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CRISIS, SOCIAL MOVEMENTS AND REVOLUTIONARY TRANSFORMATIONS
Interface: a journal for and about social movements

Volume two, issue one:

Crises, social movements and revolutionary transformations. The third issue of Interface, a peer-reviewed e-journal produced and refereed by social movement practitioners and engaged movement researchers, is now available at http://www.interfacejournal.net on the special theme of ‘Crisis, Social Movements and Revolutionary Transformations’.

Interface is open-access, global and programmatically multilingual. Our overall aim is to “learn from each other’s struggles”: to develop a dialogue between researchers and practitioners, but also between different social movements, intellectual traditions and national contexts.

This issue of Interface includes 28 pieces. There are a number of writings on the theme and other peer-reviewed articles:

* John Charlton, “Another world was possible”? Anti-capitalism in the year 2000

* Colin Barker, Crises and turning points in revolutionary development: emotion, organization and strategy in Solidarnosc, 1980

* Kirk Helliker, The state of emancipation: with, within, without?

* Samuel R Friedman, Sociopolitical and philosophical questions of organization in making a human society

* Jean Bridgeman, A matter of trust: the politics of working-class self-education

* Alfredo Duarte Corte, Pensar las luchas autónomas como potencia, pensar la autonomía como categoria abierta (Autonomous struggles as power; autonomy as an open category)

* Peter Waterman, Labour at the 2009 Belém World Social Forum: between an ambiguous past and an uncertain future

A special section dialogue is devoted to David Harvey’s essay Organizing for the anti-capitalist transition, with responses from six writers: Willie Baptist, AK Thompson, Benjamin Shepard, Laurence Cox, Anna Selmeczi, Marcelo Lopez de Souza

Action notes and event analysis from:

* Anne Elizabeth Moore on The outdoor games of the 2009 Winter Olympiad at Washington Park

* Maria Kyriakidou on “Another world is possible as long as it is feminist too”: dissenting acts and discourses by Greek leftist feminists

* Beth Gonzalez and Walda Katz-Fishman on New openings for movement and consciousness in the US

Key documents: Producción colectiva, En boca de todos: apuntes para divulgar historia (Everyone’s talking about it: notes on disseminating history)

This issue’s reviews includes the following titles:

* The will of the many: how the alterglobalisation movement is changing the face of democracy

* Chains of Babylon: the rise of Asian America

* Rise of the Ku Klux Klan: right-wing movements and national politics

* Zones of proletarian development

* Black flame: the revolutionary class politics of anarchism and syndicalism

* Contesting patriotism: culture, power and strategy in the peace movement

* Networking futures: the movements against corporate globalization

A call for papers for issue five (Vol 3/Issue 1) of Interface is now open, on the theme of ‘Repression and Social Movements’ (deadline November 1 2010). We can review and publish articles in Afrikaans, Catalan, Croatian, Danish, Dutch, English, French, German, Hungarian, Italian, Maltese, Norwegian, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish and Zulu. Full details at: http://interface-articles.googlegroups.com/web/3%20-%20CFP%205.pdf  

Issue 4 on ‘Voices of dissent: activists’ engagements in the creation of alternative, autonomous, radical and independent media is due to be released in November 2010.

Interface is keen to find IT collaborators who can help us make our site more useful and accessible to movement activists, and translators to support our multilingual project; for more details see: http://www.interfacejournal.net/2009/01/looking-for-it-activist-allies.html  

We are also looking for activists or academics interested in helping out, particularly with our African, Arab world, South Asian, Spanish-speaking Latin American, East and Central European, and Oceania / SE Asian groups. For details please see: http://www.interfacejournal.net/2008/03/editorial-contacts.html  

Please forward this to anyone you think may be interested.

Interface: ISSN 2009 – 2431

Department of Sociology
National University of Ireland, Maynooth
Co. Kildare
Republic of Ireland
Tel. (+353-1) 708 3985
email: laurence.cox@nuim.ie

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Crisis Theory

World Social Forum

CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL MOVEMENTS AND THE SOCIAL FORUM PROCESS: FROM THE GLOBAL TO THE LOCAL

June 21, 2010

General Lectures 100 and Mangoongian 150 and 151
Wayne State University
Detroit, MI

http://irows.ucr.edu/conferences/ussf10conf/ussf10conf.htm

Program Schedule

9-10:30: Session 1: The Significance of the World Social Forum Process

Moderator: Jackie Smith, University of Notre Dame

David Fasenfest (Sociology, Wayne State University and editor, Critical Sociology), Opening Remarks

Christopher Chase-Dunn (Sociology & Institute of Research on World Systems, UC-Riverside), “The New Global Left and the World Revolution of 20xx”

Lauren Langman (Sociology, Loyola University at Chicago), “Globalization from Below”

Francis Shor (History, Wayne State University), “The World Social Forum as Utopian Alternative”

10:40-12pm: Session 2 (concurrent): Organizing and Decision-making within the Social Forum Process

Moderator: Juliann Allison (Political Science, UC-Riverside)

Peter J. Smith (Athabasca University) and Elizabeth Smythe, Concordia University, College of Alberta), “Academic Disconnections? Social Scientists, Faith Groups and Transnational Activism: The Case of the World Social Forum”

Nicole Doerr (Sociology, Free University, Berlin), “Decision-making in multilingual groups? Comparative impressions from the European Social Forum”

Scott Byrd (Sociology, UC-Irvine, Nicolas Haeringer, http://www.mouvements.info, http://www.m-e-dium.net, Mallory Knobel, May First / People Link, National Technology Coordinator, USSF), “Technological Resources and Social Forum Organizing”

Jeffrey S. Juris, Erica Bushell, Meghan Doran, Mathew T. Judge, Amy Lubitow, Lauren Nicoll, and Chris Prenner (Anthropology & Sociology, Northeastern University), “From Boston to Detroit: Tracing Grassroots Mobilization to the 2010 United States Social Forum (USSF)”

10:40-12pm: Session 3 (concurrent): Do Social Forums Challenge or Reproduce Social Inequalities by Race, Nativity, and Nation?

Moderator: Ellen Reese (Sociology, UC-Riverside)

James Love (Sociology, UC-Riverside) “Global Racism: Connecting The Local to The Global in USSF and WSF Meetings”

Rose Brewer (African-American and African Studies, University of Minnesota and founding member of AfroEco), “Resisting Racism and the USSF: Possible or Not?”

Janet Conway (Sociology, Brock University), “Is the Global Justice Movement Colonial? A Study of Indigenous Positionality at the World Social Forum”

David W. Everson (Political Science, UC-Riverside), “An Indigenous Voice? The Indigenous Movement, Representation, and the Social Forum Process”

12-1:10pm: Lunch break (sponsored by Critical Sociology)

1:10-2:30pm: Session 4 (concurrent): Who Participates and for What?

Moderator: Juliann Allison (Political Science, UC-Riverside)

Mark Herkenrath (University of Zurich), Wolfgang Stuppert (Social Science Research Center Berlin), Dieter Rucht (Social Science Research Center Berlin), “Who participates? Socio-demographic and Political Characteristics of European Social Forum Participants”

Gary Coyne, Jesse Fletcher and Preeta Saxena (Sociology, UC-Riverside), “From Recruitment to Participation: Bridging the Gap between Differential Recruitment and Collective Action”

Anthony Roberts (Sociology, UC-Riverside), “The U.S. Social Forum and the U.S. Class System: Local-Global Orientation of Participants and Social Movements”

1:10-2:30pm: Session 5 (concurrent): Social Movements and the Social Forum Process

Moderator: Christopher Chase-Dunn (Sociology, UC-Riverside)

Elizabeth Schwarz and James Love (Sociology, UC-Riverside), “The Internet and the US Social Forum: Tracing Connections and Demographics of the Environmental Movement”

Elena Shih (Sociology, UC-Los Angeles), “Globalizing Morality: The Transnational Moral Economy of Women’s Work in the Anti-Trafficking Movement”

Edwin Elias (Sociology, UC-Riverside), “Immigrant Rights in the U.S. Social Forum: Role and Impact.”

2:40-4:20pm: Workshop Training #1: “Doing Collective Ethnography at the 2010 U.S. Social Forum,” Jackie Smith (Sociology, University of Notre Dame) and Jeffrey S. Juris (Anthropology & Sociology, Northeastern University)

4:30-5:30pm: Workshop Training #2: “Doing Survey Research at the 2010 U.S. Social Forum,” Juliann Allison (Political Science, UC-Riverside), Christopher Chase-Dunn (Sociology, UC-Riverside), Ellen Reese (Sociology, UC-Riverside)

This conference is co-sponsored by the Center for Peace and Conflict at Wayne State University, the Political Economy of World-Systems section of the American Sociological Association, the journal Critical Sociology, the Program on Global Studies at the University of California-Riverside,  the Institute for Research on World-Systems at the University of California-Riverside, the Global Studies Association, the World Society Foundation and Sociologists Without Borders.

Professor David Fasenfest, Department of Sociology, Wayne State University
Editor, Critical Sociology http://crs.sagepub.com
Series Editor, Studies in Critical Social Science, http://www.brill.nl/scss

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

2009102016401brazilmid2[1]POLITICS, POETICS AND POPULAR EDUCATION IN BRAZILIAN CINEMA, 1962-1979

‘Stronger are the powers of the people’: politics, poetics and popular education in Brazilian cinema, 1962-1979

December 4 (6.30pm – 10pm) 
December 5th and 6th (2pm to 10pm)

At No-w-here, First Floor, 316-318 Bethnal Green Road, London, E2 OAG

Full programme and further information: http://www.no-w-here.org.uk/index.php?cat=1&subCat=docdetail&&id=212

The late 1950s and early 1960s were a period of intense social and economic transformation in Brazil. It was also a period of political upheaval, curbed by the 1964 military coup, and one in which the relations between politics, poetics and popular education, the role of the cultural producer, the vanguard-popular-mass culture nexus, were absolutely central to the cultural and political debate.

‘Stronger are the powers of the people’, a programme of films and debates curated and presented by Brazilian philosopher, artist and political activist Rodrigo Nunes, uses Brazilian films from 1962 to 1979 as ‘monuments’ whose animating forces can be put again into play to understand how the problems posed by the period are expressed in the aesthetic and political choices of filmmakers.

In particular, it examines one of the most neglected experiences of that time – the Popular Culture Centres (CPCs) – as a central node of the practical and theoretical articulation of those debates. With this, the programme addresses them not only in their historical situatedness, but above all in relation to those problems that animate artistic and political practice in the present, when so much is made of the intersections between politics, art, and pedagogy, and there is a growing interest in recovering past experiences of this convergence – above all, from the 1960s, and increasingly, from peripheral countries such as Brazil. What can the problems of those years teach us regarding what we are or would like to be doing today? How can the proposals emerging in this field then – Paulo Freire’s pedagogy, Liberation Theology, Augusto Boal’s Theatre of the Oppressed,tropicalismo, Helio Oiticica’s, Lygia Clark’s and Lygia Pape’s researches, cinema novo – resonate with us today?

The programme includes the rare collective work Five Times Favela, the only CPC-produced film, and the first film for many of that generation’s directors; Glauber Rocha’s internationally acclaimed Land in Anguish and Antonio das Mortes; Ruy Guerra’s The Guns and its sequel, The Fall; and Leon Hirszman’s ABC of the Strike.

Rodrigo Nunes has a PhD in philosophy from Goldsmiths College, University of London, where he prepared a thesis on immanence and philosophy in Foucault and Deleuze with a grant from CAPES – Brazilian government. As an organiser, popular educator and artist, he has been involved in many political initiatives in Latin America and Europe, including the organisation of the first three editions of the World Social Forum. He is a member of the editorial collective of Turbulence (http://www.turbulence.org.uk). His work, as writer and translator, has appeared in such publications as ephemera, Mute, Transform, and he has forthcoming papers in Radical Philosophy and Third Text.

This project is supported by Raven Row, the Brazilian embassy in London, and No.w.here.

Films

Cinco vezes favela (Five times favela), various authors, 1962: The only film the Popular Culture Centre (CPC) brought to completion, it comprises five episodes directed by Miguel Borges, Joaquim Pedro de Andrade, Caca Diegues, Marcos Farias and Leon Hirszman, and was responsible for a split between the CPC and the cinema novo group. Some of the key figures in the CPC reportedly considered the film both a commercial and a political flop, and filmmakers such as Diegues and Arnaldo Jabor (though not Hirszman) left after decrying a narrow, instrumental conception of the relation between aesthetics and politics. With a cast including many of Augusto Boal’s colleagues from Teatro de Arena (and, most notably, CPC founder Oduvaldo Viana Filho), it captures a group of young filmmakers grappling with the same problems – how to create a form adequate to the specificity of Brazilian content? How to do so in a way that reaches beyond a middle-class audience, and plays a role in the transformation of Brazilian society from below? What is popular culture, and how must the artist deal with it? – while working through a host of influences, from Russian revolutionary cinema to neo-realism. Joaquim Pedro de Andrade’s Couro de gato (Catgut) was included in a list of the 100 best shorts of all times selected by the Clermont-Ferrand Festival.

Os Fuzis (The guns), Ruy Guerra, 1964: One of the greatest achievements of the first crop of cinema novo – alongside Nelson Pereira dos Santos’ Vidas secas (Barren lives) and Glauber Rocha’s Deus e o Diabo na Terra do Sol (Black God White Devil) (1964) –, it showcases many of the period’s defining traits: the rural Northeastern setting, the use of location, natural light and non-professional actors. At the same time, in its plot about the existential and moral crises undergone by a group of soldiers sent to a small town to stop the starving victims of the draught from attacking a food warehouse, it provides in arguably the clearest way the keys to reading some of the political limitations of cinema novo at this stage. It won the Silver Bear at the Berlin Festival.

Terra em transe (Land in anguish), Glauber Rocha, 1967: Part roman à clef about the Joao Goulart government and the 1964 military coup, part schematic description of the dynamics of the post-colonial world, part baroque allegory about the destiny of Latin America, part gauntlet thrown at the right and left of post- coup Brazil: one of Rocha’s most celebrated films, it finds the effects of his ‘epic-didactic’ cinema all the more effective because its target is much clearer. A whole generation at a crossroads appears in the vacillations of the main character, his multiple allegiances to social transformation and to his own class, to aesthetics and to politics, to utopia, the heat of the struggle, and his professional situation as a hired pen; the choice for armed struggle, which the film suggests in ambiguous fashion, was already brewing as it was produced. Nominated to the Palme d’Or at Cannes, best film at the Havana Film Festival.

O Dragão da Maldade contra o Santo Guerreiro (Antônio das Mortes), Glauber Rocha, 1969: Rocha’s first international co-production, first film in colour, and first using direct sound. He would often refer to it as ‘my western’, but, despite some nods at John Ford and Howard Hawks, it is clear that the oeuvre in question here is above all his own. Like a revision of his two earlier films that relaunches its questions, but also seems to run out of answers, it already points towards some of the procedures (such as the long, semi-improvised takes) that would characterise his work in the exile that immediately follows it. The plot finds Antônio das Mortes, the gunman hired by landowners to kill cangaceiros (highwaymen), brought out of retirement for one last job which, once executed, causes him to question the side on which he has fought over the years. Won best director and a nomination to the Palme d’Or at Cannes.

A Queda (The Fall), Ruy Guerra, 1976: An accident at a construction site, resulting in one death, sets one worker off on a struggle for justice that exposes the mechanisms of exploitation and the class relations of a country that had undergone one decade of fast-paced ‘conservative modernisation’ at the hands of the military. As a sort of sequel to the classic The Guns (1964), following the fate of those characters as they move from enforcers of exploitation to exploited, it offers more than a snapshot of the period: the correspondent time lapses in fiction and reality capture the passage of a chunk of Brazilian history between the two films, and, therefore, also the transformations in cinematographic approaches to the social and political between the two moments. Equally daring in content and form, and in the originality of the adequacy of one to the other, it won the Silver Bear at Berlin.

ABC da greve (ABC of the strike), Leon Hirszman, 1979-91: While preparing the cinema version of groundbreaking 1957 Teatro de Arena play Eles não usam black tie on location in the ABC (the auto industry belt around São Paulo), Hirszman has the opportunity to document the most powerful strikes in over a decade of Brazilian history. The latter would become a catalyst and a convergence point for the opposition to the military regime, intellectuals, artists, returning exiles, eventually leading to the creation of the Worker’s Party – whose biggest leader, Lula, was the president of the metalworkers union who led the strikes. Running into problems with the regime’s censorship because of the material, Hirszman dies in 1987 leaving the film unfinished until 1991, when his two daughters and son eventually release a final cut. The narration and text are provided by Ferreira Gullar, poet, who was president of the CPC at the time of the military coup.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com