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WAGES OF WHITENESS & RACIST SYMBOLIC CAPITAL

Racism Analysis – Yearbook 1 – 2010: Edited by Wulf D. Hund, Jeremy Krikler, David Roediger

219 pp., 24.90€, ISBN 978-3-643-10949-1 threadstiching, softcover with flaps Lit Verlag | Berlin – Münster – London – Wien – Zurich

CONTENTS:

DAVID ROEDIGER: ACCOUNTING FOR THE WAGES OF WHITENESS: U.S MARXISM AND THE CRITICAL HISTORY OF RACE. 

ANJA WEISS: RACIST SYMBOLIC CAPITAL: A BOURDIEUIAN APPROACH TO THE ANALYSIS OF RACISM. 

WULF D. HUND: NEGATIVE SOCIETALISATION, RACISM AND THE CONSTITUTION OF RACE.

STEFANIE AFFELDT: A PAROXYSM OF WHITENESS: WHITE LABOUR, WHITE NATION 
AND WHITE SUGAR IN AUSTRALIA.

JEREMY KRIKLER: RE-THINKING RACE AND CLASS IN SOUTH AFRICA: SOME WAYS FORWARD. 

DAGMAR ENGELKEN: A WHITE MAN’S COUNTRY? THE CHINESE LABOUR CONTROVERSY IN THE TRANSVAAL.

ELIZABETH ESCH: RACIALIZING TRANSNATIONALISM: THE FORD MOTOR COMPANY AND WHITE SUPREMACY FROM DETROIT TO SOUTH AFRICA.

The essays assembled in this volume shed light on the complex of class and race from which W.E.B. Du Bois saw originating “a sort of public and psychological wage” of whiteness. David Roediger (University of Illinois) preliminarily addresses the evolution of whiteness as a category of critical social analysis. Anja Weib (Universität Duisburg-Essen) explains that the perspective of whiteness studies can be expanded by a modification of Bourdieu’s category of symbolic capital. Wulf D. Hund (Universität Hamburg) pleads for the generalisation of this concept and for its application to an analysis of racism as negative societalisation. Stefanie Affeldt (Universitat Hamburg) specifies the analytic dimensions of the categories ‘racist symbolic capital’ and ‘wages of whiteness’ using the example of the white sugar campaign in Australia. Jeremy Krikler (University of Essex) explores some missing dimensions in the study of race and class in South Africa. Dagmar Engelken (University of Essex) investigates the Chinese Labour Question in South Africa. Elizabeth Esch (Columbia University) examines the ways in which corporate initiatives of the Ford Motor Company in the U.S. and South Africa imagined the assembly line worker as a white citizen and consumer.

Racism Analysis is a research series that explores racial discrimination in all its varying historical, ideological and cultural patterns. It examines the invention of race, the dimensions of modern racism and inquires into racism avant la lettre. The series brings together scholars from various disciplines and schools of thought. A key aim is to contribute to the conceptualisation of racism and to identify the practices of dehumanisation intrinsic to it.

The Racism Analysis Studies will publish monographs as well as anthologies, proceedings and textbooks, thereby assembling contributions committed to various perspectives of a critical research into society. The contributions will delve into examples of racist inclusion and exclusion, or outline specific aspects of the different fields of research into racism.

The Racism Analysis Yearbook will be issued by varying teams of special editors. Each volume will deal with key topics in the debates over racism and will focus on illuminating such topics through the investigation of particular subjects and will refer to the state of scholarly discussion on them.

Check out the book at Lit Verlag’s site: (http://www.lit-verlag.de/isbn/3-643-10949-1)

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Culture

WAGES OF WHITENESS & RACIST SYMBOLIC CAPITAL

(Racism Analysis – Yearbook 1 – 2010) Edited by Wulf D. Hund, Jeremy Krikler, David Roediger

W. E. B. Du Bois

W. E. B. Du Bois

RACE, LABOR AND CITIZENSHIP IN THE POST-EMANCIPATION SOUTH

 

Call for Papers
 
Conference on ‘Race, Labor & Citizenship in the Post-Emancipation South’
Charleston, March 11-13, 2010
College of Charleston
Charleston, South Carolina
 
Keynote by Steven Hahn, author of the prize-winning A Nation Under Our Feet:
Black Political Struggles in the Rural South from Slavery to the Great Migration

Rationale: One hundred years ago the outstanding African American scholar-activist, W. E. B. Du Bois, presented to the American Historical Association a paper entitled “Reconstruction and Its Benefits.” In the paper and in his seminal Black Reconstruction, published a quarter century later, Du Bois not only exposed the racial assumptions underpinning the then dominant view of the period following slave emancipation: he insisted that the struggles over slavery and the shape of the freedom that followed were central to the history of America’s working people, calling it “the kernel and meaning of the labor movement in the United States.” Over the past generation, historians have built upon Du Bois’s powerful insight about the connections between race, labor and citizenship in the post-emancipation South, producing some of the most compelling scholarship in the field of U. S. history.
 
The After Slavery Project, a transatlantic research collaboration based at Queen’s University Belfast, welcomes proposals from scholars at all levels for individual papers and panels that showcase new and developing research on these and related themes across the former slave South, between the end of the Civil War and the early years of the twentieth century. As part of our commitment to making this scholarship widely available to teachers and students outside of higher education, labor and community activists, and interested citizens, we invite proposals for teachers’ workshops and panels that attempt to link new scholarship and public/popular history and/or online learning.  
 
Suggested topics include:
Labor and the Politics of Reconstruction
Freedwomen, Citizenship and the Public Sphere
Freedom, Property Rights and the Land Question in the Postwar South
Black Workers, the Union Leagues and the Republican Party
White Supremacy and the Prospects for Interracialism
The Franchise and Grassroots Political Activism
Coercion, Paramilitary Violence and Resistance
Emigration Movements and Black Mobility
Gender and the Free Labor Vision
Religion and Southern Laborers
Dockworkers, Port Cities and Black Mobilization
Race Leadership after ‘Redemption’
Populism and the Color Line
Agricultural and Urban Labor
Race, Labor and New South Industrialization
Independent Politics after 1880
 
Details are available online at http://www.afterslavery.com . Proposals (limit 200 words/paper) should be submitted by November 20, 2009 either electronically to charlestonconference@afterslavery.com or by completing the online form at the After Slavery http://www.afterslavery.com  website.
 
Conference Organizers:
Brian Kelly, Queen’s University Belfast
Susan E. O’Donovan, University of Memphis
Bruce E. Baker, Royal Holloway–University of London
Bernard E. Powers Jr., College of Charleston
Simon K. Lewis, College of Charleston (CLAW)
Kerry Taylor, The Citadel
 
Organized by the After Slavery Project
Co-sponsored by the Program in the Carolina Lowcountry and the Atlantic World (CLAW); the Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture (College of Charleston); the (SC) African American Historical Alliance; School of Humanities and Social Sciences (The Citadel) and the Southern Labor Studies Association

Other supporting organizations: Center for the Study of the American South (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill); Institute for Southern Studies (University of South Carolina at Columbia); Labor and Working Class History Association (LAWCHA); Charleston International Longshoremen’s Association Local 1422; The Citadel Oral History Program; W. E. B. Du Bois Institute (Harvard University)
 
The After Slavery Project is funded by the (UK) Arts and Humanities Research Council

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk