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Tag Archives: Transformation

Education Crisis

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK: UPDATE 19th OCTOBER 2012

EVENTS

CRIMT Conference – Union Futures: Innovations, Transformations, Strategies

October 25-27, 2012
Montreal, Canada

Please take a look at the detailed conference program. It is very rich with a fantastic variety of trade unionists and researchers working on key challenges for the labour movement. The focus is on providing a learning platform for labour movement innovation.

There are two approaches to registration. Days 1 and 3 are more focused on reporting a wide range of research. Day 2 (Friday the 26th of October) is a special Forum on Union Innovation with a large number of labour movement participants along with researchers on a variety of themes. There is also a morning plenary with Quebec student movement leaders on lessons to be learned by the labour movement from that social movement experience. It is possible to register for the whole three days of the conference or just for the 1-day Forum on Union Innovation.

More info: http://www.crimt.org/UnionFutures.html

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Co-op Conference and International Year of Co-ops (IYC) Gala

Friday, Nov. 30
5pm-midnight
Teatro Conference & Event Centre
Milton, ON

Mark your calendar for Friday, November 30th, 2012. On Co-op has moved its traditional Co-op Conference and Gala out of Co-op Week this year so that co-ops can use the time for their own celebrations… We have also separated the conference and gala into distinct events!

On Friday, November 30th, we’ll all get together for a fantastic gala party and celebration of all things co-op, credit union and IYC! We are planning an exciting evening celebration, including a cocktail reception, a three-course plated meal, Spirit of IYC Award ceremony, live auction and raffle draws, and new this year… live entertainment and dancing. It’s definitely a night you won’t want to miss! Online registration began on September 1st. Reserve your seat or corporate table, as there is a 200
person capacity for this years banquet/awards ceremony! The Gala is presented in English.

More info: http://www.ontario.coop/programs_services/public_awareness/coop_conference_and_iyc_gala

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Working Class Hero: A Night of Protest Songs

Tuesday, 6 November 2012
8:00 pm
The Dominion
500 Queen St. East, Toronto

The Dominion on Queen St. plays host to a benefit night of protest music on U.S. Election night.

It’s rare that a single stage is shared by country/rockabilly performers, punk bands, old-time folkies, modern singer songwriters, and a chamber orchestra, but that’s exactly what the upcoming “Working Class Heroes” benefit show features at the Dominion on Queen, this November 6.

The date is no mistake—the night of the US Elections. The event has emerged from a growing camaraderie between local musicians of all kinds, united by deep concerns about the modern political climate, and the current electoral process in particular.

Featured will be such diverse musical and cultural luminaries as David Henmann (formerly of April Wine), David DePoe (Toronto 60’s hippie movement leader), Toronto rockabilly mainstay Alistair Christl and his mother Margaret Christl who is herself a renowned veteran of the North American folk circuit, alternative roots/jazz musicians Laura Hubert and Laura Repo, as well as Corktown’s own Corktown Chamber Orchestra, performing selections from GeorgeCrumb’s avant-garde war commentary “Black Angels”; and many many other guests.

Billed as “A Night of Protest Music”, the show aims to pay homage to the compelling songbook of populist, revolutionary and resistance music penned throughout the ages, bring together an increasingly politicized neighborhood, and finally generate significant proceeds for Fort York Residence Homeless employment program.

Live coverage of election results will be streamed throughout the evening.

Suggested donation is $10. All proceeds to go to Fort York Residence Homeless employment program. Fort York Residence provides housing for men working toward getting a job. The goal is to have clients get and keep a stable job, set aside some savings and eventually move into their own place.

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International Seminar – Transitions to Adulthood in Knowledge Societies: Present and Future of Young People with Low Educational Levels

29 and 30 November, 2012
Palma de Mallorca, Spain

This seminar is funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness and is closely linked to the project ““Pathways from secondary education into employment: a biographic perspective” (Plan for R+D+I). Its main objectives are:

– To disseminate the results of current research in the field of training and employment trajectories of young people with little education.

– To strengthen relationships with other research groups and the various actors in the territory of the Balearics.

More information: http://www.uibcongres.org/congresos/ficha.en.html?cc=263&

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The End of Immigration? A Film about Canada’s Addiction to Temporary Foreign Workers

Saturday, October 20, 2012
6:00 PM
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE)
252 Bloor Street West, Room 5-150

“The End of Immigration?,” a film by Marie Boti & Malcolm Guy is a documentary which highlights the Canadian trend where an increasing number of temporary workers are employed in all sectors of the economy. This compelling documentary asks the question – is this shift away from nation-building and permanent residency to temporary worker programs the end of immigration as we know it?

While the number of temporary workers arriving in Canada has grown exponentially each year and may exceed the number of immigrants entering Canada, these temporary worker programs lend themselves to abuse and exploitation of our “guest workers.”

Migrante Canada, and UFCW Canada – Canada’s largest private sector union – are pleased to sponsor the Toronto screening for this documentary produced by Multi-Monde.

Filmmakers Marie Boti & Malcolm Guy will be in attendance for a panel discussion following the film screening, along with Migrante Canada and UFCW Canada.

For more information about the film, go to http://www.pmm.qc.ca and/or check out the trailer at http://diffusionmultimonde.com/en/, https://vimeo.com/44838473

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International Education and Transformative Learning: Voices From the Field

Monday, October 22
1:00-2:15 EDT (10:00 a.m. – 11:15 p.m. PDT)

A virtual panel discussion that is part of an ongoing series of Virtual Conversations on Transformative Learning, offered by the Center for Transformative Learning at Meridian University.

Study abroad and other forms of international education are increasingly becoming a major focus of many institutions of higher education. While study abroad has long been associated with undergraduate experiences, over the last 10 – 15 years we have witnessed a dramatic increase in the numbers of graduate students and faculty from K-12 and community colleges, as well as four-year institutions participating in various forms of education abroad. In addition, the number of international students coming to study in the U.S. has also dramatically increased.

Based on our own research and experience as participants, we will explore the experiences and potential outcomes associated with education abroad from the theoretical perspective of transformative learning, and the implications of this perspective for the design and facilitating of education abroad programs, activities, and experiences. In addition, we will discuss what our research and experience suggests for our emerging understanding of transformative learning.

This focus will be approached from several viewpoints, including that of the institution, faculty leading study abroad groups, U.S. students abroad, and Asian students within the United States.

Panelists:

• Dr. John Dirkx, Professor and Mildred B. Erickson Distinguished Chair, Higher, Adult and Lifelong Education, Michigan State University (Moderator)
• Dr. Dennis Dunham, Executive Director, Office of International Services, University of Central Oklahoma
• Dr. Qi Sun, Associate Professor, Adult and Post Secondary Education Programs, Department of Professional Studies, College of Education, University of Wyoming
• Ms. Julie Sinclair, Higher, Research Assistant and Doctoral Candidate, Adult and Lifelong Education, Michigan State University

We hope that you will join us for this live conversation. These conversations are offered at no charge.

Click here to register: http://meridianuniversity.edu/index.php/telesummit-on-transformative-learning

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NEWS & VIEWS

* Music Video – We Are the Working Class

The World’s Grievance Man – Mike Stout is a socially conscious singer song-writer and community leader. He leads crusades against economic injustice, rallying people with his music. His sound and lyrics are influenced by Woody Guthrie, Bob Dylan, & Springsteen.

Watch the video: http://www.reverbnation.com/open_graph/song/4510907

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Inspired Learning: Evaluation of Vibrant Communities’ National Supports

by Jamie Gamble, Caledon Institute

Vibrant Communities (VC) was a ten-year action research initiative that involved 13 Canadian communities. They all sought effective local solutions to poverty reduction by applying comprehensive approaches. The objectives of this pan-Canadian learning partnership were to reduce poverty, increase engagement, change public policy and enable community innovation.

VC was established in 2002 through the partnership of three national sponsors – Tamarack – An Institute for Community Engagement, the Caledon Institute and The J.W. McConnell Family Foundation – and 13 communities across the country.

Tamarack was responsible for overall leadership, coaching and strategy. The J.W. McConnell Family foundation provided grants to Trail Builder communities, hosted periodic funders’ forums and shaped the dissemination strategy. Caledon prepared relevant policy papers, documented local efforts and helped design an evaluation framework for the initiative.

Vibrant Communities has had a positive impact on thousands of low-income households across Canada. This report outlines the results of providing national supports to such a large and complex pan-Canadian initiative.

Read the report: http://vibrantcanada.ca/files/evaluation_report-aug2012.pdf

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Memo from Chicago: We Stood Up to the Bullies, But the Fight Isn’t Over
by Kirsten Roberts, Alternet

The Chicago teachers strike may have ended, but the struggle for justice in our public schools presses on.

The nine-day strike of the Chicago Teachers Union (CTU) ended last month with a decisive victory against Mayor Rahm Emanuel and his drive to impose the corporate school deform agenda on the public education system. Around the country, teachers, students and everyone who cares about education justice have been inspired by the showdown in Chicago.

On October 6, some 120 people attended a forum looking back on the struggle, titled, “The Revolution Will Not Be Standardized: What the CTU Strike Teaches Us About How to Fight for a Better World.” Among the featured speakers at the forum was Kirstin Roberts , a preschool teacher and member of the CTU. Here, we publish her speech.

Read more: http://www.alternet.org/memo-chicago-we-stood-bullies-fight-isnt-over

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Video – Meet Richard Hayes. He picks up Mitt Romney’s trash.

Richard is a City of San Diego sanitation worker whose route includes Mitt Romney’s $12 million oceanfront villa in La Jolla, Calif. This is his story.

Not only does Mitt Romney think we should have fewer public service workers, he has aggressively tried to avoid paying his fair share in taxes for the service they provide him.

Immediately after Romney bought his $12 million La Jolla mansion, he hired a lawyer to knock more than $100,000 off of his tax bill for it.

Watch the video: http://www.afscme.org/meetrichard
   
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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education. For more information about this project, visit http://www.apcol.ca

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

 

**END**

 

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Negation

PRODUCTIVE NEGATION

“Productive Negation”: the inaugural issue of the Journal of Peer Production is now published

JPP: http://peerproduction.net/issues/issue-1/

The Journal of Peer Production scrutinises the contradictions of peer (collaborative) production. It is thus situated in between grassroots initiatives and discussions driven by practitioners and activists and the debates taking place in academia. The inaugural issue’s theme, “Productive Negation”, aims to interrogate the role of peer production as a “work of the negative”, that is to say as a critical force. As the traditional left is struggling to come up with an adequate response to the mounting crisis of the capitalist system, contributors propose a range of interpretations about the relationship between the profit-oriented capitalist mode of production and the commons-based and oriented mode of peer production. The Journal of Peer Production also strives to make a small contribution to the reforming of scientific publishing. Taking a cue from Wikipedia, the journal publishes original article submissions, reviewers’ reports, and signals indicating how reviewers perceive the revised article. Our ambition
is to make the process of peer reviewing papers more transparent and more effective.

The inaugural issue is coordinated by Mathieu O’Neil. It includes three research papers, four invited comments and three debate papers:

George Dafermos, Authority in Peer Production: The Emergence of Governance in the FreeBSD Project

Stefano De Paoli, Vincenzo D’Andrea and Maurizio Teli, Why Free Software Is Not the Antonym of Commercial Software: Two Case Studies from Corporate and Volunteer Based Projects

Francesca Musiani, Caring About the Plumbing: On the Importance of Architectures in Social Studies of (Peer-to-Peer) Technology

Michel Bauwens, From the Theory of Peer Production to the Production of Peer Production Theory

Jakob Rigi, Peer to Peer Production as the Alternative to Capitalism: A New Communist Horizon

Christian Siefkes, Beyond Digital Plenty: Building Blocks for Physical Peer Production

Jean Zin, Changing the System of Production

Stefan Meretz, Peer Production and Societal Transformation: Ten Patterns Developed by the Oekonux Project

Maurizio Teli, Peer Production and Societal Transformation: A Practice-Based Perspective

Toni Prug, A Note on Evaluation Processes for Social Phenomena with Ambitious Claims

 

Originally published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/productive-negation-the-inaugural-issue-of-the-journal-of-peer-production-now-available  

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

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Fear of a Blank Planet

RECONNECTING POLITICAL DISCONNECTION

Call for Papers: Reconnecting Political Disconnection

JOMEC Journal

Reconnecting Political Disconnection

 

Winter 2010 to Summer 2011 saw surprising political processes and events: massive political upheaval and transformation in formerly undemocratic countries, on the one hand, and the apparent ineffectuality of widespread discontent and protest in many ‘democratic’ countries on the other. At the same time, new and old forms of media and journalism technology and practice had disparate effects: some appeared to enable political connection, movement and transformation, while others worked to disconnect, close down and preserve stasis.

This issue of JOMEC, Reconnecting Political Disconnection, invites contributions which engage with what is to be learned from these complex conjunctions in which new and old forms of journalism, media, cultural and political practice converge and operate in competing ways.

 

Submission guidelines:

Abstracts: 100-500 words

Deadline for abstracts: Friday 11th November 2011

Contributor details: 100-200 words (position, institution, publications, etc.)

Deadline for first draft submissions: End February 2012.

Article Length: 1,000-6,000 words

Journal Referencing Style: Harvard

 

Contact: Paul Bowman: BowmanP@cf.ac.uk


Dr Paul Bowman
Director of Postgraduate Research Studies
Director: Race, Representation & Cultural Politics Research Group
Co-Director: The (Re-)Constructing Multiculturalism Research Network
School of Journalism, Media & Cultural Studies [JOMEC], Cardiff University

http://cardiff.academia.edu/PaulBowman  

 

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Critical Pedagogy

CRITICAL PEDAGOGIES IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY: A CONFERENCE ON TRANSFORMATIVE PEDAGOGIES

Call for Papers

Critical Theories in the Twenty First Century: A Conference of Transformative Pedagogies

West Chester University of Pennsylvania

Conference Founders: Curry Malott, John Elmore, and Brad Porfilio

November 18th and 19th 2011

Proposals for papers, panels, performances, workshops, and other multimedia presentations should include title(s) and names and contact information for presenter(s). The deadline for sending prooposals is August 31, 2011. The Steering Committee will email acceptance or rejection notices by September 8, 2011. The proposal formats available to the presenters are as follows:

The general purpose of the West Chester Critical Theory Conference is to promote and support critical scholarship within students, and to advance critical theory and pedagogy more generally. By “advance” we mean to expose more people to critical practices and understandings as part of the process of the development of theory.

Through this focus we hope to work toward unifying and strengthening the sub-genres of critical pedagogy from Marxism, critical race theory, to critical neo-colonial studies. This goal is approached through the conferences internal pedagogy and therefore through a horizontal rather than a vertical organizing structure; by including students and classroom teachers in the critical pedagogical work dominated by professors; and by attempting to create a space where criticalists who do not usually work together can create meaningful unity, respect, and common goals. Since the dominant form of power in the twenty first century—neoliberal capitalist power—is both multicultural and global, critical pedagogy must too become more multicultural and global if it is to pose a significant challenge to it for a more democratic life after capitalism.

Because critical theory is concerned with not only understanding the world, but with transforming it, the conference is focused on not only understanding the consequences of an unjust social and economic system (i.e. corporate take-over of schools, high stakes testing and behaviorist pedagogy, micro classroom aggressions and bullying, poverty, racism, sexism, white supremacy, homophobia, perpetual war, ableism, etc.), but with transforming or dissolving their root causes (i.e. neoliberal capitalism and settler-state, Euro-centric oppression and their patriarchal, homophobic, racist, etc. hegemonies). As part of this goal the conference will hopefully provide introductory discussions and presentations on critical pedagogy and critical theory.

SUBMISSIONS
Proposal Formats

Individual Proposal: (45 minutes)
The conference committee welcomes individual paper proposals, with the understanding that those accepted will be grouped together around common or overlapping themes, Presenters will have approximately 45 minutes to present or summarize their individual papers. Individual paper submissions will be considered for panels with the same topic/theme. If you would prefer to present your paper/research individually you should consider the alternative format proposal. A 300-500 word abstract of the paper will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Symposium Proposal: (90 minutes)
Presenters are also welcomed to submit proposals for a symposium. A symposium is typically composed of a chair and discussant and three to five participants who present or summarize their papers. Each symposium is organized around a common theme. Each participant will have between 15 and 45 minutes to present their papers, depending upon the number of participants involved in the symposium. A 300-500 word abstract of the symposium will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Panel Proposal: (90 minutes)
A panel discussion is another venue available presenters. A panel discussion is typically composed of three to six participants who discuss their scholarly work within the context of a dialogue or conversation on a topic or theme related to the conference theme. Typically, each panelist is given 10-15 minutes to discuss the topic, present theoretical ideas, and/or point to relevant research. A chair should be identified who introduces the panel and frames the issues and questions being addressed. In addition to the chair, we encourage (but do not require) organizers of panels to include a discussant who responds to the comments of the panelists. Individual proposal submissions will be combined into panels with the same theme/topic. A 300-500 word abstract of the panel discussion will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Alternative Format and Special Interest Groups (90 minutes)
Alternative proposals that do not fit into the above categories, such as workshops, performances, video and multimedia presentations, and round-table dialogues, are encouraged. We also welcome proposals for the organization of special interest groups. A 150-250 word abstract of the panel discussion will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Email proposals to conference coordinators Brad Porfilio (porfilio16@aol.com) and Curry Malott (currymalott@hotmail.com) by August 31, 2011.

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Critical Pedagogy

RADICALIZING LEARNING

New Title: Radicalizing Learning: Adult Education for a Just World

Brookfield, S. D., & Holst, J. D. (2010): Radicalizing learning: Adult education for a just world. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

$38.00 USD
Hardcover
http://www.josseybass.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0787998257.html

Radicalizing Learning calls for a total rethinking of what the field of adult education stands for and how adult educators should assess their effectiveness. Arguing that major changes in society are needed to create a more just world, Brookfield and Holst set out to show how educators can help learners envision and enact this radical transformation.

Praise for Radicalizing Learning

“This is a book that is so interesting that I had trouble putting it down. It is well written; there is new material; it articulates familiar concepts in such novel ways that your thought patterns get hijacked reading it. Adult learning and its processes are examined from a socialist perspective with a focus on social justice.” –Phyllis M. Cunningham, Distinguished Teaching Professor Emeritus, Northern Illinois University

“Read this book and rub shoulders with Nelson Mandela, Septima Clark, Antonio Gramsci, Paulo Freire, Jane Thompson, Myles Horton, and a whole horde of inspiring leaders, learners, teachers, trainers, and activists. Engage with remarkable writers you have heard of, and, if you are like me, encounter a number of remarkable writers for the first time. This is a splendid, extraordinary book, which will stir and trouble you. But why am I not surprised? It is a seamlessly collaborative work by two of the best minds in the field—John Holst, the challenging, unremittingly rigorous theorist; and Stephen Brookfield, the inspired and cannily perceptive analyst. This book earns my highest praise: it will make you think.” —Michael Newman, author, Teaching Defiance

“Stephen Brookfield and John Holst have written a monumental text in the field of adult education. It is a bold, ambitious book, beautifully written and uncompromising in its social justice agenda. It is sure to become a classic in the field.” —Peter McLaren, Professor, University of California, Los Angeles

“This book offers new readings of the theory, politics, policy, and practice of radical adult education and learning where people’s lives are understood as complex and interrelated matters. Brookfield and Holst’s poetics and deeply human prose sound rebellious; the authors confront some of the main radical trends in the field of adult education including critical theory, transformative learning, and popular education.” —Shahrzad Mojab, Professor, Department of Adult Education and Counseling Psychology, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto

END

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

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Manufacturing Happiness

 

CALL FOR PAPERS:

Manufacturing Happiness: Investigating Subjectivity, Transformation, and Cultural Capital

The Graduate Students of George Mason University invite paper proposals for our 4th Annual Cultural Studies Conference. The Conference will take place on Saturday, September 19, 2009 at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia

This conference considers practices, institutions, and products that promise happiness, in a sense of inducing “the good life,” typically expressed as self-realization or finding one’s purpose-borrowing Agamben’s term, subjective technologies that have a specific relationship to social and political forces. How do practices designed or claimed for such diverse purposes as personal stress management, recovering from colonization, parenting, global conglomeration, and corporate development work? What kinds of transformations do they bring, in terms of personality, power, and communitas? And what becomes of the living cultural traditions from which these practices are abstracted, as in the care of the psychotherapeutic practice of “western Buddhism,” which Zizek claims is the “hegemonic ideology par excellance of late capitalism?” From the transmission of packaged idealisms and practices with a putative relationship to traditional sources to the commodified transactions for services and goods, the conference organizers seeks papers that investigate the growing cultural industries, both global and local, devoted to manufacturing happiness.

The wide-ranging contexts for our investigation include, but are not limited to: the social positions within the family, home, workplace, community, or nation-state; geographical and global considerations of institutional development and affiliation; the political economy of corporate training models; cultural capital and legitimation; media and mediation (print, television, DVD, Internet, radio, etc.); religious connections and origins; the confirmation and construction of identities (gender, physical, class, spiritual, national, sexual, and race) in social or political realms; and the rise and intensity of ecological subjectivities.

Examples:
* Integral Institute, Integral Naked, and Ken Wilber
* Est Training
* Shambhala Training
* Eckhardt Tolle and Oprah’s Book Club
* Weight loss and Constructing Beauty
* The “Human Potential” Movement
* The Zen Alarm Clock
* The Secret
* Hollywood Kabballah Centre
* Transpersonal Psychology
* The “Self-Help” Industry
* Magazines such as What Is Enlightenment?

Please e-mail a 500-word abstract of your presentation along with a short CV to Michael Lecker (mlecker@gmu.edu) no later than June 15, 2009.

 

Additional information:

http://www.allconferences.com/conferences/2009/20090427183905/

http://www.h-net.org/announce/show.cgi?ID=168118

http://culturalstudies.gmu.edu/happiness/

 

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Workers Councils in Historical and Comparative Perspective

Call for Essays: Workers Councils in Historical and Comparative Perspective
DARIO AZZELINI Dario & IMMANUEL NESS

14 April 2009

The editors consider workers councils as the definitive form of democratic labor control. Worker councils, seen as worker control over the economic resources that are vital to their lives, has had a prodigious history as one of the most dramatic forms of radical working-class action against business and corporate domination. From the origin of the industrial revolution to the present neoliberal capitalist era, workers councils have been recognized as a tangible means of both expressing working-class radicalism and grasping and consolidating power and control from the ruling class following labor organizing and direct insurgency.

The editors Dario Azzellini and Immanuel Ness are seeking submissions for a special collection on issue on worker councils and worker control from a comparative and historical perspective. The editors consider worker councils as a significant form of challenging capitalism and obtaining and securing worker power over workplaces and communities. We are seeking essays that demonstrate how worker councils have engendered and advanced perceptible gains for labor. We also seek essays that examine the endogenous and exogenous state and capitalist forces aligned against workers councils and democracy under labor control. We encourage submissions that are both contemporary and historical, including case studies and theoretical essays that range over any geographical space (including international, cultural, country, or regional focus).

The editors are seeking academically rigorous essays that also are accessible to workers, trade unionists, and activists. We encourage submissions that are free of jargon and rooted in historical experience. The culmination of the essays will be a book on workers councils published in many languages that embraces theory and action and easily grasped by a wide range of readers seeking democratic and socialist transformation through workers councils.

Possible topics for submission may include the following:

* Theoretical and philosophical consideration of worker councils and worker control
* Historical case studies of worker councils drawn from throughout the world
* Contemporary regional and national examples of workers councils
* Worker councils as a means toward revolutionary transformation

The editors consider the questions related to workers councils as praxis as essential to reclaiming democratic participation from capitalist forms of domination in general and, and particularly significant in the contemporary era of financial crisis. As such, please ensure that the essays are accessible to a broad range of readers, and offer a tangible contribution to research and praxis of social transformation.

Proposals for essays are welcome and are due and will be accepted through August 15 2009. Manuscript submissions are due November 15 2009, with anticipated publication in early 2010. Essays should range from 5,000 to 7,500 words in length, although the editors will consider shorter or longer manuscripts on a case by case basis. Essays will be published in a volume to appear in several languages. The editors have already secured publication agreements from publishers for this work in several languages.

Please send all proposals and manuscript submissions electronically to both editors: Dario Azzellini dnapress@gmx.net and Immanuel Ness iness@brooklyn.cuny.edu

Postal Addresses and telephone:
Dario Azzellini
Lausitzer Str. 10
10999 Berlin
Germany

Tel. +49-30-61288162
Fax: +49-30-61288162
Email: dnapress@gmx.net
http://www.azzellini.net

Immanuel Ness
Brooklyn College Graduate Center/CUNY
25 Broadway – 7th Floor
New York 10004 NY (US)

Tel. +011-212-822-1715
Fax. +011-212-966-4038
Email: iness@brooklyn.cuny.edu
http://www.immanuelness.net

Please circulate this call widely to all interested parties

 

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