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Marx for TodayINSURGENT NOTES – ISSUE 6 (March 2013)

Insurgent Notes: http://insurgentnotes.com

 

Editorial: In This Issue

Loren Goldner: Fictitious Capital and Contracted Social Reproduction Today: China and Permanent Revolution

John Garvey: The New Worker Organizing

Matthew Quest: CLR James and Maoism

John Garvey: Trotsky Reconsidered: Claude Lefort’s Perspective

Michael Rectenwald: A Post-Mortem on Post-Modernism

 

Book Reviews:

Loren Goldner.  Review/Essay:  Cesar Chavez, the United Farm Workers, and the Question of Unions in Contemporary Capitalism

Freddy Fitzsimmons. Review/Essay: The Condition of the Working Classes in England

Maury Moriarity  on  Michael Schmidt/Lucien van der Walt

Black Flame: The Revolutionary Class Politics of Anarchism and Syndicalism.

AK Press 2009. Vol. 1.

 

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/new-issue-of-insurgent-notes

Posthuman

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

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Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Yehoshua Yakhot

YEHOSHUA YAKHOT – ‘THE SUPPRESSION OF PHILOSOPHY IN THE USSR (THE 1920s & 1930s)’

New from Mehring Books
Yakhot’s history of early Soviet philosophy
19 June 2012
See: http://wsws.org/tools/index.php?page=print&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwsws.org%2Farticles%2F2012%2Fjun2012%2Fmehr-j19.shtml

Mehring Books is proud to announce the publication of Yehoshua Yakhot’s The Suppression of Philosophy in the USSR (The 1920s & 1930s). Originally published in Russian in 1981, this unique history of early Soviet philosophy is now available for the first time in English, translated by Frederick Choate.

Yehoshua Yakhot (1919-2003) was a professor of philosophy in the Soviet Union until forced to emigrate to Israel in 1975. While in emigration, he finished writing the book begun in Moscow years before.

Yakhot’s book is essential reading for an understanding of the counter-revolutionary role of Stalinism and its devastating impact on every aspect of Soviet thought. Rare among works dealing with this period, Yakhot presents an objective account of the theoretical role of the major figures in the early Soviet Union – including, most significantly, that of Leon Trotsky, co-leader with Lenin of the Russian Revolution of October 1917.

The book describes the flourishing of philosophical discussion after the revolution and ensuing Civil War. By 1922, the major theoretical journal Under the Banner of Marxism had been founded at Trotsky’s urging. The first two issues contained letters from Trotsky and Lenin that constituted the program of the journal.

By the mid-1920s, two contending camps had formed in philosophy: the mechanists and dialecticians. The relatively free debate between them on many complex issues was followed by Stalin’s intervention in December 1930. In a ferocious reaction against the theoretical foundations of the October Revolution, Stalin sent countless genuine Marxists to their deaths during the Great Terror of 1936-1938.

Prior to the opening of the archives in the late 1980s and early 1990s, Yakhot presents the largely unknown history of many of the Marxist philosophers victimized by Stalinism.

The subjects covered in the book include: the subject matter of Marxist philosophy; the problem of contingency; the principle of partisanship in philosophy; Hegel and Marxist dialectics; Spinoza’s place in the discussions of the 1920s and 1930s; the rejection of ideology by Marx and Engels; the influence of Bogdanov’s ideas; the inevitable crisis of Soviet ideology; and continued attempts to conceal the crimes of Stalinism in the USSR.

This new English edition contains photographs, biographical information, an index and two letters by Trotsky and Lenin.

To order your advance copy, click here: http://mehring.com/index.php/the-suppression-of-philosophy-in-the-ussr-1920s-and-1930s.html

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski 

 

Russian Revolution

THE OCTOBER REVOLUTION IN PROSPECT AND RETROSPECT

A new book in the Historical Materialism Book Series

http://www.brill.nl/october-revolution-prospect-and-retrospect

The October Revolution in Prospect and Retrospect: Interventions in Russian and Soviet History
John Eric Marot, Keimyung University, Korea

In a series of probing analytical essays, John Marot tracks the development of Bolshevism through the prism of pre-1917 intra-Russian Social Democratic controversies in politics and philosophy. For 1917, the author presents a critique of social historical interpretation of the Russian Revolution.

Turning to NEP Russia, the author applies Robert Brenner’s analysis of pre-capitalist modes of production and concludes that neither Bukharin nor Trotsky’s NEP-premised programs of economic transformation and advance toward socialism were feasible. At the same time, he rejects the view thatStalinism was pre-destined to supplant NEP. Instead, he hypothesises that the superior alternative to Stalinism was NEP without collectivization and the Five-Year Plans – a outcome that would have been possible had Bukharin and Trotsky joined forces to stop Stalin.

Biographical note
John Eric Marot, Ph.D. (1987), University of California, Los Angeles, teaches History at Keimyung University in Korea. He has published many articles on Russian and Soviet History, notably ‘Class Conflict, Political Competition, and Social Transformation: Critical Perspectives on the Social History of the Russian Revolution’ (Revolutionary Russia, 1994) and ‘Trotsky, the Left Opposition, and the Rise of the Stalinism: Theory and Practice’ (Historical Materialism, 2006).

Readership
This work will appeal to those interested in the fate of the October Revolution.

Table of contents
Acknowledgements
Introduction

1. The Peasant-Question and the Origins of Stalinism: Rethinking the Destruction of the October Revolution

2. Trotsky, the Left Opposition and the Rise of Stalinism: Theory and Practice

3. Class-Conflict, Political Competition and Social Transformation: Critical Perspectives on the Social History of the Russian Revolution

4. Political Leadership and Working-Class Agency in the Russian Revolution: Reply to William G. Rosenberg and S.A. Smith

5. A ‘Postmodern’ Approach to the Russian Revolution? Comment on Ronald Suny

6. Alexander Bogdanov, Vpered, and the Role of the Intellectual in the Workers’ Movement

7. The Bogdanov Issue: Reply to Andrzej Walicki, Aileen Kelly and Zenovia Sochor

8. Marxism, Science, Materialism: Toward a Deeper Appreciation of the 1908-1909 Philosophical Debate in Russian Social Democracy

9. Politics and Philosophy in Russian Social Democracy: Alexander Bogdanov and the Socio-theoretical Foundations of Vpered

References
General Index

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Dave Hill

FOURTH INTERNATIONAL

Revolutionary Marxists

http://4thinternational.blogspot.co.uk/

4th INTERNATIONAL Revolutionary Marxists

The Views and Opinions of Revolutionary Marxists in the Fourth International

 

The first three posts are …

Posts:

 

Andreas Kloke: Answer to the statement of the FI on Greece 

Dear Comrades, you’ve probably seen that the “Executive Bureau of the Fourth International” (EBFI) has issued a statement on G…

 

Manos Skoufoglou: The Pendulum

It is generally true that there is some delay between the real, active class struggle and elections. However, the re…

 

Vote in Greece in the June 17 2012 election for Antarsya and a Transitional Programme by Dave Hill

In this paper I argue that Antarsya should not join Syriza in an electoral coalition or joint list, but that Antarsya should fight the elect…

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Rosa Luxemburg

IN THE STEPS OF ROSA LUXEMBURG

Please get your library to order this book!

http://www.brill.nl/steps-rosa-luxemburg

In the Steps of Rosa Luxemburg
Selected Writings of Paul Levi
Paul Levi. Edited and introduced by David Fernbach

Paul Levi remains one of the most interesting and controversial figures in the early history of the Communist movement. As leader of the KPD after the murder of Rosa Luxemburg and Karl Liebknecht, he successfully built up a party of a third of a million members, but by 1921 Comintern pressure for ‘Bolshevisation’ forced Levi’s resignation and expulsion. Until his early death in 1930 he remained ‘a revolutionary socialist of the Rosa Luxemburg school’ (Carl von Ossietsky), and was described by Albert Einstein as ‘one of the wisest, most just and courageous persons I have come across’. The first English edition of Levi’s writings fills a long-standing gap in the documents of German Communism.

Biographical note
David Fernbach, studied at London School of Economics. Freelance writer, editor and translator. Publications include the three-volume edition of Karl Marx’s Political Writings (Penguin 1973-4, reissued Verso 2010), and The Spiral Path: a gay contribution to human survival (1981). Translations include Marx’s Capital Volumes Two and Three, and works by Georg Lukacs, Rudolf Bahro, Boris Groys, Nicos Poulantzas, Pierre Bourdieu, Alain Badiou and Jacques Rancière.

Readership
People interested in Communist history from either an academic or an activist perspective.

Table of contents

Introduction

Part One: Leading the KPD
Address to the Founding Congress of the KPD
Letter to Lenin (1919)
The Munich Experience: An Opposing View
The Political Situation and the KPD (October 1919)
The Lessons of the Hungarian Revolution
The World-Situation and the German Revolution
The Beginning of the Crisis in the Communist Party and the International
Letter to Loriot

Part Two: The March Action
Our Path: Against Putschism
What Is the Crime? The March Action or Criticising It?
Letter to Lenin (1921)
The Demands of the Kommunistische Arbeitsgemeinschaft

Part Three: The Soviet Question
Letter to Clara Zetkin
Introduction to Rosa Luxemburg’s pamphlet The Russian Revolution
Introduction to Trotsky, The Lessons of October
The Retreat from Leninism
After Ten Years
Approaching the End
Return

Part Four: The German Republic
The Murder of Erzberger
The Needs of the Hour
Why We Are Joining the United Social-Democratic Party
The Assassination of Rathenau  
The Situation after Rathenau’s Death
The Reich and the Workers
The Defenders of the Republic
After the Oath

References
Index

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Marxism and Culture

MARXIST LITERARY GROUP SUMMER INSTITUTE ON CULTURE AND SOCIETY

 

Monday, June 20

9:00-10:15: MARXISM AND BOURGEOIS REVOLUTION 
Spencer Leonard: Marx’s Critique of Political Economy: Proletarian Socialism Continuing the Bourgeois Revolution?
Pamela Nogales: Marx on the U.S. Civil War as the 2nd American Revolution
Jeremy Cohan: Lukács on Marx’s Hegelianism and the Dialectic of Marxism

10:30-11:30: WAR AND SOCIAL CLASS
Pat Keeton: “Class, War, and Class War: Changing Ideology in American Films from Vietnam to Post-9/11
Peter Scheckner: “End of Empire: How American Cinema since Vietnam Narrates the Erosion of American Global Power.

12:30-1:30: ROUNDTABLE: AFTER GLOBALIZATION

1:45-3:00: POLITICS AND CONSCIOUSNESS
Eric Vazquez: Counterinsurgency’s Suppositions
Joel Nickels: From Spontaneity to Self-government: Imagining Self-Organization in the Twentieth Century and Beyond
Gino Signoracci: Marxism and Eastern Thought: Toward a Philosophy of Perpetual Revolution?

3:15-4:45: COMMODITIES
Ariane Pasternak: Commodity Fetishism and the Feminized Sphere of Non-Value
Ericka Beckman: Seeing the World System: The Latin American “Commodity Novel”
Sina Rahmani: Einwaggonieren: Containerization, Displacement, and the “Forbidden Commodities”
Max Haiven: Abject Finance: Wal-Mart and the Unbankables

7:00: FILM SCREENING: SHASHWATI TALUKDAR’S PLEASE DON’T BEAT ME, SIR.

Tuesday, June 21

9:00-10:15: HISTORY, LITERATURE, REVOLUTION
Eldon Birthwright: Caribbean Literature and the Sanitizing of History
Sheshalatha Reddy: Bodies in Bondage, Bodies in Labor: Class Consciousness and the “Oppressed Natives” in the Morant Bay Uprising
Aisha Karim: Literature and Revolution

10:30-11:45: RACE, REVOLUTION, POSTCOLONIALITY
Julie Fiorelli: Recurrent Revolutions? Arna Bontemps’s Conception of Time and African American Race-War Novels of the Late 1960s
LaRose Parris: The African Diasporic Proletariat
Henry Schwarz: Marxism and Postcolonial Studies

1:00-2:30: READING GROUP: ANTONIO GRAMSCI 
Led by Jaafar Aksikas

2:45-4:00: REVOLUTION AS EVENT
Kanishka Chowdhury: Revolution and the “Hidden Abode of Production”
Barbara Foley: Event, Non-Event, and “Arrested Dialectic”: The Aftermath of 1919.
Neil Larsen: Revolution as Event and the Temporality of Crisis

4:15-5:30: REVOLUTION AND UNEVEN DEVELOPMENT, AKA THE SPATIAL DIALECTIC 
Laura Martin: Colonial Servitude in the Transition to Capitalism.
Joe Ramsey: Learning from Failures, and from Afar: The Problem of Revolutionary Subjectivity in the US of A, Today

5:45-6:30: WHAT IS A MARXIST POLITICS TODAY?
Oded Nir: Waltz With Bashir: Mediating Class In and Out of Globalized Israeli Culture
Niamh Mulcahy: Class Struggle and the Possibility of a Science of Aleatory History
Andrew Culp: Three Theses for Marxist Politics Today
Joshua Kurz, respondent

Wednesday, June 22

9:00-10:15: AESTHETICS AND POLITICS
Vin Adiutori: Appearance and Phantasm: Reconfiguring Misrecognition
Anthony Squiers: Rethinking Brecht’s Split Character: Dialectics, Social Ontology and Literary Technique
Eleanor Kaufman: Revolution and the Question of Party in Sartre, Brecht, and Badiou

10:30-11:45: BETWEEN REVOLUTIONS: RESISTANCE, CULTURAL POLITICS, AND THE CLICHÉ
Joe Hughes: Ethico-Aesthetics and the Politics of the Cliché
Christian Haines: “It is you who give the life”: On Walt Whitman, Cultural Revolution, and Biopolitics
Hyeryung Hwang: “I prefer not to”: Embodied Subjectivity as the Site of Resistance

1:00-2:30: READING GROUP: MARXISM AND FEMINISM REVISITED 
Led by Ann Mattis and Susan Comfort)

2:45-4:00: THE MARXISM OF SECOND INTERNATIONAL RADICALISM: LENIN, LUXEMBURG, TROTSKY AND LUKÁCS 
Chris Cutrone: Vladmir Lenin
Greg Gabrellas: Rosa Luxemburg
Ian Morrison: Leon Trotsky
Spencer Leonard, respondent

4:15-5:30:  END TIMES
Mathias Nilges: The Tenses of Form or, Literature at the End of Time
Brent Bellamy: Foreclosing Revolution, or the Apocalyptic Contradiction of Late Capitalism
Eui Kang: Apocalyptic Marx

7:00: FILM SCREENING: MICHAEL TRUSCELLO’S CAPITALISM IS THE CRISIS

Thursday, June 23

9:00-10:15: HISTORY I
Lucas Johnson: Measuring History in the Post-National
Jackson Petsche: Marxism, Posthumanism, and the Future of Animal Liberation
Nathaniel Boyd: Re-thinking the Contingent Political Sequence of Revolutionary Class Struggle

10:30-11:45: HISTORY II
Grover Furr: Why Is It Vital To All of Us To Get the Stalin Period Right?
Ryan Culpepper: 5 Years After the 1929 Economic Collapse
Justin Sully: Population Decline and the Historical Lateness of Capitalism

1:00-2:30: READING GROUP: C.L.R. JAMES AND JAMES BOGGS 
Led by Joel Woller

2:45-3:45: THE PERIPHERAL STANDPOINT
Jefferson Agostini Mello: Desiring the World: A New Brazilian Culture?
Maria Elisa Cevasco: Misplaced Ideas: What We Can Learn from How Ideas Fare in Brazil

4:00-5:00: BUSINESS MEETING

7:00: FILM SCREENING: ANDREW FRIEND’S WORKERS’ REPUBLIC

Friday, June 24

8:45-10:15: LITERATURE I
Emilio Sauri: Cognitive Mapping, Then and Now
David Aitchison: Literature and Revolution: Radical Politics and the Novel in the U.S.A.
Jen Hammond: The Lyric Moment and Revolution
Madeleine Monson-Rosen: The Structure of Media Revolution: Thomas Pynchon and the Politics of Paradigm Shift

10:30-12:00: LITERATURE II
Jonathan Poore: John Steinbeck and the Proletarian Aesthetic
Carolyn Lesjak: Realism and Revolution
Peter Gardner: The Political Unconscious of A Farewell to Arms
Kristin Bergen: Gertrude Stein and the Relation of Political Periodization to Aesthetic Form

1:00-2:30: READING GROUP: THE STRUCTURE OF REVOLUTION 
Led by Joe Ramsey and Rich Daniels

2:45-4:00: GUY DEBORD
Sarah Hamblin: Repetition as a Revolutionary Aesthetic in the Cinema of Guy Debord
Jane Winston: Revolution in Debord
Vanessa R. S. Cavalcanti and Antonio Carlos Silva: The Society of the Spectacle to the Beat of the Capital: a Contribution to the Criticism of Modernity’s Ritual

6:30: MLG BARBECUE

Marxist Literary Group: http://mlg.eserver.org/the-institute/2011-chicago/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Capitalism

UNEVEN AND COMBINED DEVELOPMENT AND CONTEMPORARY WORLD POLITICS

Dear Colleague,

I am pleased to announce that Queen Mary’s Centre for the Study of Global Security and Development will be hosting a symposium on ‘Uneven and Combined Development and Contemporary World Politics’ on Wednesday, Februaury 9, 2011 between 2-6pm.

The programme is below. If you wish to attend please contact Rick Saull – r.g.saull@qmul.ac.uk – in advance of the symposium.

Regards,
Rick Saull
Director, Queen Mary, Centre for the Study of Global Security and
Development

Symposium on UNEVEN AND COMBINED DEVELOPMENT AND CONTEMPORARY WORLD POLITICS

Wednesday, February 9, 2-6pm (room Arts G.02), Queen Mary, Mile End Campus, London, E1 4NS

Programme/Presenters

Session 1, 2.00pm – 3.30pm

Alex Anievas (Cambridge)
‘Origins and Extensions of Uneven and Combined Development in the History and Theory of International Relations: The Case of the First World War’ This paper aims to contribute to recent debates on ‘international historical sociology’ specifically regarding the potential utility of Leon Trotsky’s concept of uneven and combined development (U&CD) in advancing a theory of modern inter-state conflict. The paper first re-examines recent debates over the theoretical status of U&CD considering, in particular, the various socio-historical and spatial registers covered by the idea as deployed by the different positions within the debates. Considering the possible benefits and pitfalls of stretching the concept to a generalized theory of ‘the international’ throughout history, the paper argues that a central challenge remains. This regards the development of a sufficiently historically-differentiated conception of ‘unevenness’ and ‘combination’-one capable of theorizing the radical historical disjuncture represented by the international relations of capitalist modernity while nonetheless capturing aspects of inter-societal relations common to all historical epochs and thus forming a crucial causal element in the transition to capitalism itself. Developing such a perspective, a theory of U&CD could take up John Hobson’s (and others) charges of ‘Euro-centricism’ with a more historically-sensitive interpretation of the internationally-pressurized multiple paths to capitalist modernity and their crucial ‘feed-back’ effects in restructuring processes of inter-state competition. Drawing on and further contributing to the theory, the second half of the paper sketches an alternative approach to the causes of the First World War distinctively combining ‘geopolitical’ and ‘sociological’ modes of explanations into a single framework. This highlights how the necessarily variegated character of interactive socio-historical development explains the inter-state rivalries leading to war. Contextualizing the sources of conflict within the broad developmental tendencies of the Long Nineteenth century (1789-1914) and their particular articulation during the immediate pre-war juncture, the paper aims further develop the theory of U&CD in and through the rich empirical terrain of the pre-war period thereby providing a much needed empirical contribution to recent debates.

Ben Selwyn (Sussex)
‘Trotsky, Gerschenkron and the Political Economy of Late Capitalist Development’
The study of late capitalist development is often characterised as a battle between protagonists of market-led vs state-led development. For the latter position, Alexander Gerschenkron looms large, as one of the most significant theorists of state-led development under conditions of relative backwardness. There are striking similarities between Gerschenkron’s explication of the advantages of backwardness and Trotsky’s concept of uneven and combined development and the privilege of backwardness. (These similarities have been commented upon often but rarely subject to closer comparison): Indeed, both men share a common problematic – the comprehension of how economically backward countries could skip stages of development in order to join the ranks of economically advanced countries. This paper compares their conception of this problematic and illustrates how in a number of areas the two are complementary. These are: Their rejection of unilinear patterns of capitalist development, their appreciation of the role of states and institutions in facilitating late development, and their understanding of development as a disruptive social process.  However, in crucial areas the two diverge. These are: Their comprehension of international economic and political relations, the role and position of labour in late development, and ultimately, the potential for late capitalist development to unleash social upheavals and further, non-capitalist transformations. Overall, I suggest how Trotsky and Gerschenkron’s approaches can complement each other, but that ultimately they represent fundamentally opposed approaches to human development.

Coffee Break, 3.30pm – 4.00pm

Session Two, 4.00pm – 6.00pm

Mick Dunford (Sussex)
‘Combined and Uneven Development: A Geographical Perspective’

John Hobson (Sheffield)
‘What’s at Stake in the Neo-Trotskyist Debate? Towards a Non-Eurocentric Historical Sociology of Uneven and Combined Development’
This piece seeks to advance what is being termed ‘third wave historical sociology of IR’ (HSIR). In particular I consider how a third-wave ‘non-Eurocentric’ HSIR could be developed by entering into the extant internecine debate that is raging within the newly emergent neo-Trotskyist school of HSIR. At one extreme lies Justin Rosenberg who argues that the concept of uneven and combined development (U&CD) should be historically generalised while the majority position insists that U&CD is specific only to the modern capitalist era (e.g., Ashman, Davidson, Allinson and Anievas). Here I provide some support for the Rosenberg position, by arguing that failure to historically generalise the concept beyond modern capitalism leads into the cul-de-sac of Eurocentrism. As a counter, I spend the majority of the piece sketching the outlines of a non-Eurocentric theory of U&CD by considering the ‘rise of the West’ as a case of a late-developing civilization; and in the process sketching the basis for an adequate third-wave non-Eurocentric HSIR.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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Marxism 2009 – A Festival of Resistance

 

CAPITALISM ISN’T WORKING…

COME AND DISCUSS THE ALTERNATIVE AT…

Marxism 2009 – a festival of resistance

Thursday 2nd – Monday 6th July 2009, central London

BOOK NOW TO GET £5 OFF YOU TICKET PRICE!

Online: http://www.marxismfestival.org.uk

Phone: 020 7819 1190

Over 1,000 people have already bought tickets for Marxism 2009. We are now entering the last full week of the £5 discount on Marxism tickets: get yours now at:  http://www.marxismfestival.org.uk or call us in the office on 020 7819 1190.

With the current £5 discount, prices are: Waged – £40, Unwaged – £27, HE student – £20, FE student – £10.

Remember, if you can’t afford to pay now but want to get the £5 discount you can register before 31st March and postdate your payment – just give us a call in the office: 020 7819 1190.

Highlights include:

* Alex Callinicos vs Slavoj Zizek – a debate on “What does it mean to be a revolutionary today?”

* David Harvey on Marx’s Capital and debating Chris Harman on “The crisis of neoliberalism”

* Tariq Ali on Pakistan’s deepening crisis

* Terry Eagleton on “Socialism and culture”

* Sheila Rowbotham discusses pioneering gay rights campaigner Edward Carpenter

* Gary Younge speaks on Obama’s rise to power

* Ghada Karmi participates in a course of meetings on Palestinian liberation

* Michael Billington and Sam West take part in a tribute to Harold Pinter

* Bernadette McAliskey speaks 40 years on from her election to parliament and the Battle of the Bogside

* John Bellamy Foster takes part in a course on “Marx and Darwin” and speaks on Marxist ecology

Other participants include: Tony Benn, Paul Gilroy, Eamonn McCann, Mark Serwotka, Sally Hunt, Jeremy Corbyn MP, Nick Broomfield, Michael Rosen, Istvan Meszaros, Roy Bailey and David Ferrard, Pat Devine, Danny Dorling, Zoe Williams, David Edgar, Haifa Zangana, Steven Rose, Ambalavaner Sivanandan, Ben Fine, Ron Oppenheim and Natalie Adler, Jeremy Dear, Ludi Simpson, Leo Zeilig, Graham Turner, Chris Searle, Adam Tooze, Costas Lapavitsas, Omar Puente… and many more!

Courses and meetings include: Capital for beginners * The Marxist method * The economic crisis – causes, consequences and questions * Resistance and recession in Britain * The culture of crisis * The International Socialist tradition * 1989 and the collapse of the Soviet block – before, during and after * Islam and Islamism * Lenin and Leninism * Trotsky * Revolution and beyond * Racism, segregation and multiculturalism * British society today * The fight against fascism * Women’s liberation * LGBT rights * The US – then and now * China – from Mao to markets * Imperialism today and the “war on terror” * Pakistan * Voices from the Middle East * Palestine’s fight for freedom * Latin America * Africa * Climate Change – saving the planet * Darwin and Marx – evolution revolution * Education * Students and the struggle * Capitalism and the media

 

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk