Skip navigation

Tag Archives: USSR

Jacques Ranciere

Jacques Ranciere

THE POLITICS OF POST-SOVIET CINEMA: COLLOQUIUM FEATURING JACQUES RANCIERE

The Department of Comparative Literature and the Cogut Center for the Humanities at Brown University present “Béla Tarr: The Politics of Post-Soviet Cinema,” a colloquium on the work of the Hungarian filmmaker, featuring Jacques Rancière, András Bálint Kovács, and Eva Cermanová.

Date and Time: Thursday April 10, 2:00pm-6:30 pm
Location: Brown University, Pembroke Hall room 305, 172 Meeting Street, Providence, RI 02912

Discussions of Béla Tarr’s films typically divide his work into the pre-1989 cinema of a militant director, grappling with the problems of socialist Hungary, and the post-1989 work of a mature artist, characterized by disenchantment and contemplation. Jacques Rancière’s book Béla Tarr, The Time After strongly and compellingly rejects this narrative. “Béla Tarr: The Politics of Post-Soviet Cinema” will feature Rancière returning to this them e, along with András Bálint Kovács, acclaimed scholar of European cinema and one of the foremost interpreters of Tarr’s work, and Eva Cermanová, a graduate researcher on Béla Tarr.

Schedule:
2:00  Timothy Bewes, Introductory Remarks

2:15  Eva Cermanová, “The Time After Disaster: Intensity and Sequence in Béla Tarr”
András Bálint Kovács “Difference and Repetition: The Question of the Homogeneity of Béla Tarr’s Work”

4:15  Break

4:30  Jacques Rancière, “Béla Tarr: The Poetics and Politics of Fiction”

5:30  Roundtable – Jacques Rancière, András Bálint Kovács, Eva Cermanová

6:30  Reception

Organized by Timothy Bewes (Department of English), with help from Silvia Cernea Clark and the Department of Comparative Literature.

Co-sponsored by the Creative Arts Council, the Malcolm S. Forbes fund (Modern Culture and Media), Office of International Affairs, Department of Comparative Literature, Cogut Center for the Humanities, Department of English, Department of French, Pembroke Center, Department of History of Art and Architecture, and the Department of Visual Art.

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/bela-tarr-the-politics-of-post-soviet-cinema-colloquium-featuring-jacques-ranciere-brown-university-thursday-april-10

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Lenin

LENIN’S THOUGHT IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY

International Conference
Lenin’s Thought in the 21st Century: Interpretation and Its Value
(Wuhan, Saturday-Monday, October 20-22, 2012)
CALL FOR PAPERS

The Rosa Luxemburg Foundation; the School of Philosophy, Wuhan University; the Institute of Marxist Philosophy, Wuhan University; and the Institute of Western Marxist Philosophy, Wuhan University are planning to hold an international conference dealing with various aspects of the ideas and activities of Vladimir Lenin (1870-1924), to develop the study of Lenin’s thought and contemporary issues in the world of 21st century and enhance the academic exchanges between western and eastern scholars.

Themes to be discussed at the conference:

(1) Lenin and Marx;

(2) Lenin and the Marxism of the Second International;

(3) Lenin and Luxemburg;

(4) Lenin and Chinese Marxism;

(5) Lenin and Russian Marxism;

(6) Lenin and the Western Marxist Tradition;

(7) Lenin’s theory of Imperialism and World Systems Today;

(8) Lenin’s National Question and the “Third World” Today;

(9) Lenin’s conception of Democracy and the Socialism Today;

(10) Lenin’s Conception of Revolution and the Revolutionary Party;

(11) Lenin and Feminism;

(12) Lenin’s Relevance for the 21st Century.

Further themes and aspects regarding his life and thought and its relevance to today’s world are welcome.

Scholars interested in participating in the conference are invited to submit proposals for papers to be presented. The submission should include:

(1) A short CV, with a list of main publications;

(2) The title of the proposed presentation and a summary of up to 250 words.

The submission should be sent in English to Dr. Wu Xinwei: waynewood@163.com by July 15, 2012. Full text of paper to be presented should be sent in English by September 20, 2012.

The conference will be held atWuhanUniversityon October 20-22, 2012. Conference language: English and Chinese.

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

 

 

Aesthetics

SOCIALIST REALIST ART: PRODUCTION, CONSUMPTION, AESTHETICS

An International Conference, sponsored by the Center for Baltic and East European Studies, Södertörn University, Stockholm, in collaboration with the Museum of Modern Art, Stockholm
Stockholm, 19-20 October 2012

Since the early 1990s, there has been a striking growth of interest in the legacy of Soviet Socialist Realist art, which has reshaped our understanding of it in fundamental ways. A substantial body of research has demonstrated that the method of Socialist Realism was a highly creative and diversified cultural arena that was both heterogeneous in its pictorial strategies and often conflicted and ambivalent in its representations of the social and political messages of the day. Yet the label ‘totalitarian’ continues to influence the ways in which Soviet art is interpreted and contextualised, limiting our understanding of Socialist Realism and obstructing its integration into a broader narrative of twentieth-century art.

In the proposed conference we seek to examine the interests and influences which contributed to the development of Socialist Realism as a diverse and contested field of art from the 1930s to the 1980s. Participants will be invited to focus on aspects of Socialist Realist fine art production, evaluation and consumption in order to consider the ways in which artistic conventions of pictorial representation were established, adapted and transformed to reflect the changing nature of the Soviet project. This approach will facilitate a shift away from the tendency to draw conclusions about Socialist Realism based on a limited number of canonical works of art and acclaimed artists, and will encourage a reappraisal of the diversity and originality of creative output in its formal, stylistic and geographical variations.

Proposed topics may include (but should not be restricted to) the following:

· How did Socialist Realist art develop over time and according to changing sociopolitical contexts? On what basis should specific periods can be identified, for example “Stalinist” or “post-Stalinist” art?
· What were the variations in Socialist Realist art beyond Moscow and Leningrad: across the different parts of the RSRSR and the other SSRs? How did the centre-periphery relationship function in the Soviet art world?
· Who were the audiences for Socialist Realist art and how was fine art consumed in the Soviet Union?
· What was the role of the art critic in the definition of artistic merit? How was value and significance ascribed to works of art in the absence of an art market?
· What was the role of the state in the definition of Socialist Realist art and how was the interface between artists and art world authorities managed?
· What was the status of minor genres within the canon of Socialist Realist art (e.g. landscape, still life, personal portraiture) and what new and hybrid genres emerged?
· How did artists seek to manipulate the development of Socialist Realism according to their own aesthetic preferences and agendas?
· How did Socialist Realist art in the USSR relate to broader international narratives of Realism in the visual arts of the twentieth century?
· How did Soviet Socialist Realism relate to the art sponsored by other authoritarian regimes, in the inter-war period and after? Is “totalitarian art” a viable concept?
· How did the ideas and methods of Socialist Realist art relate to developments in other fields of cultural production in the USSR and vice versa? Was Socialist Realism a uniform canon, or did it vary across the fields of art, literature, music, film, architecture and so on?

Proposals for Papers
We invite proposals dealing with these or related themes. Proposals should include your name, institutional affiliation, email address, proposed paper title, 150-word abstract and short curriculum vitae. Post-graduate students are encouraged to apply. Successful applicants will be asked to submit a conference paper of around 3000 words for pre-circulation before the conference.

Participants will be asked to cover their own travel expenses. We are currently exploring possibilities for support for accommodation expenses. The submission deadline for proposals is 20 April 2012. Applicants will be informed about acceptance by around 1 May 2012.

Contacts For general questions and further information, please contact Mark Bassin (mark.bassin@sh.se). Please submit proposals via email to Oliver Johnson (o.johnson@sheffield.ac.uk)

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Bankers

MEMORIES

http://www.boitempoeditorial.com.br

Memories

by Gregório Bezerra

Over thirty years after the publication of Memories (Memórias, 1979), by Gregório Bezerra, the legendary icon of the resistance against the Brazilian military dictatorship (that took place between 1964 and 1985) is honored with the release of his autobiography, by Boitempo Editorial, enriched with photos, new texts, and composed on a single volume. The book counts with the unprecedented contribution of Jurandir Bezerra, Gregório’s son, who safeguarded the memory of his father; the historian Anita Prestes, daughter of Olga Benário and Luiz Carlos Prestes, who signs the presentation of the new edition; Ferreira Gullar on the fourth cover; and Roberto Arrais in the book’s jacket. In addition, there is the inclusion of testimonials by Oscar Niemeyer, Ziraldo, the lawyer Mércia Albuquerque, and Pernambuco’s governor (and grandson of Miguel Arraes) Eduardo Campos, among others.

In Memories, the communist leader goes over his life trajectory and rescues a rich period of Brazilian’s political history. The story encompasses the period between his birth (1900) to his release from prison in exchange for the kidnapped American ambassador, in 1969, and ends with his arrival in USSR, where he would stay until Amnesty, in 1979. While exiled, he started writing his autobiography.

Born in Panelas, Pernambuco’s agreste, at 180km from Recife, Gregório was the son of a poor country couple, whom he lost when still a child. As a 5 year old he already worked at sugar cane plantations. Illiterate up until 25 years old and militant since the first upraise of workers influenced by the Russian Revolution in 1917, Bezerra had an important role in main political events of the Brazilian left-wing, and, for this reason, he served a total of non-consecutive 23 years in jail in several prisons throughout time. He served as a federal legislator (the most voted one in 1964) affiliated to PCB (Brazilian Communist Party) and was a fierce combatant against the military dictatorship, which led him to be the protagonist of one of the most brutal acts of the newly installed post-coup dictatorship in 1964: he was captured and dragged around Recife’ streets by his captors, while the images were shown on the TV in Repórter Esso. The savagery caused such a commotion that registers of the torture were never found in the military archives.

In spite of his harsh reality, Gregório never spread hate or rancor. He was considered a sweet and kind man by everyone. Although not an intellectual, he was a great observer and a brilliant story teller. And his story is narrated like that, without purple prose or hypocrisy, going through his life in the country and the agreste in times of great drought, his life in Recife, his exile in USSR, the militancy in PCB. He said: “I don’t fight against people, I fight against the system that explores and crushes the majority of the people”. In 1983, Brazil lost this person who was one of its greatest protectors. Luckily, he left behind his memories, filled with truths and hope and that, above all, told the story of many other “Gregório”, who transformed their destinies into the fight to change the reality imposed.

Technical Specifications

Title: Memories (Memórias)
Author: Gregório Bezerra
Presentation: Anita Prestes
Jacket text: Roberto Arrais
Fourth Cover: Ferreira Gullar
Pages: 648
Price: R$74,00 (U$46.00)
ISBN: 978-85-7559-160-4
Publisher: Boitempo

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Spinoza

SPINOZA IN SOVIET PHILOSOPHY 2012 – CALL FOR PAPERS

Dear Colleagues,

The Aleksanteri Institute of the University of Helsinki is going to organize in May 18–19, 2012 an international symposium on “Spinoza in Soviet Philosophy”.

Please consult the description of the symposium focus in the address: http://www.helsinki.fi/aleksanteri/english/news/events/2012/spinoza.html (take a look at the seminar invitation letter, too, which is in PDF format!)

The dead-line for the paper proposals is December 31, 2011.

 

The final programme of the symposium will be published during January 2012. A symposium volume is intended. Language of the symposium is English.

With best regards
Vesa Oittinen
——————————-
Vesa Oittinen
Professor, Ph. D., Docent
——————————-
Aleksanteri Institute
P.O.Box 42 (Unioninkatu 33)
FI – 00014 UNIVERSITY OF HELSINKI
Fax +358-9-191 23615
vesa.oittinen@helsinki.fi
http://www.helsinki.fi/aleksanteri/

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

 

Revolution

REVOLUTIONARY VOICES: MARXISM, COMMUNICATION, AND SOCIAL CHANGE

National Communication Association (NCA) Preconvention Seminar
“Revolutionary Voices: Marxism, Communication, and Social Change”
10:30 am-5:00 PM, Wednesday, November 16th.
New Orleans, LA

In the wake of the Soviet Union’s collapse, and the subsequent worldwide retreat of the communist and socialist Left, the very concept of “revolution” was deemed by many theorists to be outdated and passé. Liberal, poststructuralist and conservative intellectuals jointly proclaimed Marxist project -with its emphasis on class struggle, anti-imperialism and a totalizing critique of capitalism– no longer relevant to an understanding of our “postmodern” world. Today, with the popular uprisings associated with the “Arab Spring” roiling dictatorships in countries like Egypt, Tunisia, Syria and Yemen and with the global capitalist economy just barely emerging from the throes of its worst crisis since the Great Depression, Marxism is not so easily dismissed. The recent popularity of thinkers like Giovanni Arrighi, Alain Badiou, Antonio Negri, David Harvey and Slavoj Zizek suggests a renewal of scholarly interest in Marxist and post-Marxist theory. The fact that Karl Marx himself was featured on the cover of the February 2, 2009 TIME Magazine suggests that this revival of interest is not confined to the academy.

This pre-convention conference aims to explore the continued relevance of Marxism and Marxist theoretical concepts (i.e. ideology, hegemony, class, dialectics, reification, commodification ) to the study of communication, focusing on communication’s instrumental role in maintaining, perpetuating and contesting capitalism’s structures of domination. Unlike other theoretical orientations within the social sciences and the humanities, Marxism has long insisted that theory be informed by and inform social and political praxis. Thus, one special emphasis of our discussions will be on the way that Marxist work in field of communication can help to advance and clarify current struggles for progressive social change in the US and around the world. Moreover, at a time when even the mainstream corporate press speaks openly of the revolutionary currents spreading across North Africa and the Middle East, we will devote special attention to the concept of “revolution” and the way that it can refine and enhance our understanding of communication, political conflict and social change.

We hope that by bringing together a critical mass of scholars whose work is informed by Marxist theory, our seminar will “make a difference” both in our discipline and in the larger fight for social justice. Ultimately, we plan to publish an edited volume or a special issue of an academic journal as a way of bringing the scholarship produced by seminar participants to an even larger audience.

This mini-conference builds on a series of NCA panels, pre-conference seminars and publications about Marxism and communication that began with a well-attended panel at the 2003 NCA convention in Miami. Last year’s mini-conference “Bridging Theory and Practice” drew dozens of participants to a series of three inter-related panels at the national conference in San Francisco. The year before that, in Chicago, our panel “The 2009 Crisis of Neoliberalism: Marxist Scholars on Rhetorics of Stability and Change,” drew a standing-room-only crowd. And in 2006, three of the co-organizers of this seminar (Artz, Cloud and Macek) published an anthology — Marxism and Communication Studies: The Point is to Change It (Peter Lang)-composed almost entirely of conference papers delivered at our NCA panels and seminars. This seems to us an opportune moment for yet another pre-convention seminar and yet another publication devoted to this topic.

The organizers invite potential participants to submit complete papers or extended abstracts (350-500 words) relevant to the subject of Marxism, communication and social change for inclusion in this pre-convention seminar. Work in political economy of the media, cultural studies, rhetoric, critical theory, social movement studies and political communication is especially welcome. Send your submissions along with complete contact information (mailing address, e-mail and phone #) to both Steve Macek (at shmacek@noctrl.edu) and Dana Cloud (at dcloud@mail.utexas.edu) no later than August 8th, 2011.

Steve Macek
Associate Professor
Speech Communication
Program Coordinator, Urban and Suburban Studies
North Central College
30 N. Brainard
Naperville, IL 60540-4690
Phone: 630-637-5369
Fax: 630-637-5140
Webpage: http://shmacek.faculty.noctrl.edu/

Out now from U of MN Press:
Urban Nightmares: The Media, the Right, and the Moral Panic over the City. Winner of the 2006 Urban Communication Foundation Publication Award.
ISBN: ISBN 0-8166-4361-X
http://www.upress.umn.edu/Books/M/macek_urban.html

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Socialism and Hope

SOTS-SPEAK: REGIMES OF LANGUAGE UNDER SOCIALISM

From: Serguei A. Oushakine

[mailto:oushakin@princeton.edu

Conference Program

Sots-Speak: Regimes of Language under Socialism
May 20-22, 2011
219 Aaron Burr Hall
Princeton University
Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures

Friday, May 20

12.30     Welcome Address

12.45 – 2.45         Panel 1:   Linguistic Anatomies

Konstantin Bogdanov [Russian Academy of  Sciences, St. Petersburg] — “Soviet Language Culture in the Light of Ethnolinguistics”
Anastasia Smirnova [Ohio State U] — “Aligning Language to Ideology: A Socio-Semantic Analysis of Communist and Democratic Discourse in Bulgaria”
Calin Morar Vulcu [Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj] — “From Subject to Object of Description: Classes in Romanian State-Socialist Discourse”

Chair: Olga Hasty [Princeton U]
Discussant: Mirjam Fried [Czech Academy of Sciences]

3.00 – 5.15           Panel 2: Making Things with Words 

Choi Chatterjee [California State U, Los Angeles] — “Lady in Red: Bolshevik Feminism in the American Imagination, 1917-1939”
Samantha Sherry [U of Edinburgh] — “‘Bird Watchers of the World, Unite!’ The Language of Ideology in Soviet Translation”
Jessie Labov [Ohio State U] — “The Puzzle of the Yugoslav Nationalist/ Dissident from Helsinki to Dayton”
Alyssa DeBlasio [Dickinson College] — “Philosophical Rhetoric and Istoriia russkoi filosofii”
Chair: David Bellos [Princeton U]
Discussant: Irena Grudzinska Gross [Princeton U]

5.30 – 6.45    Keynote address: Jochen Hellbeck (Rutgers U), “The Language of Soviet Experience and Its Meanings” 

7.00        Reception    

Saturday, May 21

9.00 – 11.00   Panel 3:   Speaking Stalinese

Carol AnyTrinity College] — “Public and Private Speech Genres in the Soviet Writers’ Union under Stalin”
Ilya Venyavkin [Russian State University for the Humanities] — “Mystical Insight under Socialism: The Language of Political Confessions in the late 1930-s”
Anastasia Ryabchuk [National U of Kyiv Mohyla Academy] — “Parasites, Asocials, and Work-Shy: Discursive Construction of Homelessness and Vagrancy in the USSR”
Chair: Petre Petrov [Princeton U]
Discussant: Jochen Hellbeck [Rutgers U]

11.15 – 1.15  Panel 4:   Figures of Rhetoric

Elena Gapova [Western Michigan U / European Humanities U] — “The Party Solemnly Proclaims: the Present Generation of Soviet People Shall Live in Communism”: The Rhetoric of Utopia in Krushchev Era”
Karen Petrone [U of Kentucky] — “Afghanistan and the New Discourse of War in the Late Soviet Era”
Yulia Minkova [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State] — “Our Man in Chile, or Victor Jara’s Posthumous Life in Soviet Media and Popular Culture”
Chair: Ellen Chances [Princeton U]
Discussant: Eliot Borenstein [New York U]

Lunch

2.30 – 4.45    Panel 5:   On the Literary Front

Maria Kisel [Lawrence U] — “Satirical and Philosophical Dimensions of Sots-speak in Andrei Platonov’s Fiction”
Natalia Skradol [Hebrew U / Ben Gurion University of the Negev] — “The Evolution of the Soviet Bestiary: Satirical Fables from Bednyi to Mikhalkov”
Eva Cermanova [U of Aberdeen] — “The Diktat of Language: Bureaucratic Paranoia in Havel’s Memorandum”
Baktyul Aliev [McGill U] — “Visuality in V. Narbikova’s Okolo ekolo”
Chair: Emily Van Buskirk [Rutgers U]
Discussant: Helena Goscilo (Ohio State U)

5.00 – 6.15    Media Presentation: Vitaly Komar, “Word and Image: The Duality of Sots-Art”

6.30     Dinner [Prospect House]

Sunday, May 22

9.00 – 11.15   Panel 6: Practices of Language

Jonathan Larson [U of Iowa] — “Sentimental Kritika: Hazardous Dialectics and Deictics in Socialist Criticism”
James RobertsonNew York U] — “Speaking Titoism: Non-Alignment and the Language Regime of Yugoslav Socialism”
Suzanne Cohen [Temple U] — “In and Out of Frame: The Soviet Training as Sots-Speak”
Julia Lerner and Claudia Zbenovich [Ben Gurion University of the Negev / Hadassah College of Jerusalem] —  “Talk and Dress: Adapting the Therapeutic Paradigm to Post-Soviet Speak”
Chair: Margaret Beissinger [Princeton U]
Discussant: Anna Katsnelson [Princeton U]

11.30 – 1.30    Panel 7: Discursive Remnants

Maria Rives [Yale U] — “Authoritative Discourse in Post-Authoritarian Russia”
Lara Ryazanova-Clarke [U of Edinburgh] — “Stalinism as an Auteur Project: Meta Sots-Speak in Contemporary Russian Public Discourse”
Gasan Gusejnov [Moscow State U] — “On the Vitality of Artificial, or Stalin’s Rhetoric Revisited”
Chair: Rossen Djagalov [Yale U]
Discussant: Caryl Emerson [Princeton U]

The Kremlinaires, the best in Soviet swing: http://www.kremlinaires.com/

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

All that is Solid for Glenn Rikowski: https://rikowski.wordpress.com

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Karl Marx

REFORM COMMUNISM

Call for Papers:

One-day seminar/workshop on: “Reform communism” since 1945 in comparative historical perspective.

Saturday 22 October 2011.

Organised by UEA School of History in conjunction with the journal Socialist History
Venue: School of History, University of East Anglia, Norwich, NR4 7TJ.

The collapse of the USSR and the Eastern bloc in the wake of Gorbachev’s perestroika seemed to show that communism was essentially unreformable. It could be preserved, dismantled, or overthrown, but it could not be reconstructed as a viable alternative to capitalism, free from the defects of its Leninist-Stalinist prototype.

Prior to 1989-91, however, reform communism was a live political issue in many countries. At different times in countries as diverse as Yugoslavia, the USSR, Czechoslovakia, Western Europe, Japan, and China, the leaderships of communist parties themselves sought to change direction, re-evaluate their own past, correct mistakes and so on with the aim of cleansing, strengthening and improving communism, rather than undermining or dismantling it. In countries ruled by communist parties this process usually involved political relaxation and an easing of repression, and was often accompanied by an upsurge of intellectual and cultural ferment.

The aim of this seminar is to consider reform communism as a distinct phenomenon, which can usefully be distinguished from, on the one hand, mere changes of line or leader without any engagement with a party’s own past and the assumptions which underpinned it, and on the other, dissenting and oppositional activity within and outside parties which failed to change the party’s direction.

This seminar will explore different experiences of reform communism around the world after 1945 in a comparative context. 

Examples might include:
·        Tito and Titoism
·        Khrushchev and “de-Stalinisation”
·        Kadarism and the “Hungarian model”
·        Eurocommunism and ideas of socialist democracy
·        The Prague Spring
·        The Deng Xiaoping reforms in China
·        Gorbachev’s perestroika

We are seeking papers of 5000 to 10000 words on various experiences or aspects of reform communism in history, to be presented at the seminar. Selected papers will be published in 2012 in a special issue of Socialist History (http://www.socialist-history-journal.org.uk) devoted to the subject.

Proposals for papers should be submitted by 1 July 2011 to Francis King (f.king@uea.ac.uk) and Matthias Neumann (m.neumann@uea.ac.uk) at School of History, UEA, Norwich NR4 7TJ.

Attendance at the seminar is free of charge, but space is limited. Please e-mail us if you are interested in attending.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Chinese Revolution

Russian Revolution

CONFERENCE ON WAR, REVOLUTION, CIVIL WAR: EASTERN EUROPE 1917-23

UCD CENTRE FOR WAR STUDIES

War, Revolution, Civil War: Eastern Europe 1917-23
25-26 March 2011

Venue: Clinton Institute, Seminar Room
University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
Friday, 25 March 2011

13:00 Registration
13:30  Welcome and Introduction

13:45 – 15:30   Panel 1: The War as Imperial Challenge – Russia
Chair: Nikolaus Katzer (German Historical Institute Moscow)

Semen Gol’din (Hebrew University Jerusalem): The Jewish Policy of Military and Civilian Authorities as a Case Study of the Systemic Crisis in the Russian Empire, 1914-1917

Alexander Semyonov (Smolny Institute St. Petersburg/ Ab Imperio) World War as the Civil War and Civil War as the World War: The Radicalization of Political Visions in the War Time Russian Empire

Boris Kolonicky (European University St. Petersburg) “Nicolas the 3rd”: Images of the Commander in Chief Grand Duke Nikolaj Nikolaevich (1914-1915)

15:030– 16:00   COFFEE BREAK

16:00 – 17:30 Panel 2:  Revolution and Civil War – Russia
Chair: Katja Bruisch (German Historical Institute Moscow)

Vladimir Shishkin (Institute of History, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk) WWI as a factor of Russian Revolution and Counterrevolution

Yulia Yurievna Khmelevskaya (Center for Cultural History Studies, South Ural State University, Chelyabinsk) A la Guerre com a la Guerre: the American Relief Administration and experience of the First World War in Fighting the famine in early Soviet Russia, 1921-1923

Dmitrij Simonov (Institute of History, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk) Russia’s Military Potential in 1918

19:30 DINNER

Saturday, 26 March 2011

09:30 – 11:00   Panel 3: The Baltics and Finland
Chair:  Tomas Balkelis (University College Dublin)

Juha Siltala (Helsinki University) Terror in the Finnish Civil War

Aldis Minins (University of Latvia) Manifestations of the Civil War in Latvia, 1918-1920

Taavi Minnik (Talinn University) Terror and Repressions in Estonia, 1918-1919

11:00– 11:30 TEA / COFFE BREAK

11:30 -13:00  Panel 4: Poland
Chair: Julia Eichenberg (University College Dublin)

Frank Golczewski (University of Hamburg): The Wars after the War. The Fight for the Polish Eastern Border 1918-1920

Jan Snopko (Białystok University): The influence of the Russian revolution on the policy of Joseph Pilsudski and the fate of the Polish Legions (1917-1918)

Rüdiger Ritter (Free University Berlin): Germans and Poles fighting against regional identity: The Confrontations in Upper Silesia after World War I from the perspectives of participants, the regional, national, and international public

13:00– 13:30 LUNCH BREAK

13:00 – 14:30  Panel 5:  The Balkans
Chair: John Paul Newman (University College Dublin)

Mark Biondich (Carleton University) Preliminary title: The Balkans Revolution, War, and Political Violence

Alexander Korb (University of Leicester) “Terrorists interned” Ustasha nationalists, revisionist powers and the breakup of Yugoslavia

Uğur Ümit Üngör (University of Utrecht) A Ten-year War? Post-war Violence in the Ottoman-Russian Borderlands

Dmitar Tasic (Institute for Strategic Research, Department of Military History) Some Common Attributes of Political Violence in Albania, Yugoslavia, and Bulgaria

14:30 COFFEE / TEA BREAK

15:00 – 16:00  Rountable Discussion
Chair: Robert Gerwarth (University College Dublin)

For information about attendance, contact: christina.griessler@ucd.ie

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Leon Trotsky

SEVENTY YEARS SINCE TROTSKY’S DEATH

70 year since Trotsky’s death
A meeting to celebrate Trotsky’s revolutionary life

7-9pm Tuesday 21 September
2nd floor, ULU, Malet Street, Euston, London

Speakers:

John McDonnell MP

Kim Moody (American activist and author) 

Farook Tariq (Labour Party Pakistan)

Yvan Lemaitre (New Anti-capitalist Party, France)

Sean Matgamna (AWL)

Organised by Alliance for Workers Liberty: http://www.workersliberty.org

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski:
The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

WORKSHOP ON AGRARIAN REFORM

22nd – 25th SEPTEMBER 2010

PARIS

http://actuelmarx.u-paris10.fr/cm6/index6.htm

La Réforme agraire, au passé et au futur

coordonné par Pablo F. Luna (Université Paris Sorbonne): pablo-fernando.luna@paris-sorbonne.fr

La Reforma Agraria, en pasado y futuro

Agrarian Reforms: Past and Future

La Section histoire du Congrès Marx International VI, Crise, révoltes, utopies propose la réunion d’un Atelier de travail consacré a la discussion, dans une perspective historienne et marxiste, de cette problématique du monde contemporain. Il est ouvert aux spécialistes de l’étude de la réforme agraire de par le monde. Mais il voudrait aussi amorcer une réflexion sur la réalité des mondes ruraux actuels et des désastres humains et naturels provoqués dans les campagnes par plusieurs décennies d’un néolibéralisme mondialisé et impitoyable. Il voudrait également s’interroger sur le futur d’une lutte pour la réforme agraire, dans son sens originel, qui semble désormais plus actuelle que jamais.

La réforme de la possession des terres est une aspiration moderne. Après les projets des philosophes, des théologiens et des penseurs, les hommes politiques réformateurs ont essayé de la mettre en pratique avec toutefois des objectifs différents, que ce soit dans le monde britannique ou en Europe continentale (les pays germaniques et nordiques, la France, la Péninsule ibérique, la Péninsule italienne). A la fin du 18e siècle, la Révolution française a eu, tel que nous le savons, une forte composante agraire et paysanne. La nationalisation et la vente des biens du clergé et de la noblesse, pour s’attaquer aux forces hostiles au processus révolutionnaire, a pu ouvrir la voie à un important transfert de terres dans le court et dans le moyen terme, qui a également favorisé certains segments sociaux du monde paysan.

Sous des formes diverses, tout le 19e siècle a été marqué ici et là, y compris en Russie et en Amérique, par la question agraire et par celle de la possession de la terre. Ces deux ambitions ont été en même temps des revendications socioéconomiques et politiques, rattachées souvent, dans le cadre des empires, à la reconnaissance des peuples et des nations sans Etat et à la lutte contre l’oppression nationale, pour la liberté. La paysannerie et sa lutte pour la terre et contre les propriétaires fanciers et les hobereaux, étrangers ou autochtones, se sont ainsi régulièrement situées au cœur du mouvement national.

Mais il a fallu attendre 1910 — il y a tout juste un siècle —, pour voir vraiment apparaître le mot « réforme agraire » dans sa signification contemporaine. Et avec le mot son contenu et avec le contenu son application politique concrète, dans le contexte d’un mouvement populaire victorieux. C’est au Mexique, — où se produit la première révolution du 20e siècle — et dans la pratique des mouvements paysans puis des gouvernements révolutionnaires, que la réforme agraire a pris tout son sens de lutte pour le changement de la propriété de la terre, pour la réforme du régime de travail, pour la transformation du système de production et de distribution de la richesse, et aussi pour le pouvoir politique de l’Etat. Le mot d’ordre Terre et liberté qui synthétisait alors, et durant plusieurs décennies, les aspirations des Indiens et des paysans mexicains est devenu depuis la pierre de touche des projets de réforme agraire formulés et mis en pratique.

Le 20e siècle a connu des réformes agraires, au pluriel, les unes plus radicales que les autres, proposées soit par la lutte paysanne et ouvrière révolutionnaire, soit par des Etats réformateurs (parfois militaires et/ou nationalistes), et même par des projets politiques qui ont voulu preserver la société et le système en vigueur et contrecarrer des mouvements révolutionnaires en perspective. Cette tendance, mondialement transversale, n’a pratiquement épargnée aucune région du monde: l’ancienne Russie devenu URSS, la Chine populaire, l’Europe centrale, orientale et méridionale, l’Inde, l’Indochine, l’Amérique latine, et meme l’Afrique d’avant et d’après les décolonisations.

Les propositions d’intervention peuvent être envoyées jusqu’au 30 juin 2010 à pablo-fernando.luna@paris-sorbonne.fr

Pablo F. Luna (Université Paris Sorbonne)

La Reforma Agraria, en pasado y futuro

La reforma de la posesión de la tierra es una aspiración moderna. Luego de los proyectos esbozados por filósofos, teólogos y pensadores, los hombres políticos reformistas intentaron ponerla en práctica —aun cuando fuera con objetivos distintos—, ya sea en el mundo británico o en Europa continental (Los países germánicos y nórdicos, Francia, la Península Ibérica o la Península Italiana). A finales del siglo XVIII, como sabemos, la revolución francesa tuvo un fuerte componente agrario y campesino. La nacionalización y venta de los bienes del clero y la nobleza, para neutralizar a las fuerzas hostiles al proceso revolucionario, desencadenó a corto y a mediano plazo una importante transferencia de tierras que también favoreció a determinados segmentos sociales del mundo campesino.

Bajo formas distintas y en diversos lugares, incluso en Rusia y en el continente americano, todo el siglo XIX estuvo signado por la cuestión agraria y la cuestión de la posesión de la tierra. Estas dos ambiciones fueron al mismo tiempo reivindicaciones socioeconómicas y políticas, muy ligadas en el contexto de los imperios al reconocimiento de los pueblos y naciones sin Estado y a la lucha por la libertad y contra la oppression nacional. El campesinado y su lucha por la tierra y contra los terratenientes e hidalgüelos, oriundos o extranjeros, se situaron muy a menudo en el corazón de los movimientos nacionales.

Pero hubo que esperar 1910 —hace exactamente un siglo—, para asistir a la aparición verdadera de la palabra « reforma agraria » en su acepción contemporánea. Y con la fórmula el contenido ; y con el contenido su aplicación política concreta, en el cuadro de un movimiento popular victorioso. Fue en México —en donde se produjo la primera revolución del siglo XX— y en la práctica de los movimientos campesinos, primero, y luego en la de los gobiernos revolucionarios, donde y cuando la réforma agrarian adquirió todo su sentido de lucha por el cambio en la propiedad de la tierra, por la reforma del régimen de trabajo, por la transformación del sistema de producción y distribución de la riqueza y también por el poder político del Estado. La consigna Tierra y Libertad que concretizó entonces, y durante varias décadas, las aspiraciones de los indios y campesinos mexicanos, se volvió la piedra de toque de los proyectos de reforma agraria concebidos y puestos en aplicación.

El siglo XX asistió a reformas agrarias, en plural; unas más radicals que las otras. Algunas propuestas por la lucha campesina y obrera revolucionaria, otras por Estados reformistas (a veces militares y/o nacionalistas), e incluso algunas fomentadas por proyectos políticos que quisieron preservar el orden y el sistema vigentes, contrarrestando movimientos revolucionarios en ciernes. Fue una tendencia mundialmente transversal, que no dispensó a casi ninguna región del planeta: la antigua Rusia, transformada en URSS ; China popular ; Europa central, meridional y oriental ; India e Indochina ; América Latina ; e incluso la Africa de antes y de después de las descolonizaciones.

La Sección Historia del Congreso Marx Internacional VI, Crisis, Revueltas, Utopías (http://netx.u-paris10.fr/actuelmarx/cm6/index6.htm), que tendrá lugar en París —entre el 22 y el 25 de septiembre de 2010—, propone reunir sobre esta problemática del mundo contemporáneo un Taller de trabajo y discusión, en una perspectiva histórica y marxista. Un encuentro abierto a los especialistas del estudio de la reforma agraria en el mundo. Pero también un encuentro para reflexionar sobre la realidad de los mundos rurales actuales y los desastres humanos y naturales provocados en el campo por varias décadas de un neoliberalismo mundializado y despiadado. También desearía interrogarse sobre el porvenir de una lucha por la reforma agraria, en su sentido original, que parece de aquí en adelante más actual que nunca.

Pablo F. Luna (Université Paris Sorbonne): pablo-fernando.luna@paris-sorbonne.fr

Agrarian Reforms: Past and Future

Reforms related to land ownership is a modern hope. After Philosophes, theologians and thinkers had earlier made their own proposals for change, political reformers then tried to implement their own specific reforms, their objectives being however different, whether in Britain or in Continental Europe (German and Scandinavian countries, France, the Iberian and Italian peninsulas). At the end of the 18th century, the French Revolution had a significant agrarian and peasant component, as we all know. The nationalization and sale of clergy and aristocratic land and property, which aimed at suppressing the forces hostile to the Revolutionary process, opened the door to important land transfers as a short-term or medium-term phenomenon, which also favorised some groups within the peasantry.

In different ways in the 19th century, various places, including Russia and America, were affected by issues related to land distribution and land ownership. These two phenomena also reflected socio-economic and political demands which within empires were often associated to the recognition of the peoples and nations without State deprived of self-determination and to their fight against oppression towards liberty. The peasantry and its fight for land against large land owners and foreign or national squires and hobereaux were thus recurrently caught in the middle of national movements.

It was however in 1910 —one hundred years ago only— that the concept of “agrarian reform” was for the first time formulated and given its contemporary meaning. And with the word, there followed its concrete political implementation, within a victorious popular movement. It was in Mexico that the first twentieth-century revolution took place with the development of peasant movements and the establishment of revolutionary governments. There, agrarian reforms reflected the fight for land ownership changes, for labour reforms, for the transformation of the production and redistribution of wealth, and also for state power. The slogan “Land and liberty” which symbolized then and for several decades Indian and Mexican peasants’ aspirations became the touchstone of all the agrarian reforms which were then proposed and implemented.

The 20th Century knew several agrarian reforms, some being more radical than others, proposed either by peasant or working-class revolutionary groups or by reformatory States (sometimes military and/or nationalist ones) and even political projects whose programs aimed at preserving the status quo in their current society and government in an attempt to counteract and downplay growing revolutionary movements. This world trend spared almost no part of the world from old Russia (now USSR), the People’s Republic of China, Central, Eastern and Southern Europe, India, Indochina, Latin America, and even Africa before and after decolonization.

The History Section of the VI International Marx Conference entitled Crisis, revolts, utopias (http://netx.u-paris10.fr/actuelmarx/cm6/index6.htm), which will meet in Paris — September 22nd – 25th, 2010 — proposes a workshop to discuss these contemporary issues using a Marxist and historical perspective. It welcomes specialists of the study of agrarian reforms in the world. The intent is also to engage in discussions on today’s rural reality and on human and natural disasters taking place in rural areas which experienced several decades of ruthless global neoliberal governance. The organizers will also encourage debates on the future of the campaign for agrarian reforms in its original form, one which seems more topical than ever.

Pablo F. Luna (Université Paris Sorbonne): pablo-fernando.luna@paris-sorbonne.fr

Organisateur  : Pablo F. Luna, pablo-fernando.luna@paris-sorbonne.fr 
Maître de conférences, Histoire, Université Paris Sorbonne, Paris IV

Président de séance : Béaur Gérard, Professeur, Histoire, GDR 2912, CRH – EHESS, CNRS
Président de séance : Piel Jean, Professeur, Histoire, Université Denis Diderot, Paris 7

Barkin David, barkin@correo.xoc.uam.mx  Professeur, Economie, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana de México, Xochimilco, Mexique

Pour reconsidérer le nouveau rôle de la paysannerie en Amérique latine: Les nouvelles réalités communautaires rurales

Partout où elles se trouvent en Amérique latine, les communautés agraires et indigènes réagissent devant le rétrécissement de possibilités résultant de l’effort gouvernemental d’internationalisation économique. Leur réponse articule des stratégies locales et régionales d’autonomie visant l’autosuffisance à plusieurs niveaux, pas seulement sur le plan alimentaire mais aussi sur le plan des infrastructures, des services sociaux (par exemple, la santé et l’éducation), de la préservation et de la réhabilitation de l’environnement. Cette communication voudrait apporter, à partir des expériences locales concrètes, une discussion sur les notions analytiques qui permettraient de comprendre ces stratégies productives et politiques, confrontées aux defies lancés aux communautés. Et ceci afin de mettre en relief une nouvelle approche pour élaborer des réponses « post-capitalistes ».

Bregianni Catherine, cbregiann@academyofathens.gr, Chercheuse-enseignante, Histoire, Université Ouverte Grecque, Grèce

Réforme agraire et monétisation de l’économie agraire en Grèce (de la fin du XIXe siècle à la Seconde Guerre mondiale)

Dans le but d’examiner la réforme agraire en Grèce, ayant eu lieu pendant la période de l’entre-deux-guerres, exprimant les objectifs politiques de la Première République Grecque, il a fallu observer premièrement l’évolution de la question rurale qui dans le pays s’est posée en même temps que celle de l’expansion territoriale. Ainsi, une première réforme a été appliquée au cours des années 1870, quand les terres nationales ont été partiellement divisées et octroyées aux paysans sans terre par le gouvernement libéral. La formation d’une classe sociale de petits propriétaires fonciers, orientée vers la culture des produits commerciaux, a ainsi été mise en œuvre, laquelle — en alliance avec les élites du Royaume — aurait pu soutenir les efforts de modernisation. Néanmoins, l’annexion de la Thessalie, en 1881, et ensuite celle de la Macédoine grecque en 1912, ont donné naissance à la question rurale, puisque le mode de production dominante y était la grande propriété foncière. Outil des Etats réformateurs grecs, la reforme agraire des années 1920 a provoqué la création de mécanismes d’incorporation de l’agriculture à l’économie nationale, tels que les coopératives agricoles et la diffusion du crédit agricole. Ainsi, dans le secteur agricole ont été créés des réseaux techniques qui avaient en même temps une fonction sociale, tels les réseaux bancaires et les réseaux de coopératives agricoles. La protection de l’agriculture a également induit l’articulation des instituts étatiques visant à implanter dans le monde rural les méthodes de culture rationnelles. Sans doute, la politique modernisatrice de l’Etat grec pour l’économie agraire visait aussi à anticiper les protestations paysannes et à contrecarrer l’influence croissante du parti communiste à la campagne (étant donné qu’en Grèce la classe ouvrière était fortement liée au monde rural). La faillite du schéma linéaire « réforme agraire – monétarisation de l’économie rurale – expansion des coopératives agricoles » à la fin des années trente a été souvent approchée par l’historiographie moderne grecque comme étant le résultat de l’activité bancaire. Ι lest néanmoins clair que les mécanismes bancaires ne sont pas autonomes vis-à-vis du marché. Cet aspect nous aidera à formuler nos conclusions afin de nous approcher au présent, en ce qui concerne la situation actuelle de l’agriculture grecque, sous le prisme du néolibéralisme.

Brocheux Pierre, pib531@wanadoo.fr  Professeur, Histoire, Université Denis Diderot, Paris 7

Réforme agraire et Développement au Viet Nam : contradiction ou complémentarité? (1953-1989)

Dans un but à la fois politique et économique les gouvernements au pouvoir dans le nord (République démocratique du Viet Nam) et dans le sud (République du Viet Nam) ont changé l’assiette foncière de leur paysannerie en appliquant des méthodes différentes. Les communistes du nord ont fait une révolution agraire à la manière chinoise avec reference à la lutte des classes, la mise en place de tribunaux populaires et sociodrames, expropriations et exécutions des personnes. Cette revolution agraire qui débute en 1953, utilise la violence physique et engendre des « erreurs » qui sont corrigées en 1956-1957. Cette « correction » donne lieu à une redistribution des terres, qui n’est que le prélude à la collectivisation des campagnes jugée nécessaire à l’essor de la grande agriculture moderne qui doit accompagner et soutenir l’industrialisation. Le gouvernement du Sud Viet Nam applique tardivement (1970-1971) des procédures légales et non violentes (sur le modèle japonais et taïwanais). La réforme renforce les rangs et le rôle économique de la petite et moyenne paysannerie qui fait échouer la collectivisation que les communistes veulent introduire dans le sud après avoir conquis et réunifié le pays (1975-1976). La réforme agraire du sud qui avait pour but politique de couper l’herbe sous les pieds des communistes, révèle son efficacité, elle est l’une des raisons déterminantes de la politique dite de Rénovation du gouvernement socialiste du Viet Nam. La Rénovation débute dans les campagnes et enclenche la dé-collectivisation, autrement dit un deuxième partage des terres. Le retour à l’exploitation familiale est aussi celui à l’économie de marché et à la spéculation commerciale et foncière. Cette évolution pose la question : le développement dans son sens classique ne favorise-t-il pas le retour à la concentration foncière et à la différenciation sociale dans campagnes ?

Cohen Arón, acohen@ugr.es  Professeur, Géographie,  Universidad de Granada, Espagne
Ferrer Amparo, aferrer@ugr.es  Maître de conférences, Géographie, Universidad de Granada, Espagne

Des « sans terre » aux « sans papiers » ? Réflexions à propos des campagnes andalouses

Au lendemain de la mort de Franco la revendication d’une réforme agraire restait un des signes programmatiques de l’opposition antifranquiste la plus active. Au début des années 1980, au cœur de la Transition politique, le PSOE cumulant le gouvernement central et ceux des toutes récentes «autonomies» de l’Espagne méridionale, inspirait la Carte de l’Autonomie Andalouse. Un des objectifs affichés était la « réforme agraire entendue comme la transformation (…) des structures agraires » dans la région. Cet objectif est resté complètement inédit, et assez vite la remise à jour du vocabulaire, dans le discours politique dominant et dans les normes, a effacé la moindre source de malentendu : point de recours désormais à d’autres catégories que celles de la « modernisation » et de l’ « entreprise » agricoles. Parallèlement, avec l’émergence de l’Espagne comme pays d’immigration, l’ « immigré » s’est quasiment substitué au « journalier » dans les discourse en vogue… et comme objet d’analyse. Les sujets sociaux et la nature des dossiers ne sont plus les mêmes. Les réclamations des « papiers pour tous » et contre l’ « exclusion sociale » ne laisseraient-elles plus de place aux « questions agraires »?

Estevam Douglas, douglasestevam@mst.org.br Représentant du MST, Brésil, Mouvement des paysans sans terre, Brésil

Les limites de la reforme agraire au Brésil et les conséquences du renforcement du modèle de l’agrobusiness

Cette communication analysera les conséquences du modèle brésilien de l’agrobusiness, à partir de plusieurs points de vue. D’abord, du point de vue social, avec la reproduction d’une population de paysans sans terres. Ensuite, du point de vue économique, en fonction de la concentration de richesse qu’un tel modèle engendre, de la réduction du nombre de travailleurs agricoles, des problèmes concernant les conditions de travail, ou à propos de l’absence d’une politique publique pour la production vivrière, mais aussi du point de vue du rôle du capital financier dans la production agricole et dans la concentration des terres. Ce modèle se configure dans le cadre d’un marché de plus un plus internationalisé et dans un contexte de crise énergétique où la production d’agro-carburants se présente comme un secteur économique de grande importance.

Figueroa A. Víctor  Professeur, Histoire, Universidad Marta Abreu, Las Villas, Cuba

Cuba : une expérience de développement rural

Cette communication présente et résume l’expérience cubaine dans la mise en œuvre de la Loi de la réforme agraire de 1959. Elle explique les conditions objectives historiques qui ont conduit à cet événement; elle présente aussi une analyse des premiers résultats obtenus. Cette communication fournit également les données statistiques illustrant la
situation avant et après la mise en œuvre de la loi, ainsi que les principales caractéristiques particulières du cas cubain.

Jacobs Susan, S.Jacobs@mmu.ac.uk  Reader, Sociologie, Manchester Metropolitan University, Grande-Bretagne

Gender and agrarian reforms : Critical reflections

Au cours des dernières années, lorsque l’on a parlé de la réforme agraire ou de la redistribution des terres, ce sont des sujets tels que la hausse des prix ou la sécurité alimentaires, ou l’appropriation des terres, qui ont concentré l’attention des spécialistes. Cette communication voudrait examiner l’impact des processus de réforme agraire sur les femmes, en particulier dans le modèle familial individuel. Dans des nombreux contextes et sous l’optique de la tenure et de la conduite des terres, les femmes se sont trouvées dans une situation défavorable, que ce soit du point de vue de la concession des titres de possession ou par la préférence accordée aux hommes comme chefs de famille. Cependant, des groupes familiaux conduits par des femmes ont souvent obtenu des terres et dans certaines réalités, en Chine, au Viet Nam ou dans certains pays d’Amérique latine, on a essayé de garantir les droits à la terre des femmes mariées. L’exploitation des terres ouvre aux femmes la possibilité de la réussite mais il leur est toujours difficile d’accéder à la terre sur un même plan d’égalité que les hommes. L’une des questions posées est celle de la forme que ces droits devraient prendre : la coutume traditionnelle est fréquemment défavorable aux femmes, mais l’accès individuel aux titres de possession débouche souvent, surtout parmi les pauvres, à la dépossession des terres. Cette communication examine ces faits et les tensions qu’ils ont provoquées, à partir de plusieurs études de cas, au Viet Nam, au Zimbabwe et au Brésil. Quel a été le rôle joué par le mouvement des femmes et les autres mouvements sociaux et comment devront-ils se consolider pour assurer, à l’avenir et sur le terrain, les droits des femmes?

Mesini Béatrice Mesini@mmsh.univ-aix.fr  Chargé de recherche, Sociologie politique, CNRS Telemme, Université d’Aix-en-Provence

Dynamiques et enjeux de la réforme agraire dans les forums sociaux 2000-2008

Inscrite dans une sociologie des mobilisations collectives, cette analyse décentrée sur des segments de luttes locales et globales, se propose d’explorer la diversité et l’originalité des revendications portées par les acteurs paysans et ruraux dans les forums sociaux – locaux, nationaux, régionaux, continentaux et internationaux – mais aussi « généralistes » et « thématiques » entre 2000 et 2008. C’est suite au tournant neoliberal opéré dans les années 1990 sous l’effet des programmes d’ajustements structurels impulsés par les grandes institutions financiers internationales (Banque Mondiale, Fonds Monétaire International, OMC…) que les sans-terre, journaliers, paysans familiaux, pêcheurs, peoples autochtones menacés, ruraux déplacés, femmes exploitées se sont en effet mobilisés sur la définition de leurs droits d’existence. Ils ont progressivement investi les forums sociaux, arguant de la centralité de leurs luttes dans les divers ateliers, plénières, séminaires, notamment autour des questions de domination et d’exploitation, dans les rapports de classe, de caste, de race et de genre. Autour du thème de la réforme agraire, les associations, organisations et collectifs structurent et amplifient le cadre interprétatif d’une negation globale des droits humains fondamentaux mais aussi de la disparition orchestrée des usages communautaires et droits collectifs – économiques, sociaux, culturels, cultuels, environnementaux – sur les terres. Dans un premier temps, nous montrerons comment ces acteurs ruraux hétérogènes ont accompli, à partir des années 1990, un travail de convergence et de transnationalisation des luttes, sur la base de diagnostics partagés en termes de privation, d’exclusion, de pauvreté, d’exploitation et de misère. Sont en particulier incriminés la privatisation des ressources et des terres, la concentration et l’internationalisation du capital foncier, le maintien de structures sociales agraires héritées de la colonisation et/ou recomposée de façon multiforme par le développement durable, le développement de l’ « agrobusiness », le brevetage du vivant, la destruction des communautés de vie, les migrations forcées – internes et
internationales -, l’exploitation et la violence dans les champs, ou encore la criminalisation et la répression des mouvements sociaux et des luttes syndicales. En second lieu, nous mettrons au jour le double processus d’intrication des luttes paysannes, indigènes/autochtones, mais aussi d’articulation des luttes rurales et urbaines, réactivé dans les Forums sociaux en termes d’autonomie, de sécurité et de souveraineté alimentaire, gagnant progressivement l’ensemble des nations, des continents et des régions. Enfin, nous montrerons que l’expressivité des revendications dans ces tribunes relève d’une pluralité de luttes locales, singulières et diversifiées et que la « co-vision » de la Pacha Mama redessine, à partir de la définition de devoirs envers la « Terre commune », le contour des droits d’existence civils, politiques, économiques, sociaux, et culturels.

Martínez Luciano (Intervention à confirmer)  Chercheur, Sociologie, FLACSO – Universidad de Quito, Equateur

Equateur, les nouveaux propriétaires après la réforme agraire

Mignemi Niccoló, mignic@gmail.com  Doctorant, Histoire, EHESS Paris – Università degli Studi di Milano, Italie

Italie 1920-1950 : Vers la réforme agraire ou la réforme de l’agriculture ?

Les lois de réforme agraire de 1950 en Italie ont été adoptées sous la pression d’un mouvement paysan qui a débuté dans le Mezzogiorno en 1943-1944 et s’est diffusé dans toutes les campagnes du pays. Le fascisme, ruraliste dans son discours, l’était beaucoup moins dans ses pratiques, en dissimulant le progressif appauvrissement des petits paysans derrière la propagande du retour à la terre. C’est donc en suivant le sort des paysans, au moins depuis le début des années Vingt, alors qu’ils vivent une période de prospérité, interrompue par les décisions prises par le régime et par la crise des années Trente, que l’on pourra comprendre dans la longue durée la signification de l’explosion sociale des campagnes dans l’après-guerre. Ici par ailleurs, si les forces antifascistes ont pris conscience que la résolution de la question agraire, toujours renvoyée depuis l’unité politique de 1861, ne pouvait plus être esquivée, deux conceptions s’affrontent alors : d’un côté la perspective d’une réforme agraire générale, avec la réorganisation du secteur primaire dans son ensemble qui pouvait remettre en cause son rôle même dans le modèle de développement, de l’autre côté l’idée d’une réforme minimale, voire seulement foncière, limitée soit au niveau géographique, soit dans ses ambitions.

Oliveira (de) Batista Fernando (Intervention à confirmer) Professeur, Agronomie, Universidade Politecnica de Lisboa, Portugal

La question de la terre aujourd’hui : Pour une comparaison entre le Portugal, le Brésil et l’Angola.

Robledo Ricardo, rrobledo@usal.es Histoire Professeur Universidad de Salamanca, Espagne

La réforme agraire de la Seconde République espagnole : Une question déjà vue ?

La recherche sur la réforme agraire, qui a été une sujet central dans l’historiographie espagnole, plus ou moins jusqu’en 1980, a été ensuite peu à peu négligée voire oubliée ; ce qui n’a pas été par ailleurs l’apanage de la seule Espagne. D’un côté, le travail d’Edward Malefakis (Reforma agraria y revolución campesina en la España del siglo XX, Barcelona, Ariel, 1972) a joué jusqu’à un certain point un rôle dissuasif, ce qui a fait que certaines recherches ultérieures se sont souvent contentées de paraphraser une œuvre qui a été publiée il y a environ quarante ans. D’un autre côté, l’orientation internationale de la politique économique, mettant en question les réformes agraires latino-américaines, n’a pas été un facteur favorable pour encourager une telle recherche. L’un des nombreux reproches adressés à la réforme agraire de la Seconde République espagnole a été son choix anti-latifundium, tout en mettant en opposition la rentabilité supposée de la grande exploitation face à l’inefficacité imputée au partage des terres. Ce serait l’un des aspects de la réforme agraire que les ingénieurs agronomes auraient mis en cause dans leurs rapports —des rapports très peu utilisés, par ailleurs. Mais il y aurait aussi un autre aspect, celui de la fonction sociale du latifundium, que l’on n’étudie pas d’une façon simultanée avec l’examen du fait réformateur, ce qui donne lieu à des perceptions partielles de la problématique. On néglige de préciser les avantages sociaux découlant de la perte par les propriétaires de leurs prérogatives politiques. En tout cas, la réforme agraire ne peut et ne doit être présentée comme une panacée et l’on peut tout autant apprendre de son échec — dans sa mise en application — que de son succès.

Roux Bernard, bernard.roux@agroparistech.fr Chercheur, Agronomie, CESAER – INRA Agrocampus Dijon

Au Portugal: Vie et mort d’une réforme agraire prolétarienne

La « révolution des œillets » d’avril 1974 au Portugal a été suivie par des mouvements sociaux et des réformes qui, dans un premier temps, orientèrent la société portugaise vers le socialisme. L’évolution rapide des rapports de force politiques, en faveur des conservateurs, ne permit pas que cette orientation perdure. La réalisation d’une réforme agraire puis sa destruction, tout cela dans un bref délai de quelques années, doivent s’interpréter dans ce cadre. C’est au cours de l’année 1975 que les ouvriers agricoles, dont une majorité de journaliers, de l’Alentejo et du Ribatejo, dans la moitié sud du pays, soutenus par les forces progressistes au pouvoir, ont réalisé l’occupation de plus d’un million d’hectares des latifundia et des grandes exploitations capitalistes. Cette réforme agraire peut être qualifiée de prolétarienne pour deux raisons : d’abord parce que son principal moteur a été le proletariat rural, depuis toujours soumis à l’exploitation de la bourgeoisie agraire mais auteur de nombreuses luttes pour l’amélioration des conditions de travail et des salaires ; ensuite, en raison de la nature collective des nouvelles unités de production créées, certaines d’entre elles dépassant 10 000 ha. Avec le basculement du pouvoir à droite la contre réforme agraire fut mise en œuvre dès 1977. Les terres furent rendues aux grands propriétaires et les unités de production des ouvriers agricoles détruites.

Siron Thomas, thomassiron@gmail.com  Doctorant, Anthopologie, EHESS Marseille

« Je ne demande pas d’argent pour cheminer ! » Le dirigeant paysan, la redistribution foncière et l’échange de loyautés politiques en Bolivie

« No pido plata para andar » : un dirigeant de la communauté Tierra Prometida signifait ainsi à ses « bases » qu’il n’exerçait pas sa fonction par intérêt pécuniaire et qu’en retour il était légitime à recevoir leur « appui ». C’est sur la dimension morale et politique du partage foncier, au sein d’un processus de réforme agraire, que je voudrais insister dans cette présentation. Je m’appuierai sur une recherche menée dans une communauté de « paysans sans terre » bolivienne (Tierra Prometida), fondée à la suite de la « prise » d’une propriété mise en vente par un « trafiquant de terre » et mobilisée depuis pour obtenir de l’Etat central un titre foncier et une personnalité juridique. Ce sont les deux buts ultimes de l’andar (cheminement) du dirigeant « au dehors » de la communauté (dans le monde de la politique). La « redistribution » de la terre se présente donc à la fois comme un transfert de droits fonciers entre une classe de possédants et une classe de travailleurs et comme un procès de distribution de droits et d’obligations au sein d’un corps politique. Le dirigeant paysan joue un rôle central dans le rapport redistributif qui s’instaure et se noue simultanément à l’échelle communale et nationale, rapport qui conditionne la transformation de la structure foncière à un échange de loyautés politiques parfois fluide et imprévisible.

Thivet Delphine,  Doctorante,Sociologie, IRIS – EHESS

Dynamiques et enjeux de la réforme agraire dans les forums sociaux 2000-2008

Inscrite dans une sociologie des mobilisations collectives, cette analyse décentrée sur des segments de luttes locales et globales, se propose d’explorer la diversité et l’originalité des revendications portées par les acteurs paysans et ruraux dans les forums sociaux – locaux, nationaux, régionaux, continentaux et internationaux – mais aussi « généralistes » et « thématiques » entre 2000 et 2008. C’est suite au tournant neoliberal opéré dans les années 1990 sous l’effet des programmes d’ajustements structurels impulsés par les grandes institutions financiers internationales (Banque Mondiale, Fonds Monétaire International, OMC…) que les sans-terre, journaliers, paysans familiaux, pêcheurs, peuples autochtones menacés, ruraux déplacés, femmes exploitées se sont en effet mobilisés sur la définition de leurs droits d’existence. Ils ont progressivement investi les forums sociaux, arguant de la centralité de leurs luttes dans les divers ateliers, plénières, séminaires, notamment autour des questions de domination et d’exploitation, dans les rapports de classe, de caste, de race et de genre. Autour du thème de la réforme agraire, les associations, organisations et collectifs structurent et amplifient le cadre interprétatif d’une negation globale des droits humains fondamentaux mais aussi de la disparition orchestrée des usages communautaires et droits collectifs – économiques, sociaux, culturels, cultuels, environnementaux – sur les terres. Dans un premier temps, nous montrerons comment ces acteurs ruraux hétérogènes ont accompli, à partir des années 1990, un travail de convergence et de transnationalisation des luttes, sur la base de diagnostics partagés en termes de privation, d’exclusion, de pauvreté, d’exploitation et de misère. Sont en particulier incriminés la privatisation des ressources et des terres, la concentration et l’internationalisation du capital foncier, le maintien de structures sociales agraires héritées de la colonisation et/ou recomposée de façon multiforme par le développement durable, le développement de l’ « agrobusiness », le brevetage du vivant, la destruction des communautés de vie, les migrations forcées – internes et internationales -, l’exploitation et la violence dans les champs, ou encore la criminalisation et la répression des mouvements sociaux et des luttes syndicales. En second lieu, nous mettrons au jour le double processus d’intrication des luttes paysannes, indigènes/autochtones, mais aussi d’articulation des luttes rurales et urbaines, réactivé dans les Forums sociaux en termes d’autonomie, de sécurité et de souveraineté alimentaire, gagnant progressivement l’ensemble des nations, des continents et des régions. Enfin, nous montrerons que l’expressivité des revendications dans ces tribunes relève d’une pluralité de luttes locales, singulières et diversifiées et que la « co-vision » de la Pacha Mama redessine, à partir de la définition de devoirs envers la « Terre commune », le contour des droits d’existence civils, politiques, économiques, sociaux, et culturels.

Tortolero Alejando, (Intervention à confirmer), Professeur, Histoire, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana de México, Iztapalapa, Mexique

La réforme agraire de la révolution mexicaine

(Sous réserve)Syndicaliste,  FRONT EZEQUIEL ZAMORA

Une réforme bolivarienne au Venezuela

Pablo F. Luna
Institut Hispanique
Université Paris Sorbonne
Pablo-Fernando.Luna@paris-sorbonne.fr

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Harvesting

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Karl Marx

HISTORICAL MATERIALISM CONFERENCE 2010

Extended Abstract Deadline

Due to high demand, the deadline for submitting abstracts for the 2010 Historical Materialism Conference in London has now been extended to 1 JULY 2010. This will be the last extension.

‘Crisis and Critique’: Historical Materialism Annual London Conference 2010,

Central London, Thursday 11th to Sunday 14th November*

Call for Papers

Notwithstanding repeated invocations of the ‘green shoots of recovery’, the effects of the economic crisis that began in 2008 continue to be felt around the world. While some central tenets of the neoliberal project have been called into question, bank bailouts, cuts to public services and attacks on working people’s lives demonstrate that the ruling order remains capable of imposing its agenda. Many significant Marxist analyses have already been produced of the origins, forms and prospects of the crisis, and we look forward to furthering these debates at HM London 2010. We also aim to encourage dialogue between the critique of political economy and other modes of criticism – ideological, political, aesthetic, philosophical – central to the Marxist tradition.

In the 1930s, Walter Benjamin and Bertolt Brecht projected a journal to be called ‘Crisis and Critique’. In very different times, but in a similar spirit, HM London 2010 aims to serve as a forum for dialogue, interaction and debate between different strands of critical-Marxist theory. Whether their focus is the study of the capitalist mode of production’s theoretical and practical foundations, the unmasking of its ideological forms of legitimation or its political negation, we are convinced that a renewed and politically effective Marxism will need to rely on all the resources of critique in the years ahead. Crises produce periods of ideological and political uncertainty. They are moments that put into question established cognitive and disciplinary compartmentalisations, and require a recomposition at the level of both theory and practice. HM London 2010 hopes to contribute to a broader dialogue on the Left aimed at such a recomposition, one of whose prerequisites remains the young Marx’s call for the ‘ruthless criticism of all that exists’.

We are seeking papers that respond to the current crisis from a range of Marxist perspectives, but also submissions that try to think about crisis and critique in their widest ramifications. HM will also consider proposals on themes and topics of interest to critical-Marxist theory not directly linked to the call for papers (we particularly welcome contributions on non-Western Marxism and on empirical enquiries employing Marxist methods).

While Historical Materialism is happy to receive proposals for panels, the editorial board reserves the right to change the composition of panels or to reject individual papers from panel proposals. We also expect all participants to attend the whole conference and not simply make ‘cameo’ appearances. We cannot accommodate special requests for specific slots or days, except in highly exceptional circumstances.

*Please note that, in order to allow for expected demand, this year the conference will be three and a half days’ long, starting on the Thursday afternoon.

Please submit a title and abstract of between 200 and 300 words by registering at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/conferences/annual7/submit by 1 JULY 2010

Possible themes include:

•       Crisis and left recomposition

•       Critique and crisis in the global south

•       Anti-racist critique

•       Marxist and non-Marxist theories of crisis

•       Capitalist and anti-capitalist uses of the crisis

•       Global dimensions of the crisis

•       Comparative and historical accounts of capitalist crisis

•       Ecological and economic crisis

•       Critical theory today

•       Finance and the crisis

•       Neoliberalism and legitimation crisis

•       Negation and negativity

•       Feminism and critique

•       Political imaginaries of crisis and catastrophe

•       The critique of everyday life (Lefebvre, the Situationists etc.)

•       The idea of critique in Marx, his predecessors and contemporaries

•       Art criticism, political critique and the critique of political economy

•       Geography and crisis, geography and the critique of political economy

•       Right-wing movements and crisis

•       Critiques of the concept of crisis

•       New forms of critique in the social and human sciences

•       Aesthetic critique

•       Marxist literary and cultural criticism

•       Reports on recent evolution of former USSR countries and China

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

“Daystar” by Will Roberts, at YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s6f_pA5XUPk

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski