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Capitorg

Capitorg

GENERAL ORGANOLOGY

 

General Organology

The Co-individuation of Minds, Bodies, Social Organisations and Technº

20th-22nd November 2014

International Conference

University of Kent

General organology proposes to rethink the relations between biological organs, technical organs and social organisations and how all of these individuate in the socius. General organology draws from the original practice of organology in musicology, which is the study of the history of musical instruments, their practices and their social roles in all civilizations and historical periods. Yet general organology is not limited to the study of musical instruments but it takes into account all technical instruments and their effects on biological and social organs.

In addition to Marianne Wolf, Maurizio Lazzarato and Bernard Stiegler, other renowned academics will present on the project of general organology: Cornelius Borck (Lübeck), Antoinette Rouvroy (FNRS and Namur), Francesco Vitale (Salerno), John Mowitt (Leeds), Michael Lewis (UWE), Ian James (Cambridge), Martin Crowley (Cambridge), Ben Roberts (Bradford), Patrick Crogan (UWE), Yuk Hui (Leuphana), Pieter Lemmens (Radboud University of Nijmegen), and many others.

The conference programme is available at this address: http://nootechnics.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/ProgrammeKent1.pdf

And for more information on the conference, please follow the link to the Noötechnics website: http://www.nootechnics.org/

Attendance is free but places are limited, please register before the 10th November (for catering purposes): https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/general-organology-3-days-tickets-13075618527

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

 

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

Glenn Rikowski’s article, Education, Capital and the Transhuman – can also now be found at Academia: https://www.academia.edu/9033532/Education_Capital_and_the_Transhuman

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

PRAKTYKA TEORETYCZNA (THEORETICAL PRACTICE) – CALL FOR PAPERS

Praktyka Teoretyczna: http://www.praktykateoretyczna.pl/

This Call for Papers is for the Introduction section, known as “Varia” in the fourth issue of “Theoretical Practice”. “Varia” will be concerned with unsolicited texts, interesting research topics and interventions that do not fit into the thematic nature of the issue. “Varia” will then become a permanent feature of the journal.

We encourage you to submit to the Editor scientific articles in the area of broad leftist thought and engaged research practice, in writing that is clear, and is in tune with the practical-theoretical perspective of the journal (with particular emphasis on Marxist thought, as well as, among others, biopolitics, poststructuralism, posthumanism, postcolonial studies, gender, queer, urban, animal research or higher education).

This invitation is permanent and is not associated with any particular deadline for submitting articles. The authors and the author must, however, reckon with the fact that the potential publication will depend on the normal mode of publishing in the magazine.

The volume of the article (written in Polish or English) can not exceed 40 thousand characters (including spaces and footnotes, please refer to the other guidelines in the section for authors ). Each of the texts is subject to technical editing and double-substantive editorial. Those articles that undergo the process of positive evaluation will be peer reviewed by two anonymous reviewers, independent and non-editorial, who have expertise in the field and relevant research interests. The review process will be ‘double blind’. An article that will pass through this procedure successfully will then be published in one of the numbers thematic magazines.

Call for Papers (with Polish-English translation facility): http://www.praktykateoretyczna.pl/call-for-papers/call-for-papers-varia/

 

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The New Left Book Club: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2014/01/05/the-new-left-book-club-call-for-papers/

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Posthuman

SRHE DIGITAL UNIVERSITY NETWORK

SRHE Digital University Network

Friday 2 March 2012

9.30 – 12.30 followed by lunch

 

Digital Disaggregation:  Assessing the Uncanny Posthuman

Dr Sian Bayne, School of Education, University of Edinburgh

To learn and teach across multiple digital spaces can be to experience uncertainty, disorientation and fragmentation in both generative and disturbing ways. This presentation will draw on notions of the uncanny and of the posthuman in theorising the ‘strangeness’ of these new modes of being in education. In particular, it will discuss the ways in which assessment practices in online learning can explicitly engage with disaggregation, spectrality and posthuman pedagogy, as critical moves in re-thinking teaching, learning and assessment for the digital mode.

Dr Bayne’s research focuses on the impact of the digital on higher education, museum education and lifelong learning. Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at the University of Edinburgh, she has held awards from the British Academy, the Higher Education Academy, the AHRC and the Royal Society of Edinburgh for a range of projects concerned with the ways in which technological change prompts us to re-think what education is and can be. Dr Bayne is a member of the University of Edinburgh Digital Cultures and Education research group (http://www.education.ed.ac.uk/dice/), Programme Co-Director of the University of Edinburgh MSc in E-learning (http://www.education.ed.ac.uk/e-learning/), and Associate Dean (digital scholarship) for the College of Humanities and Social Sciences at Edinburgh (http://www.digital.hss.ed.ac.uk/).

 

Education as Sociomaterial Practices – Posthuman Frontiers for Educational Technology

Professor Tara Fenwick, School of Education, University of Stirling
The materiality of everyday interaction is too often ignored, dismissed, or isolated in educational research. Objects and technologies are often assumed to be separate and distinct from human desire and action, in ways that lead to other unhelpful distinctions between virtual and real, designers and users, and knowledge and action. In this presentation I argue for a different configuration, showing how the social and material not only are entangled in assemblages of the human and nonhuman, but also constitute the practices and knowings that comprise education. Sociomaterial analyses trace how and why particular practices and knowledges in educational processes become naturalized or stabilised, what is holding them together, what is excluded and what inequities are created. Capacities for action are more-than-human, they are relational, distributed, and enacted through particular dynamic assemblages. This is a posthuman, not anti-human approach – a sociomaterial sensibility opens radical new questions and imaginative possibilities for education and educational technology.
Professor Fenwick has written extensively about theories of learning and gender in relation to work practices and education, most recently focusing on what some call ‘socio-material’ theories, particularly actor-network theory and complexity sciences. Her book Learning Through Experience: Troubling Assumptions and Intersecting Questions (Krieger, 2003) was granted the 2004 Cyril Houle Award of the American Association for Adult and Continuing Education for Outstanding Contribution to Adult Education Literature. Recent large projects funded by Canada’s Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council include (1) an examination of older professionals’ informal learning and its relation to aging and generational issues; (2) a study exploring knowledge networks and practices of ‘portfolio’ workers (independent and mobile professionals who work with multiple employers and organizations simultaneously); and (3) a participatory research project studying social responsibility learning among small business owners, including professional firms. Her current project with Canadian colleagues Kathryn Church, Elizabeth Lange, Taylor Webb is comparing knowledge-creation practices of nurses, social workers and teachers in changing organizations, using an activity theory framework.

 

Event booking details

To reserve a place at this seminar please register at: www.eventdotorg.co.uk/events.asp

Or telephone +44 (0) 207 4472525.  SRHE events are open to all and free to SRHE members as part of their membership package. The delegate fee for non-members is £25 [full time students £20]. Non-members wishing to join the Society may do so at the time of registration and the delegate fee will be waived. Please note that places must be booked in advance and that a £25 for non-attendance will be charged if a place has been reserved but no notice of cancellation/non-attendance has been given in advance.

 

Yours sincerely

Francois Smit, SRHE Event Manager

PLEASE NOTE THAT SRHE HAS MOVED TO NEW OFFICES. OUR NEW TELEPHONE NUMBER

OUR NEW OFFICE DETAILS ARE: Society for Research into Higher Education, 73 Collier Street, London N1 9BE

Telephone 0207 427 2350; Fax number 0207 278 1135; srheoffice@srhe.ac.uk; http://www.srhe.ac.uk

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Utopia

ALTERNATIVE WORLDS

Alternative Worlds: A retrospective of the last 111 years

Call for Papers / Art Presentations

Seminar in Visual Culture 2011
Deadline for proposals: 13 December 2010

Institute of Germanic & Romance Studies, Room ST 274 (School of Advanced Study, Stewart House, 32 Russell Square, WC1B 5DN London)

This series of seminars acts as a forum for practicing artists, researchers, curators, students, and others interested in visual culture who are invited to present, discuss and explore a given theme within the broad field of Visual Culture.

In an attempt to escape the doom and gloom of the economic crisis the theme for 2011 is ‘Alternative Worlds’. The aim is to examine the dreams, plans and hopes, but also the nightmares and fears reflected in utopian thinking since 1900 in the Western hemisphere. What has become of all those possible worlds? How do they reflect their contemporary culture and society and what, if anything, do or can they mean for our present, or indeed, our future? What alternative worlds are engendered by our own times, by the world of 2011 itself? This is, hence not only a retrospective of past utopias and their after-lives but also an invitation to look towards our possible futures.

Looking backwards, we could revisit the Futurist utopia of a mechanical universe based on the principles of speed and technology, or look at the somewhat similar proposals of the American Technocratic Society for a world based on the laws of engineering. Or we could examine the repercussions of Hermann Sörgel’s plan for Atlantropa, a merger of Europe and Africa created by damming the Strait of Gibraltar, meticulously worked out in the late 1920s and promoted by Sörgel until his death in 1952. Or we could look at the architectural utopias of Modernism, at Le Corbusier’s Plan Voisin, or at GM’s 1939 Futurama exhibit of the ‘City of the Future’ with its intricate congestion-free road systems. We could look at the social housing projects of the 1950s and ’60s – those that were built and those that were imagined. We could look at the many futures inspired by the space age, or at the alternative lives and societies envisaged in reaction to the Cold War and the nuclear threat. We could revisit the multiple Ballardian worlds or the various projects for the future proposed by the architects and artists who contributed to “This is Tomorrow”, the exhibition held at London’s Whitechapel Gallery in 1956 and restaged in 2006 at Tate Britain. We could look at the social utopias of the 1960s, the communes, sex and free love as a basis for a new society. We could look at the alternative worlds inspired by the possibilities of robotics, cybernetics or genetics; or at virtual worlds, like Second Life or all those parallel lives made possible by social networking sites. We could look backwards and at the same time look forwards.

Contributions on any of the above topics or on other alternative worlds of the past and the present are invited from individuals working in the fields of art history, philosophy, literary, cultural and visual studies, fine arts, film and media studies, theatre, history, etc.

Artists are also invited to present new (and existing) work on the theme.

Please send proposals for art presentations (200 words plus images) or academic papers (200 words) to Ricarda Vidal: ricarda.vidal@sas.ac.uk ||| by 13 December 2010.

Please indicate which date you would prefer for your talk.

Dates and times:

Wednesday 26 Jan. 2011, 6.30pm – 8.00pm

Wednesday 23 Feb. 2011, 6.30pm – 8.00pm

Wednesday 30 March 2011, 6.30pm – 8.00pm

Wednesday 27 April 2011, 6.30pm – 8.00pm

Wednesday 25 May 2010, 6.30pm – 8.00pm

END

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

The Man in Black

THE COMING OF THE BODY

NEW TITLE FROM VERSO: The Coming of the Body

By HERVE JUVIN

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“After gods, after revolutions, after financial markets, the body is becoming our truth system. It alone endures, it alone remains.” Herve Juvin

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This startling book argues that scientific developments are redefining what it means to be human. Though we live longer than ever before, we are increasingly obsessed with youth and longevity, and increasingly disconnected from suffering, need and time. In the process, are we losing our morality?

The human lifespan has tripled in the last two centuries, ushering in a new kind of humanity which places the body at its centre. In the West, money, technology and medicine combine to deliver the body from war, suffering, death and religion. Even as state and global institutions crumble, this emergent body no longer struggles or resists.

The new body is rendered immune and newly resistant to the ravages of time, nature and capital. An emergent ‘industry of life’—from diets and plastic surgery to sex-free reproduction and virtual reality—further seeks to liberate the body from its biological functions.

Newly translated into English, THE COMING OF THE BODY weaves together a rich variety of sources to paint a cogent, if chilling, picture of this new paradigm. Technological advancement couples with demographic shifts to bring about a sweeping change in social relations. Adult adolescence becomes increasingly protracted and a new ethics of desire begins to emerge. Unabashedly hedonistic, the body becomes a machine of desire that eschews family, state and nation in favour of individual health, security and pleasure. In a society governed by contracts rather than ethical ties, money replaces traditional morals, fidelity and family in an insatiable quest for eternal youth.

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Praise for THE COMING OF THE BODY:

“Mr. Juvin’s book is being read attentively by philosophers and politicians, because it warns that pretty much all the values we consider human or humanist are collapsing…If we accept Mr. Juvin’s argument, the trinity of western ideals (‘liberty, equality, fraternity’) is in the course of being replaced by another one (‘health, security, pleasure’).” Christopher Caldwell, Financial Times

“Juvin’s central message is a sinister paradox: what communism set out to do, and disastrously failed to achieve, capitalism is in the process of realizing—the discredited messianic goal of reinventing humanity.” Perry Anderson, New Left Review

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HERVE JUVIN is President and founder of the Eurogroup Institute and is the author of a number of books on economics, finance, and management. He was a columnist for LE MONDE and now regularly contributes to L’EXPANSION and ENJEUX LES ECHOS.

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ISBN: 978 1 84467 310 0 / $27.95 / £14.99 / CAN$31.00 / Hardback / 188 Pages

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For more information visit: http://www.versobooks.com/books/ghij/ij-titles/juvin_h_coming_of_the_body.shtml

To buy the book in the UK : http://www.bookdepository.co.uk/book/9781844673100/The-Coming-of-the-Body

or

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Coming-Body-Herve-Juvin/dp/1844673103/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1283790998&sr=8-3

To buy the book in the US : http://www.amazon.com/Coming-Body-Herv%C3%A9-Juvin/dp/1844673103/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1283791027&sr=8-1

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ACADEMICS BASED OUTSIDE NORTH AMERICA MAY REQUEST AN INSPECTION COPY – PLEASE CONTACT tamar@verso.co.uk

ACADEMICS BASED WITHIN NORTH AMERICA MAY REQUEST AN EXAMINATION COPY – PLEASE CONTACT clara@versobooks.com

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Not What It Seems

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com/