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Partenope

SIREN SONG

Saturday 20 May 2017

Performances at 5.00pm and 6.30pm

The Mulberry and Bigland Green Centre, Bigland Street, London, E1 2LG

 

This short performance is the culmination of an ENO Baylis Community Project inspired by ENO’s production of Handel’s Partenope 

The project brings together adult women of all ages from across London, and takes the central female characters in the opera as a starting point from which to explore contemporary perspectives on being a woman. The performance will combine original text and music created by the group alongside extracts from Partenope.

The group will be joined by ENO principal cast member Patricia Bardon and female members of the ENO Baylis Opera Works programme, with lighting design by ENO lighting technician Christina Smith.

This is a free event and places are limited.

To confirm your place please RSVP baylis@eno.org by Thursday 18th April, stating your preferred performance time and the name of up to two guests.

We hope to see you there.

From the team at ENO Baylis.

 

ENO Baylis 

Learning and Participation Team

+44 (0)20 7632 8484 | Baylis@eno.org
ENGLISH NATIONAL OPERA | St Martin’s Lane, London, WC2N 4ES

 

Click to support English National Opera online today

 

ENO Partenope: https://www.eno.org/operas/partenope-3/ and https://www.eno.org/whats-on/partenope/

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Feminism

Feminism

ROOMS OF OUR OWN

CONFERENCE ON WOMEN’S SPACES

Women’s Spaces and Feminist Politics: yesterday, today and tomorrow

You are invited to a one-day conference organized by London Women and Planning Forum, Rooms of our Own and Women’s Studies without Walls

FRIDAY 16th MAY 2014, 9.30 for 10.0 – 5.0pm
@ Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Rd, E1 4NS 
Geography Department, First Floor, Room 126

This one-day conference will explore the role of women’s spaces in feminist politics, focusing on women’s centres and other women’s spaces in the past, present and future. During the 1970s there were autonomous women’s centres in most London boroughs and throughout the UK. They provided an exciting, safe and liberating environment for women to share thoughts and experiences and to campaign for change. Many of these centres were funded by local authority grants but as the grant-giving environment diminished most were forced to close. Some have survived by tendering for out-sourced council services such as domestic violence and rape counselling. Many have struggled against the conflation of feminist demands into a generalised equality agenda. During the past decade a new  generation of feminists has started to campaign against the objectification of women in the media, the expansion of pornography, sexism in the workplace and on the street, the lack of representation of women in public life and the sexualisation of young children. This new generation of feminists is largely organized via social media rather than in physical spaces. 

There will be four key sessions.

  1. Why “Women Only”?  Speakers on the history of women’s spaces, lesbian and separatist issues, cultural and religious diversity issues and requirements for women’s safety.
  2. Women’s Spaces past, present and future. A range of speakers looking at Women’s Centres that have closed, those that have survived and ideas for new forms for the future.
  3. Virtual women’s spaces. Speakers from organisations that organise almost exclusively online; benefits and problems.
  4. One hour discussion involving all the speakers and audience chaired by Woman’s Hour’s Jane Garvey, followed by a Networking session

We aim to organise another event following on from this Conference with the opportunity for much more discussion, networking and planning for the future.

Please go to Eventbrite to register: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/womens-spaces-and-feminist-politics-yesterday-today-and-tomorrow-tickets-11140033139

£38 for waged +booking fee

£8.50 for unwaged +booking fee  (if this is difficult for you, please email us)

Includes tea/ coffee throughout the day and a vegetarian lunch.
Please let us know if you have particular access and /or dietary requirements
REGISTRATION DEADLINE: 6th May 2014
EMAIL CONTACT: womensspaces@gmail.com

Feminism

Feminism

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Raya Dunayevskaya

Raya Dunayevskaya

RECENT ARTICLES AND FEATURES IN THE INTERNATIONAL MARXIST-HUMANIST WEBZINE (August 2013)
http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/

EGYPTIAN MILITARY SEEKS TO EXTINGUISH REVOLUTION — by Kevin Anderson
The Egyptian military’s August 14 massacre of supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood marked a reach for total power. The complicity of some parts of the democratic movement has placed in jeopardy the entire revolutionary wave that has gripped the country since 2011.

REFLECTIONS ON TURKEY’S GEZI PARK PROTESTS? — by Onur Kapdan
Draws lessons from the Gezi Park protests as new type of horizontal social struggle that goes beyond earlier Turkish politics, whether leftist or nationalist; analyzes the ideological control mechanisms of Turkish capitalism under Erdogan’s Justice and Development Party (AKP).

HEGEL IN 10 MINUTES? — by David Black
This riff on Hegel took place at a fringe meeting of the Association of Musical Marxists during the Marxism 2013 conference in London in July. [Originally appeared on the AMM website.]

ROSA LUXEMBURG: INTERVIEW WITH LUXEMBURG SCHOLAR AND EDITOR, PETER HUDIS
Dr. Lenore Daniels, a columnist for “Black Commentator Magazine,” discusses Luxemburg’s legacy as an anti-imperialist thinker and interviews Peter Hudis, co-editor of “The Letters of Rosa Luxemburg” (2011). [Originally appeared in OpEdNews.]

ANALYSES OF 2013 IRANIAN PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION? — by Frieda Afary
Persian and English-language analyses that have attempted to comprehend these events have ranged from a dismissal of the election process as a completely engineered one, to uncritical support for the election results. [Originally appeared in Iranian Progressives in Translation.]

HUSBY RIOTS: THE OTHER FACE OF SWEDISH SOCIAL DEMOCRACY EXPOSED? — by Ba Karang
The recent rioting in Stockholm over the police killing of a Portuguese immigrant was a manifestation of the growing inequalities in Sweden, a society once seen as synonymous with social democracy.

TWO POEMS ON REVOLUTION? — by Sam Friedman

IRANIAN INTELLECTUALS BREAK TABOOS? — by Frieda Afary
Mohammad Nourizad and Mohsen Makhmalbaf are both filmmakers.  Both were active supporters of the Iranian regime but later turned against the regime and became ardent advocates of human rights.  Now they have openly broken with another feature of their past:  prejudice against religious minorities. [Originally appeared in Iranian Progressives in Translation.]

WHITHER THE IRANIAN DEMOCRATIC OPPOSITION? — by Frieda Afary
Although the recent disqualification of two candidates Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani and Esfandiar Rahim Mashaei from the election is very significant and further reveals the intense power struggles within the regime, more significant are the defining issues that continue to fuel the grassroots discontent inside Iran. [Originally appeared in Iranian Progressives in Translation.]

*** OTHER LANGUAGES
MANY ARTICLES on our site have recently been translated from English into Persian, Spanish, and other languages. (See the Languages Pages.)

***RECENT BOOKS OF INTEREST:

MARX’S CONCEPT OF THE ALTERNATIVE TO CAPITALISM ? by Peter Hudis 
Historical Materialism Series, now in paperback with Haymarket Books
MARX ON GENDER AND THE FAMILY: A CRITICAL STUDY ? by Heather Brown
Historical Materialism Series, now in paperback with Haymarket Books

REVIEWS of Heather Brown’s “Marx on Gender and the Family: A Critical Study”:
Sally Campbell, “Engels Revisited,” Socialist Review, Issue 138, March 20, 2013
Sheila McGregor, “Marxism and women’s oppression today,” International Socialism Journal, 10 April 13
Len T, “The ‘F-Word’: Marxism and Women’s Oppression Today,” International Socialist Network, July 2013
Lindsey German, Counterfire, July 2013

THE INTERNATIONAL MARXIST-HUMANIST is the webzine of the INTERNATIONAL MARXIST-HUMANIST ORGANIZATION (IMHO): http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/
Contact: arise@internationalmarxisthumanist.org 

 

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski 

 

The Match Women

The Match Women

MATCHWOMEN’S STRIKE 2013 FESTIVAL

Bishopsgate Institute

London

6th July 2013

11.00am – 11.00pm

Admission Free (but register for tickets)

Family Friendly

Celebrate the 125th anniversary of the Matchwomen’s victory, and the beginning of the modern labour movement

125 years ago the Matchwomen’s gallant struggle and victory against all the odds led to the new union movement. For far too long they have been unsung heroes in the pages of history. Celebrate the 125th anniversary of the Matchwomen’s victory and the beginning of the modern labour movement!

The festival will be the kind of ‘knees- up’ the Matchwomen themselves would have enjoyed – there will be bands, comedians and actors, choirs, stalls, and great food and drink.

In July 1888, several hundred women walked out of an East London match factory – and changed the world. The strike was a reaction to management bullying and terrible conditions, and it should have failed. Bryant & May were powerful and prosperous, with friends in government. The women were mere ‘factory girls’, and even worse, mostly Irish. But their courage, solidarity and refusal to back down impressed all who saw it. What they revealed about conditions inside the factory, including the horrors of the industrial disease ‘phossy jaw’, shamed Bryant & May, and their shareholders, many of whom were MP’s and clergymen. In just two weeks, the women won better rates of pay and conditions, and the right to form the largest union of women in the country.

Their victory was remarkable, but until now, rarely acknowledged as the beginning of the modern trade union movement. Following the Matchwomen’s victory a wave of strikes, including the 1889 Great London Dock Strike, swept the nation. Multitudes of the most exploited workers formed new unions, sowing the seeds of the modern labour movement, and Labour Party. The Dock Strikers never denied the Matchwomen’s influence. In the throes of the Dock Strike, leader John Burns urged a mass meeting of tens of thousands to ‘stand shoulder to shoulder.

Remember the Matchwomen, who won their fight and formed a union.

Speakers & Performers include: Tony Benn, Owen Jones, Lindsey German, Robb Johnson, Anna Davin, Professor Jane Martin, Michael Rosen, The Socialist Choir and many more, with lots of events for children and young people.

Website and Registration for Tickets: http://www.matchwomensfestival.com/

Bryant & May

Bryant & May

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Match Women's Strike

The Match Women’s Strike

Sociology

Sociology

GENDER AND BOURDIEU

Forthcoming BSA Bourdieu Study Group event: Gender and Bourdieu, “Is doing gender unavoidable?”

Thursday 13th December 2012, School of Law and Social Science, University of East London

Online booking: http://portal.britsoc.co.uk/public/event/eventBooking.aspx?id=EVT10252

 

Bourdieu first entered the sociological discussion of gender relationships in the 1990s. In 1998 he published  La Domination masculine . Bourdieu argues that the relations between men and women are tied to masculine domination and that this masculine domination or habitus gives men and women a specific role in society.

Bourdieu’s work often causes divisions between feminists. Many argue that although he explored gender relations in his work he paid very little attention to feminist theory, focusing instead on gendering of taste or how structured sexual division of labour generates a sexually differentiated perspective on the world. However, others dispute this insisting that  his contribution has scarcely been recognized by feminists. They claim that one of Bourdieu’s most important insights is that gender is present in all social relationships.  Furthermore, Bourdieu’s work is valuable to feminist approaches because theoretical frameworks and political programmes are always embedded in social relations.

There has been a range of responses to Bourdieu from feminists and this event will aim to bring together different perspectives for discussion with key note speakers: Dr Catherine Hakim,  Dr Lisa Mckenzie and Professor Derek Robbins.

Dr Catherine Hakim is renowned for coining the term ‘erotic capital‘, referring to a person’s  combination of physical and social attractiveness and its power in all social interactions; in the workplace, politics and in public life generally, as well as in the invisible negotiations of private relationships. Her publication Honey-Money: The Power of Erotic Capital  has received large scale mainstream media attention. She has published extensively on changing patterns of employment, women’s employment and women’s position in society, occupational segregation and the pay gap. She sits on the Editorial Boards of several academic journals, including  the European Sociological Review and International Sociology

Dr Lisa Mckenzie’s research has focused upon class inequalities of men and women living on council estates within the UK, using a collaborative ethnographic approach whilst applying the work of Pierre Bourdieu, with particular influence relating to symbolic violence, capital exchange, and power relationships with neo-liberal structures. She currently holds an Early Years Leverhulme Research Fellowship at the University of Nottingham within the school of sociology and social policy. Her current research is a re-study of the 1970 Coates and Silburn St Anns ‘Poverty’ study, focusing upon the changing shapes of community, family, and belonging in contemporary Britain.

Prof Derek Robbins has long been one of the leading exponents of Pierre Bourdieu’s theories in the fields of sociology and is a favourite with the Bourdieu study group. He is Professor of International Social Theory at the University of East London, where he also is Director of the Group for the Study of International Social Science in the School of Law and Social Science. He is the editor of the four-volume collection of articles on Bourdieu in the Sage Masters of Contemporary Social Thought series (2000).

His most recent publication: French Post-War Social Theory sets up a Bourdieusian investigation of the habitus of the five French social thinkers; Aron, Althusser, Foucault, Lyotard, Bourdieu.

As a study group, we’re always very interested in the new ways Bourdieu’s concepts can be applied and hope you will join us for what is likely to be a lively discussion.

The event will take place at the University of East London, Docklands Campus on Thursday 13th December 2012.

Online booking: http://portal.britsoc.co.uk/public/event/eventBooking.aspx?id=EVT10252

 

BSA members £20.00

Non BSA members £30.00    

Please note that our last study group event sold out with a few days. To avoid disappointment please book early.

 

Timetable:

10-30-11.00: Registration and tea and coffee

11.00-12.15: Dr Catherine Hakim key note speech

12.15-13.15: Lunch

13.15-14.30: Dr Lisa Mckenzie key note speech

14.30-14.45: Refreshments

14.45-16.00: Prof. Derek Robbins Key note speech: “La domination masculine and social constructionism”.

16.00-17.00: Discussions with key note speakers

17.00-17.30: Wine reception.

 

Jenny Thatcher

PhD Candidate and Sociology Lecturer

Co-convenor of the BSA Bourdieu Study Group j.thatcher@uel.ac.uk University of East London School of Law and Social Science Docklands Campus University Way, E16 2RD

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

 

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com 

Gender and Education

TEACHING GENDER SERIES – CALL FOR BOOK PROPOSALS

Sense Publishers

Series Editor, Patricia Leavy, PhD

The Teaching Gender Series will publish approximately three books annually. We are looking for books that deal centrally with gender and are intended to be used in college classes. Books should be of significant value to the teaching of gender. The series aims to promote social justice perspectives and will be published by Sense Publishers, leaders in educational research.

 

The International Editorial Advisory Board for the Series includes:

Tony E. Adams, Northeastern Illinois University, USA

Paula Banerjee, University of Calcutta, India

Nitza Berkovitch, Ben Gurion University, Israel

Cheryl Dellasega, Penn State University, USA

Máiréad Dunne, University of Sussex, UK

Mary Holmes, Flinders University, Australia

Laurel Richardson, Ohio State University, Emerita, USA

Sophie Tamas, Queen’s University in Kingston, Canada

  

Books on any gender-related topic will be considered; however, we are presently most interested in proposals for books on the following topics (please note we are looking to publish slim volumes and not very large textbooks- approximately 200 printed pages with an estimated 450 words per page when tabulated using Sense’s style guidelines):

  

Introduction to Gender Studies

International Perspectives on Gender

Women, Work & Family

Feminist Pedagogies

Feminist Research Methods or Research Methods for Gender Studies

  

Please send queries or full proposals for monographs or edited volumes to Series Editor, Patricia Leavy at pleavy7@aol.com.

Visit Sense Publishers at: www.sensepublishers.com

  

**END**

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

 

Revolution at Point Zero

REVOLUTION AT POINT ZERO: HOUSEWORK, REPRODUCTION AND FEMINIST STRUGGLE

Book Launch

Silvia Federici launches Revolution at Point Zero: Housework, Reproduction and Feminist Struggle.

12 November, 6pm, LG02, New Academic Building, Goldsmiths University, Lewisham Way, SE14 6NW, near New Cross station.

 

Written between 1974 and the present, Revolution at Point Zero collects forty years of research and theorizing on the nature of housework, social reproduction, and women’s struggles on this terrain—to escape it, to better its conditions, to reconstruct it in ways that provide an alternative to capitalist relations.

Indeed, as Federici reveals, behind the capitalist organization of work and the contradictions inherent in “alienated labor” is an explosive ground zero for revolutionary practice upon which are decided the daily realities of our collective reproduction.

Beginning with Federici’s organizational work in the Wages for Housework movement, the essays collected here unravel the power and politics of wide but related issues including the international restructuring of reproductive work and its effects on the sexual division of labor, the globalization of care work and sex work, the crisis of elder care, the development of affective labor, and the politics of the commons.

Praise:

“Finally we have a volume that collects the many essays that over a period of four decades Silvia Federici has written on the question of social reproduction and women’s struggles on this terrain. While providing a powerful history of the changes in the organization of reproductive labor, Revolution at Point Zero documents the development of Federici’s thought on some of the most important questions of our time: globalization, gender relations, the construction of new commons.”
Mariarosa Dalla Costa, coauthor of The Power of Women and the Subversion of the Community and Our Mother Ocean

“As the academy colonizes and tames women’s studies, Silvia Federici speaks the experience of a generation of women for whom politics was raw, passionately lived, often in the shadow of an uncritical Marxism. She spells out the subtle violence of housework and sexual servicing, the futility of equating waged work with emancipation, and the ongoing invisibility of women’s reproductive labors. Under neoliberal globalization women’s exploitation intensifies—in land enclosures, in forced migration, in the crisis of elder care. With ecofeminist thinkers and activists, Federici argues that protecting the means of subsistence now becomes the key terrain of struggle, and she calls on women North and South to join hands in building new commons.”
Ariel Salleh, author of Ecofeminism as Politics: Nature, Marx, and the Postmodern

“The zero point of revolution is where new social relations first burst forth, from which countless waves ripple outward into other domains. For over thirty years, Silvia Federici has fiercely argued that this zero point cannot have any other location but the sphere of reproduction. It is here that we encounter the most promising battlefield between an outside to capital and a capital that cannot abide by any outsides. This timely collection of her essays reminds us that the shape and form of any revolution are decided in the daily realities and social construction of sex, care, food, love, and health. Women inhabit this zero point neither by choice nor by nature, but simply because they carry the burden of reproduction in a disproportionate manner. Their struggle to take control of this labor is everybody’s struggle, just as capital’s commodification of their demands is everybody’s commodification.”
Massimo De Angelis, author of The Beginning of History: Values, Struggles, and Global Capital

“In her unfailing generosity of mind, Silvia Federici has offered us yet another brilliant and groundbreaking reflection on how capitalism naturalizes the exploitation of every aspect of women’s productive and reproductive life. Federici theorizes convincingly that, whether in the domestic or public sphere, capital normalizes women’s labor as ‘housework’ worthy of no economic compensation or social recognition. Such economic and social normalization of capitalist exploitation of women underlies the gender-based violence produced by the neoliberal wars that are ravaging communities around the world, especially in Africa. The intent of such wars is to keep women off the communal lands they care for, while transforming them into refugees in nation-states weakened by the negative effects of neoliberalism. Silvia Federici’s call for ecofeminists’ return to the Commons against Capital is compelling. Revolution at Point Zero is a timely release and a must read for scholars and activists concerned with the condition of women around the world.”
Ousseina D. Alidou, Committee for Academic Freedom in Africa (CAFA), Director of the Center for African Studies at Rutgers University and author of Engaging Modernity: Muslim Women and the Politics of Agency in Postcolonial Niger

About Silvia Federici:

Silvia Federici is a feminist writer, teacher, and militant. In 1972, she was cofounder of the International Feminist Collective, which launched the Wages for Housework campaign internationally. With other members of Wages for Housework, like Mariarosa Dalla Costa and Selma James, and with feminist authors like Maria Mies and Vandana Shiva, Federici has been instrumental in developing the concept of “reproduction” as a key to class relations of exploitation and domination in local and global contexts, and as central to forms of autonomy and the commons.

In the 1990s, after a period of teaching and research in Nigeria, she was active in the anti-globalization movement and the U.S. anti-death penalty movement. She is one of the co-founders of the Committee for Academic Freedom in Africa, an organization dedicated to generating support for the struggles of students and teachers in Africa against the structural adjustment of African economies and education systems. From 1987 to 2005, she also taught international studies, women’s studies, and political philosophy courses at Hofstra University in Hempstead, NY.

Her decades of research and political organizing accompanies a long list of publications on philosophy and feminist theory, women’s history, education, culture, international politics, and more recently on the worldwide struggle against capitalist globalization and for a feminist reconstruction of the commons. Her steadfast commitment to these issues resounds in her focus on autonomy and her emphasis on the power of what she calls self-reproducing movements as a challenge to capitalism through the construction of new social relations.

Product Details:

Author: Silvia Federici
Publisher: PM Press/Common Notions/Autonomedia
ISBN: 978-1-60486-333-8
Published September 2012
Format: Paperback
Size: 8 by 5
Page count: 208 Pages
Subjects: Women’s Studies/Politics/Sociology

Revolution at Point Zero at PM Press: https://secure.pmpress.org/index.php?l=product_detail&p=420

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

 

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Revolt!

REVOLUTIONS

Revolutions: Call for Articles and Open Space
Pieces for this Feminist Review
Special Issue, No. 106, February 2014
CALL FOR PAPERS

Revolutions as a deliberately open special issue title references revolution as a phenomenon, social movement or form of transformation both contemporarily and historically. The editors are particularly interested in highlighting the difference it makes to the theory or practice of revolution to consider gender, or to gender to consider ‘revolution’. We want to ask not so much ‘what about the women?’ (although this remains an important question), but ‘what kind of revolution can or cannot attend to gender relations?’ The title also references changes that might be made in the world that might not usually be thought of as revolutionary, and our plural form ‘revolutions’ stresses both different forms (including counterrevolution) and the effects of and contests within revolutionary practices. Where does activism end and revolution begin? How might that distinction itself be gendered? 

In this special issue, we hope to explore the gendered nature of revolutions of a variety of kinds, some but not all of which might also be called feminist, and to situate the question of revolutions in historical and cultural context, making it a question rather than a presumption: revolutions? Revolutions as a term has a further openness that may not reference recent or past social movements, even where contested. It may refer to the transformation or return (in altered form) of ideas, to the phrase that ‘what goes around comes around’. In this sense our pluralisation resists an easy periodisation of revolution as well as the assumption that we already know what a revolution is when we see one, what makes a revolution gendered or feminist, or who its proper subject is. Revolution is always a relationship, always one with actors who exchange fantasies and desires as well as strategies and practices.

Themes under this framework may include but are not limited to the following:
* Interrogations of the concepts of ‘revolution’ and ‘feminist revolution’
* Case studies theorizing gender and revolution in original ways
* Innovative theoretical and historical approaches to gender and revolution
* Intersectional, transnational and/or comparative approaches to (en)gendering revolution
* Engagement with gendered symbolization within revolutions, including masculinity and femininity, motherhood, fatherhood and nation
* The impact and affects of revolution, including feelings of rage, disillusionment, joy, and forms of attachment
* Inclusion and exclusion of particular bodies (e.g. racialised and queer) in revolutionary movements/moments
* Counter-revolution and post-revolution, their impact on e.g. women’s participation and gender relations
* Revolutionary icons, their roles and relations to e.g. race, gender and class
* Interrogation of the subject and object of revolution

Special Issue Editors: Carrie Hamilton, Clare Hemmings and Rutvica Andrijasevic

Deadline for first drafts of papers marked clearly ‘REVOLUTIONS’ submitted online and following Feminist Review guidelines by: Friday, 14 December 2012.

The editors are happy to discuss possible papers informally with potential contributors. Please contact: c.hamilton@roehampton.ac.uk; c.hemmings@lse.ac.ukr.andrijasevic@le.ac.uk

First published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/revolutions-call-for-articles-and-open-space-pieces-for-this-feminist-review  

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Progress

INTERFACE VOLUME 3 ISSUE 2: FEMINISM, WOMEN’S MOVEMENTS AND WOMEN IN MOVEMENT

Interface 3(2) now out: feminism, women’s movements and women in movement

Volume three, issue two (November 2011): Feminism, women’s movements and women in movement
Issue editors: Sara Motta, Cristina Flesher Fominaya, Catherine Eschle, Laurence Cox
http://www.interfacejournal.net/current/

Volume three, issue two of Interface, a peer-reviewed e-journal produced and refereed by social movement practitioners and engaged movement researchers, is now out, on the special theme “Feminism, women’s movements and women in movement”. Interface is open-access (free), global and multilingual. Our overall aim is to “learn from each other’s struggles”: to develop a dialogue between practitioners and researchers, but also between different social movements, intellectual traditions and national or regional contexts.
 
This issue of Interface includes xx pages and 27 pieces in English and Spanish, by authors writing from / about Australia, Canada, Denmark, Guatemala, India, Ireland, Mexico, Nicaragua, the Netherlands, Poland, South Africa, Spain, the UK and the US.

Articles include:

 

Sara Motta, Cristina Flesher Fominaya, Catherine Eschle and Laurence Cox, Feminism, women’s movements and women in movement

 Theme-related articles:

 Janet Conway, Feminist knowledges on the anti-globalization terrain: transnational feminisms at the World Social Forum

Lyndi Hewitt, Framing across differences, building solidarities: lessons from women’s rights activism in transnational spaces

Eurig Scandrett, Suroopa Mukherjee and the Bhopal Research Team, “We are flames not flowers”: a gendered reading of the social movement for justice in Bhopal

Akwugo Emejulu, Can “the people” be feminists? Analysing the fate of feminist justice claims in populist grassroots movements in the United States

Finn Mackay, A movement of their own: voices of young feminist activists in the London Feminist Network

Melody L Hoffmann, Bike Babes in Boyland: women cyclists’ pedagogical strategies in urban bicycle culture

Nina Nissen, Challenging perspectives: women, complementary and alternative medicine, and social change

 

Special section: feminist strategies for change:

Sisters of Resistance, Why we need a feminist movement now

Nina Nijsten, Some things we need for a feminist revolution

Rosario González Arias, Viejas tensiones, nuevos desafíos y futuros territorios feministas

Tiny aka Lisa Gray-Garcia, Independence vs interdependence

Roberta Villalón, Feminist activist research and strategies from within the battered immigrants’ movement

Elena Jeffreys, Audry Autonomy, Jane Green, Christian Vega (Scarlet Alliance Australian Sex Workers Association), Listen to sex workers: support decriminalisation and anti-discrimination protections

Jean Bridgeman, Wise women in community: building on everyday radical feminism for social change

Jennifer Verson, Performing unseen identities: a feminist strategy for radical communication

Jed Picksley, Jamie Heckert and Sara Motta, Feminist love, feminist rage; or, Learning to listen

Anarchist Feminists Nottingham, Statement on intimate partner violence within activist communities

 

Other articles:

Kenneth Good, The capacities of the people versus a predominant, militarist, ethno-nationalist elite: democratisation in South Africa c. 1973 – 97

Michael Neocosmos, Transition, human rights and violence: rethinking a liberal political relationship in the African neo-colony

Roy Krøvel, Alternative journalism and the relationship between guerrillas and indigenous peoples in Latin America

Tomás Mac Sheoin, Greenpeace: a (partly) annotated bibliography of English-language publications

Anna Feigenbaum with Kheya Bag, Ken Barlow, Jakob Horstmann, David Shulman and Kika Sroka-Miller, “Everything we do is niche”: a roundtable on contemporary progressive publishing

 

This issue’s reviews include the following titles:

Jennifer Earl and Katrina Kimport, Digitally enabled social change: activism in the Internet age

SV Ojas, Madhuresh Kumar, MJ Vijayan and Joe Athialy, Plural narratives from Narmada Valley

Eurig Scandrett et al, Bhopal survivors speak: emergent voices from a people’s movement

Hilary Wainwright, Reclaim the state: experiments in popular democracy

 

A Call for Papers for volume 4 issue 2 of Interface is now open, on the theme of “The global emancipation of labour: new movements and struggles around work, workers and precarity” (submissions deadline May 1 2012). We can review and publish articles in Afrikaans, Arabic, Catalan, Croatian, Danish, Dutch, English, French, German, Hungarian, Italian, Maltese, Norwegian, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish and Zulu. The website has the full CFP and details on how to submit articles for this issue at http://interfacejournal.nuim.ie/2011/06/call-for-papers-volume-4-issue-2-for-the-global-emancipation-of-labour-new-movements-and-struggles-around-work-workers-and-precarity/
 
The next issue of Interface (May 2012) will be on “The season of revolutions: the Arab Spring”, with a special section on the new wave of European mobilizations.

Interface is always open to new collaborators.

More details can be found on our website: http://interfacejournal.net
 
Please forward this to anyone you think may be interested

 

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Feminism

DISSIDENT FEMINISMS

Announcing a New Series: Dissident Feminisms

Series Editor: Piya Chatterjee, University of California, Riverside

The University of Illinois Press is pleased to announce a new series, Dissident Feminisms, which seeks new feminist writing that traverses the fault lines of epistemology and power, particularly the relationship between social action, activism and theory. Featuring work by scholar-activists with critical and praxis-oriented methods, this interdisciplinary series seeks to intervene in conversations of critical import in a number of fields. We plan to foster rigorous feminist engagement with the enduring, intractable problems of our time: racisms; genocides; war and occupation; heteronormative, communitarian and state violence; militarism; and struggles for livelihood and basic human rights.

Dissident Feminisms seeks writing that breaks taboos. We will feature feminist analyses that combine radical critique with work towards progressive social change. The series is particularly interested in bridging the gaps between transnational and postcolonial feminist scholars, activists, and organizers and the work of U.S., immigrant, and native women of color. It will create space for radically plural critiques that combine analytic rigor with accessibility. The series will feature lucid and compelling academic monographs, edited collections that bring together a number of voices in focused, critical, and timely dialogue, and other writings that pointedly intervene in these urgent feminist conversations.

Please direct all questions and submissions to:

Larin McLaughlin
Senior Acquisitions Editor
University of Illinois Press
1325 South Oak St.
Champaign, IL 61820-6903
larinmc@uillinois.edu

 

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Education

RESEARCH IN COMPARATIVE AND INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION – VOLUME 6 NUMBER 1 (2011)

Now available at: www.wwwords.co.uk/rcie/content/pdfs/6/issue6_1.asp

RESEARCH IN COMPARATIVE AND INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION
Volume 6 Number 1 2011   ISSN 1745-4999

SPECIAL ISSUE
Girls and Young Women’s Education and Empowerment in Marginalized Regions of the World
Guest Editors: VILMA SEEBERG & KAREN MONKMAN

Karen Monkman. Introduction. Framing Gender, Education and Empowerment

Halla B. Holmarsdottir, Ingrid Birgitte Møller Ekne & Heidi L. Augestad. The Dialectic between Global Gender Goals and Local Empowerment: girls’ education in Southern Sudan and South Africa

Joan DeJaeghere & Soo Kyoung Lee. What Matters for Marginalized Girls and Boys in Bangladesh: a capabilities approach for understanding educational well-being and empowerment

Vilma Seeberg. Schooling, Jobbing, Marrying: what’s a girl to do to make life better? Empowerment Capabilities of Girls at the Margins of Globalization in China

Kristen J. Molyneaux. Uganda’s Universal Secondary Education Policy and its Effect on ‘Empowered’ Women: how reduced income and moonlighting activities differentially impact male and female teachers

Sofie Haug Changezi & Heidi Biseth. Education of Hazara Girls in a Diaspora: education as empowerment and an agent of change

Payal P. Shah. Girls’ Education and Discursive Spaces for Empowerment: perspectives from rural India

Supriya Baily. Speaking Up: contextualizing women’s voices and gatekeepers’ reactions in promoting women’s empowerment in rural India

Mary Ann Maslak. Education, Employment and Empowerment: the case of a young woman in northwestern China

Joshua A. Muskin, Abdelhak Kamime & Abdellah Adlaoui. Empowered to Empower: a civil society-government partnership to increase girls’ junior secondary school outcomes in Morocco

Access to the full texts of articles is restricted to those who have a Personal subscription, or those whose institution has a Library subscription. However, all articles become free-to-view 18 months after first publication.

CALL FOR PAPERS: For all editorial matters, including articles offered for publication, please contact the Editor, Professor David Phillips (david.phillips@education.ox.ac.uk). Full details concerning the submission of articles can be found at www.wwwords.co.uk/RCIE/04.html

PERSONAL SUBSCRIPTION. Subscription to the 2011 issues (this includes access to ALL PAST ISSUES) is available to private individuals at a cost of US$50.00. If you wish to subscribe you may do so immediately at www.wwwords.co.uk/subscribeRCIE.asp

LIBRARY SUBSCRIPTION (institution-wide access). If you are working within an institution that maintains a Library, please urge your Librarian to take out a subscription so that we can provide unrestricted access throughout your institution; details of subscription rates and access control arrangements for libraries can be found at www.symposium-journals.co.uk/prices.html

In the event of problems concerning subscription, or difficulty in gaining access to the journal articles on the website, please email the publishers at support@symposium-journals.co.uk

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Social Justice

MATERIALIST FEMINISMS IN AN AGE OF NEOLIBERALISM

Materialist Feminisms in an age of Neoliberalism; or, Would the critique of patriarchal capitalism please stand up?

A special issue of the online journal Politics and Culture (http://www.politicsandculture.org)

***Please Note: In addition to article-length contributions, we also solicit shorter interventions, provocations, or position papers (1500-2000 words) for two themed discussions 1) experiences and direction from elders in this work and 2) experiences and demands from junior scholars.

Liberal inclusion. Globalization and neoliberal crisis. Neoconservative backlash. We know that feminism has had many lives. We are especially attuned to the forms of imperialist, settler and liberal “feminism” that have motivated a great many social projects, most recently the ostensible concern over the status of women in Afghanistan that has played so well as a rationale for war. And yet, we live amidst a rapidly accelerating culture of neoliberal individualism, combined with the virulent cult of persecuted white masculinity that marks the neoconservative shift, the backlash against supposed minority gains, and the dogged attack by the state and corporate elite on the material and social protections won through decades of struggle. The need for anti-capitalist feminist foment has never been so dire.

From early noted thinkers such as Lucy B. Parsons, Rosa Luxembourg and Emma Goldman, to Marxist Feminist scholars such as Maria Mies, Mariarosa Dalla Costa and Giovanna Dalla Costa, Angela Davis and Sylvia Federici, to anti-racist and anti-colonialist scholars such as bell hooks, Himani Bannerji, Patricia Monture Angus, Vandana Shiva, Chandra Talpade Mohanty, Andrea Smith, to theorists such as Zillah Eisenstein, Wendy Brown, and Nancy Fraser, “structuralist” or “materialist” feminisms draw a lineage that views economics, capitalism and political struggles specifically through the lenses of gender, race and class, and anti-imperialist, anti-patriarchal, anti-heteronormative and anti-racist agendas. While the distinctions are far too subtle and complex to enumerate here, critical to Marxist, socialist, anarchist, materialist and other kinds of structuralist feminism is the notion that ending gender-based oppression requires (among other things) a reckoning of capitalist, colonial and patriarchal histories and organizations of power. We invite a forward-looking conversation that draws trajectories in the body of work we might broadly think of as structural or materialist feminisms.

Topics for consideration may include:
* In a neoliberal age in which the ecological collapse wreaked by capitalism’s rapacious appetite appears as an urgent horizon framing cultural politics, what is to be gained or lost by prioritizing gender as a category of analysis? What is the task ahead for materialist feminism?
* The contemporary backlash
* Where is the work of structural feminism taking place? Do you observe or practice it in the university, in the streets, in your creative work, in your everyday life relations and survival?
* Identity politics vs. anti-capitalist struggle: whose schism?
* Women and the gift, women for the land, women and the spirit
* Queer materialisms
* Is there a materialist feminism outside of struggle? And is there a struggle?
* From “Marxist feminism” to transnational, anti-imperialist, anti-racist, anti-capitalist, anti-colonial feminist?  There is a story that has been told many ways many times and yet not told nearly enough: history and future of structural feminisms? Revisiting feminist theory, women’s studies, institutionalization, ghettoization, backlash, disciplinarity

****In addition to article-length contributions, we also solicit shorter interventions or provocations (1500-2000 words) for two themed discussions 1) experiences and direction from elders in this work and 2) experiences and demands from junior scholars.

Please send 200 word abstracts and/or short queries to Alyson McCready (alyson.mccready@gmail.com) or Mary Ellen Campbell (campbeme@mcmaster.ca) by April 1st, 2011.

Submissions will be expected May 15th, 2011.
 
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Feminism