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Aesthetics

Aesthetics

VIOLENCE, REPRESENTATIONS AND SEXUALITY

FIFTH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF THE INTERNATIONAL NETWORK FOR SEXUAL ETHICS AND POLITICS – INSEP

CALL FOR PAPERS – INSEP2015

13th ‐ 15th July, 2015, Ghent University, Belgium
Hosted by CEVI – Centre for Ethics and Value Inquiry
Faculty of Arts and Philosophy
Ghent University, Blandijnberg 2
9000 Ghent – Belgium
See: http://www.insep.ugent.be/insep2015/
General Conference Theme – Violence, Representations and Sexuality

The relationship between violence and sexuality is one of the most critical areas of engagement for sex and sexuality research and activism. There continues to be an epidemic of violence against women and children – rape, sexual assault, sexual harassment and abuse – across the globe, manifest in different cultural customs and practices, authority structures, hetero‐patriarchal and hetero‐normative regimes at both national (and supranational in the case of trafficking) and everyday micro levels. This epidemic is often met with: limited regulatory responses suffused with heterosexist assumptions; legal authorities that fail to prioritise or regard it is less important than other criminal activity; indifference; and/or claims that the prevalent cultural milieu makes it impossible to act. While some efforts have been made in North America, Europe and Australasia to effect change, in many parts of the globe sexual subjection and suffering continues to be seen as a normal state of affairs.

Equally, across the globe sexual difference and departures from heterosexuality are met by varying degrees of violence, ranging from physical attack and murder, to prejudicial and pathological assumptions that are present even in the social context of equality and rights discourses. To be different is still to be ‘othered’ to varying degrees, and that ‘othering’ often takes damaging forms of practice against those who present themselves as different.

The cultural and representational contexts are of particular importance here. It is in the representational form that we most saliently see the cultural demarcations of legitimacy and illegitimacy for sex and sexuality. Through representations, tensions are played out in the public arena that are sometimes manifest only in inter‐subjective or hetero‐normative meaning making. In societies where gay men and lesbians are formally recognised, there remains a dichotomy between the ‘respectable’ different that operates within homonormative constraints and lives without troubling heteronormative assumption, and the ‘queer’ whose personal practices challenge or disrupt cultural and social norms as a feature of being themselves. Likewise, the representation of sex in mainstream medias often reinforces particular understandings and meanings suffused with power, presumption and prejudice. Against that, alternate forms of media can play an important role in promote constructive understandings of the relationship between desire, pleasure and healthy satisfaction.

Violence and sexuality also creates a nexus of troubling contradictions. Recently, the fetishisation of ‘Fifty Shades of Grey’, e.g., normalises a commodified and limited exploration of sexual imagination, whilst BDSMers and others who wish to move beyond difference as an adjunct to genito‐centric and penetrative sex remain culturally prejudiced against and subject to different and sometimes punishing pathologies and legal regulatory regimes. Pornography and prostitution represent other areas of contestation. Is pornography or prostitution inherently violent? Or is there room for sufficient levels of agency and choice? The juxtaposition of pain, violence and sex, whether in practice or in representation, whether consenting or not, splits those radical voices who often support sexual freedom. Does violence and sexuality represent a fault‐line for disagreement? Is that disagreement one of language and representation or of power, degradation and its effects? We welcome papers that explore any aspect of the relationship between violence, representation, sexuality and sex. As always, we also welcome other papers that reflect innovative, creative and thought‐provoking work on sexual ethics and politics in general. For this purpose we retain open streams at the conference. Please feel free to email the conference organisers for further inquiries.

Acceptance Policy

The fifth international conference of INSEP welcomes papers, presentations and panels focusing on conceptual and theoretical debates, cultural and political analysis and empirical studies from which conceptual, ethical and political conclusions are drawn.

INSEP seeks to provide a critical and dynamic space for cutting edge thinking, new research and key discussions and debates about issues of sexual ethics or politics, whether conceptual and theoretical discourse, analytical studies or aesthetically or empirically constituted insights. INSEP sees the value in the fullest range of approaches to the study of sexual ethics and politics, including: gendered and feminist perspectives; distinctive lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and transsexual perspectives; queer perspectives; and approaches from more general positions such as liberalism, Marxism and democratic theory.

The 2015 conference seeks to be an inclusive space for discussion, welcoming dialogue and vigorous debate, but not sectarianism. We consider paper proposals and panel proposals from any disciplinary field, and are willing to consider expositions that take less orthodox forms.

To facilitate funding applications ‐ please note INSEP has no funds of its own – we operate a ‘rolling’ process of abstract review and acceptance or rejection, and can provide documentation where it is required to facilitate funding. Our turnaround time for refereeing is 10 days.

Submission & Timeline: Submissions for papers (250 words), panels or workshops (500 word stipulating participants) should reach us by Monday 15 June at the latest. Earlier of course, is better.

Normal acceptance/rejection notification ‐ 10 days. All delegates/paper‐givers must register by Monday 23 June, and we encourage earlier registration when acceptances have been communicated.

Please send abstracts to: insep.network@gmail.com

The conference fee for the full three days is 150 Euros, which includes the conference pack and refreshments. A concessionary rate of 100 Euros is available to students and postgraduates.

INSEP publishes a journal and a book series with Barbara Budrich Publishers. We would anticipate commissioning publications from the conference and, dependent on quality and coherence, may publish a collection based on themes emerging from the conference. INSEP also welcomes submissions to the journal and proposals to the Book Series.

About INSEP

Sexual ethics and politics lie at the heart of how we understand and practice our sexual lives. They form the basis from which we understand and engage with diverse and different sexualities. Both, however, are currently open to question. On the one hand, discussion of sexual ethics has previously been confined to the auspices of an abstract intellectual discourse, effectively separating it from practice. Sexual politics, on the other hand, has seen progressive advances through world‐wide activism by grass‐roots movements, NGOs and national and international agents, but in the push for progress, the space for self‐critique and reflexivity is often eradicated. INSEP wants to activate a critical dialogue between sexual ethics and politics by connecting them and exploring the ways they can contribute to each other. The sexual is political and just as sexual politics could be enriched by emancipatory ethical thinking, sexual ethics should connect with contemporary sexual activism, politics and practices aiming for the realisation of sexual equalities and justice.
For more info on INSEP & the 2015 conference please visit:

INSEP2015: http://www.insep.ugent.be/insep2015/
INSEP – http://www.insep.ugent.be/
Journal INSEP – http://budrich‐journals.de/index.php/insep
Paul Reynolds
Reader in Sociology and Social Philosophy
Edge Hill University, UK
reynoldp@edgehill.ac.uk
Tom Claes
Associate Professor of Ethics
Ghent University, Belgium
Tom.Claes@UGent.be

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

University for Strategic Optimism

University for Strategic Optimism

LONDON CAMPAIGN AGAINST POLICE AND STATE VIOLENCE ANNUAL CONFERENCE

Date: Sunday 12th October at 1pm

Venue: Richard Hoggart Building Cinema, Richard Hoggart Building,
Goldsmiths (University of London), Lewisham Way, New Cross, London SE14 6NW
Registration 1pm.

London Campaign Against Police and State Violence will be holding our annual conference on the theme of ‘The Right to Life Under Threat by the State’. Everyone is welcome, and admission is free (but donations are welcome).

The full programme will be published shortly. The conference will feature:
Kofi Klu
Raspect Fyabinghi
United Families and Friends Campaign
Joint Enterprise Not Guilty by Association (JENGbA)
®Movement
Screening of Migrant Media’s new film ‘Burn’
Spoken word

Facebook event is here: https://www.facebook.com/events/293056787547724/

Please RSVP by emailing lcapsv@gmail.com

 

Please share in your networks

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Fear of a Blank Planet

CONSORTIUM ON SOCIAL MOVEMENTS WORKSHOP – COSMOS

27 May 2013
European University Institute, Florence

Call for Papers
Popular culture and protest repertoires in 20th c. Europe

Convenors:
Ilaria Favretto (Professor of Contemporary European History, Kingston University, London)
Xabier Itçaina (CNRS Research fellow-Sciences Po Bordeaux – Marie Curie Fellow European University Institute, Florence)

Donatella della Porta (Professor of Sociology, European University Institute, Florence) will participate as discussant.

In the footsteps of Charles Tilly’s influential study of contentious politics in France and Great Britain, scholars of social movements tend to distinguish between pre-industrial and post-1789 forms of collective action. In early modern Europe, protest repertoires mainly revolved around community-based forms of direct action, which included attacks on property, field invasion, physical violence to persons. Charivari rites in particular, that is rituals of public humiliation through which small communities denounced and sanctioned certain breaches of commonly accepted customary rules, held significant prominence.  However, as a result of industrialisation, the rise of the nation-state and the spread of association politics, pre-industrial communitarian forms of protest were to gradually fade away. A new modern repertoire, which included boycotts, barricades, petitions, demonstrations, strikes, came to replace it.

Traditional forms of collective action did not disappear overnight. In particular, political charivari – that is rough music, mock trials, mock funerals, ride on donkeys, shaving, effigy burning or hanging, soiling, etc. – continued to be practiced and adapted to new political needs well up to the 20th c.  On the model of E. P. Thompson and Natalie Zemon Davis’ seminal work on popular culture(s) and protest, 19th and 20th c. historians and historical anthropologists have well documented the survival and practice of rituals of folk justice in later periods, mostly in the context of 19th c. liberal revolutions, peasant protest, Fascist violence, WWII Resistance movements, 19th c. and 20th c. industrial conflict, nationalist movements and new social movements. However, particularly in the study of 20th c. protest movements, these repertoires have been little investigated and, overall, poorly deciphered.

We believe that a better understanding of old repertoires and their underlying cultures and symbolism is crucial to fully comprehend modern protest. Therefore, the purpose of the workshop is to bring together scholars from different subject areas -historians, social anthropologists, political scientists and social movement scholars- to reflect in an interdisciplinary and comparative European perspective upon the influence of popular cultures and old repertoires of contention on modern protest.

We will address the following questions:
* To what extent, why and in what kind of contexts traditional pre-industrial repertoires continued to be practiced in the modern period (19th and 20th c.)?
* How did old repertoires of contention and traditional protest cultures survive industrialisation and urbanisation? Are there any European variations? If so, why?
* How did old protest routines integrate into modern protest tactics? Which factors account for their use and revival over time? Are there any specific groups of protesters who have practiced these repertoires?
* How have these repertoires been received and understood by public opinion, the media or political actors such as political parties or trade unions?
Contributions to theoretical approaches to the topic will also be welcome.

Please send your proposal (max 400 words; preferably in English) and information about your institutional affiliation and status (100 words) by 21 January 2013 via Email to: Ilaria Favretto (I.Favretto@Kingston.ac.uk) and Xabier Itcaina (Xabier.Itcaina@eui.eu)

Please note that participation at the workshop (that is accommodation and travel expenses) will be self-funded. Selected participants will be expected to send a short version of their paper (1500-2000 words) by 13 May 2013.
Provided we find a suitable publisher, we are planning to publish papers (in English) either as an edited volume or as an academic journal special issue. Longer and final versions of papers will be expected by 1 September 2013.

First published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-cosmos-consortium-on-social-movements-workshop-eui-florence-27-may-2013

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Autonomia

Autonomia

AUTONOMEDIA – NEW TITLES

New Titles

 

Revolutions in Reverse: Essays on Politics, Violence, Art, and Imagination

David Graeber

Capitalism as we know it appears to be coming apart. But as financial institutions stagger and crumble, there is no obvious alternative. There is good reason to believe that, in a generation or so, capitalism will no longer exist: for the simple reason that it’s impossible to maintain an engine of perpetual growth forever on a finite planet. Yet faced with this prospect, the knee-jerk reaction is often to cling to what exists because they simply can’t imagine an alternative that wouldn’t be even more oppressive and destructive. The political imagination seems to have reached an impasse. Or has it?

In this collection of essays David Graeber explores a wide-ranging set of topics including political strategy, global trade, debt, imagination, violence, aesthetics, alienation, and creativity. Written in the wake of the anti-globalization movement and the rise of the war on terror, these essays survey the political landscape for signs of hope in unexpected places.

At a moment when the old assumption about politics and power have been irrefutably broken the only real choice is to begin again: to create a new language, a new common sense, about what people basically are and what it is reasonable for them to expect from the world, and from each other. In this volume Graeber draws from the realms of politics, art, and the imagination to start this conversation and to suggest that that the task might not be nearly so daunting as we’d be given to imagine.

More information

Buy the book here

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Communization and its Discontents: Contestation, Critique, and Contemporary Struggles

Edited by Benjamin Noys

Can we find alternatives to the failed radical projects of the twentieth century? What are the possible forms of struggle today? How do we fight back against the misery of our crisis-ridden present? ‘Communization’ is the spectre of the immediate struggle to abolish capitalism and the state, which haunts Europe,Northern Californiaand wherever the real abstractions of value that shape our lives are contested. Evolving on the terrain of capitalism new practices of the ‘human strike’, autonomous communes, occupation and insurrection have attacked the alienations of our times. These signs of resistance are scattered and have yet to coalesce, and their future is deliberately precarious and insecure.

Bringing together voices from inside and outside of these currents Communization and Its Discontents treats communization as a problem to be explored rather than a solution. Taking in the new theorizations of communization proposed by Tiqqun and The Invisible Committee, Théorie Communiste, post-autonomists, and others, it offers critical reflections on the possibilities and the limits of these contemporary forms, strategies, and tactics of struggle.

More information

Buy the book here

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19 & 20: Notes for a New Social Protagonism

Colectivo Situaciones, with introductions by Michael Hardt & Antonio Negri

New book from Colectivo Situaciones… an 18th Brumaire for the 21st Century: militant research on the December 19th and 20th, 2001 uprisings inArgentina… In the heat of an economic and political crisis, people inArgentinatook to the streets on December 19th, 2001, shouting “¡Qué se vayan todos!” These words – “All of them out!” – hurled by thousands banging pots and pans, struck at every politician, economist, and journalist. These events opened a period of intense social unrest and political creativity that led to the collapse of government after government. Neighborhoods organized themselves into hundreds of popular assemblies across the country, the unemployed workers movement acquired a new visibility, workers took over factories and businesses. These events marked a sea change, a before and an after forArgentinathat resonated around the world.

Colectivo Situaciones wrote this book in the heat of that December’s aftermath. As radicals immersed within the long process of reflection and experimentation with forms of counterpower that Argentines practiced in shadow of neoliberal rule, Colectivo Situaciones knew that the novelty of the events of December 19th and 20th demanded new forms of thinking and research. This book attempts to read those struggles from within. Ten years have passed, yet the book remains as relevant and as fresh as the day it came out. Multitudes of citizens from different countries have learned their own ways to chant ¡Qué se vayan todos!, fromIcelandtoTunisia, fromSpaintoGreece, fromTahrir SquaretoZuccottiPark. Colectivo Situactiones’ practice of engaging with movements’ own thought processes resonates with everyone seeking to think current events and movements, and through that to build a new world in the shell of the old.

More information

Buy the book here

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Undressing the Academy, or The Student Handjob

University of Strategic Optimism

The weary student handbook genre is in need of a belligerent mauling. This is our crack at the job. We don’t want to talk down to anyone, but neither do we want to chat them up, so this is an attempt at thinking out the university from our own perspective, that of students. Here we air our dirty snapshot of the academy, at least semi-naked, just as we come across it. This potted guide is our pot shot at undressing and dressing down this place, the university, and understanding our place within it: its problems and potential, its power-relations and its possibilities for politicization. This is our attempt to share some of the knowledge to be gleaned in the university, but a knowledge that is rarely measured on any certificate come graduation day.

Written collectively by the University for Strategic Optimism, in the queasy come-down afterglow of the recent wave of student activism in the UK (but looking forward to cracking-off another round), this guide attempts to contextualize our struggle and to bring it closer to home. Just what is the university that we are fighting for anyway? And what perhaps could it be?

More information

Buy the book here

 

**END**

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

The Island of Chaos

TROPIC OF CHAOS

Tropic of Chaos: The Catastrophic Convergence of Poverty, Violence, and Climate Change

Christian Parenti in conversation with Vijay Prashad and David Harvey

Monday, August 29, 2011 from 7-9 pm
The James Gallery
CUNY Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue @ 34th Street

Free and open to the public; reception and book signing to follow

In TROPIC OF CHAOS: Climate Change and the New Geography of Violence (Nation Books; July 1, 2011), award-winning writer Christian Parenti argues that the new era of climate war has begun, intertwining environmental disasters, poverty, social inequality, and violence in the Global South. Parenti, historian Vijay Prashad and Marxist scholar David Harvey will discuss the historical legacy of Cold War militarism, neoliberal economic restructuring, and the convergent onset of climate change expressed as warfare, crime, repression, state failure, and a planet in peril.

About the author:

Christian Parenti is a Puffin Foundation Writing Fellow, a contributing editor at The Nation, and a visiting scholar at the Center for Place, Culture and Politics at the City University of New York, Graduate Center. The author of Lockdown America, The Soft Cage, and The Freedom, he has written for Fortune, The New York Times, Mother Jones, The London Review of Books, and Salon, among others. His latest book is, Tropic of Chaos: Climate Change and the New Geography of Violence (Nation Books, 2011).

About the panelists:

Vijay Prashad is the author of eleven books, most recently, The Darker Nations: A People’s History of the Third World (The New Press, paperback 2008), which won the 2009 Muzaffar Ahmad Book Prize. His forthcoming books include The Poorer Nations: A Possible History of the Global South (Verso and LeftWord, 2012). His web dispatches can be read at Counterpunch (counterpunch.org), at ZNET (http://zmag.org/znet) and at Pragoti (http://www.pragoti.org).

David Harvey is Director of the Center for Place, Culture and Politics and Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Geography at the CUNY Graduate Center. He is the author of numerous books, including The Engima of Capital (Oxford University Press, 2010), A Brief History of Neoliberalism (Oxford University Press, 2005), and Spaces of Global Capitalism: Towards a Theory of Uneven Geographical Development (Verso, 2006).

Sponsored by the Center for Place, Culture and Politics Co-sponsored by the Center for Humanities at the GC and the Brecht Forum

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Sociology

NEW COMMUNICATIONS AND DEMONSTRATIONS

How are demonstrations represented in the mass media?  How do activists use new media to organise and communicate protest? What benefits do Social Media provide? 

The BSA Media Study Group and the University of Leicester are proud to announce a symposium called ‘New Communications and Demonstrations’. This event will showcase a plethora of valuable research in this field and invite discussions and comments on this topic.

A full programme for the day and online registration are now available at: http://www.britsoc.co.uk/specialisms/Media.htm

 

‘New Communications and Demonstrations’

Wednesday 13th July 2011, 10.30am – 4.30pm

Attenborough Building, University of Leicester

Directions: http://www2.le.ac.uk/maps

 

Symposium fees (Places are limited, so sign up early!)

£25 BSA members and Postgraduates

£35 for non-members

 

For more details about the study group please visit: http://www.britsoc.co.uk/specialisms/Media.htm

Please direct any administrative enquiries to the BSA office at events@britsoc.org.uk and any academic enquires to Dr. Julian Matthews jpm29@leicester.ac.uk  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Equality

THE SPIRIT LEVEL: WHY EQUALITY IS BETTER FOR EVERYONE

27 June 2011

Conference Centre, British Library, Euston Road, London from 18.30–20.00
An event to celebrate the 60th anniversary of the British Sociological Association 

Comparing life expectancy, mental health, levels of violence, teenage birth rates, drug abuse, child wellbeing, obesity rates, levels of trust, the educational performance of school children, or the strength of community life among rich countries, it is clear that societies which tend to do well on one of these measures tend to do well on all of them, and the ones which do badly, do badly on all of them. What accounts for the difference?  

The key is the amount of inequality in each society. The more unequal a society is, the more ill health and social problems it has. Compelling new evidence which highlights the benefits of more equal societies was published in 2009 in the best-selling book The Spirit Level by Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett. 

To promote public discussion and understanding of the issues, the British Sociological Association, working in partnership with the British Library, invites you to attend an evening with Richard Wilkinson, the co-author of The Spirit Level: Why Equality is Better for Everyone. Richard is co-director of The Equality Trust, which aims to gain public and political understanding of the consequences of widespread inequality and he will explore some of the ideas and themes covered in the book.  

Please join us for what promises to be a thought-provoking and inspiring event, as well as the opportunity to meet one of the authors of this groundbreaking book.  

Register now at: http://www.bl.uk/whatson/events/event122196.html.  Book early to avoid disappointment!

Price:  £7.50/£5.00 concessions.

END***

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Russian Revolution

CONFERENCE ON WAR, REVOLUTION, CIVIL WAR: EASTERN EUROPE 1917-23

UCD CENTRE FOR WAR STUDIES

War, Revolution, Civil War: Eastern Europe 1917-23
25-26 March 2011

Venue: Clinton Institute, Seminar Room
University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
Friday, 25 March 2011

13:00 Registration
13:30  Welcome and Introduction

13:45 – 15:30   Panel 1: The War as Imperial Challenge – Russia
Chair: Nikolaus Katzer (German Historical Institute Moscow)

Semen Gol’din (Hebrew University Jerusalem): The Jewish Policy of Military and Civilian Authorities as a Case Study of the Systemic Crisis in the Russian Empire, 1914-1917

Alexander Semyonov (Smolny Institute St. Petersburg/ Ab Imperio) World War as the Civil War and Civil War as the World War: The Radicalization of Political Visions in the War Time Russian Empire

Boris Kolonicky (European University St. Petersburg) “Nicolas the 3rd”: Images of the Commander in Chief Grand Duke Nikolaj Nikolaevich (1914-1915)

15:030– 16:00   COFFEE BREAK

16:00 – 17:30 Panel 2:  Revolution and Civil War – Russia
Chair: Katja Bruisch (German Historical Institute Moscow)

Vladimir Shishkin (Institute of History, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk) WWI as a factor of Russian Revolution and Counterrevolution

Yulia Yurievna Khmelevskaya (Center for Cultural History Studies, South Ural State University, Chelyabinsk) A la Guerre com a la Guerre: the American Relief Administration and experience of the First World War in Fighting the famine in early Soviet Russia, 1921-1923

Dmitrij Simonov (Institute of History, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk) Russia’s Military Potential in 1918

19:30 DINNER

Saturday, 26 March 2011

09:30 – 11:00   Panel 3: The Baltics and Finland
Chair:  Tomas Balkelis (University College Dublin)

Juha Siltala (Helsinki University) Terror in the Finnish Civil War

Aldis Minins (University of Latvia) Manifestations of the Civil War in Latvia, 1918-1920

Taavi Minnik (Talinn University) Terror and Repressions in Estonia, 1918-1919

11:00– 11:30 TEA / COFFE BREAK

11:30 -13:00  Panel 4: Poland
Chair: Julia Eichenberg (University College Dublin)

Frank Golczewski (University of Hamburg): The Wars after the War. The Fight for the Polish Eastern Border 1918-1920

Jan Snopko (Białystok University): The influence of the Russian revolution on the policy of Joseph Pilsudski and the fate of the Polish Legions (1917-1918)

Rüdiger Ritter (Free University Berlin): Germans and Poles fighting against regional identity: The Confrontations in Upper Silesia after World War I from the perspectives of participants, the regional, national, and international public

13:00– 13:30 LUNCH BREAK

13:00 – 14:30  Panel 5:  The Balkans
Chair: John Paul Newman (University College Dublin)

Mark Biondich (Carleton University) Preliminary title: The Balkans Revolution, War, and Political Violence

Alexander Korb (University of Leicester) “Terrorists interned” Ustasha nationalists, revisionist powers and the breakup of Yugoslavia

Uğur Ümit Üngör (University of Utrecht) A Ten-year War? Post-war Violence in the Ottoman-Russian Borderlands

Dmitar Tasic (Institute for Strategic Research, Department of Military History) Some Common Attributes of Political Violence in Albania, Yugoslavia, and Bulgaria

14:30 COFFEE / TEA BREAK

15:00 – 16:00  Rountable Discussion
Chair: Robert Gerwarth (University College Dublin)

For information about attendance, contact: christina.griessler@ucd.ie

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Violence

VIOLENCE AND REPRESENTATION

Saturday 18 September 2010, 10.30–17.00

To coincide with the exhibition Exposed: Voyeurism, Surveillance and the Camera, this symposium explores violence as a subject in relation to representations in the broadest range of historical and geographical contexts. It includes international artists, photojournalists and theorists who from their distinctive perspectives will attempt to unveil notions of spectatorship and consumption of violent images in contemporary culture. Key questions will encompass the notion of the political, apolitical or depoliticised spectator of representations of violence; the consequences of these kinds of practice and the difference between photo reportage and art photography. 

Speakers include Shahidul Alam, Steve Edwards, Susan Meiselas, Simon Norfolk, John Roberts, Julian Stallabrass and Alberto Toscano.

Supported by Oxford Art Journal, the Open University and the British Council

Tate Modern Starr Auditorium
£20 (£15 concessions), booking recommended

Violence and Representation

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com/

Globalisation

TRANSNATIONAL MILITANCY IN THE 21st CENTURY

A roundtable discussion for the launch of issue 2 of the Journal of Critical Globalisation Studies

http://www.criticalglobalisation.com

Faisal Devji, Saul Newman, Kevin McDonald & Nathan Coombs

February 25th 2010, 6PM, Goldsmiths College

The second issue of the Journal of Critical Globalisation Studies will be launched with a special event at Goldsmiths College in London – a roundtable on ‘Transnational Militancy in the 21st Century’ based on a discussion conducted, and to be published in the forthcoming issue. The participants will be Faisal Devji (author: The Terrorist in Search of Humanity),Kevin McDonald (Global Movements: Action and Culture), Saul Newman (Politics Most Unusual: Violence, Sovereignty and Democracy in the War on Terror) & Nathan Coombs (editor-in-chief for issue 2 of the JCGS).

Amongst the themes explored will be: the relationship of transnational politics to the possibility of militancy; what/who is a militant subject? what are militant demands today (none, some, infinitely many?); and what developments might we see throughout the rest of the 21st century?

The event is free and unticketed. It is scheduled for 25th February 2010, 6-8PMat Goldsmiths College, room Ben Pimlott Lecture Theatre (BPB LT).

For a campus map of Goldsmiths College: http://www.gold.ac.uk/media/campus-map.pdf

***

Nathan Coombs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

 

Marxism

Marxism

HISTORICAL MATERIALISM 17:1 & 17:2

 

 

http://www.brill.nl/hima

Historical Materialism: Research in Critical Marxist Theory
Volume 17 Issue 2
2009

CONTENTS

Isaac and Tamara Deutscher Memorial Prize Lecture
Rick Kuhn
Economic Crisis, Henryk Grossman and the Responsibility of Socialists

Articles

David McNally
From Financial Crisis to World Slump: Accumulation, Financialisation, and the Global Slowdown

Steve Edwards
Apocalyptic Sublime: On the Third Brighton Photo Biennal

Symposium on the Global Financial Crisis
Samantha Ashman
Editorial Introduction

Costas Lapavitsas
Financialised Capitalism: Crisis and Financial Expropriation

Gary A. Dymski
Racial Exclusion and the Political Economy of the Subprime Crisis

Paulo L. Dos Santos
On The Content of Banking in Contemporary Capitalism

Reflections on ‘Gewalt’ (contd.)
Luca Basso
The Ambivalence of Gewalt in Marx and Engels: On the
Interpretation of Balibar

Review Articles

Ian Hudson & Mark Hudson
on Gavin Fridell’s Fair Trade Coffee: The Prospects and Pitfalls of Market Driven Social Justice, Daniel Jaffee’s Brewing Justice: Fair Trade Coffee, Sustainability, and Survival, and Laura Raynolds’, Douglas Murray’s & John Wilkinson’s Fair Trade: The Challenges of Transforming Globalization

Richard Westra
on Pierre Bourdieu’s Firing Back: Against the Tyranny of the Market 2, Global Turbulence: Social Activists’ and State Responses to Globalization, edited by Marjorie Griffin Cohen and Stephen McBride, John Rapley’s Globalization and Inequality: Neoliberalism’s Downward Spiral and Anti-Capitalism: A Marxist Introduction, edited by Alfredo Saad-Filho

Michele Filippini
on Alberto Burgio’s Gramsci storico

Richard Seymour
on Markku Ruotsila’s John Spargo and American Socialism

Robert Knox
On Alain Supiot’s Homo Juridicus

Historical-Critical Dictionary of Marxism
Stefan Bollinger & Juha Koivisto
Hegemonic Apparatus

 

Historical Materialism: Research in Critical Marxist Theory
Volume 17 Issue 1
2009

CONTENTS

Articles

Marcus E. Green and Peter Ives
Subalternity and Language: Overcoming the Fragmentation of Common Sense

Henry Heller
The Longue Durée of the French Bourgeoisie

Michael Löwy
Capitalism as Religion: Walter Benjamin and Max Weber

Daniel Cho
Adorno on Education, or, Can Critical Self-Reflection Prevent the Next Auschwitz?

Reflections on ‘Gewalt’
Étienne Balibar
Violence

Massimilano Tomba
Another Type of Gewalt: Beyond Law. Re-Reading Benjamin

Interventions
Guglielmo Carchedi
The Fallacies of ‘New Dialectics’ and Value-Form Theory

Christopher J. Arthur
Contradiction and Abstraction: A Reply to Finelli

Review Articles

Benjamin Noys
on Ian Parker’s Revolution in Psychology: Alienation to Emancipation, and Yannis Stavrakakis’s The Lacanian Left: Psychoanalysis, Theory, and Politics

Marcel Bois
on Christian Gotthardt’s Die radikale Linke als Massenbewegung. Kommunisten in Harburg-Wilhelmsburg 1918–1933

Tyson E. Lewis
on Peter McLaren’s Capitalists and Conquerors, and McLaren and Ramin Farahmandpur’s Teaching Against Global Capitalism and the New Imperialism

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk