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Situationism

DevXS

DevXS is a FREE developer marathon spread across three days, where students from across the UK and beyond are encouraged to team up and build cool things that contribute to university life. All you need to do is get here! If you are not a student, it would be great if you could pass this email onto relevant people in your organisation.

Please note we actively encourage you to speak to computer science tutors, who are also welcome to attend as long as they bring along some students! Tutors might be able to organise a team of you to attend (e.g. travelling by minibus etc). If you think you might have difficulty getting here, please contact us on hello@devxs.org, and we might be able to help.

Tell others about it by printing off a poster and putting it somewhere visible where others can see it!

See: http://devxs.org/assets

DevXS is about students sharing their ideas, mashing up data and building prototypes that improve, challenge and positively disrupt the research, teaching and learning landscapes of further and higher education.

We’re going to award prizes to the best ideas, prototypes and collaborations and there are going to be developers from universities around the country hanging around to help you out.

So if you are a student (undergraduate or postgraduate) or a tutor, please register for this event as soon as possible, places are limited and it is a fantastic opportunity to improve your CV and work with some of the best young developers in the country! You may even get the chance to speak to recruiters from industry.

The event will take place at the University of Lincoln on the weekend of 11-13 November, 2011. We will provide free accommodation on the night of the 11th (twin rooms) and then a relaxation zone on the 12th (bring your sleeping bag!). There will also be free food and refreshments!

Register now before it is too late: http://devxs.org/register

For more information about the event, please see: http://devxs.org/

ΔΔΔΔΔΔΔ
Mr Mahendra Mahey

Project Manager DevCSI
Research Officer
UKOLN,
University of Bath,
Bath,
BA2 7AY

Tel: ++44 (0) 1225 384594
Fax: ++44 (0) 1225 386256
Mobile: ++44 (0) 07581069575
Email: m.mahey@ukoln.ac.uk
skypeID: mr_mahendra_mahey
http://devcsi.ukoln.ac.uk/
http://cerify.ukoln.ac.uk/
http://www.ukoln.ac.uk

 

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NEW ISSUE OF ‘WORKPLACE: A JOURNAL FOR ACADEMIC LABOR’

Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor has just published its latest issue at: http://m1.cust.educ.ubc.ca/journal/index.php/workplace

We invite you to review the Table of Contents here and then visit our web site to review articles and items of interest.

We would like to thank Professor Howard Stevenson (University of Lincoln, UK) for his tremendous work as section editor for this issue.

Thanks for the continuing interest in our work.

Stephen Petrina
E. Wayne Ross
Co-Editors, Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor
University of British Columbia
wayne.ross@ubc.ca

Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor
No 17 (2010): Working In, and Against, the Neo-Liberal State: Global Perspectives on K-12 Teacher Unions
Table of Contents
http://m1.cust.educ.ubc.ca/journal/index.php/workplace/issue/view/8

Articles
——–

Working In, and Against, the Neo-Liberal State: Global Perspectives on K-12 Teacher Unions: Special Issue Introduction
Howard Stevenson

Terminating the Teaching Profession: Neoliberal Reform, Resistance and the Assault on Teachers in Chile
Jill Pinkney Pastrana

Social Justice Teacher Unionism in a Canadian Context: Linking Local and Global efforts
Cindy Rottman

Australian Education Unionism in the Age of Neoliberalism: Education as a Public Good, Not a Private Benefit
Jeff Garsed, John Williamson

“What’s Best for Kids” vs. Teacher Unions: How Teach For America Blames Teacher Unions for the Problems of Urban Schools
Heidi Katherine Pitzer

Gramsci, Embryonic Organic Intellectuals, and Scottish Teacher Learning Representatives: Alternatives to Neoliberal Approaches to Professional Development in the K-12 Sector
Alex Alexandrou

Pedagogy of Liminality? The Case of Turkish Teachers’ Union Egitim-Sen
Duygun Gokturk

Book Reviews
——–

Review of Industrial Relations in Education: Transforming the School Workforce
Merryn Hutchings

A Portrait of Authenticity: A Review of Carl Mirra’s (2010) The Admirable Radical: Staughton Lynd and Cold War Dissent, 1945-1970. Kent, OH: Kent
University Press
Adam Renner

Review of Union Learning Representatives: Challenges and Opportunities
Becky Wright

Review of How the University Works: Higher Education and the Low-Wage Nation
Marisa Huerta

Review of Academic Repression: Reflections from the Academic-Industrial Complex
Leah Schweitzer

The Sociopathology of Everyday Business: A Review of The University Against Itself: The NYU Strike and the Future of the Academic Workplace
Jim Rovira

Review of The Rich World and the Impoverishment of Education: Diminishing Democracy, Equity and Workers’ Rights
Paul Orlowski

Technology and (Human) Rights: A Review of Human Rights in the Global Information Society
Stephen Petrina

Review of The Developing World and State Education: Neoliberal Depredation and Egalitarian Alternatives
Steven L. Strauss

Miscellany
——–
Connecting Teacher Unions and Teacher Union Research
AERA Teachers’ Work/Teacher Unions SIG

********************

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

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The University of Utopia
Radicalising Higher Education

 

2nd Annual Research Conference

The Centre for Educational Research and Development of the University of Lincoln

 

Thursday, 4th June, 2009

EMMTEC Conference Centre, Brayford Pool, University of Lincoln, LN6 7TS

 

 

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS:         

Professor Ron Barnett, Institute of Education:         The Utopian University: Challenges and Prospects

Professor Antonia Darder, University of Illinois: “Breaking Silence: A Study into the Pervasiveness of Oppression”

 

 

THEMATIC WORKSHOPS

Patrick Ainley, Joyce Canaan: “The Student Experience”

Stefano Harney, Fred Moten: “Academic Labour”

Cath Lambert, Mike Neary, Elisabeth Simbuerger: “Teaching in Public”

Dennis Hayes, Terence Karran: “Academic Freedom”

 

 

What is the Conference About?

 

Thomas More’s Utopia (1516) sets out, for the first time, the paradox of the modern (new) world: the possibility of abundance (freedom) in a society of scarcity (non-freedom); and the dangers that are inherent in this paradoxical situation for the development of the emergent capitalist society.

 

More suggests the universality of education as a way of resolving this paradox.  For the humanist More, the highest pleasures are those of the mind, and true happiness depends on their realization.  On More’s fantasy island, Utopia is a universal school for all its citizens, where all civic life is education.  Citizens attend public lectures in the morning, participate in lively discussions during meal-times, and, in the evening, receive formal supervision from scholars. (Meiksins Wood, 1997).

 

In 1953, with the publication of The University of Utopia, the educational philosopher Robert Hutchins extended More’s allegory to a liberal humanist reappraisal of higher education.  Anticipating the vocationalist critique of contemporary higher education, Hutchins wrote ‘The object of the educational system, taken as a whole, is not to produce hands for industry or to teach the young how to make a living. It is to produce responsible citizens’ (p.3). Hutchins’s views have been repeated and endorsed in the increasing volume of critical literature on the commercialisation of higher education.

 

However this critical literature has struggled to provide any convincing alternatives to ‘academic capitalism’ (Slaughter and Leslie, 1997).  This absence of any radical alternative, occurs not because of a lack of imagination, but by virtue of the nature of liberal-humanism itself.  For Zizek (2002) liberal humanism ‘precludes any serious questioning of the way in which this liberal democratic order is complicit in the phenomena it officially condemns, and, of course, any serious attempt to imagine a different socio-political order’ (167). What this amounts to, for Zizek, is ‘a prohibition on thinking… the moment we question the liberal consensus we are accused of abandoning scientific objectivity and recourse to outdate ideological positions’ (168).

 

The aim of this conference is to recover the freshness of More’s critique, while going beyond Hutchins’s liberal fundamentalism, in order to imagine some real radical futures for higher education.  The conference addresses the problem of inventing a form of radicality that confronts the same paradox that emerged in Tudor England, and continues to undermine the progressive development of the postmodern world.

 

 

Why Come to the Conference?

 

The conference will be of interest to all staff in further and higher education who are concerned about the future direction and role of the changing university within the emerging global knowledge economy.

 

We look forward to welcoming you

Register online now at: http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/conferences/  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk 

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski