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Tag Archives: Young People

Neoliberalism

Neoliberalism

NARRATIVES OF ASPIRATIONS WITHIN NEOLIBERALISM

Dr Laura Harvey

Lecturer in Sociology, University of Surrey

Speaking at the University of East London

8 January 2015, 5 – 6pm

ED 2.02, Cass Building, Stratford Campus

We would like to invite you to attend our Research Seminar on 8 January 2015, details below.   You will be very welcome but please let Daniel Blackman, D.Blackman@uel.ac.uk, know so we have an idea of how many people to expect.

Regards

Veronica Burton

Administrator for Research and Knowledge Exchange

Cass School of Education and Communities

University of East London

In this presentation we will explore the stories that young people tell about their aspirations and imagined futures at a time of deepening social inequalities.   We will examine how neoliberal discourses of individualism, self-responsibility and enterprise feature in young people’s everyday talk about ‘success’ and ‘failure’. Our analysis draws on interview data with 14-17 year-olds across England from an ESRC-funded study of ‘The role of celebrity in young people’s classed and gendered aspirations’. We will highlight the pervasiveness of neoliberal discourses of individualism, meritocracy and hard work within young people’s accounts. But we will also unpack the contradictions, ambivalences and ambiguities within neoliberalism as it works within and through the messiness of everyday practices.

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

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Crisis

Crisis

HISTORY OF YOUTH AND COMMUNITY WORK STUDY CONFERENCE

13 – 15 March 2015

Youth and Policy

We are delighted to announce that the seventh History of Youth and Community Work Study Conference will be taking place at Hinsley Hall, Leeds in March 2015.

See: http://www.youthandpolicy.org/events/

As with the earlier gatherings, it will include a mix of plenary sessions, workshops and ‘surprise’ events. Amongst the plenary speakers will be Michael Snape from Birmingham University, a well-known historian of Christianity and war in the modern world. His talk is titled ‘Barclay Baron: A settlement worker goes to war’. A second plenary speaker will be Carol Dyhouse from the University of Sussex, a social historian and much published author, who will be talking on ‘Girl Trouble: Panic in the History of Young Women’. The speakers for the third plenary will be Sarah Banks and Andrea Armstrong from Durham University. Their presentation will review the lessons and legacies of the Community Development Projects of the 1970s. Symposiums are also planned on the history of Community and Youth Work Education and Training and on the Historical Development of Youth Work Curricula.

The breadth of workshops is always impressive covering an enormous range of topics linked to the history of youth work, adult education and community work. As before some of these will focus on the historical development of practice in countries outside the UK.

We hope that this conference will be once again a relaxed gathering of enthusiasts keen to talk to and learn from each other.

Just fill in the booking form and email it back to us.

Paula Connaughton and Tony Jeffs
Youth and Policy
conferences@youthandpolicy.org

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

CSD BG D65/552

A EUROPEAN YOUTH REVOLT IN 1980/81?

Conference

Date: 15 May 2014 to 17 May 2014

Location: IISH Amsterdam

Conference Organiser: Internationaal Instituut voor Sociale Geschiedenis, Amsterdam / Institut für soziale Bewegungen, Bochum / Forschungsstelle für Zeitgeschichte in Hamburg, Hamburg
Place: Amsterdam, International Institute of Social History

From 15-17 May 2014, a conference will be held on European youth revolts in 1980/81. We welcome papers and proposals for presentations (deadline: 1 June 2013) . The conference is organized by the International Institute of Social History, Amsterdam / Institut für soziale Bewegungen, Bochum / Forschungsstelle für Zeitgeschichte in Hamburg, Hamburg.

Place: Amsterdam, Internationaal Instituut voor Sociale Geschiedenis
Deadline: June 1, 2013

Proposals for 25-minute-presentations consisting of a one-page abstract, a short CV and a list of publications should be sent to Knud Andresen [Andresen@zeitgeschichte-hamburg.de] and Bart van der Steen [bart.vandersteen@gmail.com] until June, 1th, 2013. Conference language is English. Publication of the proceedings is intended.

Scope

Sparked off by urban conflicts on youth centres and squatted houses, youth revolts unfolded in April/May 1980 in Amsterdam and Zurich, and soon spread to West-Berlin and other West-German cities. Simultaneously, cities such as Copenhagen and Vienna also witnessed a rise of confrontations between youth and the police, while in Great Britain so called ‘race riots’ broke out in more than thirty cities in the early summer of 1981.
This far from complete enumeration tends to lend weight to the impression that the second youth revolt – as it was often called at the time – was above all a Northern European phenomenon. Did other European countries also witness an upturn of youth protests in the early 1980s, which was not solely linked to house occupations and structural urban conflicts? Can specific patterns of youth protests be discerned, that rise above nationally focused discourses? Can we speak of an international protest attitude among young people in the early 1980s? These questions will be central at this conference, which aims at gaining a European perspective on the 1980/81 youth revolt as well as more in-depth insights into its specific aspects.

Questions

The question of how youth and social movements in the 1980s related to each other has not been answered yet. Were, for example, the conspicuous locality of youth movements and the rejection of theoretical analyses the result of activists’ negative experiences during the 1970s, or are we dealing with a generation that was not interested in history and wanted to create its own future? Similarly, the social composition of the youth movements is an issue that has not been researched in-depth. Were the protests mainly carried by deprived youth and students who had only enrolled formally but used the university not for educational purposes but as a laboratory for new life styles? Was the percentage of high school and working class youth significantly higher than during the protests in the late 1960s? Can the youth protests be explained as a side effect of a European wide development towards longer and more extensive education schemes or was the economic downturn and youth unemployment a primary cause for the protests?

Goals

The goal of the conference will be to achieve an overview of developments in Europe that moves beyond the descriptions of spectacular confrontations. We aim at embedding the youth revolt of 1980/1981 in a broader context of European post-war history. How can disparities be explained? Were the youth revolts mainly reactions to state repression and police violence, as was often claimed at the time? Or were the protesters’ motivations less specific and their actions more generally directed at a society which was deemed rigid and cold? With these questions we hope to uncover new traces, which may lead to a new understanding of the youth revolt. The revolts and (partly) new groups and scenes of the 1980s were connected to a radical form of subjectivity, which can be linked to more general social trends such as secularisation, individualisation, and pluralisation of life styles. This development can also be observed in the ‘differentiation of youth subcultures’ during the early 1980s, with the rise of punks, skinheads, teds, and mods as well as other youth counter cultures. Was this differentiation an international phenomenon?

The effects of the revolts need to be discussed as well. The autonomous movements and squatters of the 1980s can be seen as heirs of the 1980/1981 youth revolts, even though they remained a quantitatively marginal group already at their time. The revolts were also expressions of the search for new forms of socialization and small, manageable social spheres. How did those involved develop after 1980/81, and which effects can be observed nationally and trans-nationally? The ‘silent revolution’ thesis of Ronald Inglehart, which claims that the values held by youth created a path for societal development, can be countered by an interpretation that interprets the development of the protests mainly as a story of de-radicalization and adjustment. This raises the questions which aspects of the youth cultures were carried on and which were put aside.

Another field of interest are the political and societal reactions to youth’s unruliness. Did critical social scientists write sympathetic reports, partly based on their own experiences? Did their expertise and publications influence political decision making, or, for example, change the conduct of the police? How did politics and society react to these challenges?
The years 1980/81 are to be understood as the conference’s point of departure, not as a limitation. Up to now, few historical works have been published on the subject. The protests have traditionally been the topic of contemporary sociological studies on youth, focusing on the changes of values and attitudes amongst youth during the 1980s or on deviancy and confrontation. As the 1980s are now gaining importance as a topic of historical research, the conference should contribute to the historical analysis of the youth protest wave.

At the conference, we want to explore if 1980/81 was the accumulation point of a set of international developments or rather the outflow of local and national political opportunities, by paying attention to specific countries and systematic comparisons.

Contributions

The contributions should be based on historical source material and embedded in a social-cultural history of post-war Europe. We especially welcome proposals that highlight the following four questions/perspectives:

  • Which events and social groups shaped and characterized the youth revolts of 1980/1981?
  • Which political programs were articulated or can be discerned? Did these build forth and/or were they taken up by other societal currents?
  • What were the political and societal reactions to the youth revolts?
  • How did these revolts influence or impact more general social developments, if at all?

Proposals for 25-minute-presentations consisting of a one-page abstract, a short CV and a list of publications should be sent to Knud Andresen [Andresen@zeitgeschichte-hamburg.de] and Bart van der Steen [bart.vandersteen@gmail.com] until June, 1th, 2013. Conference language is English. Publication of the proceedings is intended.

Geplaatst:

6 maart 2013

Europa

Jeugd

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Childhood

Childhood

CONFERENCE ON THE NATURE AND VALUE OF CHILDHOOD

16-17 May 2014

University of Sheffield, UK

Currently there is widespread philosophical interest in children’s rights, parental rights and duties, and wider issues concerning good parenting and the social organisation of childrearing. Yet, to fully address these topics one needs to assume an answer to the question of ’What is a child?’ To know who owes what to children in any detail, we need to know what distinguishes childhood from adulthood, and to answer questions about the relative value of childhood and adulthood in the overall life of a human being.

This conference brings together philosophers interested in a cluster of questions that have not been sufficiently discussed so far, but which are starting to draw philosophical attention: What is childhood? Is childhood good intrinsically, or only as preparation for adulthood? If it is intrinsically good, does it have special value – would it be a loss, from the perspective of an entire human life, if one missed out on childhood? Are there any ‘intrinsic goods of childhood’, and what are they? Do we owe children things that are different in nature from the things owed to adults?

 

PAPERS:

Monika Betzler (Berne) ‘Good childhood and the good life’

Teresa Blankmeyer Burke (Gallaudet): ‘The Nature and Value of a Deaf Childhood’

Samantha Brennan (Western Ontario) ‘Trust, time, and play: Three intrinsic goods of childhood’

Matthew Clayton (Warwick) ‘Dignity as an ideal for children’

Jurgen De Wispelaere (McGill) ‘Political rights for Rugrats: Children in the democratic state’

Timothy Fowler (Bristol) ‘Variety is the spice of life?: On the possible significance of their being intrinsic goods of childhood’

Colin Macleod (Victoria) ‘Just schools and good fun: Non-preparatory dimensions of educational justice’

Serena Olsaretti (ICREA/Pompeu Fabra University) ‘Egoism, altruism and the special duties of parents’

Norvin Richards (Alabama) ‘The intrinsic goods of childhood’

Judith Suissa (London) ‘Narrativity, childhood and parenting’

Patrick Tomlin (Reading) ‘Saplings or caterpillars?: Trying to understand children”

Daniel Weinstock (McGill) ‘On the complementarity of the ages of life: Why we wouldn’t want adulthood without childhood, or childhood without
adulthood’

 

The conference will take place on the 16th and 17th of May 2014 at the University of Sheffield, Jessops West Exhibition Space.

Registrationhttp://onlineshop.shef.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=2&catid=8&prodid=259

For more details get in touch with the organisers: Anca Gheaus (a.gheaus@sheffield.ac.uk) or Lindsey Porter (l.porter@lancaster.ac.uk)

The conference is sponsored by the Society for Applied Philosophy, The Mind Association and The Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain.

Thanks to Pedagogy & the Inhumanities for alerting me to this interesting and important conference: http://benjaminpedagogy.wordpress.com/2014/02/25/conference-the-nature-and-value-of-childhood/Glenn Rikowski

 

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‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

 

 

Neoliberalism

Neoliberalism

AFTER NEOLIBERALISM? THE KILBURN MANIFESTO

Marx Memorial Library

37a Clerkenwell Green

London EC1R 0DU

Coming up on Thursday 20 February, we have our fifth seminar of the series: “Is young the new poor? Class and generation under neoliberalism” to discuss the chapter written by Soundings co-editor Ben Little on the role of generational politics emerging as a response to the material effects of neoliberalism on the lives of young people.

Ben will present his manifesto chapter “A growing discontent: class and generation under neoliberalism”, with responses from Shiv Malik (co-author Jilted Generation) and Mevan Babakar (Head of Digital, Bite the Ballot). The seminar will be chaired by Doreen Massey (Emeritus Professor of Geography at the Open University and founding editor of Soundings).

Tickets for this seminar are available online and cost £5 / £3 (concessions) / free (Soundings subscribers). Previous chapters of the Kilburn Manifesto, as well as the Manifesto framing statement are all available for download for free from the Lawrence & Wishart website.

The success of our previous seminars have been due to the quality of the discussions – both from the panelists and the audience. We hope you will join us again to make the future ones similarly engaging.

Yours
Becky and the rest of the Soundings team

 

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‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Education Is Not For Sale

Education Is Not For Sale

STATE OF EDUCATION 2014: CONFERENCE ON RADICAL AND AUTONOMOUS EDUCATION

Where: Oxford House, Derbyshire Street,  Bethnal Green,  London E2 6HG
When: Saturday 1st March 2014, 10.30am to 7pm (+ afterparty tbc.) 
Bookings (Please book in advance as places are limited): http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/state-of-education-conference-1-march-2014-tickets-10238604943 

Access: Conference spaces are fully accessible to wheelchair users and a crèche will run in the gallery space. 

Day Programme

10.30-11.00: Arrivals and Registration 

11.00-11.30: Opening 

11.30-13.00: World Cafe

Taking place in the main theatre, World Cafe will be used as a way to start having conversations in small groups.  A convener will sit in each group throughout to facilitate three 30 minute sessions around a ‘key’ question and subject. Conference participants will have the opportunity to gather around questions of interest, meet each other and contribute to group discussions, which will be recorded and shared at the end of the morning. 

13.00-14.00: Lunch 

14.00-17.30 (including two 15 mins breaks): Afternoon Workshops 

The Trend Away from Freedom
For thousands of years we were becoming more free. Now we have become less so:
How can Enlightenment thinkers like Hegel, Mill and (later) Fromm influence our practice today?

Instead of school 
What if mass, compulsory, full-time schooling is a 150 year old experiment which hasn’t worked?  A workshop to generate and discuss ideas about what ‘instead of school’ might look like, convened by a group with experience of the ideas and practices surrounding alternatives to school.

Direct Action in Schools
What can teachers do to raise awareness of and respond to the current market-led reforms of state schooling? This session will be led by a full-time state primary teacher.
http://jennycollinsteacher.wordpress.com/

Chatting Critically with Young People and Youth Workers  
Turning Voices into Action
Facilitated by ‘In Defence of Youth Work’

Freedom and Democracy in action
Democratic Education is, of course, no longer radical. Staff and students from two of the world’s most famous democratic schools, the UK’s Summerhill School and Sands School, will explain and take questions about democratic education, the schools themselves, and the unique experience they offer both students and teachers.

Another Roadmap for Arts Education: ‘Glossary of Conflicted Terms’
‘Cultural Exchange’, ‘Creative Workforce’, ‘Arts Curriculum’, ‘Radical Education’ are terms which have become synonymous for a rigid, tokenistic, yet empty tick-boxing exercise around Arts Education. By unpicking these terms we want to foster a conversation that looks at what actually is important to us as arts education practitioners, teachers, students and organisers.

Education workers and unions: organising to reclaim education
Collective organising is essential to transform our education system into one that will genuinely meet our needs.
What can we learn from successful struggles in this country and further afield?

The potential of socially critical environmental education

The aim of the workshop is to present and criticise dominant trends in environmental education and raise a debate on critical approaches. The discussion will draw from the participants’ teaching experiences in environmental education and relevant curriculum subjects (e.g. geography, science, citizenship) as well as their interests in environmental issues.

Ethics and practice in teaching

Teachers / educators of the Radical Education Forum have been working through their experiences to build an ethical framework for our practice. We will workshop input from the REF ‘s Behaviour Management Clinic and the application of participatory theatre methods to ethical issues, based on the “Ethics of Participatory Theatre”.
http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/resources/detail/subjects/palatine/ethics-of-participatory-theatre

‘Hip Hop Education as Radical Education? 
History, Theory and Practice

Sustaining the movement

How do we ensure that the stateofeducation2014 conference is not just a one-off experience?  What real and practical next steps do we need to take? This workshop will feed its ideas and plans into the plenary event.

The suppression of freedom in schools

Do schools undermine school students’ human rights? Can students ever have a say and be listened to at school? Are schools like prisons? Can school students, youth workers, teachers and others work together to make a serious change to schools?

‘Voice of Youth’ will present their short film and lead a discussion.

17.30-17.45: Break

17.45-18.15: Closing Thoughts

18.15-19.00: Informal Networking

BOOK YOUR FREE TICKET HERE

For any additional needs or questions, or if you need to cancel your participation, please let us know by sending us an email to stateofeducation@riseup.net

WhatRadical Education Forum and Libertarian Education are co-organising a one-day conference, which will bring together teachers and education workers interested in radical education. We will meet, share ideas and discuss concrete alternatives to dominant trends towards increasingly right wing and authoritarian ideologies in education.

Who is the conference for?

The conference is open to teachers and other workers in formal state education, school students, parents, youth workers, activistsand other educators and workers.

Who are we?

We are teachers, educators, students, researchers, community members, parents, precarious workers, people interested in being part of a wider social change. Our use of the term ‘radical’ is not meant to make claims of political purity, nor to be off-putting for those who don’t think of themselves as ‘radicals’. It is rather to mark our terrain that includes different forms of practice including popular education and research, critical literacy, participatory action research, social justice education, libertarian education and many others.

 

Conference website: http://stateofeducation2014.wordpress.com/

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‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

 

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK: UPDATE 26th OCTOBER 2013

EVENTS

FILMS FROM THE CANADIAN LABOUR INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2013
November 29
7 pm
PSAC Headquarters
233 Gilmour Street
Ottawa, ON

The Workers’ History Museum is proud to host Ottawa’s first-ever Canadian Labour International Film Festival. CLIFF gives a stage to those who seek justice on the job and dignity in their workplaces, so it is a perfect fit for our museum. This successful festival, now in its fifth year, has brought independent films about working people to cities throughout Canada. On November 29th, we’re bringing them to Ottawa.

Please join us for five films — and five perspectives — that you won’t see anywhere else. Information about the films can be found at: http://workershistorymuseum.ca/cliff2013/

Admission is $5.00. For more information or for advance tickets, please contact: treasurer@workershistorymuseum.ca

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PEOPLE UNITED – CREATING A NEW SPACE FOR COMMUNITY DIALOGUE

November 28
6 p.m.
Beit Zatoun
612 Markham St., Toronto (2 blocks west of Bathurst St., south side of Bloor St. W.)

Join other activists, advocates, and organizers:
–  Weaving connections between community groups, city-wide organizations, social justice networks, and progressive movements
–  Sharing stories from our struggles
–  Finding common ground on issues, goals, values
–  Developing the groundwork for a solidarity strategy and creating the conditions for an active solidarity alliance

Sponsored by the Toronto Community Development Institute (TCDI)
For more information about the TCDI, visit: http://www.torontocdi.ca/

We invite you to join us or work with us on our projects. For more information about how you can be a part of TCDI, email: organizing.tcdi@gmail.com or call (416) 231-5499.

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TORONTO BOOK LAUNCH: TAX IS NOT A FOUR LETTER WORD

Tuesday, November 5, 2013
6:00pm to 8:00pm
Sears Atrium, George Vari Engineering Building
245 Church Street, 3rd Floor
Toronto, ON

Join the CCPA (Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) Ontario for a special book launch: Tax is Not a Four-Letter Word.

It’s time to start talking about the value of taxes in Canada. Join us for the launch of Canada’s newest book on the subject: Tax is Not a Four Letter Word.

Featuring the book’s co-editors:
– Alex Himelfarb, Glendon College Director and former Clerk of the Privy Council
– Jordan Himelfarb, Toronto Star Opinion Editor
and three of the book’s CCPA contributors:
– Jim Stanford, Ontario Advisory Board Chair
– Hugh Mackenzie, Research Associate
– Trish Hennessy, Ontario Director

We hope you can join us! Space is limited so sign up here: http://www.eventbrite.com/event/8368792283

– See more at: http://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/ontario/events/toronto-book-launch-tax-not-four-letter-word#sthash.HJZc3oSc.dpuf

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GETTING IN & STAYING IN: LABOUR MARKET CHALLENGES FACING YOUTH

Mon. Nov. 4
9:00am- 4:00pm
Toronto

Youth are experiencing unprecedented barriers to entering the workforce and are resorting to creative, and sometimes unpaid, outlets to gain meaningful experiences, network and secure stable employment.

Co-hosted by Social Planning Toronto (SPT), Toronto Workforce Innovation Group and McMaster University’s School of Labour Studies, this full day event will explore overall trends in youth unemployment in Canada and Ontario, including public policy options.

To register: Contact Mary Micallef, mmicallef@socialplanningtoronto.org, or 416-351-0095 ext. 251

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SEMINAR – COMMUNITY ORGANIZING

Saturday, November 23, 2013
1:00 PM to 4:00 PM
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education
252 Bloor Street West
Toronto, Ontario

Sponsored by Tools for Change

This workshop will outline the theory of community organizing and the steps and strategies involved in actively participating in an organization engaged in community organizing.

Exact campus room location given to registrants a week before the event.

Trainer: Effie Vlachoyannacos is the Managing Director of Public Interest, a social enterprise in Toronto working with communities to fuel social change and build the capacity of non-profit organizations and labour groups to do the same. With Public Interest, Effie has worked on diverse community engagement initiatives and campaigns across Toronto’s inner suburbs, with a particular focus on affordable and social housing advocacy.

For more info and to register: http://www.eventbrite.ca/org/1382386439?s=17819903

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NEWS & VIEWS

VIDEO – LET’S TALK ABOUT UNIONS: NORA LORETO’S BOOK LAUNCH AND Q&A

Nora Loreto has released a new book From Demonized to Organized: Building the New Union Movement with support from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives that serves as a call to incite union activists and supporter, debunk anti-union rhetoric and start the conversation around building a strong, community-focus union movement in Canada.

Watch the video: http://rabble.ca/rabbletv/program-guide/2013/10/best-net/lets-talk-about-unions-nora-loretos-book-launch-and-qa

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BRIARPATCH MAGAZINE – SNEAK PEEK AT OUR LABOUR ISSUE: THE POLITICS OF PRECARITY

In the last two decades precarious employment has doubled. The National Urban Worker Strategy, introduced on Monday in the House of Commons by MP Andrew Cash, “proposes a sweeping suite of overdue federal policies that respond to the plight of temps, freelancers, interns, part-timers and other flexworkers who flit from gig to gig, shift to shift, contract to contract, with no guarantee of income or future work, let alone access to benefits or pensions.” What promise does it hold for precarious workers? In this issue, award-winning writers Nicole Cohen and Grieg de Peuter take a critical look at the Urban Worker Strategy and the politics of precarity.

Read the full story here: http://bit.ly/1ae4EBI

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LET’S GET THIS CLASS WAR STARTED

By Chris Hedges, Common Dreams

“The rich are different from us,” F. Scott Fitzgerald is said to have remarked to Ernest Hemingway, to which Hemingway allegedly replied, “Yes, they have more money.”

The exchange, although it never actually took place, sums up a wisdom Fitzgerald had that eluded Hemingway. The rich are different. The cocoon of wealth and privilege permits the rich to turn those around them into compliant workers, hangers-on, servants, flatterers and sycophants.

Read more: http://www.commondreams.org/view/2013/10/21

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HOW DOMESTIC WORKERS WON THEIR RIGHTS: FIVE BIG LESSONS

By Amy Dean, Alternet

Domestic workers have had some breakthrough wins over the past two weeks. Up until then, these workers were excluded from protections such as a guaranteed minimum wage, paid breaks, and overtime pay. On September 17, the Obama administration  announced new rules extending the Fair Labor Standards Act to include the 800,000 to 2 million home health workers—who help seniors and others with self-care tasks like taking medications, bathing, and shopping—under the federal government’s wage and hour protections.

Read more: http://www.alternet.org/activism/how-domestic-workers-won-their-rights-five-big-lessons

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VIDEO – TRADE UNION AND ‘PROGRESSIVE’ STRATEGIES: THE RESPONSIBLE INVESTMENT, CAPITAL STEWARDSHIP, AND ‘PENSION FUND ACTIVISM’ MOVEMENTS

It is noteworthy that as finance has been on the ‘rise,’ some activists began to formalize anti-corporate and targeted activist campaign strategies through pension and personal investment funds. In Canada and the U.S., several faith organizations began to argue that anti-social corporate behaviour should be, in some sense, sanctioned by individual investors and ultimate owners, on the basis of social principle or humanitarian values.

These initiatives then crystallized and drew broader support with the rise of the sanctions and divestment movement directed against corporate and government support for apartheid South Africa in the 1980s.

Such initiatives have seen their labels evolving from “ethical investment,” to “socially responsible investment” (SRI), to the most recent simplified term of “responsible investment.” While many trade unions, NGOs, and activists have embraced these efforts, others have not, and a substantial differentiation on the political left has emerged. Most recently, Queen’s political economist Susanne Soederberg has produced a sharply critical analysis of these investor-activist efforts from a Marxist political economy framework. This critique follows previous analyses by CAW economists Sam Gindin and Jim Stanford, both of whom have raised serious questions about these strategies as projections of trade union or working class power. Other unions and labour organizations have embraced these strategies with enthusiasm, as is notable in the establishment of a “Committee on Workers Capital” at the international level.

Moderated by Greg Albo. Convenor: Kevin Skerrett. Presentations by:
– Susanne Soederberg (Queen’s University) – Corporate Power and Ownership in Contemporary Capitalism.
– Jim Stanford (UNIFOR) – Paper Boom.

Sponsors: Centre for Social Justice, Global Labour Research Centre (York University), Canada Research Chair in Political Economy (York University) and Socialist Project.

Watch the video: http://www.socialistproject.ca/leftstreamed/ls189.php

++++++++++
++++++++++

ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education. For more information about this project, visit http://www.apcol.ca

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Peter Hudis

Peter Hudis

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK: UPDATE 7th OCTOBER 2013

EVENTS

RYERSON SOCIAL JUSTICE WEEK (OCTOBER 7 – 11)
A week of events, speakers, exhibit and cultural events to transform Ryerson into a hub of social justice and solidarity.

Monday October 7th

Rally: Decent Work For All!
Time: 12:00pm – 1:30pm
Location: Gould Street & Victoria
-Drumming
-Student and Worker Speakers

Social Justice ‘Walking Tour’
Time: 2:00pm – 3:30pm
Location: Meet at Ryerson statue

Opening Lecture – Idle No More: Reframing the Nation To Nation Relationship
Time: 6:30pm – 8:30pm
Location: TRS1067 (TRSM Building – 55 Dundas St. West)

For more info on the week’s events: http://www.ryerson.ca/socialjustice/events/index.html

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REBELS WITH A CAUSE FILM FESTIVAL AT YORK UNIVERSITY

Tuesday, October 22- Friday, October 25, 2013
York University
4700 Keele St., Toronto

The Rebels with a Cause Film Festival is brought to the York U community by artists and activists who seek the delicate balance between both creative and political work. We believe that film should not pacify or be escapist, but politicize and give us the courage to transform ourselves and our communities. The films selected are artistic reflections on social justice issues and critical documentations of unsung community work. Located within a university context, Rebels engages in dialogue outside the classroom through conversations after screenings. We hope that the communal act of viewing and sharing our ideas about films will strengthen our community and empower our work on York campus and beyond.

For more info: http://rebelsfilmfest.wordpress.com/

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FROM INDUSTRIAL FOOD TO WORLD FOOD: A BOOK LAUNCH AND PANEL DISCUSSION ON WORLD FOOD DAY

Wednesday, Oct 16
6pm – 8pm
FoodShare Toronto
90 Croatia Street, Toronto

Contact: Robyn Shyllit – 416.363.6441 x282 – robyn@foodshare.net

The event is FREE and snacks will be provided. Books will be available for sale and signing. Wheelchair accessible.

Celebrate World Food Day on October 16, with a special book launch and panel discussion featuring author of The Industrial Diet Anthony Winson, No Nonsense Guide to World Food, Second Edition author Wayne Roberts, FoodShare Executive Director Debbie Field, and Executive Director of Marin Organic in California Jeffrey Westman.

Plus, meet the author’s of FoodShare’s first cookbook, Marion Kane and Adrienne De Francesco, and purchase your own signed copy of share: Delicious Dishes from FoodShare and Friends.

For more info: http://www.foodshare.net/events/from-industrial-food-to-world-food-a-book-launch-and-panel-discussion/

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GETTING IN & STAYING IN: LABOUR MARKET CHALLENGES FACING YOUTH

Monday, 4 November 2013
9:00 AM to 4:00 PM
Toronto Central YMCA Centre
20 Grosvenor Street, Toronto

Youth are experiencing unprecedented barriers to entering the workforce and are resorting to creative, and sometimes unpaid, outlets to gain meaningful experiences, network and secure stable employment. Join Social Planning Toronto, Toronto Workforce Innovation Group and McMaster University’s School of Labour Studies as we explore overall trends in youth unemployment in Canada and Ontario; the rise in unpaid internships; the debate around skills mismatch; youth & unions; youth in self-employment; and the public policy options and promising practices available to support youth in these difficult times.

For more info: http://bit.ly/17elObc

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WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH – OCTOBER 2013

In 1992, October was proclaimed Women’s History Month to acknowledge and celebrate the achievements of women throughout Canadian history. October was chosen to coincide with anniversary of the Persons Case, which on October 18, 1929 – through the courage and determination of the Famous Five, the five Canadian women who launched the case – established once and for all that women were “persons” when the Privy Council overturned a Supreme Court of Canada decision and ruled that women were indeed persons, and could become Senators. The ruling not only opened the political doors for Canadian women. It also clearly asserted that women’s equality rights in Canada were fundamental.

What the law allows is one thing, but what opportunity allows is another. For millions of Canadian women, their opportunity to fully use their talents and vision continues to be limited by access to affordable and accessible quality child care. In Canada, women’s share of unpaid work, including childcare, remains double to that of men; so the lack of quality, affordable child care falls particularly hard on women and their access to work outside the home.

Women’s History in Canada deserves to be celebrated and acknowledged. It is a time to look back, but also to commit to a future  where a lack of quality, affordable child care is a historical footnote  — and where no woman is limited by an uncaring government. Add your voice to make that future happen. UFCW Canada members, activist and allies are also encouraged to download and share a special poster to commemorate Women’s History Month.

Take action on child care: http://www.ufcw.ca/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=3664&Itemid=358&lang=en

Download the poster: http://www.ufcw.ca/templates/ufcwcanada/images/media/posters/Women-History-Month/2013/WoHistyMo_oct2013_EN_8x11_email.pdf

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FEAST FOR FAIRNESS

Join us at a Feast for Fairness at Toronto’s St. Lawrence Market!  Help us win a minimum wage increase for all workers!

Saturday October 12
10:30am to 12pm
St. Lawrence Market
Meet at the corner of Front St. E and Jarvis.
(1 block south of King St. E) Toronto

This Thanksgiving weekend, many low-wage workers are resorting to food banks in order to get by and restaurant workers continue to see their wages stagnate. Many migrant workers are excluded from minimum wage laws altogether.

Join the Campaign to Raise the Minimum Wage and Migrant Workers Alliance for Change as we demand an immediate increase to the minimum wage to $14 and ending minimum wage exemptions for all workers!

Under the banner of “Poverty Wages? NO THANKS!” this event will be just one of many province-wide actions taking place around the Thanksgiving weekend calling for a $14 minimum wage, and in alliance with the Raise the Rates Week of Action from Oct. 14-20.

Find out more here: http://raisetheminimumwage.ca/updates/look-whos-putting-food-on-your-table/

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NEWS & VIEWS

VIDEO – “MADE IN THE USA” DOCUMENTARY CRITIQUES HUDAK’S PLANS FOR A LOW-WAGE ONTARIO

In June 2012, Ontario PC leader Tim Hudak published a “white paper” outlining the changes his party would like to make to the province’s labour laws. Hudak and the Tories say employees in unionized workplaces should be allowed to receive the benefits of union representation without paying the dues that make those benefits possible. While this proposal would violate current Ontario law and an historic legal ruling by Supreme Court Justice Ivan Rand, such “free rider” laws are used to suppress union activity in 24 U.S. states, where they are commonly referred to as “right to work” laws.

In June 2013, veteran journalist Bill Gillespie climbed in a van with a camera crew and headed south to get the real story about “right to work.” His documentary film, Made in the USA: Tim Hudak’s plan to cut your wages, is the result.

“There is a lot of great research out there about the dangers of ‘right to work’ laws,” says Gillespie. “Our goal in making this film was to present that research in a way that was accessible to a wide audience. By presenting the facts through the stories of people who have personal experience with right-to-work laws, I think we’ve succeeded in doing that.”

Made in the USA was financed by the Ontario Public Service Employees Union.

Watch the video: http://www.madeinusamovie.ca/

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CALL FOR ABSTRACTS! GENDER, WORK AND ORGANIZATION

Gender, Work and Organization
8th Biennial International Interdisciplinary Conference
24th – 26th June, 2014, Keele University, UK

As a central theme in social science research in the field of work and organisation, the study of gender has achieved contemporary significance beyond the confines of early discussions of women at work. Launched in 1994, Gender, Work and Organization was the first journal to provide an arena dedicated to debate and analysis of gender relations, the organisation of gender and the gendering of organisations. The Gender, Work and Organization conference provides an international forum for debate and analysis of a variety of issues in relation to gender studies. The 2012 conference at Keele University attracted approximately 380 international scholars from over 30 nations. The Conference will be held at Keele University, Staffordshire, in Central England, the UK’s largest integrated campus
university.

For more info: http://labouringfutures.com/network/stream-for-gender-work-and-organization-2014/

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SOCIAL PLANNING TORONTO (SPT) DEPUTATION TO ONTARIO MINIMUM WAGE PANEL

On Sept. 6, 2013, Social Planning Toronto presented its deputation to the Ontario Minimum Wage Advisory Panel. Part of SPT’s mission is to be actively involved in highlighting the impact of poverty and income inequality on Toronto residents. With nearly half of Canadian workers living paycheque to paycheque, SPT strongly believes the Ontario government has a key role and responsibility to ensure that its labour force is not working for poverty level wages.

Read more: http://www.socialplanningtoronto.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/SPTDeputation.OntMinimumWagePanel.13.09.061.pdf

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PROSPECTS FOR A CONTINENTAL WORKERS’ MOVEMENT: A FRIENDLY DEBATE

From The Bullet

The two articles that follow are part of a debate on the prospects and problems of building international working-class solidarity and struggle. They focus on these issues for the case of North America, a continent bound together through NAFTA, continental economic integration, overlapping labour markets, and U.S.-Canadian unions. Dan La Botz’ article presents a very positive but critical commentary on Richard Roman and Edur Velasco Arregui’s book, Continental Crucible: Big Business, Workers, and Unions in the Transformation of North America. La Botz questions what he sees as an overly optimistic analysis of prospects for the working class movement in North America. The reply by Roman and Velasco Arregui argues for a cautious optimism, an optimism based both on characteristics of the present moment of globalized capitalism and the historical ties between the working classes of North America. This debate seeks to contribute to both the rebuilding of the Left and the building of a class-wide, continent-wide and eventually international, fight against capitalism, two tasks that are inseparably intertwined.

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/885.php

+++++

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS – MAYWORKS FESTIVAL 2014

The Mayworks Festival – Toronto is pleased to invite submissions for its 29th festival season. Applications are accepted from groups and individuals in a range of disciplines, including: visual art, music/ poetry, film, video, interdisciplinary, and theatre. We also welcome unions and art organizations to propose panel presentations, forums, and screenings, and to sponsor or co-sponsor events.

Mayworks Festival is a multi-disciplinary arts festival that celebrates cultural production working class culture. We seek to showcase high calibre art by artists at all stages in their careers that are politically and socially engaged with labour realities.  Mayworks Festival is especially committed to providing a platform to support the underrepresented labor of indigenous peoples, people with disabilities, migrants, women, queer-identified people, people of color, and youth.

Submissions will not be accepted after the deadline date: Nov. 1, 2013.
Proposals selected will be notified by email by December 2013. The festival dates (TBD) will be in early May 2014.

For more info: http://www.mayworks.ca

+++++

JOB POSTINGS

CO-ORDINATOR, CENTRE FOR RESEARCH ON LATIN AMERICA & THE CARIBBEAN (CERLAC), YORK UNIVERSITY

Please note: The Centre Coordinator is required to speak, read and write Spanish fluently.

The Centre Coordinator supports the Centre Director for the overall operation of Centre-related activities, including providing support to financial activities; program administration and secretarial support to the Centre Director and projects.

Education:
Completion of university degree in a related field such as Humanities, Development Studies and any related field in the Social or Environmental Sciences.

Experience:
2-3 years of related work experience in an academic or related research focused unit or NGO environment providing administrative support. Experience with, or demonstrable knowledge and awareness of, issues related to critical social science research, international development, and social justice and Latin American and Caribbean region and/or communities. Experience in Latin America and the Caribbean and/or with Latin American and Caribbean communities is an asset.

For more info: http://webapps.yorku.ca/nonacademicpostings/summary.jsp?postingnumber=8577

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HEAD OFFICE SECRETARY– BILINGUAL, CANADIAN LABOUR CONGRESS

The Canadian Labour Congress requires a bilingual Head Office Secretary. The primary role of the Head Office Secretary is to proofread and format French and English documents.

Duties:
– use word processing software to produce correspondence, memos, reports, briefs, bulletins, letters and documents;
– proofread and format existing documents including memos, reports, briefs and letters;
– use desktop publishing software to format and/or draft layout design for publications;
– enter information in databases;
– act as relief and assume responsibilities of other secretarial positions;
– ensure correct filing of electronic and physical documents;
– register participants for conferences;
– draft routine correspondence and reply to email enquiries;
– provide switchboard relief;
– post information on the intranet and CLC websites.

Qualifications:
– 2 years office experience performing similar tasks;
– oral and written fluency in English and French;
– excellent proofreading and formatting skills in French and English;
– ability to work as part of a team;
– completion of post-secondary office administration training is preferred.

For more info:
https://charityvillage.com/jobs/search-results/job-detail.aspx?id=281857&l=2

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PUBLIC SERVICE ALLIANCE CANADA: REGIONAL EDUCATION OFFICER (BILINGUAL) – ATLANTIC

Under the direction of the Regional Coordinator and as part of a regional team that includes other regional office staff, the Regional Council, the Regional Education Committee, and other regional union bodies such as the Alliance Facilitators’ Network, the Regional Education Officer builds the union and fosters membership solidarity by coordinating the development and delivery of a quality program of membership education and empowerment in the region. The Regional Education Officer closely collaborates with other Regional Education Officers and with the staff of the Education Section in
Ottawa to maintain a core Program of PSAC Membership Education that is relevant, comprehensive, innovative and dynamic.

For more info: https://charityvillage.com/jobs/search-results/job-detail.aspx?id=281800&l=2

++++++++++
++++++++++

ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education. For more information about this project, visit http://www.apcol.ca

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Educating from Marx

Educating from Marx

 

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK: UPDATE 26th AUGUST 2013

EVENTS

THINK BIG AND LET’S GET GOING: APPLYING THE SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH TO OUR DAILY WORK

26th Annual Health Promotion Ontario Conference

Thursday September 26, 2013
Oakham House, Ryerson University
63 Gould Street, Toronto

Speakers:
Keynote Address:  Dr Ryan Meili, MD – Upstream – Reviving Politics through a Focus on Health
Code Red Panel Discussion:
– Neil Johnston, Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, McMaster University
– Suzanne Brown, MSW, Manager of Neighbourhood Development Strategies, City of Hamilton
– Steve Buist, Investigations Editor, The Hamilton Spectator
– Tom Cooper, Director, Hamilton Roundtable for Poverty Reduction
Closing Keynote: Paul Berton, Editor-in-Chief, The Hamilton Spectator – The Role of Media in Addressing the SDOH

Register now:  http://www.hpontario.com

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FREE PUBLIC CONCERT TO CELEBRATE CANADA’S NEWEST UNION – UNIFOR

Sunday, September 1
6:30pm until 11:30pm
Nathan Phillips Square
100 Queen St. West, Toronto

This year, Labour Day marks the formation of a new union – Unifor – with the coming together of the Communications Energy and Paperworkers’ union and the Canadian Auto Workers.

To celebrate we are hosting a free public concert at Nathan Phillips Square with diverse acts from all across Canada. Come see some of Canada’s greatest bands: Stars, Blackie and the Rodeo Kings, Les Colocs, Sister Says

19+ drink tent with beer, wine and food available for purchase. All-age food vendors in square.

For more information on Unifor visit:  http://www.newunionconvention.ca

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WORLD FESTIVAL OF YOUTH & STUDENTS TORONTO INFO MEETING

Tuesday, August 27
6pm
OISE, 252 Bloor St. West, Room 8-170
St. George Subway station, Toronto

The WFYS is the largest gathering of progressive and anti-imperialist youth and students in the world, taking place this December in Quito, Ecuador. Over 15,000 young people will unite for a week-long experience of culture, music, conferences, workshops, discussions and other meetings about peace, environmentalism, anti-imperialism, and the struggle for social progress.

This year from December 7-13th, the youth festival will be held in Quito, Ecuador with the support of the PAIX alliance as well as student, environmental, indigenous and other leftist youth, under the banner of “Youth unite against imperialism, for a world of peace, solidarity and social transformation!

You can find out more at http://www.18wfys.tumblr.com

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WORKSHOP SERIES: PENSION FUNDS, UNIONS, AND WORKING CLASS STRATEGIES

September 27-December 13
3:30pm – 6:00pm
Centre for Social Innovation, ING Room, ground level
720 Bathurst Street (one block south of Bloor), Toronto

One of the key features of the continuing deep economic crisis facing Canadian workers is the attack on long established pension and retirement benefits, which are now dismissed as a costly frill that only benefits a shrinking minority of the workforce. The defence of these benefits by trade unions is becoming more difficult and divisive – it risks appearing self-serving in a context where the older notion that private, employer-based plans might serve as a positive step toward a universal system of full coverage for all workers is no longer credible.

Workshop Coordinators:
• Convenor: Kevin Skerrett (Canadian Union of Public Employees), kevin.skerrett@gmail.com
• Greg Albo (Centre for Social Justice), albo@yorku.ca

Each of the six workshops will be held on Friday afternoons from 3:30pm – 6:00pm, every other week. (We will skip November 8th, and use November 15th in its place)

*** We ask that those interested in attending please register and RSVP their interest to Kevin Skerrett, at kevin.skerrett@gmail.com ***

For more info: http://www.socialjustice.org/community/Pensions.pdf

This workshop is co-sponsored by the Centre for Social Justice, Global Labour Research Centre (York University), Canada Research Chair in Political Economy (York University) and Socialist Project

+++++

EXHIBITION – THE RIGHT TO LIVE IN PEACE: 40 YEAR COMMEMORATION OF CHILE’S LOST DEMOCRACY

Friday, Sep 6 to Wednesday, Sep 11
Closing reception: Wednesday, Sep 11 @ 7 pm
Beit Zatoun, 612 Markham St., Toronto
(Bloor & Bathurst)

A multimedia exhibition to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the CIA-sponsored military coup in Chile which deposed the democratic government of Salvador Allende.  The exhibition is an opportunity to reflect on this period in history which for many marked the beginning of the slide to neoliberal economy and politics and to hear voices calling for equity and justice.

Collective Alas rescues and salvages artifacts that at one point were designated subversive, and as a consequence dangerous to the military regime of Agusto Pinochet (1973-1990). Alas gathers magazines, film, newspaper articles, books, audio cassettes, vinyl, and posters that were destroyed by the military. During this period, people risked their lives to preserve these items. Poetry, music and articles were considered subversive because they denounced a dictatorial regime.  Alas’ mission is to reflect on our collective memory and work towards greater understanding, justice and human rights for all. The closing reception on September 11 will feature live musical performances.

To learn more: http://beitzatoun.org/event/exhibition-the-right-to-live-in-peace/

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NEWS & VIEWS

CANADIAN GOVERNMENT: HELP FREE TAREK AND JOHN

On Friday August 16th, Tarek Loubani, a Canadian emergency physician and John Greyson, a Canadian filmmaker and professor were arrested by Egyptian authorities. Tarek and John were on their way to Gaza — where Tarek was to work at Al Shifa Hospital, and John to explore the possibility of making a film about the work.

Days later, Tarek and John are still being held in Cairo’s Tora prison. Egyptian officials have given no clear reason for their arrest.  In fact, a recent press release by a Cairo district prosecution states that 9 foreigners, including John and Tarek, will be detained for 15 days, pending investigations.  Egypt is going through a turbulent time, and after hundreds were killed in violent clashes last week, foreigners, particularly journalists are being targeted. We need to get our friends out of there.

Family and friends are worried sick about their safety. Pressure from the Canadian government is our best hope. We must pressure our government to demand their freedom and pressure the Egyptian authorities to let them go. Thank you for your action on this urgent matter!

To find out how to help: http://www.change.org/en-CA/petitions/canadian-government-help-free-tarek-and-john

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ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY SUPPORT: ONLINE INFO

The Ottawa Network for Education (ONE) has created an excellent online resource relating to assistive technology support to enhance academic access. The website includes a number of captioned videos which are excellent. The English and French ONE Assistive Technology Support websites are highlighted below:
http://www.onfe-rope.ca/programs/assistive-technology-support
http://www.onfe-rope.ca/fr/programs/l%E2%80%99initiative-d%E2%80%99appui-aux-technologies-d%E2%80%99aide

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RANK AND FILE PODCAST WITH KYLE BUOTT

Dave Bush speaks with Kyle Buott, President of the Halifax-Dartmouth & District Labour Council, about trade unionism and worker activism. Kyle addresses the political importance of local labour councils in regional labour movement struggles and building solidarity between workplace issues and social movements.
http://rankandfile.ca/2013/08/21/rank-and-file-podcast-with-kyle-buott/

+++++

DECENT JOBS, HOUSING, AND EDUCATION: MLK’S STILL ELUSIVE DREAM

By Michael K. Honey, History News Network

A quarter of a million people rallied “For Jobs and Freedom” at the Lincoln Monument in Washington, D.C., on August 28, 1963, and tens if not hundreds of thousands will do so again at this year’s fifty-year commemorations of the event.

See: http://hnn.us/articles/decent-jobs-housing-and-education-mlks-still-elusive-dream

+++++

CLC ENDORSES CONSUMER BOYCOTT OF LABATT IMPORTS: ST. JOHN’S BREWERY WORKERS ON STRIKE SINCE APRIL

OTTAWA ― The Canadian Labour Congress has endorsed a national consumer boycott against a number of imported brands of Labatt beer and is calling on the company to return to the bargaining table.

“This is a David and Goliath struggle between about 50 local workers and the world’s largest multi-national brewing corporation trying to force its employees into a race to the bottom,” says CLC President Ken Georgetti. “Canadian workers and their unions are not going to stand idly by and allow
this to happen.”

The workers in St. John’s have been on strike since April 10. They are members of the Newfoundland and Labrador Association of Public Employees (NAPE/NUPGE). Their employer is the Canadian division of the Anheuser-Busch InBev brewing corporation, which has after-tax profits of more than $9 billion.

The Labatt imports being targeted for boycott include Stella Artois, Becks, and Lowenbrau. The focus is on imported products in order to prevent other unionized Labatt employees in Canada from experiencing a loss of work.

In Newfoundland and Labrador people are also being urged to boycott a number of other Labatt beers, including Budweiser, Labatt Blue, Alexander Keith’s and Kokanee.

For more info: http://www.canadianlabour.ca/national/news/clc-endorses-consumer-boycott-labatt-imports-st-john-s-brewery-workers-strike-april

For a list of union-made beers: http://www.alternet.org/labor/union-beer-you-are-drinking?page=0%2C0

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TORONTO PLAZA HOTEL WORKERS’ STRIKE INTO ITS 14TH WEEK

On strike for 14 long weeks, the USW members at the Toronto Plaza Hotel know exactly what their employer thinks of them.  They know because he tells the world he thinks they are “animals”.  And apparently “animals” shouldn’t receive any benefits and aren’t entitled to union representation in the workplace.  Tell him and his financial backers he’s wrong and tell the workers you’re standing with them HERE: http://www.labourstartcampaigns.net/show_campaign.cgi?c=1938&src=canadamail

++++++++++
++++++++++

ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education. For more information about this project, visit http://www.apcol.ca

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

EDUCATION FOR ACTION

Inspired by the debates in the ‘uncut’ and ‘occupy’ movements around the globe, a group of us have been meeting in Leeds to talk about what’s been happening to adult and workers’ education. We’d like to ask you to join in our discussions so we can generate ideas and action that work in communities and trade unions and inspire new ideas about the content and delivery of an education that we own ourselves.

This group has started to evolve. We are a loose collective that is committed to empowerment through education for a social purpose. Education is being turned into an economic commodity and is being slowly privatised in the interests of the rich and powerful. We want to join forces with others who oppose those that want to reduce the experience of living (for the 99%) to providing consumer demand for stuff!

See: http://education4action.wordpress.com/

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Henry Giroux

Henry Giroux

HENRY GIROUX ON YOUTH CULTURAL STUDIES & CRITICAL PEDAGOGY – POLICY FUTURES IN EDUCATION: VOLUME 10 ISSUE 6 (2012)

Now available at: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pfie/content/pdfs/10/issue10_6.asp

POLICY FUTURES IN EDUCATION
Volume 10 Number 6 2012  ISSN 1478-2103

 

SYMPOSIUM FESTSCHRIFT
Henry Giroux on Youth Cultural Studies and Critical Pedagogy
Guest Editor: TINA (A.C.) BESLEY

Tina (A.C.) Besley. Introduction. Why Read Giroux? OPEN ACCESS

Peter Mayo. Recuperating Democratic Spaces in an Age of Militarisation and a ‘New Fascism’

David Trend. Henry Giroux and the Arts

Tony Kashani. The Transformative Intellectual: an examination of Henry Giroux’s ethics

Christopher G. Robbins. Disposable Youth/Damaged Democracy: youth, neoliberalism, and the promise of pedagogy in the work of Henry Giroux

Sophia A. McClennen. ‘Young People are No Longer at Risk: they are the risk’. Henry Giroux’s Youth in a Suspect Society

Doug Morris. Pedagogy in Catastrophic Times: Giroux and the tasks of critical public intellectuals

Robin Truth Goodman. The New Taylorism: hacking at the philosophy of the university’s end

Kenneth J. Saltman. Why Henry Giroux’s Democratic Pedagogy is Crucial for Confronting Failed Corporate School Reform and How Liberals Like Ravitch and Darling-Hammond Are Making Things Worse

Michael A. Peters. Henry Giroux on Democracy Unsettled: from critical pedagogy to the war on youth – an interview

REVIEW ESSAY

Joao M. Paraskeva. Challenging the Neoliberal Global Minotaur (Henry A. Giroux: Education and the Crisis of Public Values: challenging the assault on teachers, students and public education)

OCCASIONAL THOUGHTS

Henry A. Giroux. Santorum and God’s Will: the religionization of politics and the tyranny of totalitarianism
Henry A. Giroux. The Scorched Earth Politics of America’s Fundamentalisms
Henry Giroux. Gated Intellectuals and Fortress America: towards a borderless pedagogy in the Occupy Movement

SCIENCE IN SOCIETY IN BRIEF

Alan Cottey. Limits to Stability

 

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PERSONAL SUBSCRIPTION (single user access) Subscription to the January-December 2013 issues (including full access to ALL back numbers, including those of 2012), is available to individuals at a cost of US$54.00. If you wish to subscribe you may do so immediately at www.wwwords.co.uk/subscribePFIE.asp

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For all editorial matters, including articles offered for publication, please contact the Editor, Professor Michael A. Peters: mpeters@waikato.ac.nz

In the event of problems concerning a subscription, or difficulty in gaining access to the articles, please contact the publishers: support@symposium-journals.co.uk

 

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Glenn Rikowski and Ruth Rikowski have a number of articles in Policy Futures in Education. These include:

Rikowski, Ruth (2003) Value – the Life Blood of Capitalism: knowledge is the current key, Policy Futures in Education, Vol.1 No.1, pp.160-178:http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pdf/viewpdf.asp?j=pfie&vol=1&issue=1&year=2003&article=9_Rikowski_PFIE_1_1&id=195.93.21.68

Rikowski, Glenn (2004) Marx and the Education of the Future, Policy Futures in Education, Vol.2 Nos. 3 & 4, pp.565-577, online at:http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pdf/viewpdf.asp?j=pfie&vol=2&issue=3&year=2004&article=10_Rikowski_PFEO_2_3-4_web&id=195.93.21.71

Rikowski, Ruth (2006) A Marxist Analysis of the World Trade Organisation’s Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights, Policy Futures in Education, Vol.4 No.4: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pdf/viewpdf.asp?j=pfie&vol=4&issue=4&year=2006&article=7_Rikowski_PFIE_4_4_web&id=205.188.117.66

Rikowski, Ruth (2008) Review Essay: ‘On Marx: An introduction to the revolutionary intellect of Karl Marx’, by Paula Allman, Policy Futures in Education,Vol.6 No.5, pp.653-661: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pdf/validate.asp?j=pfie&vol=6&issue=5&year=2008&article=11_Rikowski_PFIE_6_5_web

Note: These articles can be accessed without subscription, as they were published more than 3 years ago.

 

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‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

 

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com 

 

The Individuality Pr♥test: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/transcontinental/the-individuality-prtest

Kenneth Saltman 

Teaching Marx

TEACHING MARX: THE SOCIALIST CHALLENGE

Announcing a forthcoming book: Teaching Marx: The Socialist Challenge

Edited by Curry Stephenson Malott, Mike Cole and John Elmore

To be published by Information Age Publishing

Critical Construction: Studies in Education and Society, see: http://www.infoagepub.com/series/critical-constructions

Series Editor: Curry Stephenson Malott, West Chester University

“There is growing disillusionment with a social system where increasing productivity leads only to increased gaps between rich and poor, where reductions in social programs (retirement, health care, education) are the chief response an uninspired political sector can muster, and where non-sustainable exploitation of the Earth continues undiminished — in short, as the looming, world-wide economic crisis draws nearer, the essays in Teaching Marx: The Socialist Challengeare critical reading. It is time for our teachers to prepare students not to take their place in an increasingly corrupt economy, but to bring about the fundamental changes we need to build an equitable, prosperous, sustainable future” — Dr. Dennis Vickers, Humanities Department, College of Menominee Nation, Keshena, Wisconsin.

Curry Malott

Teaching Marx: The Socialist Challenge is an extraordinarily important text at this juncture of world history. Functioning as more than just another pedagogical weapon to be used against the ideological structures of death and social hallucinogenics manufactured by the transnational capitalist class, it is a book that can provide fecund opportunities for teachers to re-learn how to put social and economic justice front and center in the agenda for educational reform by putting Marx front and center, where he belongs” — Peter McLaren, Professor, UCLA and author of Che Guevara, Paulo Freire and the Pedagogy of Revolution

Teaching Marx: The Socialist Challenge provides a useful starting point for understanding the origins of today’s global crisis of capitalism. Our work in public schools to encourage respectful dialogues between Indian and non-Indian students about local conflicts over land ownership, through the TERRA Institute, should encourage cooperative action to find common interests. This book reminds us to move those specific discussions to explorations of the causes of conflicts over land, including the imperatives of global capitalism” — David Stanfield, TERRA Institute, www.terrainstitute.org

“As this book so clearly and illustratively points out, the work of Marx has always served as a critical tool for identifying and scraping away the residue of commodity relations as a means to an end of revolutionary purpose, and teaching Marx is therefore keynote to education becoming able to serve as a tool of liberation and revolution. The reasons for why this is so are very clear in the book. As its authors successively and in detail clearly point out, we are ‘educated’ to believe that we live in a meritocracy where god-given abilities and hard work afford position and reward, and the work of social institutions like the school play a key part in this. These institutions, as ideological apparatuses of the State, barrage us with propaganda and bombard us with ideas inside practices that are designed to convince us all that at the head of the equation of the constitution of the social and economic order is the work, skills, ideas, knowledge and commitment of individual people themselves and that the effort and competences of these individuals determine social position and the possibilities for economic reward and even social justice for all.

Mike Cole

Put directly and simply, the book shows us how the public has been hoodwinked by the school and other social institutions to believe in the ethics of capitalism and its central ideological tenet that the present social order is natural and in the end inevitable and beneficial for us all. However, as well as critiquing the work of the school as an instrument of reproduction, the book also shows how and why the education system could and should challenge the anti-democratic perspectives that disguise and defend the current social relations of production and the ideological and material needs of the capitalist class. It offers that is an educational challenge to the inevitability and “correctness” of capitalism by showing how its laws can be made visible to ordinary people so the oppressive power of the capitalist class can be more correctly identified, challenged and defeated.  In this way the book both poses the question and provides answers concerning what role education can play in a possible future revolutionary moment: both as a “true” education as an act of liberation and as a dialectic lens for critiquing the world in which we live. Used appropriately the book can become a clear and fundamental ingredient for helping to create the possibilities for a more egalitarian and socially just world” — Dennis Beach, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

“This collection by Malott, Cole and Elmore’s is a very timely contribution to the current revival of Marxism in education. The authors engage seriously with the ideas of Marx – from his theory of capitalist crises to the increasing impoverishment of the working class – and debunk many of the commonly held myths about Marxism. The compilation of writings provide a devastating rejoinder to those who believe that we can only make changes within the present system and show how this crisis has made discussion of socialist alternatives, in education and society, an urgent necessity. They argue that, in Marx’s words, the educators need to get educated and find ways – through their students, through what they teach, and through their political activism – to feed into wider movements of social change” — Marnie Holborow, author on Marxism and Language, Dublin City University, Ireland.

John Elmore

 

UPDATE 2nd MARCH 2013

Teaching Marx: The Socialist Challenge – is now out!

At Amazon.com: http://www.amazon.com/Teaching-Marx-Curry-Stephenson-Malott/dp/1623961203/ref=sr_1_1_title_0_main?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1362256280&sr=1-1

At Amazon.co.uk: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Teaching-Marx-Curry-Stephenson-Malott/dp/1623961203/ref=sr_1_7?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1362256511&sr=1-7

At the Publishers (Information Age Publishing): http://www.infoagepub.com/products/Teaching-Marx

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski