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CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK: UPDATE 18th JANUARY 2012

EVENTS

VIDEO & DISCUSSION – THE WAY FORWARD: RETHINKING THE PROBLEM OF WORKPLACE SEXUAL HARASSMENT

Wednesday, February 1, 2012
6:30 – 8:30 p.m.
OISE, Room 5–170
252 Bloor St. West, Toronto

Video followed by a dynamic panel discussion.

Sponsored by the Workplace Learning and Social Change Collaborative Program, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), University of Toronto.

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LEFT BEHIND – CBC DOCUMENTARY ON INEQUALITY

Monday, January 16, 23, 30
on Ideas at 9:04 pm, CBC Radio One

Over the past 30 years, the benefits of economic growth in Canada, the US and much of the rest of the world, have gone increasingly to the top one percent of the population. For the majority of families, however, incomes have stagnated. This rise in inequality coincided with a sea change in government policy. Beginning in the 1980s, governments in much of the English-speaking world embarked on what has been called the neoliberal revolution – deregulation, privatization and tax cuts, aimed at liberating markets and stimulating the economy. The rising tide was supposed to lift all boats, but it didn’t. Jill Eisen explores what happened.

Part 2 airs on Monday, January 23, and part 3 on Jan 30.

To listen to a podcast of Part 1, click here: http://www.cbc.ca/ideas/episodes/2012/01/16/left-behind/

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INTERCHANGE: EVERYONE CAN BE A PEACEBUILDER WORKSHOP

Wednesday January 25, 2012
6:00pm – 8:30pm
Ellington’s Cafe, 805 St.Clair Avenue West (http://ellingtonsmusicandcafe.com)
Suggested Fee: $30 general, $20 InterChange members, $20 students/unwaged

Everyone can be a Peacebuilder!

Please join us for a creative and participatory ‘Peace Ambassadors’ Workshop in which you will:

­- learn core peace concepts and models
­- explore the idea of “peace literacy” and how it can be promoted
­- discover your unique peacebuilding role
­- find out more about the InterChange workshops and facilitators and how these can be brought to your community
­- share your values and ideas with like-minded people
­- use the metaphor of a picnic to help spread the Culture of Peace

Food and refreshments will be provided!

Registration is limited so please e-mail in advance to reserve your spot!

To RSVP and for more information, contact community@interchange4peace.org or
http://www.interchange4peace.org

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LUNCHBOX SPEAKERS’ SERIES – A GOOD FOOD SOCIAL ENTERPRISE: LEARNINGS FROM FOODSHARE

Wednesday, Jan 25, 2012
Noon – 1:30 pm
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto, 252 Bloor St. West, (St. George Subway Station) Room 3-104

Zahra Parvinian, Director of Social Enterprise Programs, Alvin Rebick, Senior Manager of Kitchen and Focus on Food, and Meredith Hayes, Senior Manager of School Programs will introduce FoodShare Toronto’s social enterprise programs and discuss:  the organization’s different enterprise program models, as well as the challenges, sustainability issues, and other aspects related to running a food social enterprise.
   
*No registration required. Bring your lunch and a mug. Water, coffee, tea, and fresh-baked snacks from Lemon & Allspice will be provided.

For more information, please contact Andrea at secspeakerseries@gmail.com

Presented by the Social Economy Centre (OISE/UT) & Toronto Enterprise Fund.

This event will be webcast live on the Internet. For detailed instructions, please see our website at http://socialeconomycentre.ca/webcast-instructions
 
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GREATER TORONTO WORKERS’ ASSEMBLY (GTWA) COFFEEHOUSE: OCCUPY DEBRIEF

January 27, 2012
7pm
Beit Zatoun, 612 Markham Street, Toronto

2011 – maybe it wasn’t quite 1968 but it was a year of great social upheaval. With 2011 behind us, the GTWA is holding the first in what will be a new series of Coffeehouses to discuss where we are as a movement, with this particular one featuring two local activists who were very involved in Occupy Toronto, and in particular building links between the Occupy movement and the labour movement. Is this the beginning of a new community/labour coalition that we’ve been waiting for? Will the Occupy movement be able to sustain itself and help awaken a dormant labour movement? How did the Occupy Toronto experience measure up with other Occupations? These and other issues will be topics of comradely discussion.

Speakers include two activists with the Occupy movement – Brendan Bruce and Lana Goldberg.

This Coffeehouse is organized by the Greater Toronto Workers’ Assembly Internal Education and Political Development Committee (IEPD).

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NEWS AND VIEWS

CANADIAN LABOUR AT THE CROSSROADS?

By Doug Nesbitt, The Bullet

A wage cut of fifty per cent. An elimination of pensions. Cuts to benefits. These demands have inevitably led to a major showdown at a locomotive factory in London, Ontario between the 700 unionized workers of Electro-Motive Diesel (EMD) and Caterpillar, a massive U.S.-based corporation. The workers, members of Canadian Auto Workers Local 27, responded to the employer’s demands with a positive strike vote of 97 per cent. The employer, Progress Rail, a subsidiary of Caterpillar, locked out the workers on New Year’s Day.

In addition to facing down a notorious anti-union employer who hammered the American United Auto Workers in the 1990s, there are plenty of rumours about Caterpillar closing the London plant and moving operations to Muncie, Indiana. EMD workers in London make $36/hour while their counterparts in Muncie are paid only $12.50-14.50 (Cdn). Indiana is also on the cusp of becoming the first rust-belt state to introduce a “Right to Work” law, a notorious form of anti-union legislation made possible by the even more infamous Taft-Hartley law of 1947, the long-standing crown jewel of American anti-union legislation.

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/586.php

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SPECIAL ISSUE OF GUERNICA ON SCHOOLING

Here is the summary of the contents in the current issue on global education:

In this issue, we examine global education and the shifting gap between rich and poor countries. “Into this gap,” writes author Zadie Smith, “well-meaning people tend to pour in two large groups: the Church Workers and the Aid Workers.” When it comes to education, Smith writes, “there were so few people writing development stories from a human perspective. Stories that were not especially concerned with a man’s eternal soul or his statistical representation, but with his life.” Enter Writers Bloc, a group of renowned scribblers launched into far-flung corners of the globe to report humanely on schools: Aleksander Hemon on Bosnia and Herzegovina’s ethnic education enforcers; Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie on Nigeria’s schools as battleground for politics; Kamila Shamsie on the struggles of education reformers in Pakistan; plus, Nathalie Handal on Haiti, two years after the earthquake. Nor is the United States spared this scrutiny. Former Gates Foundation education entrepreneur Tom Vander Ark and Waiting for Superman’s Michelle Rhee discuss why Latvia and Russia are surpassing Americans in schooling. And more great poetry, blogs, art; and for fiction–instead—a play. And Guernica launches the global education issue with a pair of events in London.

Read more: http://guernicamag.com/newsletter/newsletter_browser_Jan16.html

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CALL FOR PAPERS ON COMMUNITY ORGANIZING

Call for papers:  COMM-ORG (http://comm-org.wisc.edu) is a website and list-serve that attempts to bring together theory and practice, and academics and organizers, to advance the craft of community organizing.

COMM-ORG is looking for papers to publish on the COMM-ORG Papers page (http://comm-org.wisc.edu/papers.htm). All papers are also announced on the list-serve, which reaches over 1000 people across more than a dozen nations.

COMM-ORG welcomes papers from scholars, organizers, and scholar-organizers. I also welcome previously published hard-to-find writing.  Authors retain complete control over their work, and COMM-ORG supports authors revising their papers for submission to other outlets.

To submit a paper, contact the editor, Randy Stoecker, at rstoecker@wisc.edu

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OCCUPY WALL STREET: WHY NOW? WHAT’S NEXT?

Naomi Klein and Yotam Marom in conversation about Occupy Wall Street. Read more: http://www.commondreams.org/view/2012/01/10-1  

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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education. For more information about this project, visit http://www.apcol.ca

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Dave Hill

JOURNAL FOR CRITICAL EDUCATION POLICY STUDIES – VOLUME 8 NUMBER 2 (DECEMBER 2010)

The latest edition of JCEPS (The Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies) is now online.

JCEPS is a free, online, peer-juried/refereed international scholarly journal.

It is online at: http://www.jceps.com

Dave Hill (Chief/ Founding Editor; Middlesex University, London, UK; Visiting Professor of Education at  Athens University, Greece; Visiting Professor of Critical Education Policy and Equality Studies at the University of Limerick, Ireland)

Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies, Volume 8, Number 2: December 2010

CONTENTS:

Anna-Carin Jonsson and Dennis Beach (University of Borås, Sweden): Reproduction of social class in teacher education: The influence of scientific theories on future teachers’ implicit beliefs

Petar Jandric (Polytechnic Graduate School, Zagreb, Croatia): Wikipedia and education: anarchist perspectives and virtual practices

Periklis Pavlidis (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece): Critical Thinking as Dialectics: a Hegelian-Marxist Approach

Andrew N. McNight (University of Alabama at Birmingham, Alabama, USA): A Pragmatic and pedagogically Minded Revaluation of Historical Materialism

Diana Mulinari and Anders Neergaard (Centre for Gender Studies, Lund University, Sweden; Institute for Migration, Ethnicity and Society, Linköping University, Sweden): The ‘others’ in Sweden. Neoliberal policies and the politics of ‘race’ in education

James Avis (Huddersfield University, UK): Workplace learning, knowledge, practice and transformation

Imed Labidi (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA): Arab Education Going Medieval: Sanitizing Western Representation in Arab Schools

Margaret Kennedy and Martin J. Power (University of Limerick, Ireland): ‘The Smokescreen of meritocracy’: Elite Education in Ireland and the reproduction of class privilege

Magnus Dahlstedt and Mekonnen Tesfahuney (Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society), Linköping University, Sweden; University of Karlstad, Sweden): Speculative Pedagogy: Education, Entrepreneurialism and the Politics of Inclusion in Contemporary Sweden

Jean Leon Boucher (The University of Texas at El Paso, USA): There Will be Struggle: The Development and Operational Issues of Social Justice Programs at State Universities in the United States of America

Knud Jensen and Dirk Michel-Schertges (Aarhus University, School of Education, Denmark): Transforming of Educational Institutions after GATS – Consequences in Social Relations as Corporation, Competition and State Regulation

Donn Short (University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada): Conversations in Equity and Social Justice: Constructing Safe Schools for Queer Youth

Shahrzad Mojab (Ontario Institute in the Studies of Education, University of Toronto, Canada): Pedagogical Possibilities of Class in Culture: Review of: Ebert, Teresa, L. and Mas’ud Zavarzadeh (2008) Class in Culture. Boulder, Colorado: Paradigm Publishers.

Samuel Day Fassbinder (DeVry University. USA): Book Review: Nocella II, Anthony J., Steven Best, and Peter McLaren, eds. Academic Repression: Reflections from the Academic-Industrial Complex. Oakland CA: AK, 2010.

The Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies is a free e-journal published by The Institute for Education Policy Studies (IEPS)

IEPS is an independent Radical Left/ Socialist/ Marxist institute for developing policy analysis and development of education policy. It is at www.ieps.org.uk The Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies (JCEPS) seeks to develop Marxist and other Left analysis of education.

The Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies seeks and publishes articles that critique global, national, neo-liberal, neo-conservative, New Labour, Third Way, postmodernist and other analyses of policy developments, as well as those that attempt to report on, analyse and develop Socialist/ Marxist transformative policy for schooling and education from a number of Radical Left perspectives. JCEPS also addresses issues of social class, ‘race’, gender, sexual orientation, disability and capital/ism; critical pedagogies; new public managerialism and academic / non-academic labour, and empowerment/ disempowerment. JCEPS welcomes articles from academics and activists throughout the globe. It is a refereed / peer reviewed/ peer juried international journal.

Contact: dave.hill@ieps.org.uk and DAVE6@mdx.ac.uk

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Work, work, work

Work, work, work

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 9th NOVEMBER 2009

 

OUR MANDATE: The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

To change your subscription settings, visit http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

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EVENTS

FALL COLLOQUIUM: DEVELOPING THE VISION OF SOCIAL CHANGE

Wednesday, November 18
6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
OISE Room 5 – 250
252 Bloor St. West, Toronto

With:

Kathryn Church, Associate Professor, School of Disability Studies, Ryerson University. Long-time ally and researcher with disability and mental health communities.

Winnie Ng, OISE doctoral student, well-known Toronto community activist and labour educator. Currently engaged in reimagining anti-racist learning.

What does an agenda for “workplace learning” look like from the perspective of workers with disabilities? From a racial and economic justice perspective?

Join us for these two dynamic presentations, with time for questions. You will also have an opportunity to meet with faculty and students in OISE’s Collaborative Program in Workplace Learning and Social Change.

Light refreshments will be served. For more information on the program, visit: http://aecp.oise.utoronto.ca/ae/programs/collaborative/wlsc.html

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CANADIAN LABOUR INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL (CLIFF) DEBUTS!

November 22-29, 2009

Imagine a world where thousands of films are made about workers and the conditions under which they live, work, fight, and succeed in their daily lives. In just a few days, the Canadian Labour International Film Festival (CLiFF) will debut in Toronto. All screenings are free!

The launch at the Sheraton Centre at 4 pm on Sunday November 22 (site of the Ontario Federation of Labour convention) will be followed by six evenings at the Bloor Cinema in Toronto.

Hope you can join us for the grand opening on the 22nd – great films, music, speakers! And at the Bloor Cinema from Monday through Saturday. Details of the festival country-wide in dozens of locations Saturday-Sunday November 28-29 are available on the CLIFF website: http://www.labourfilms.ca

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TORONTO SOCIALIST ACTION PRESENTS REBEL FILMS: DR. STRANGELOVE

Friday, November 13
7 p.m.
OISE, 252 Bloor St. West, Room 2-212
St. George Subway Station
Everyone welcome. $4 donation requested.

93 minutes, 1964, B&W. An insane general starts a process towards nuclear holocaust that a war room of politicians and generals frantically try to stop. Stanley Kubrick’s iconic spoof on the arms race makes a powerful case for nuclear disarmament. Science for Peace executive board member Jim Deutsch will speak about the current nuclear arms race, followed by an open discussion.

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RESEARCH FORUM: THE PEOPLE’S RECESSION – ONE YEAR LATER

Social Planning Toronto Research and Policy Forum

Wednesday, November 11
9:30 a.m. – Noon
Lillian H. Smith Library,
239 College Street (just east of Spadina) Room BC

Please join us for our November forum with:

* Armine Yalnizyan, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives – Recession and realcovery: what’s community service got to do with it?
* Beth Wilson, Social Planning Toronto and the Social Planning Network of Ontario – SPNO’s hard hit: impact of the economic downturn on nonprofit community social services in Ontario
* Ann Fitzpatrick, Recession Relief Coalition – Taking action on the people’s recession

All are welcome but space is limited. Register at: http://socialplanningtoronto.org/news/research-forum-the-peoples-recession-one-year-later/

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LUNCHBOX SPEAKERS’ SERIES: NOVEMBER SPEAKERS’ PANEL – YOUTH FOR YOUTH INITIATIVES

Wednesday, November 18
Noon – 1:30 pm
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education
University of Toronto
252 Bloor St. West
Toronto, Room 12-199

Speakers:

Hannah Feldberg – will discuss the concept of Me to We as a new kind of social enterprise; one which was first a philosophy and is now a movement carried by dedicated social justice advocates – the youth of today.

Liam O’Doherty – will explore how social media can empower youth organizing and how online, peer-to-peer collaboration is complimentary to traditional methods of activism.

Jeffrey Ma – will talk about why crossing borders can be easier than crossing the street, and the importance of connecting with people of different faiths and values, both internationally and here at home.

Bring your lunch and a mug – coffee, tea and water will be provided.

For more information, contact Lisa White at: secspeaker@oise.utoronto.ca or visit our website at: http://socialeconomy.utoronto.ca

This event will also be webcast live on the Internet. Please see our website at: http://socialeconomy.utoronto.ca/english/webcast.php for detailed instructions.

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GOOD JOBS, STRONG COMMUNITIES! UNITE-HERE CAMPAIGN 2010

Join hundreds of members of Unite Here Local 75 as we celebrate our victories and launch our 2010 multi-city campaign for good jobs and strong communities!

November 10, 2009

5:30: Gather at City Hall for rally, March to Hyatt Regency Hotel
*Pre-rally activities at City Hall, 100 Queen St. W, Toronto
3:30-4:30 Press conference and welcome, Member’s Lounge, City Hall
4:30-5:30 Briefing: Looking back, moving forward. Council Chambers, City Hall

* Hear what the Hotel Workers Rising movement has won in Toronto and North America.
* Learn about the role of hospitality jobs in the road to economic recovery
* Meet members of the “Hyatt 100,” a group of non-union housekeepers from Boston fighting Hyatt’s efforts to outsource their jobs with low-paid agency work
* Learn about the fight for good hospitality jobs in Toronto, 2010.

Hotel Workers Rising: Standing up for good jobs and strong communities.
RSVP: info@uniteherelocal75.org

Find out more: http://www.uniteherelocal75.org, http://www.uniteherecanada.org, or http://www.unitehere.org.

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NEWS & VIEWS

CITY OF TORONTO’S CAPITAL BUDGET – HAVE YOUR SAY!

The City of Toronto’s proposed 2010 capital budget and 10-year plan were presented at the City’s Budget Committee on Tuesday, November 3. Find more details on how you can make a submission, read the analyst’s notes and more on the city website: http://www.toronto.ca/budget2010/.

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NEW STUDY IDENTIFIES PEAK TIMES FOR BRAIN INJURIES IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

TORONTO, Oct. 6 /CNW/ – August may be the cruellest month for brain injuries in Ontario’s construction industry, but a new study shows October is not far behind.

“We thought it was important to track these injuries month by month,” says Dr. Angela Colantonio, a senior scientist at Toronto Rehabilitation Institute and co-author of the study published this week in the journal Brain Injury.

Few academic studies have looked at brain injury among construction workers. Yet the construction industry – with approximately 400,000 workers in Ontario alone – is known to have a high rate of serious brain injury. The new study used data from the Ontario Workplace Safety and Insurance Board on 218 cases of non-fatal brain injury which resulted in days off work in 2004-2005.

The authors weren’t surprised to find the highest number of brain injuries in the busy construction month of August, while December had the lowest number. But they didn’t expect to find a second peak of injuries in October. This may reflect a surge in work to complete projects prior to the winter months. Contributing factors, they speculate, could be shorter days to work, less light, and more adverse weather conditions. The authors want to do further study to find out if this seasonal pattern holds for other years.

Their study also begins to raise questions about the time of day when many construction-related brain injuries occur. It identifies two peaks during the day: the hour before and the hours after lunch.

“Most of us know that lethargic feeling that hits just before or after lunch at work: our energy dips, it’s hard to focus but we have a job to finish,” says Dr. Colantonio. Other factors may also be distracting workers in anticipation of, or during, their lunch break – and affecting their attention on the job. “For construction workers, this could have devastating consequences.”

Doug McVittie, study co-author and assistant general manager and director of operations for the Construction Safety Association of Ontario (CSAO), says his group will circulate the findings to construction companies across the province, as well as labour and management health and safety committees. The results will also be shared with CSAO staff members who provide training and safety seminars for construction workers.

For further information: Carolyn Lovas, Media Relations Specialist, Toronto Rehab, (416) 597-3422, ext. 3837, Lovas.Carolyn@torontorehab.on.ca.

To read the study: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02699050903036033

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BRIARPATCH MAGAZINE, NOV/DEC 2009: WORK & THE GREEN ECONOMY

The economic crisis has taken a grim toll on working people and on the labour movement. In its wake, can labour activists and environmentalists join forces to build a green economy that works for everyone? This is just one of the many questions we set out to answer in our annual labour issue, which also brings you a report on the sorry state of freelance journalism, a first-hand account of fighting fire in Canada’s Big Wild, an assessment of the prospects for union organizing in tough times, a look at the intersection of neoliberalism and volunteerism in New Orleans, and more.

To subscribe or order a copy of this issue, call 1-866-431-5777 or visit our secure online shop at: http://briarpatchmagazine.com/webstore.

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VIDEO: CF 61 (LOCKED-OUT CADILLAC FAIRVIEW WORKERS) TALK TO THE CROWD AT ST JAMES PARK, TORONTO

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8az_8QpfQtI

CF 61 told the crowd how Cadillac Fairview has attacked the workers to avoid employing older workers. Information sheets being circulated talk about the malls to boycott during the 2009 Christmas Shopping season.

The OCAP TD Centre rally supported the 61 locked out and terminated employees of Cadillac Fairview. The CF 61 are represented by CEP Local 2003. Please visit the story of the workers struggle against the bank and their fight for justice here: ‘Solidarity with Toronto Dominion Centre employees under attack’: http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=104383668872  or visit: http://www.ceplocal2003.org/.

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CANADA/BRAZIL: TELL VALE THAT DIVIDE-AND-CONQUER WON’T WORK

Since being privatized in 1997, the global mining giant Vale has unleashed a vicious attack on workers. The company undermined health and safety standards in Brazil and now it’s set its sights on Canada. In 2009 negotiations with the United Steelworkers (USW), Vale claimed it needed deep concessions – despite making over $13 billion (USD) in 2008 net profits. The company’s strategy is to divide and conquer by undermining seniority and providing lesser benefits to new employees. 3,500 members of the USW rejected Vale’s demands and went on strike in mid-July. Vale has since announced it will hire replacement workers and force other union members to do the work of the striking miners. Meanwhile Vale workers throughout Brazil are struggling to hold on to jobs, earn a living wage, achieve minimum standards for safe working conditions, and guarantee basic labor rights. Vale employees and their unions in Brazil and Canada are fighting back together,
reaching out to workers in a global campaign for fair treatment at Vale.

To read more, click here: http://www.labourstart.org/cgi-bin/solidarityforever/show_campaign.cgi?c=595

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PAY BONANZA CONTINUES FOR BANKERS

By Linda McQuaig – Source: rabble.ca

Some people were outraged last week by a report that a member of the kitchen staff of bailed-out Wall Street firm AIG had received a $7,700 bonus.

Surely that was far less outrageous than the million-dollar bonuses paid to others at AIG who actually carried out the firm’s financial business.

After all, the kitchen helper produced something that at least could be eaten. Apart from perhaps overcooking the Chateaubriand or leaving spots on the champagne glasses, what harm could the kitchen helper have done — compared to driving the world economy over a cliff?

To read more: http://rabble.ca/columnists/2009/10/pay-bonanza-continues-bankers

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JOB POSTINGS

COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER, SOCIAL PLANNING TORONTO (SPT)

Social Planning Toronto (SPT) is a non-profit community organization committed to independent social planning at the local and city-wide levels. We work to improve the quality of life for all people in Toronto through community capacity building, community education and advocacy, policy research and analysis, and social reporting.

SPT has a full-time Communications Officer position available. This position will be of interest to individuals who have a proven track record working in the area of communications focused on community development and action.

This position encompasses the development and implementation of the overall communications, public relations and media strategies of SPT.

Responsibilities include:

* Develop and implement internal and external communication strategies/policies;
* Prepare SPT annual communications plan;
* Design, edit and disseminate all SPT publications, print and promotional materials (e.g. reports, newsletters, journals, periodic publications, brochures, written and electronic bulletins, flyers, press releases, etc.);
* Manage information on the SPT website (using a popular content management platform) including all content both textual and visual;
* Write and develop press releases, articles, speeches, media advisories, media kits, and cultivate media relations;
* Supervise placement students and volunteers as appropriate.

Application deadline is November 22. For a complete copy of the job description and application info visit: http://socialplanningtoronto.org/news/position-opening-communications-officer/

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VOLUNTEER WITH CLIFF- CANADA’S ONLY NATIONAL LABOUR FILM FEST!

The Canadian Labour International Film Festival (CLiFF) is now accepting volunteer applicants to help out with our inaugural festival. Our not-for-profit festival celebrates films about workers, for workers and by workers.

Volunteers can be involved in many aspects of the festival from suggesting recent films for inclusion to helping throw media-related events like the one we are planning for Labour Day! As our festival launch draws closer we will also need people to help distribute leaflets, assemble media kits, as well as helping manage other volunteers. During the festival itself we’ll also need help taking tickets and individuals to act us ushers. There’s a place for everyone.

Upon request, volunteers will receive a letter reflecting their commitment and involvement in the festival. Don’t pass up this unique opportunity to see the inner workings of a festival in its first year!

All volunteers should be: 18 years of age or older willing to attend a mandatory volunteer orientation session, committed, friendly, team players.

The festival launches November 22nd in Toronto and runs until November 29th. It launches country-wide November 28th. We will be holding volunteer orientations sessions in August through the start of November.

Please e-mail us at: festival@labourfilms.ca with the word “Volunteer” in the subject line.

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PROGRAM ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT, CANADA WORLD YOUTH

Type: Definite term contract, part-time: 17.5 hours/week
Organization: Canada World Youth http://www.cwy-jcm.org
Location: Toronto, Montreal or Vancouver, Canada

Main responsibilities: In keeping with Canada World Youth’s policies,

* Plan and support program activities.
* Provide direct administrative and logistical support to the programs.
* Ensure effective communications between the various constituencies of the programs.
* Liaise with volunteers participating in team support activities.
* Perform a number of accounting functions.
* Ensure the layout and production of training and/or information tools.
* Revise and maintain up-dated program-related information systems.
* Write various letters, reports and other documents.

Application deadline is November 10. For the complete job description and application info visit: http://www.planetfriendly.net/gwd.php?id=9594

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JOURNAL ARTICLES

Cities and the making of modern Europe
Friedrich Lenger
Journal of Urban History published 14 October 2009, 10.1177/0096144209349891
http://juh.sagepub.com/cgi/rapidpdf/0096144209349891v1

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Grounding the regime of precarious employment: Homeless day laborers’ negotiation of the job queue
Damian T. Williams
Work and Occupations 2009;36 209-246
http://wox.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/36/3/209

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“The worse you behave, the more you seem to be rewarded”: Bullying in nursing as organizational corruption
Marie Hutchinson, Margaret H. Vickers, Lesley Wilkes, Debra Jackson
Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal, Volume 21, Number 3 / September 2009
http://www.springerlink.com/content/dt2532t401756817/

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Social inequality, lifestyles and health – a non-linear canonical correlation analysis based on the approach of Pierre Bourdieu
Kirstin Grosse Frie, Christian Janssen
International Journal of Public Health
http://www.springerlink.com/content/u5783l3785780r34/

***END***

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Co-operation

Co-operation

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF WORK AND EDUCATION UPDATE 5 SEPTEMBER 2009

 

OUR MANDATE: The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

***HAPPY LABOUR DAY!***

RESOURCE AVAILABLE FROM CSEW – WORKPLACE LEARNING: A CRITICAL INTRODUCTION

By J. Bratton, J. Mills, T. Pyrch & P.H. Sawchuk

Covering the multi-disciplinary nature of workplace learning research, this book offers introductions to matters of organizational studies, adult education, union education and leadership in order to support either the student or experienced scholar seeking to further enhance their critical appreciation of this complex field of study.
Broadview Press, 2004. Available online from publisher, UTP: http://www.utphighereducation.com or online at http://www.amazon.com

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SOCIAL ECONOMY CENTRE – UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 2009-2010 WORKSHOP SERIES

October Workshop: Financial Management in Community Organizations, with Eric Plato, Director of Finance, Frontier College

Do you find it difficult to put together a budget for a proposal? Do you ask yourself ‘What am I looking at?’ when someone gives you financial support? Are you responsible for managing the finances for a project, but not sure what that means?

If so, join us in this workshop to learn:

*How to put together a budget for an organization or project
*Methods to deal with overhead costs
*How to read financial statements
*How to monitor a budget
 
DATE:  Friday, October 2, 2009 – 9:00 am – 4:00 pm.

COST: $140 + GST; Each additional participant from the same organization will receive a $15 discount, as will those who register for more than one workshop. Student rate available. Refreshments, coffee & tea served, but lunch not provided.

TO REGISTER:  http://sec.oise.utoronto.ca/english/workshops.php or contact Lisa White secworkshops@oise.utoronto.ca 416-978-0022

LOCATION:  Social Economy Centre of the University of Toronto, 252 Bloor St. W. (5th floor), Toronto, ON M5S 1V6, (St. George Subway Station)

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SOCIAL ECONOMY CENTRE – LUNCHBOX SPEAKERS’ SERIES

September Speakers’ Panel: Water Justice

When:  Wednesday, September 24, 2009, noon – 1:30 pm
Where:  Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto,
252 Bloor St. West, Toronto, Room 12-199

Speakers:

*Joe Cressy is the Campaigns Coordinator for the Polaris Institute. He will discuss the issue of bottled water and the need for public water infrastructure, both in Canada and internationally.
*Nancy Goucher is the Program Coordinator for the Forum for Leadership on Water (FLOW). She will discuss efforts to protect our critical fresh water resources, emphasizing the necessity of having all levels of government work together as part of a Canada-wide strategy to effectively address current and emerging threats to fresh water security.
*Mark Cazavara is the regional organizer (Ontario/Quebec) for The Council of Canadians, and he will talk about Dumpsite 41 in Toronto as it relates to water source protection, scarcity and the human right to clean water.

Bring your lunch and a mug – coffee, tea and water will be provided.

For more information, contact Lisa White at secspeaker@oise.utoronto.ca or visit our website at http://socialeconomy.utoronto.ca This event will also be webcast live on the Internet. Please see our website for detailed instructions.

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NEW ONLINE LABOUR STUDIES COURSE AT ATHABASCA UNIVERSITY

Our new Labour Studies course “Workers and the Economy” is up and running now. The course denounces market philosophy as a means to disempower workers, explains the economy from a workers perspective and explores possibilities to build a strong labour movement. Particularly timely: The course also includes a section on economic crisis.

Please also forward this information to people you know and who might be interested. Your questions, comments and critique are welcome anytime.

To find out more, follow this link http://www.athabascau.ca/html/syllabi/lbst/lbst330.htm or contact Ingo Schmidt at ingos@athabascau.ca

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LATIN AMERICAN TRADE UNIONISTS OF CANADA (“LATUC”) CONFERENCE

This September 11, 12, 13 the first ever conference of Latin American Trade Unionists from across Canada will be held in Toronto.

LATUC is a new coalition of Canadian union members of Latin American heritage.  LATUC seeks to strengthen the voice of Latin American workers within the Canadian Labour Movement.

LATUC calls for all Spanish speaking sisters and brothers in trade unions across Canada to attend and participate in the conference, which will take place on:

Date:  September 11, 12, 13 – 2009
Place:  Steelworkers Hall, 25 Cecil Street, Toronto, ON

For more information contact:  Edgar Godoy at president@cupe2191.org or at 416-979-9594

To see the agenda and registration forms, click here: http://cupe.on.ca/doc.php?document_id=919&lang=en

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LABOUR PHOTO OF THE YEAR CONTEST

Last year, LabourStart sponsored the first-ever international Labour Photo of the Year competition. It was a huge success. Photographers from all over the world submitted their pictures and a panel of expert judges selected a short-list of the five best. Our readers then voted in their thousands to choose the winning photo.

Today we’re very pleased to announce the second annual Labour Photo of the Year. We’re doing this because we want to encourage and recognize the talents of worker-photographers around the world, and at the same time to encourage them to tell the stories of our struggles in photos.  The deadline for submissions of photos is 30 September.

Full details are here: http://www.labourstart.org/lpoty/

Please share this message with your fellow union members — especially those with cameras!

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LABOUR DAY WEEKEND: A TIME TO BE THANKFUL FOR UNION POWER

By Gary Engler, rabble.ca

On Labour Day 2009 everyone should give a special thanks for union power and hope that it grows stronger.

Of course, this is not a message you read every day and some people may even be angered by it, but the truth is our society depends on unions to say “no” to the destructive forces unleashed by capitalism’s economic downturns.

To read more: http://rabble.ca/news/2009/09/labour-day-weekend-time-be-thankful-union-power

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TORONTO – PARKDALE’S FOOD, EARTH AND CULTURE FESTIVAL

Date: Sunday, Sept. 27, 2009
Masaryk Park, 220 Cowan Ave.
Our annual Fall extravaganza will be on Sunday, Sept. 27, in Masaryk Park.

For more info: http://www.greenestcity.ca

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TORONTO – HARVEST WEDNESDAYS: EAT GOOD AT THE GLADSTONE HOTEL

Gladstone Hotel Brings the Farm to Table Experience to Queen West

Every Wednesday July 08 to October 21, 2009

Every Wednesday the Gladstone Hotel and Chef Marc Breton offer urbanites farm fresh fare and an opportunity to experience the unparalleled flavour of foods harvested in the natural rhythm of our local growing season.

Each week Chef Breton’s menu is inspired by the fresh produce harvested by farmer Sherry Patterson of Chick-a-Biddy Acres CSA (Community Shared Agriculture) as well as local meats, cheeses, wines and beers from our Harvest Wednesday Partners.

Events and menus vary by the week. To see the 2009 Harvest Wednesday Events Schedule, menus and prices: http://www.gladstonehotel.com/harvestwed2009.html

* To Buy Tickets for Tastings call (416) 531-4635 Ext 7100
* To Reserve for Prix Fixe Dinners or Purchase Tickets for Final Harvest Table Dinner call (416) 531-4635 Ext 7100

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BOOK LAUNCH: CITIZEN WEALTH – WINNING THE CAMPAIGN TO SAVE WORKING FAMILIES BY WADE RATHKE

September 16, 2009
5:30pm – 7:30pm
Hart House (UofT)
7 Hart House Circle (basement)

Wade Rathke is among the most prolific community and labor organizers of his generation. He is the founder of ACORN USA (Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now, USA), which has worked to build the largest community based organization of low and moderate income families in America fighting for social and economic justice. A 2006 report credited ACORN USA’s redistributive campaigns with returning $15 Billion to poor and working class families and their communities through higher wages, home ownership opportunities and new curbs on predatory lending over a 10 year period. Wade Rathke will be speaking about lessons learned from a life of community organizing, as well as signing copies of his new book and answering questions. For more information on the book and Wade, please visit here.

To find out more about the book and Wade, click here: http://chieforganizer.org/
To find out more about ACORN, click here: http://www.acorn.org/index.php?id=12389

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MONDRAGÓN WORKER-COOPERATIVES DECIDE HOW TO RIDE OUT A DOWNTURN

The Mondragón Cooperative Corporation (MCC), the largest consortium of worker-owned companies, has developed a different way of doing business—a way that puts workers, not shareholders, first.

Here’s how it played out when one of the Mondragón cooperatives fell on hard times:  http://towardfreedom.com/home/content/view/1661/1/

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PODCAST – RADIO BASICS: UNIONISM AND THE FATE OF THE WORKING CLASS

Podcast in which labour studies Professor Stephanie Ross discusses the history of CUPE, the hypocritical nature of anti-union forces, the historical breakthroughs and strategic limitations of the current state of unionism.

Click here: http://www.radio4all.net/index.php/program/34695

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WOMEN’S COLLEGE HOSPITAL NEEDS YOUR ADVICE

We are speaking to 1000 women across Ontario about their needs when it comes to hospitals, healthcare and the care they receive. Join us and make your voice heard.

Women’s College Hospital in Toronto is building a new facility to achieve its vision of being the world’s pre-eminent ambulatory care hospital dedicated to women’s health. Join our online community forums to inspire new thinking and help WCH meet the needs of women (and their families). The more you share, the better WCH will be able to design their building, their programs and their health care practices.

It’s simple to get involved online: First, fill in a short survey of basic information to allow us to direct you to the forum that best meets your profile. Go to http://www.wch1000women.com to take the survey. (Note: To start the survey, click the “Submit This Page” button.) Secondly, share your views amongst like-minded women. Take part as much or as little as you want. We have a few questions to ask you to get the discussion started, but after you’ve answered those questions you’re free to share as much of your stories, hopes and dreams as you wish.

If you are unable to take part via the online study, all interested women in Ontario are invited to send an email or a letter describing your vision for the ideal women’s hospital. Describe how it might look, the interaction you would like to have with the people there and what is special about the care you receive in this hospital. Send your emails to:  WCH1000women@hotmail.com or mail us a letter at:  WCH 1000 WOMEN 2192 Queen Street East, Suite 62, Toronto , ON M4E 1E6.

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RALPH NADER AND SHIRLEY DOUGLAS: “PUBLICLY FUNDED HEALTH CARE AND ITS PRESERVATION IN CANADA ”, TORONTO

When: September 24, 2009, Lecture at 7:00 p.m.
Where: Great Hall, Hart House, University of Toronto

Post-lecture VIP cocktail reception with Ralph Nader and Shirley Douglas (at a private home)

Lecture: $19.62
Lecture + VIP reception: $196.20 (including tax receipt)

Proceeds support the University College Health Studies Program

For more information and to buy tickets go to this webpage: http://www.uc.utoronto.ca/component/option,com_events/task,view_detail/agid,174/year,2009/month,09/day,24/Itemid,2541/

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LEADERSHIP FUNDING OPPORTUNITY – VITAL PEOPLE

Are you a leader who is making outstanding contributions working at a not-for-profit organization in Toronto? Does your not-for-profit have someone on staff who shows incredible leadership, and is poised to take on an even greater role in the sector?

If so – consider applying for VITAL PEOPLE, the Toronto Community Foundation’s award program that supports and recognizes valued leaders who are making outstanding contributions working at not-for-profit organizations. Funded through our Vital Toronto Fund, Vital People grants of up to $5,000 are awarded to support the formal training or other informal development opportunities that best enable not-for-profit leaders to build their skills or knowledge or apply their experience in different ways to enhance their leadership contributions. Grants are available to those just taking on new leadership challenges as well as those with many years of experience.

Deadline for Application: 5:00 p.m., Wednesday September 30, 2009

For more information: http://socialplanningtoronto.org/communitynews/leadership-funding-opportunity-vital-people/

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THE END OF THE BUSINESS SIMILE

Insider Higher Ed, August 31, 2009

With so many companies collapsing, Daniel J. Ennis notices that academics are no longer being told that they need to learn management and strategy from the corporate world. As long as “business” represented competence and “university” represented inefficiency, then the Business Simile was able to win many an argument. But similes die, and they die when their referents stop making sense.

To read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/views/2009/08/31/ennis

***END***

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF WORK AND EDUCATION – UPDATE 6th JULY 2009

OUR MANDATE: The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people.

We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

To change your subscriptions settings, visit: http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

• NEW! FROM FERNWOOD PUBLISHING – FIGHT BACK: WORKPLACE JUSTICE FOR IMMIGRANTS
• REPORT – ENTRY-LEVEL AND NEXT-STEP JOBS IN THE LOW-SKILL JOB MARKET
• JULY 15 EDUCATIONAL CONFERENCE CALL – SETTING UP & RUNNING A CBPR DEPARTMENT IN A COMMUNITY AGENCY: THE ACCESS ALLIANCE EXPERIENCE
• ARTICLE – PRACTICALLY SPEAKING: IMPROVING THE FABRIC OF WORKPLACE LEARNING
• COMMEMORATIVE BOOK “A CENTURY OF CO-OPERATION” NOW AVAILABLE
• ARTICLE – LESSONS FROM THE HUMBLING OF GENERAL MOTORS
• A FAREWELL TO ATKINSON COLLEGE (TUESDAY, JUNE 30, 2009)
• ONLINE PUBLICATIONS

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NEW! FROM FERNWOOD PUBLISHING – FIGHT BACK: WORKPLACE JUSTICE FOR IMMIGRANTS
By Aziz Choudry, Jill Hanley, Steve Jordan, Eric Shragge & Martha Stiegman

Displacement of people, migration, immigration and the demand for labour are connected to the fundamental restructuring of capitalism and to the reduction of working-class power through legislation to free the market from “state interference.” The result is that a large number of immigrant and temporary foreign workers face relentless competition and little in the way of protection in the labour market. Globally and in Canada, immigrant workers are not passive in the face of these conditions: they survive and fight back. This book documents their struggles and analyzes those struggles within the context of neoliberal globalization and international and national labour markets. Fight Back grew out of collaboration between a group of university-affiliated researchers/activists and the Immigrant Workers Centre in Montreal. The book shares with us the experiences of immigrant workers in a variety of workplaces.

It is based on the belief that the best kind of research comes from people’s lived experiences and consequently tells it “how it really is”.

Available at your local independent bookstore or order online from
http://www.fernwoodpublishing.ca

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REPORT – ENTRY-LEVEL AND NEXT-STEP JOBS IN THE LOW-SKILL JOB MARKET

Low-skill jobs are not “no skill” jobs, and the labor market for non-college jobs—jobs that do not require a college degree— is vast and diverse. This brief uses data from the 2007 Survey of Employers in the Low-Skill Labor Market to explore differences between non-college jobs that have few if any requirements and those for which either a high school degree, prior experience, or previous skills training is extremely important.

The report aims to broaden and deepen our understanding of the diversity of this labor market.

To read more: http://www.urban.org/publications/411801.html

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JULY 15 EDUCATIONAL CONFERENCE CALL – SETTING UP & RUNNING A CBPR DEPARTMENT IN A COMMUNITY AGENCY: THE ACCESS ALLIANCE EXPERIENCE

Community-Campus Partnerships for Health is pleased to announce the second call in our 2009-2010 Educational Conference Call Series. In the midst of the numerous recovery act funding announcements from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), we’ve been noticing a dramatic rise in inquiries to CCPH from community-based organizations that are either applying directly for research grants or as partners of academic institutions that are the lead applicants. We’ve decided to focus the call series on answering the most frequently asked questions, as part of the over-arching theme of “Building Community Capacity for Research.” Each call includes speakers who provide answers and insights from their direct experience, helpful handouts, and links to relevant resources.

The audiofile, agenda, and handouts for the first call, which took place on June 3 and addressed the “how and why” of obtaining a federally negotiated indirect rate and federal wide assurance, are now posted on the CCPH website at:
http://depts.washington.edu/ccph/pastpresentations.html

The next call, scheduled for July 15 from 3:30 – 5 pm eastern time, addresses the question of what organizational systems and supports need to be in place to do community-based participatory research (CBPR) in a community agency setting. The call is titled “Setting Up & Running a CBPR Department in a Community Agency: The Access Alliance Experience.”

To register for the call, go to: https://catalysttools.washington.edu/webq/survey/ccphuw/78916.

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ARTICLE – PRACTICALLY SPEAKING: IMPROVING THE FABRIC OF WORKPLACE LEARNING

The rising dollar. An aging workforce. Competition from overseas. These are just a few of the challenges facing Canadian businesses. Increasingly, companies are investing in skills training as a way of gaining a much-needed edge—and Canada’s textile industry has been on the forefront of this shift, spending millions of dollars on an innovative—and inventive—workplace learning initiative.

To read more: http://www.ccl-cca.ca/CCL/Newsroom/PracticallySpeaking/20090616MWTextiles.htm?Language=EN

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COMMEMORATIVE BOOK “A CENTURY OF CO-OPERATION” NOW AVAILABLE

One of the highlights of the Canadian Co-operative Association’s National Congress in Ottawa was the launch of A Century of Co-operation, a commemorative book by Canada’s pre-eminent co-op historian, Ian MacPherson. The 234-page book chronicles the history of Canada’s co-operative movement through text and images from the movement’s beginnings to the present day.

The book can be ordered from CCA’s website at: http://www.coopscanada.coop/en/about_cca/100th/Commemorative-book . Cost is $50 plus GST.

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ARTICLE – LESSONS FROM THE HUMBLING OF GENERAL MOTORS
By Sam Gindin

Of all 20th century industries, it was the auto sector that best captured the sway of capitalism and the rise of American dominance. The assembly line showed off capitalism’s remarkable productive potential and the automobile flaunted capitalism’s consumerist possibilities … In the growth years after the war, the proudest achievement of the UAW and then the Canadian Auto Workers (CAW), even to the point of trading off workplace rights, was winning what was essentially a ‘private welfare state’ – a set of gains that brought workers not just wages, but the security of a range of benefits, of which health care and pensions were the most significant…

To read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/bullet229.html

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A FAREWELL TO ATKINSON COLLEGE (TUESDAY, JUNE 30, 2009)
By James Laxer

A great experiment in part-time, adult education is coming to an end tomorrow.

Atkinson was on the cutting edge of the drive to democratize what had been a rather hide bound system in the past. Greater accessibility was the watchword of the time … From the very start Atkinson was about much more than upgrading professionals who needed a university degree. Without being fully conscious of what this implied at the outset, Atkinson was learning through experience how to educate people who combined work and study in their lives.

To read more: http://www.jameslaxer.com/2009/06/farewell-to-atkinson-college.html

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski
The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk
MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski
Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski