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Utopia

Utopia

CREATING WORLDS: THE AFFECTIVE SPACES OF EXPERIENTIAL POLITICS

Final call for participants: 

Creating worlds: The affective spaces of experimental politics

Monday 14 January, 2013
Royal Holloway, Bedford Square, 2 Gower Street, WC1E 6DP.
10am-5pm
Facilitated by Anja Kanngieser and Jenny Pickerall.

This event seeks to bring together those exploring questions of how we live within, formulate, create and antagonise, spaces and places of politics: public and private, macro-political and micro-political. It is specifically interested in inviting conversation about spaces in which self-organisation occur, whereby people come together in some sort of common articulation. Moreover, what is of key interest is the ‘how’: how people come together in what kinds of spaces and places; what forces and desires inform these collective spaces, and how they are sustained; how spaces and subjects are processually entangled; how social reproduction occurs – the lines of class, gender, race, ability; and the ways spaces are differentiated, that is to say, how boundaries are performed. 

Rather than marking topographies of conventional ‘radical’ political sites, such as social centres, camps, protests, assemblies, allotments, workplaces, bookstores, what might be uncovered are the more messy affective and relational threads that run though them, and also far beyond them, and how we might even begin to apprehend and engage with them.

There will be three roundtables on the themes of:

Spatiality and affect with Kye Askins, Harriet Hawkins and Paul Simpson. Facilitated by Anna Feigenbaum

Spatiality and organisation (social reproduction) with Tim Cresswell, Jane Wills and Nazima Kadir. Facilitated by Fabian Frenzel

Spatiality and politics with Adam Ramadan, Andy Davies and Uri Gordon. Facilitated by Gavin Brown.

Please submit a short (200 word) statement by 15 December 2012 on why you would like to attend when registering your interest toanja.kanngieser@rhul.ac.uk. Attendance is limited to 30 people. 

Some travel funding is available for unwaged/ underwaged participants.

This event is part of a series associated with the Protest Camps: Experiments in Alternative Worlds projecthttp://protestcamps.org/ and is funded by an ESRC Postdoctoral Fellowship with Royal Holloway, University of London.

http://www.transversalgeographies.org

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

 

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com 

 

The Individuality Pr♥test: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/transcontinental/the-individuality-prtest

I Love Transcontinental: http://ihearttranscontinental.blogspot.co.uk/

 

 

Anarchism

PhD STUDENTSHIPS AT LOUGHBOROUGH UNIVERSITY: ANARCHIST HISTORY, POLITICS OR THEORY

Loughborough University’s Department of Politics, History and International Relations (UK) is inviting applications for fully-funded PhD studentships for 3 years (UK or EU fee status). Each studentship is valued at £13,590 plus tuition fees at the UK/EU rate, and is available for PhDs commencing in Autumn 2012.

The deadline for receipt of full application is Wednesday, 30 March 2012.

Details are at: http://www.lboro.ac.uk/service/graduateschool/funding/GraduateSchooolStudentships.htm 

Dr Dave Berry, Dr. Alexandre Christoyannopoulos and Dr Ruth Kinna would welcome applications in any area related to anarchist history, politics or theory. Their staff profiles are available at: http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/eu/people/index.html.

Dave Berry is a Senior Lecturer in Contemporary European History. He has published primarily on the French anarchist movement, the contemporary alternative left in France and on Daniel Guérin. He is the author of A History of the French Anarchist Movement, 1917-1945 (Greenwood Press, 2002; AK edition 2009) and co-editor of New Perspectives on Anarchism, Labour and Syndicalism (CSP, 2010); he is an associate editor and reviews editor of ‘Anarchist Studies’ and a founder member of the Anarchist Studies Network (Specialist Group for the Study of Anarchism within the Political Studies Association – http://anarchist-studies-network.org.uk/).

Alexandre Christoyannopoulos is a Lecturer in Politics and International Relations. He has published on Tolstoy, non-violence and Christian anarchism, and is the author of ‘Christian Anarchism: A Political Interpretation of the Bible’ (Imprint, 2011), and editor of ‘Religious Anarchism: New Perspectives’ (Cambridge Scholars, 2009). He is the treasurer of the Anarchist Studies Network, an executive member of the Religion and Politics research committee of the International Political Science Association, and a member of a number of related academic associations.

Ruth Kinna is Professor in Political Theory. She has published on William Morris and Peter Kropotkin, and is the author of Anarchism: A Beginner’s Guide (Oneworld, 2005; 2nd edn. 2009) and co-editor, with Laurence Davis of Anarchism and Utopianism (Manchester UP, 2009). She is the editor of the journal Anarchist Studies and is also a founder member and co-convenor of the Anarchist Studies Network.

The Department is home to an Anarchism Research Group and there are currently three PhD students in the Department working on aspects of anarchism: Cris Illiopoulos, working on Nietzsche and anarchism, James Donaghey, working on anarchism and punk and John Nightingale working on anarchist conceptions of solidarity. Sureyyya Turkeli has recently submitted his thesis on the historiography of anarchism and Gwendolyn Windpassinger has completed a dissertation on queer feminist anarchism in Buenos Aires. Two other theses have recently been successfully defended: Saku Pinta’s work on convergences and divergences between anarchism and Marxism and Matt Wilson’s thesis on anarchist ethics. Dr. Alex Prichard’s research on the political thought of P-J Proudhon was also completed at the Department and his thesis was successfully defended in 2008.

If you would like to discuss a possible research project informally, please e-mail Alex at  (a.christoyannopoulos@lboro.ac.uk), Ruth (r.e.kinna@lboro.ac.uk) or Dave (d.g.berry@lboro.ac.uk).

Please note: there is no ring-fenced funding for anarchism research, but applicants interested in anarchism have been successful in past funding rounds and there is good support for postgraduate study. Because competition is very fierce candidates with good masters qualifications and/or publications are likely to be advantaged.  We are happy to advise on draft proposals, where time allows and we encourage informal contact prior to application.

To be considered for an award you will need to complete the standard application form which may be done online, quoting the reference number GSS12B. The following list of links will direct you to useful sources of information in regard to your application.

Information about the Department
http://www.lboro.ac.uk/prospectus/pg/courses/dept/eu/index.htm
http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/eu/studying/research/programmes.html

Anarchism Research Group http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/eu/research/ResearchGroups/AnarchismRG/index.html.

Guidelines for research proposals
http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/eu/studying/research/admissions-procedure.html

Information about how to apply
http://www.lboro.ac.uk/prospectus/pg/essential/apply/index.htm

Information about fees for UK/EU students
http://www.lboro.ac.uk/admin/ar/funding/pgr/ukeu/index.htm

University Prospectus
http://www.lboro.ac.uk/prospectus/pg/research/index.htm 

Dr David Berry, Senior Lecturer, Department of Politics, History & International Relations, Loughborough University, LE11 3TU, GB, +44(0)1509-222988

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Anarchism

FUNDING FOR A PhD IN ANARCHIST HISTORY

From: David Berry D.G.Berry@lboro.ac.uk

Opportunity for PhD funding in anarchist history, politics or theory (second round of applications).

Please circulate

Loughborough University’s Department of Politics, History and International Relations (UK) is inviting applications for fully-funded PhD studentships for 3 years (UK or EU fee status). Each studentship is valued at £13,590 plus tuition fees at the UK/EU rate, and are available for PhDs commencing in October 2011. The deadline for receipt of full application is Wednesday, 15 June 2011.

Dr Dave Berry, Dr. Alexandre Christoyannopoulos and Dr Ruth Kinna would like to welcome applications in any area related to anarchist history, politics or theory. Their staff profiles are available at: http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/eu/people/index.html.

Dave Berry is a Senior Lecturer in Contemporary European History. He has published primarily on the French anarchist movement, the contemporary alternative left in France and on Daniel Guérin. He is the author of A History of the French Anarchist Movement, 1917-1945 (Greenwood Press, 2002; AK edition 2009) and co-editor of New Perspectives on Anarchism, Labour and Syndicalism (CSP, 2010); he is an associate editor and reviews editor of ‘Anarchist Studies’ and a founder member of the Anarchist Studies Network (Specialist Group for the Study of Anarchism within the Political Studies Association – http://anarchist-studies-network.org.uk/).

Alexandre Christoyannopoulos is a Lecturer in Politics and International Relations. He has published on Tolstoy, non-violence and Christian anarchism, and is the author of ‘Christian Anarchism: A Political Interpretation of the Bible’ (Imprint, 2011), and editor of ‘Religious Anarchism: New Perspectives’ (Cambridge Scholars, 2009). He is the treasurer of the Anarchist Studies Network, an executive member of the Religion and Politics research committee of the International Political Science Association, and a member of a number of related academic associations.

Ruth Kinna is a Senior Lecturer in Politics. She has published on William Morris and Peter Kropotkin, and is the author of ‘Anarchism: A Beginner’s Guide’ (Oneworld, 2005; 2nd edn. 2009) and co-editor, with Laurence Davis of ‘Anarchism and Utopianism’ (Manchester UP, 2009). She is the editor of the journal ‘Anarchist Studies’ and is also a founder member and co-convenor of the Anarchist Studies Network.

The Department is home to an Anarchism Research Group (http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/eu/research/ResearchGroups/AnarchismRG/index.html),
and there are currently five PhD students in the Department working on aspects of anarchism: Cris Illiopoulos, working on Nietzsche and anarchism; Saku Pinta; who is completing a dissertation on convergences and divergences between anarchism and Marxism; Sureyyya Turkeli working on the historiography of anarchism; Matt Wilson working on anarchist ethics; and Gwendolyn Windpassinger, working on queer feminist anarchism in Buenos Aires. Dr. Alex Prichard’s research on the political thought of P-J Proudhon was also completed at the Department and his thesis successfully defended in 2008.

If you would like to discuss a possible research project informally, please e-mail Alex (a.christoyannopoulos@lboro.ac.uk), Ruth (r.e.kinna@lboro.ac.uk) or Dave (d.g.berry@lboro.ac.uk).

In order for us to be able to consider your application you will need to complete the standard application form which may be done online, quoting the relevant reference number in respect of the funding (GSS11B). The following list of links will direct you to useful sources of information in regard to your application; and we will require to see a full research proposal together with the necessary supporting documents.

Information about the Department:
http://www.lboro.ac.uk/prospectus/pg/courses/dept/eu/index.htm
http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/eu/studying/research/programmes.html

Guidelines for research proposals: http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/eu/studying/research/admissions-procedure.html

Information about how to apply: http://www.lboro.ac.uk/prospectus/pg/essential/apply/index.htm

Information for international students: http://www.lboro.ac.uk/international/

Information about fees for international students: http://www.lboro.ac.uk/admin/ar/funding/pgr/international/index.htm

Information about fees for UK/EU students: http://www.lboro.ac.uk/admin/ar/funding/pgr/ukeu/index.htm

University Prospectus: http://www.lboro.ac.uk/prospectus/pg/research/index.htm

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

No Future

NO FUTURE

NO FUTURE: AN INTER-DISCIPLINARY INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE
Durham University, UK
25-27 March 2011

First Call for Papers

From biblical apocalypse to the nihilism of the late nineteenth century, from the Enlightenment invention of progress to the counter-cultures of the late twentieth century, from technological utopianism to contemporary anticipations of environmental catastrophe, western civilization has been consistently transfixed by the figurative potential of the future. ‘No Future’ seeks to connect and inter-animate these disparate ways of thinking about the future, while at the same time questioning the basis of the various discourses of futurity they have produced, and which have proliferated in recent years. ‘No Future’ thus also implicitly questions what it is – other than the preoccupations of the present – that is invoked when we talk about the future.

The conference aims to stage a series of inter-disciplinary encounters around these different senses of ‘No Future’, and to examine the value and implications of adopting a ‘futurist’ position across and between a range of disciplines in the Humanities and Social Sciences. Contributions may take retrospective form, re-assessing significant moments in past discourses of futurity such as apocalypticism, Enlightenment ideas of progress, the persistence of the apparent dialectical unity of utopia/dystopia, the constructions of Modernism and the Historical Avantgarde, the symbolic projections of psychoanalytic theory. Others might examine the disciplinary shifts that have displaced or dispersed avantgardism in postmodernity, opening out onto such themes as transhumanism, post-postmodern reinflections of the dialectic, and various forms of contemporary utopianism. All of these are related to the central question of the ideological and aesthetic implications of any appeal to futurity, at the heart of which lies the tension between the future as rhetorical evasion and the future as the most persistent and deeply embedded of all heuristic devices.

Keynote speakers:
Mikhail Epstein (Emory)
Jean-Michel Rabaté (Pennsylvania)
Patricia Waugh (Durham)

Plenary panels:

Apocalyptic Futures
Lenin and Futurity
Bloch and Utopian Futures

Proposals for individual papers or integrated panels that engage with any aspect of the central theme are invited. Papers should be of 20 minutes duration to allow adequate time for discussion, and proposals for integrated panels should comprise a chair and three speakers.

Proposals that specifically engage with any of the following themes are particularly welcome:

Ontologies of the Future
Forms of Utopia
Dystopian Futures
Aesthetics and Technology
Eco-criticism and Ecotopia
Gendered Futures
Transhumanism
Futurism(s)
Futures of Freud
Dialectics of the Future
The Future of Theory

Proposals should be no longer than 250 words and should be submitted as an attachment to: alastair.renfrew@durham.ac.uk by Friday 2nd July 2010.

Further information will be available in due course at the conference web-site: http://www.dur.ac.uk/mlac/research/nofuture

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

DeadwingWORK, PLAY & BOREDOM

Call for Papers on ‘Work, Play & Boredom’ for an ephemera Conference at University of St. Andrews, 5-7 May 2010. Deadline for abstracts: 31 January 2010.

In recent years, play has become an abiding concern in the popular business literature and a crucial aspect of organizational culture. While managerial interest in play has certainly been with us for some time, there is a sense that organizations are becoming ever-more receptive to incorporating fun and frivolity into everyday working life. Team-building exercises, simulation games, puzzle-solving activities, office parties, themed dress-down days, and colourful, aesthetically-stimulating workplaces are notable examples of this trend. Through play, employees are encouraged to express themselves and their capabilities, thus enhancing job satisfaction, motivation, and commitment. Play also serves to unleash an untapped creative potential in management thinking that will supposedly result in innovative product design, imaginative marketing strategies and, ultimately, superior organizational performance. Play, it seems, is a very serious business indeed.

But this has not always been the case. Until very recently, play was seen as the antithesis of work. Classical industrial theory, for examples, hinges on a fundamental distinction between waged labour and recreation. Play at work is thought to pose a threat not only to labour discipline, but also to the very basis of the wage bargain: in exchange for a day’s pay, workers are expected to leave their pleasures at home. Given this context, we can well understand Adorno’s (1978: 228) comment that the purposeless play of children – completely detached from selling one’s labour to earn a living – unconsciously rehearses the ‘right life’. But play no longer holds the promise of life after capitalism, as it once did for Adorno; today, the ‘unreality of games’ is fully incorporated within the reality of  
organizations. When employees are urged to reach out to their ‘inner child’ (Miller, 1997: 255), it becomes clear that the traditional boundary between work and play is in the process of being demolished.

A certain utopianism underpins contemporary debates about play at work, evoking the pre-Lapsarian ideal of a happy life without hard work. In this respect, organizations seem to have taken notice of Burke’s (1971: 47) compelling vision of paradise: ‘My formula for utopia is simple: it is a community in which everyone plays at work and works at play. Anything less would fail to satisfy me for long’. But such idealism is not necessarily desirable. For while play promises to relieve the monotony and boredom of work, it is intimately connected to new forms of management control: it is part of the panoply of techniques that seek to align the personal desires of workers with bottom-line corporate objectives. We should not be surprised, then, when an overbearing emphasis on fun in the workplace leads to cynicism, alienation, and resentment from employees (Fleming, 2005).

While play at work has been extensively discussed in the popular and academic literature, the role of boredom in organisations has been somewhat neglected. It seems that boredom is destined to share the fate of other ‘negative emotions’, such as anger and contempt, which have generally been silenced in organization studies (Pelzer 2005). But boredom remains an important part of organisational life. As Walter Benjamin (1999: 105) observes, ‘we are bored when we don’t know what we are waiting for’. Boredom thus contains a sense of anticipation, even promise: ‘Boredom is the threshold to great deeds’ (ibid.). Since capitalism is preoccupied with fun and games, perhaps it is boredom rather than play that now serves unconsciously to rehearse the ‘right life’ in contemporary times.

This ephemera conference and special issue ask its participants to explore the interrelated themes of work, play, and boredom alongside an exploration of the cultural and political context out of which they have emerged.

Possible topics include:
–    The politics of play
–    Play and reality
–    Anthropology of play
–    Play and utopia
–    The boredom of play
–    Boredom as resistance
–    Identity and authenticity when played
–    The blurring of work and play
–    Playfulness at work
–    Creativity and play
–    Experience economy
–    Management games
–    Cultures of fun
–    Play and pedagogy
–    Seriousness and indifference
–    Foolishness and fooling around
–    Tedium and repetition
–    Humour, jokes, and cynicism
–    Childishness and management
–    Invention and innovation through play
–    Organizing spontaneity

The best papers of the conference will be published in a special issue of ephemera.

Confirmed Keynote Speakers:
Professor Niels Åkerstrøm Andersen, Professor at the Department of Management, Politics and Philosophy, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark. Author of many books, including his recent Power at Play: The Relationship between Play, Work and Governance (2009, Palgrave Macmillan).

Professor René ten Bos, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands. His many books include Fashion and Utopia in Management Thinking (John Benjamins, 2000).

Dates and Location:

5-7 May 2010 at School of Management, University of St Andrews, Scotland, UK.

Deadline, Conference Website, and Further Information:

The deadline for abstracts is 31 January 2010. The abstracts should be submitted as a Word document to Martyna Sliwa at martyna.sliwa@newcastle.ac.uk  The conference fee has not been set yet, as it is dependent on the number of participants, but will be kept to a minimum. PhD candidates pay a reduced fee.

Further information about the conference can be found on the conference website: http://www.ephemeraweb.org/conference With queries, you can also contact one of the conference organizers: Bent Meier Sørensen (bem.lpf@cbs.dk), Lena Olaison (lo.lpf@cbs.dk), Martyna Sliwa (martyna.sliwa@ncl.ac.uk), Nick Butler (nick.butler@st-andrews.ac.uk), Stephen Dunne (s.dunne@le.ac.uk), Sverre Spoelstra (sverre.spoelstra@fek.lu.se).

References:

Adorno, T. (1978) Minima Moralia: Reflections from Damaged Life. London and New York: Verso.
Benjamin, W. (1999) The Arcades Project. Cambridge, Mass.: Belknap Press.
Burke, R. (1971) ‘“Work” and “play”’, Ethics, 82(1): 33-47.
Fleming, P. (2005) ‘Workers’ playtime? Boundaries and cynicism in a “culture of fun” programme’, Journal of Applied Behavioural Science, 41(3): 285-303.
Miller, J. (1997) ‘All work and no play may be harming your business’, Management Development Review, 10(6/7): 254-255.
Pelzer, P. (2005) ‘Contempt and organization: Present in practice – Ignored by research?’ Organization Studies, 26(8): 1217-1227.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Deadwing

Deadwing

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Richard Greeman’s Ecosocialist Book Tour Schedule

 

UK November 2008

 

Please forward via Green and Left networks

 

Richard Greeman, the U.S. writer and longtime  socialist / social activist, will be touring Britain this November speaking to Green groups on the topic: “Capitalist and Ecological Collapse: An Eco-socialist Solution.”  He will also be presenting his new book Beware of Vegetarian Sharks, a sharp-witted collection of Radical Rants and Internationalist Essays, Illustrated (Praxis 2008). Greeman, who is based in France, is best known in Britain for his work on Victor Serge, the Franco-Russian novelist and revolutionary. Greeman’s translation with introduction of Serge’s posthumous novel, Unforgiving Years (NYRB Classics 2008) appeared this Spring.

 

Contact: eurojournalistes@laposte.net

 

Dates: (As of November 2nd.  For updates please contact eurojournalistes@laposte.net )

 

LONDON

Fri. 7 Nov:  “Victor Serge: Committed Writer” University of London, Dept. of French, room 108, Malet Place, WC1, opposite Waterstone’s Bookshop.

Sat. 8 Nov: ” From Capitalist Ecoside to Ecotopia:  A future vision based on Historical Materialism, Emergence theory and Castoriadis’ Contenu du socialisme.”  Historical Materialism Conference, Panel on UTOPIANISM. 11:45 am Brunei Building opposite main entrance to SOAS rm B 104.

Mon 10 Nov: Capitalist and Ecological Collapse: An Ecosocialist Solution” at 7.30 pm in the upstairs meeting room at “The Goose on the Green” pub in Catford. Sponsored by Alliance for Green Socialism

Fri. 21 Nov: Capitalist and Ecological Collapse: An Ecosocialist Solution” 7.30pm at the Lucas Arms, Kings Cross, sponsored by Alliance Green Socialism

 

LIVERPOOL

Wed 12 Nov: “Be Utopian, Demand the Realistic” 7:30 pm at the CASA Bistro Bar on Hope Street opposite Philharmonic Pub

 

GLASGOW: For information update contact eurojournalistes@laposte.net

 

EDINBURUGH 

Sun. Nov. 16: “Victor Serge’s Ecological Vision,” Autonomous Centre of Edinburgh, 7:00 PM

Mon. Nov. 17: “The Revolutionary KIT: build your own invisible international,” Edinburgh University Chaplaincy, 7:00 PM.

 

NEWCASTLE                                

Tues. 18 Nov: “Is There Hope   After Capitalism?” (Ecosocialism versus Capitalist Ecocide) at 6:00 pm Tyneside Irish Center, 43-49 Gallowgate.

 

LONDON

Fri. 21 Nov: Capitalist and Ecological Collapse: An Ecosocialist Solution” 7.30pm at the Lucas Arms, Kings Cross, sponsored by Alliance Green Socialism

 

OXFORD

Mon. 24 Nov: Capitalist and Ecological Collapse: An Ecosocialist Solution”   7:30 pm Committee Room, Wolfson College, Oxford.

 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 

Bibliography: To see covers, blurbs, and free downloads of Dangerous Shortcuts and Vegetarian Sharks go to www.lulu.com/content/923573For  Richard’s recent translation of Serge’sUnforgiving Years (NYRB Classics 2008) http://www.nybooks.com/shop/product?usca_p=t&product_id=7159

 

 

Biography:  Richard Greeman studied at Yale College (where he became a socialist), the Sorbonne (where he was active with Socialisme ou Barbarie) and at Columbia University (where he was awarded his PhD in May, 1968 while occupying the University as one of the radical leaders of the student strike). Along with writing and translating, Greeman has been active since 1957 in civil rights, anti-war, anti-nuculear, pro-ecology and labour struggles in the U.S., France, Latin America. He is Secretary of the Victor Serge Foundation and is one of the founders of the Praxis Research and Education Center in Moscow. www.praxiscenter.ru

 

“Ecosocialism is a bet you can’t refuse. Global capitalism in it death crisis is structurally unable to halt ecocidal productivism and the looting of the environment for quick profit. As a result, the planet is likely to become uninhabitable in two or three generations as tendencies like global warming, nuclear proliferation, endless war, flooding, epidemics, food shortages, air/water pollution and destruction of human communities increasingly combine in destructive synergy.

If there remains a marginal (say 1 in 100) chance for human society to survive, it would entail replacing the competitive profit system with a planetary network of producers — a cooperative commonwealth or democratic socialism. Against the near certainty of planetary catastrophe under capitalism, we must bet on the unlikely dream of a harmonious, healthy ecosocialist world. The `Ecotopian Bet’ is one we can’t refuse.

Let us then begin by dreaming the dream, by imagining a technically feasible, ecologically sustainable post-capitalist future and historically possible roads leading to it. One such road, based on theories of cybernetics, chaos, emergence and an idea of Cornelius Castoriadis, I call the New Archimedes Lever. It involves connecting the historically proven lever of solidarity with a philosophical fulcrum (planetary consciousness) and a global electronic platform (the Internet) in order to `lift the earth’ before it succombs to capitalist ecocide.

“Global capitalism is structurally incapable of halting ecocidal productivism and the looting of the environment for quick profit. As a result, the planet is likely to become uninhabitable within decades as tendencies like global warming, nuclear proliferation, flooding, epidemics, food shortages, air/water pollution , endless war and destruction of human communities increasingly combine in destructive synergy.

If there remains a marginal (say 1 in 100) chance for human society to surviv e, it would entail a complete break: replacing the competitive profit system with a planetary network of producers , a global cooperative commonwealth. Against the near certainty of planetary catastrophe under capitalism, we have no choice but to bet on the unlikely dream of a harmonious, healthy ecosocialist world. The `Ecosocialist Bet’ is a bet we can’t refuse.

There can be no future without a dream, no progress without the hope of Utopia. So let us then begin now by trying to imagine a technically feasible, ecologically sustainable post-capitalist future and visualizing historically possible roads leading to it. The ‘New Archimedes’ hypothesis  — based on theories of cybernetics, chaos, emergence and Castoriadis’ Content of Socialism — connects a historically proven lever of worker solidarity and a 21st Century philosophical fulcrum (planetary consciousness) and a global electronicplace to stand  (the Internet) where the billions can unite  in solidarity in order to lift the earth’ before it succumbs to capitalist ecocide.”

— Richard Greeman

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Rikowski web site, The Flow of Ideas is at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk