy, Villa Mirafiori, La Sapienza – Roma
Public assembly of students and precarious collectives and networks

Against the dismissal of public university, creating the university of the common

°°°
2:00 p.m. Lunch break

°°°

4:00 p.m. College of Political Science, LaSapienza – Roma
Round table

After the revolt of the autumn toward the general strike of 6th May 2011

Speakers: Ilenia Caleo (Zeropuntotre); Roberto Ciccarelli (Il manifesto), Claudio Riccio (Link), Eva Pinna (Surf), Luca Tomassini (CPU), Giorgio Sestili (Atenei in rivolta), Simone Famularo (Assemblea di Medicina – La Sapienza)  Francesco Sinopoli (Flc-Cgil), Corrado Zunino (la Repubblica)

°°°
7:30 p.m. aperitif break and videos
°°°

Info: http://www.uniriot.org  /  and from 24th  March  >>> http://www.unicommon.org >>>

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Education Crisis

 

Paolo Virno

PAOLO VIRNO ON ’THE TURMOIL AND THE THEORY OF EXODUS’ – LIVE STREAMING

Friday 18 March,
6pm GMT/ 7pm CET/ 1pm EST

Live Streaming: http://www.globalproject.info/it/produzioni
New Website: http://www.lumproject.org

::2011 Research Event::
The Virtue of Turmoil: the Revolt between Exodus and Revolution

In full swing of the systemic crisis of global capitalism, the debate among radical transformations is a living one. In fact, on the one hand the financial capitalism and transnational corporations do not accept any form of regulation and consider the crisis to be a structural condition to be viewed as part of the contemporary production of value. On the other hand, the parabola of Obama indicates that reformism has come to halt and neo-Keynesian receipts are blunt weapons. This situation causes a rise in social tension, above all in the old continent, where deflationist policies dragged by Central Bank and Germany hit with more harshness. For about one year now on both sides of the Mediterranean turmoil has been spreading. The protagonists of these movements are the young, students, precarious and migrants. This turmoil indicates a powerful resistance to austerity and raises the question concerning the project of transformation: what is the goal of metropolitan riot? Is the no-future issue enough to explain the passions and the discord that animate the revolts that are taking place from Rome to London, from Athens to Tunis, from Paris to Cairo?

The aim of the LUM cycle of seminars is to deal with these questions, starting from the assumption that the events of the last months have opened a new space of possibility, a space that must not be limited to the cheering narration of the “burned generation”, a generation that rebels against its parents. There is undoubtedly a gap in the future, a lack of job prospects as well as an existential void. There is however also a search for a new kind of politics, for a new way to qualify the transformation that is taking place in the revolts carried out by students and by the young. It is something that urgently questions life and language, social relations and knowledge, the line of colour and sexual difference.

But how can we articulate this research with the revolutionary theory and praxis that we have known and that has taken shape over the past two centuries? Does the desire to gain a monopoly on political decision, the state, lurk among the tumult that penetrates European markets? Does the violent breakthrough differ from the everyday construction of meaning that aims at creating new political institutions? Does the concept of exodus – on which critical thinking has focused on several occasions during the last years – take full account of the unprecedented relationship among turmoil and constitutional praxis?

In order to answer these questions the LUM cycle of seminars sets two goals:

a) To qualify a theoretical and political conceptual constellation able to deal with contemporary change: we will do this through a critical review of texts and political materials that have most informed the debate of movements over the past twenty years.

b) To focus the attention on some revolutionary historical events of the last two centuries, to trace the irreducible discontinuities concerning the present and also, on the contrary, the problematic knots that the great revolutionary experiences have exhibited and that still today remain unresolved.

Seminar Program: [All events will start at 6pm GTM]

1. Actuality of the Revolt (from Europe to the Maghreb, and Egypt) – Augusto Illuminati (Friday, 18th February)

2. On the Concept of Turmoil (in Machiavelli) – Gabriele Pedullà (Friday 4th March)

3. The Turmoil and the Theory of the Exodus – Paolo Virno (Friday 18th March)

4. The Revolution in Europe from 1848 to the Commons (through the political writings of Marx) – Paolo Vinci (Tuesday, 1st April)

5. Jacqueries and Political Institutions – Marco Bascetta (Friday 15th April)

6. 1968 and the Politics of Difference (through the political writings of Carla Lonzi) – Federica Giardini (Wednesday, 29th April)

7. “War Machine” and the Multitude – Francesco Raparelli and Alberto De Nicola (Friday 13th May)

8. Haiti and the Black Jacobins – Fred Moten and Laura Harris (Friday 20th May)

Info:
info@lumproject.org
http://www.lumproject.org
—–

LUM (Libera Università Metropolitana)
presenta:
Il tumulto e la teoria dell’esodo – Paolo Virno

Venerdì 18 marzo, ore 17
Presso Esc, atelier autogestito (via dei Volsci 159 – Roma)
Diretta streaming: http://www.globalproject.info/it/produzioni
Nuovo website: http://www.lumproject.org

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Lost

SOCIAL IMMOBILITY

Patrick Ainley and Martin Allen

The chatter about social mobility from a Coalition kicking away welfare services that have kept millions from poverty disguises the fact that there has been no real upward social mobility in Britain for the past 30 years and that nowadays the only social mobility is down.

Grand announcements – like Clegg’s £5 billion premium for the most educationally disadvantaged school pupils that seeks to compensate for the LibDems’ tuition fees capitulation – have repeatedly failed to create social mobility. Even in the post-war period when substantial numbers of young people moved into occupations paying more than those of their parents, there was little ‘relative’ mobility, ie. down as well as up. Rather than challenging the inequalities of the occupational order, the upward mobility that occurred merely meant there was some more room in the middle. Via selective grammar schooling it allowed limited working-class access to expanding professional and managerial occupations sustained by full male employment and the growing welfare state.

The development of comprehensive schools and more higher education contributed to widening aspirations. But this growth was as much a consequence as a cause of limited upward mobility. This was confirmed when a decline in mobility coincided with the partial abolition of grammar schools from 1965 on. (That this was coincidental can be seen in the USA when the same period of expansion of opportunities also ended despite all-through high schools since the war).

Hopes that an expanded middle afforded opportunities to educate the working class out of existence did not materialise. At best, there was an illusion of social mobility as the formerly manually working class shrank and many occupations were redefined as ‘professional’ and therefore requiring so-called ‘skills’ attested by educational qualifications. As a result, more people – especially women – now work in expanded office and service sectors but conditions of employment for this new non-manual working middle are increasingly insecure.

Blair and Brown put their faith in the globalised economy to provide new openings for those with qualifications at the expense of those without. New Labour’s campaign to raise ‘standards’ measured by qualifications led to unprecedented exam pass rates. Consequent allegations of ‘dumbing down’ came not only from traditionalists but also from some teachers, bullied by a  growing class of ‘managers’ (the new name for deputy and assistant head teachers) to meet targets that were raised as soon as they were achieved.

The main problem with New Labour’s ‘standards agenda’ however, was not the crushing of professional autonomy as lessons were delivered from templates so that what was taught became less important than how it could be assessed. It was far more fundamental. Whereas in the past, education was unfairly accused of failing the economy by not producing workplace skills when employers didn’t want them, now the economy has definitively failed education.

Rather than globalisation resulting in endless opportunities, employment prospects for most young people are in decline. This does not mean that there are no new professional and managerial vacancies but rather that, as ICT  sweeps through offices and work is outsourced if not exported, the term ‘white-collar employment’ is becoming meaningless. The main alternative to what are reduced to para-professions at best is a life in ‘customer services’. So it isn’t surprising that McDonalds report huge increases in applications from ‘qualified’ young people.

In a situation that we refer to as ‘education without jobs’, young people have to work harder and harder simply to maintain their place in the jobs queue. Gove’s announcement of a review of ‘vocational education’ will predictably relegate the majority to apprenticeships without jobs that will replay the Youth Training Schemes of the 1980s whilst privileging academic cramming for a minority.

Education has become like running up a down-escalator where you have to run faster and faster just to stand still as the former class pyramid has gone pear-shaped. The recent ‘social mobility’ rhetoric from politicians of all Parties disguises the fact that it is fear of downward social mobility that fuels the hysteria over educational competition for academic success.

The recession has made the situation of young people worse but it is not the cause of their problems. Likewise, we cannot ‘educate ourselves out of recession’ as even some teacher union and student leaders seem to think. Of course levels of educational provision should be defended but we also need to promote employment policies. As aspiring students face mortgaging their futures in hopes of eventual ‘graduate employment’, the promise of social mobility is exposed as a sham. Education faces its own credibility crunch and rising fees could finally burst the bubble. The main argument against them is – what else are school leavers expected to do?

Patrick Ainley and Martin Allen are the authors of Lost Generation? New strategies for youth and education, (Continuum, 2010)

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