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Revolution at Point Zero

REVOLUTION AT POINT ZERO: HOUSEWORK, REPRODUCTION AND FEMINIST STRUGGLE

Book Launch

Silvia Federici launches Revolution at Point Zero: Housework, Reproduction and Feminist Struggle.

12 November, 6pm, LG02, New Academic Building, Goldsmiths University, Lewisham Way, SE14 6NW, near New Cross station.

 

Written between 1974 and the present, Revolution at Point Zero collects forty years of research and theorizing on the nature of housework, social reproduction, and women’s struggles on this terrain—to escape it, to better its conditions, to reconstruct it in ways that provide an alternative to capitalist relations.

Indeed, as Federici reveals, behind the capitalist organization of work and the contradictions inherent in “alienated labor” is an explosive ground zero for revolutionary practice upon which are decided the daily realities of our collective reproduction.

Beginning with Federici’s organizational work in the Wages for Housework movement, the essays collected here unravel the power and politics of wide but related issues including the international restructuring of reproductive work and its effects on the sexual division of labor, the globalization of care work and sex work, the crisis of elder care, the development of affective labor, and the politics of the commons.

Praise:

“Finally we have a volume that collects the many essays that over a period of four decades Silvia Federici has written on the question of social reproduction and women’s struggles on this terrain. While providing a powerful history of the changes in the organization of reproductive labor, Revolution at Point Zero documents the development of Federici’s thought on some of the most important questions of our time: globalization, gender relations, the construction of new commons.”
Mariarosa Dalla Costa, coauthor of The Power of Women and the Subversion of the Community and Our Mother Ocean

“As the academy colonizes and tames women’s studies, Silvia Federici speaks the experience of a generation of women for whom politics was raw, passionately lived, often in the shadow of an uncritical Marxism. She spells out the subtle violence of housework and sexual servicing, the futility of equating waged work with emancipation, and the ongoing invisibility of women’s reproductive labors. Under neoliberal globalization women’s exploitation intensifies—in land enclosures, in forced migration, in the crisis of elder care. With ecofeminist thinkers and activists, Federici argues that protecting the means of subsistence now becomes the key terrain of struggle, and she calls on women North and South to join hands in building new commons.”
Ariel Salleh, author of Ecofeminism as Politics: Nature, Marx, and the Postmodern

“The zero point of revolution is where new social relations first burst forth, from which countless waves ripple outward into other domains. For over thirty years, Silvia Federici has fiercely argued that this zero point cannot have any other location but the sphere of reproduction. It is here that we encounter the most promising battlefield between an outside to capital and a capital that cannot abide by any outsides. This timely collection of her essays reminds us that the shape and form of any revolution are decided in the daily realities and social construction of sex, care, food, love, and health. Women inhabit this zero point neither by choice nor by nature, but simply because they carry the burden of reproduction in a disproportionate manner. Their struggle to take control of this labor is everybody’s struggle, just as capital’s commodification of their demands is everybody’s commodification.”
Massimo De Angelis, author of The Beginning of History: Values, Struggles, and Global Capital

“In her unfailing generosity of mind, Silvia Federici has offered us yet another brilliant and groundbreaking reflection on how capitalism naturalizes the exploitation of every aspect of women’s productive and reproductive life. Federici theorizes convincingly that, whether in the domestic or public sphere, capital normalizes women’s labor as ‘housework’ worthy of no economic compensation or social recognition. Such economic and social normalization of capitalist exploitation of women underlies the gender-based violence produced by the neoliberal wars that are ravaging communities around the world, especially in Africa. The intent of such wars is to keep women off the communal lands they care for, while transforming them into refugees in nation-states weakened by the negative effects of neoliberalism. Silvia Federici’s call for ecofeminists’ return to the Commons against Capital is compelling. Revolution at Point Zero is a timely release and a must read for scholars and activists concerned with the condition of women around the world.”
Ousseina D. Alidou, Committee for Academic Freedom in Africa (CAFA), Director of the Center for African Studies at Rutgers University and author of Engaging Modernity: Muslim Women and the Politics of Agency in Postcolonial Niger

About Silvia Federici:

Silvia Federici is a feminist writer, teacher, and militant. In 1972, she was cofounder of the International Feminist Collective, which launched the Wages for Housework campaign internationally. With other members of Wages for Housework, like Mariarosa Dalla Costa and Selma James, and with feminist authors like Maria Mies and Vandana Shiva, Federici has been instrumental in developing the concept of “reproduction” as a key to class relations of exploitation and domination in local and global contexts, and as central to forms of autonomy and the commons.

In the 1990s, after a period of teaching and research in Nigeria, she was active in the anti-globalization movement and the U.S. anti-death penalty movement. She is one of the co-founders of the Committee for Academic Freedom in Africa, an organization dedicated to generating support for the struggles of students and teachers in Africa against the structural adjustment of African economies and education systems. From 1987 to 2005, she also taught international studies, women’s studies, and political philosophy courses at Hofstra University in Hempstead, NY.

Her decades of research and political organizing accompanies a long list of publications on philosophy and feminist theory, women’s history, education, culture, international politics, and more recently on the worldwide struggle against capitalist globalization and for a feminist reconstruction of the commons. Her steadfast commitment to these issues resounds in her focus on autonomy and her emphasis on the power of what she calls self-reproducing movements as a challenge to capitalism through the construction of new social relations.

Product Details:

Author: Silvia Federici
Publisher: PM Press/Common Notions/Autonomedia
ISBN: 978-1-60486-333-8
Published September 2012
Format: Paperback
Size: 8 by 5
Page count: 208 Pages
Subjects: Women’s Studies/Politics/Sociology

Revolution at Point Zero at PM Press: https://secure.pmpress.org/index.php?l=product_detail&p=420

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

 

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Progress

INTERFACE VOLUME 3 ISSUE 2: FEMINISM, WOMEN’S MOVEMENTS AND WOMEN IN MOVEMENT

Interface 3(2) now out: feminism, women’s movements and women in movement

Volume three, issue two (November 2011): Feminism, women’s movements and women in movement
Issue editors: Sara Motta, Cristina Flesher Fominaya, Catherine Eschle, Laurence Cox
http://www.interfacejournal.net/current/

Volume three, issue two of Interface, a peer-reviewed e-journal produced and refereed by social movement practitioners and engaged movement researchers, is now out, on the special theme “Feminism, women’s movements and women in movement”. Interface is open-access (free), global and multilingual. Our overall aim is to “learn from each other’s struggles”: to develop a dialogue between practitioners and researchers, but also between different social movements, intellectual traditions and national or regional contexts.
 
This issue of Interface includes xx pages and 27 pieces in English and Spanish, by authors writing from / about Australia, Canada, Denmark, Guatemala, India, Ireland, Mexico, Nicaragua, the Netherlands, Poland, South Africa, Spain, the UK and the US.

Articles include:

 

Sara Motta, Cristina Flesher Fominaya, Catherine Eschle and Laurence Cox, Feminism, women’s movements and women in movement

 Theme-related articles:

 Janet Conway, Feminist knowledges on the anti-globalization terrain: transnational feminisms at the World Social Forum

Lyndi Hewitt, Framing across differences, building solidarities: lessons from women’s rights activism in transnational spaces

Eurig Scandrett, Suroopa Mukherjee and the Bhopal Research Team, “We are flames not flowers”: a gendered reading of the social movement for justice in Bhopal

Akwugo Emejulu, Can “the people” be feminists? Analysing the fate of feminist justice claims in populist grassroots movements in the United States

Finn Mackay, A movement of their own: voices of young feminist activists in the London Feminist Network

Melody L Hoffmann, Bike Babes in Boyland: women cyclists’ pedagogical strategies in urban bicycle culture

Nina Nissen, Challenging perspectives: women, complementary and alternative medicine, and social change

 

Special section: feminist strategies for change:

Sisters of Resistance, Why we need a feminist movement now

Nina Nijsten, Some things we need for a feminist revolution

Rosario González Arias, Viejas tensiones, nuevos desafíos y futuros territorios feministas

Tiny aka Lisa Gray-Garcia, Independence vs interdependence

Roberta Villalón, Feminist activist research and strategies from within the battered immigrants’ movement

Elena Jeffreys, Audry Autonomy, Jane Green, Christian Vega (Scarlet Alliance Australian Sex Workers Association), Listen to sex workers: support decriminalisation and anti-discrimination protections

Jean Bridgeman, Wise women in community: building on everyday radical feminism for social change

Jennifer Verson, Performing unseen identities: a feminist strategy for radical communication

Jed Picksley, Jamie Heckert and Sara Motta, Feminist love, feminist rage; or, Learning to listen

Anarchist Feminists Nottingham, Statement on intimate partner violence within activist communities

 

Other articles:

Kenneth Good, The capacities of the people versus a predominant, militarist, ethno-nationalist elite: democratisation in South Africa c. 1973 – 97

Michael Neocosmos, Transition, human rights and violence: rethinking a liberal political relationship in the African neo-colony

Roy Krøvel, Alternative journalism and the relationship between guerrillas and indigenous peoples in Latin America

Tomás Mac Sheoin, Greenpeace: a (partly) annotated bibliography of English-language publications

Anna Feigenbaum with Kheya Bag, Ken Barlow, Jakob Horstmann, David Shulman and Kika Sroka-Miller, “Everything we do is niche”: a roundtable on contemporary progressive publishing

 

This issue’s reviews include the following titles:

Jennifer Earl and Katrina Kimport, Digitally enabled social change: activism in the Internet age

SV Ojas, Madhuresh Kumar, MJ Vijayan and Joe Athialy, Plural narratives from Narmada Valley

Eurig Scandrett et al, Bhopal survivors speak: emergent voices from a people’s movement

Hilary Wainwright, Reclaim the state: experiments in popular democracy

 

A Call for Papers for volume 4 issue 2 of Interface is now open, on the theme of “The global emancipation of labour: new movements and struggles around work, workers and precarity” (submissions deadline May 1 2012). We can review and publish articles in Afrikaans, Arabic, Catalan, Croatian, Danish, Dutch, English, French, German, Hungarian, Italian, Maltese, Norwegian, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish and Zulu. The website has the full CFP and details on how to submit articles for this issue at http://interfacejournal.nuim.ie/2011/06/call-for-papers-volume-4-issue-2-for-the-global-emancipation-of-labour-new-movements-and-struggles-around-work-workers-and-precarity/
 
The next issue of Interface (May 2012) will be on “The season of revolutions: the Arab Spring”, with a special section on the new wave of European mobilizations.

Interface is always open to new collaborators.

More details can be found on our website: http://interfacejournal.net
 
Please forward this to anyone you think may be interested

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Clara Zetkin

JOHN RIDDELL ON ‘THE COMMUNIST WOMEN’S MOVEMENT (1921-26)’

 

Dear friends

My working paper, “The Communist Women’s Movement (1921-26)” is available at: www.johnriddell.wordpress.com

To my knowledge, this is the first English-language study of the world Communist women’s organization launched by Clara Zetkin with Lenin’s active support.

My study concludes as follows:

“The Communist women stood for the consistent pursuit of militant unity of the workers’ movement. They sought to unite women from all social layers who were prepared to actively oppose evils of capitalism. They favoured an adroit search for common ground with non-Communist currents among women and in the labour movement. In doing so, they played a significant role in shaping the leadership of the Communist International as a whole.

“This is perhaps their most important legacy to us. The Communist Women’s International prefigures the leading role of women in movements for social progress both today and tomorrow.”

– – – – –

To receive e-mail alerts regarding new articles on my website, fill in the box “To be notified of new posts” in the home page right-hand column.

John Riddell

 

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Dissent

VOICES OF DISSENT – INTERFACE

Interface: a journal for and about social movements

Volume Two, Issue Two

Voices of dissent: activists’ engagements in the creation of alternative, autonomous, radical and independent media

Volume two, issue two of Interface, a peer-reviewed e-journal produced and refereed by social movement practitioners and engaged movement researchers, is now out, on the special theme “Voices of dissent: activists’ engagements in the creation of alternative, autonomous, radical and independent media”.

Interface is open-access (free), global and programmatically multilingual. Our overall aim is to “learn from each other’s struggles”: to develop a dialogue between practitioners and researchers, but also between different social movements, intellectual traditions and national contexts.

This new issue also marks the launch of our new website, which we hope will make the site more accessible and support multilingual material and translations in particular. The site is currently at http://interfacejournal.nuim.ie but will be accessible through the existing address of http://www.interfacejournal.net shortly. (The delay is due to the intervention of the IMF and more substantially weather-related problems in Ireland.)

This issue of Interface includes 26 pieces in 4 languages by authors from Austria, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, the Netherlands, Palestine, Russia, South Korea, Sweden, the UK and the US, including:

Theme-related articles:
    • Tina Askanius and Nils Gustafsson, Mainstreaming the alternative: the changing media practices of protest movements
    • Patrick McCurdy, Breaking the spiral of silence: the “media debate” within global justice movements. A case study of Dissent! and the Gleneagles G8 summit
    • Tatiana Bazzichelli, Towards a critique of social networking: practices of networking in grassroots communities from mail art to the case of Anna Adamolo
    • Clemens Apprich, Upload dissident culture: Public Netbase’s intervention into digital and urban space
    • Dongwon Jo, Real-time networked media activism in the 2008 Chotbul protest
    • Brigitte Geiger and Margit Hauser, Medien der neuen Frauenbewegung in Archiv / Archiving feminist grassroots media
    • Margaret Gillan, Class and voice: challenges for grassroots community activists using media in 21st century Ireland Other articles:
    • Philippe Lucas, Patient-centred strategies to counter stigma, oppression and forced incarceration in the CSX and medical cannabis  movements
    • William K Carroll, Crisis, movements, counter-hegemony: in search of the new
    • Raphael Schlembach, Towards a critique of anti-German “communism” Action notes from:
    • Cristina Guimarães Oliveira and Odalisca Moraes, Comunicação: Indicadores históricos e culturais do Pina
    • Lívia Moreira de Alcântara and Elder Gomes Barbosa, Extensão ou comunicação? O audiovisual como um instrumento facilitador da comunicação no assentamento do MST Olga Benário
    • Iyad Burnat, The Bil’in model of wall resistance

A special section is devoted to alternative international labour communications, with contributions from Peter Waterman, Eric Lee and Dave Hollis

Key documents: Chto Delat? A declaration on politics, knowledge and art (Russian and English versions)

Response by Peter Waterman to Colin Barker’s piece on Solidarnosc in issue 2/1, and response from Barker to Waterman

Advance piece for issue 3/1 (repression and social movements): Tomas Mac Sheoin, Policing and repression of anti-globalization protests and movements: a bibliography of English-language material

This issue’s reviews includes the following titles:
    • Clifford Bob, The marketing of rebellion: insurgents, media and international activism
    • John Charlton, Don’t you hear the H-Bomb’s thunder? Youth and politics on Tyneside in the late ‘fifties and early ‘sixties
    • Jo Reger et al (eds), Identity work in social movements
    • Clemencia Rodriguez et al (eds), Making our media: global initiatives towards a democratic public sphere.

A call for papers for volume 3 issue 2 of Interface is now open, on the theme of “Feminism, women’s movements and women in movement” (submissions deadline May 1 2011). We can review and publish articles in Afrikaans, Catalan, Croatian, Danish, Dutch, English, French, German, Hungarian, Italian, Maltese, Norwegian, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish and Zulu.

The website has full details on how to submit articles for this issue.

Volume 3, issue 2 on “Repression and social movements” is due to be published in May 2011.

Interface is always looking for translators to help with our multilingual project and website editors who can help with WordPress. We are also looking for activists or academics interested in helping out, particularly but not only with our African, South Asian, Spanish-speaking Latin American, East and Central European, and Oceania / SE Asian groups. More details on our website.

Please forward this to anyone you think may be interested.

Elizabeth Humphrys
Sydney, Australia
email: lizhumphrys@me.com

Interface: a journal for and about social movements: http://www.interfacejournal.net

Interface is also on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/home.php?sk=group_134658609918257&ap=1

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Andew Kliman

WHAT MUST BE CHANGED IN ORDER TO TRANSCEND CAPITALISM?

Joint Forum organized by The Commune and Marxist-Humanist Initiative

Speakers:

Andrew Kliman is author of Reclaiming Marx’s “Capital”: A refutation of the myth of inconsistency. 

Anne Jaclard is National Secretary of Marxist-Humanist Initiative and a long-time activist and writer in support of women’s movements and international solidarity movements. 

How exactly must the economic forces and social relations that dominate our lives today be changed so as to establish a real and sustainable alternative?

Kliman and Jaclard will argue that Marx was not only a theorist of capitalism, but a theorist of a new society, and that the time has come to develop his theory, instead of repeating abstractions about an imagined future.  They will employ Marx’s theory of a future communist society in order to analyze what features of present-day society are specific to capitalism and what must therefore be uprooted and transcended in order to lay the foundation for a world that no longer operates for the sake of producing “value.”

Monday 5th July, 7:00

At the Workers Educational Association,

96-100 Clifton St, London EC2

Five minutes from Old Street or Liverpool Street tube

www.thecommune.co.uk and www.marxist-humanist-initiative.org

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

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