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Tag Archives: Toni Prug

Negation

PRODUCTIVE NEGATION

“Productive Negation”: the inaugural issue of the Journal of Peer Production is now published

JPP: http://peerproduction.net/issues/issue-1/

The Journal of Peer Production scrutinises the contradictions of peer (collaborative) production. It is thus situated in between grassroots initiatives and discussions driven by practitioners and activists and the debates taking place in academia. The inaugural issue’s theme, “Productive Negation”, aims to interrogate the role of peer production as a “work of the negative”, that is to say as a critical force. As the traditional left is struggling to come up with an adequate response to the mounting crisis of the capitalist system, contributors propose a range of interpretations about the relationship between the profit-oriented capitalist mode of production and the commons-based and oriented mode of peer production. The Journal of Peer Production also strives to make a small contribution to the reforming of scientific publishing. Taking a cue from Wikipedia, the journal publishes original article submissions, reviewers’ reports, and signals indicating how reviewers perceive the revised article. Our ambition
is to make the process of peer reviewing papers more transparent and more effective.

The inaugural issue is coordinated by Mathieu O’Neil. It includes three research papers, four invited comments and three debate papers:

George Dafermos, Authority in Peer Production: The Emergence of Governance in the FreeBSD Project

Stefano De Paoli, Vincenzo D’Andrea and Maurizio Teli, Why Free Software Is Not the Antonym of Commercial Software: Two Case Studies from Corporate and Volunteer Based Projects

Francesca Musiani, Caring About the Plumbing: On the Importance of Architectures in Social Studies of (Peer-to-Peer) Technology

Michel Bauwens, From the Theory of Peer Production to the Production of Peer Production Theory

Jakob Rigi, Peer to Peer Production as the Alternative to Capitalism: A New Communist Horizon

Christian Siefkes, Beyond Digital Plenty: Building Blocks for Physical Peer Production

Jean Zin, Changing the System of Production

Stefan Meretz, Peer Production and Societal Transformation: Ten Patterns Developed by the Oekonux Project

Maurizio Teli, Peer Production and Societal Transformation: A Practice-Based Perspective

Toni Prug, A Note on Evaluation Processes for Social Phenomena with Ambitious Claims

 

Originally published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/productive-negation-the-inaugural-issue-of-the-journal-of-peer-production-now-available  

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

 

Privatization

QUESTIONS OF VALUE – FROM COMMONS TO COMMMUNOMICS: RESISTING PRIVATIZATION

27 June: 2pm – 7pm

Seminar 1 – East Park Design Centre, 200.1.39 (first floor), Loughborough University 
FREE
Speakers: Christophe Bruno, Neil Cummings, Open Music Archive, Toni Prug, Stevphen Shukaitis

Moderated by: Kuba Szreder

The Politicized Practice Research Group (PPRG) and Radar are initiating a new events series devoted to the critical examination and evaluation of social forms through which ‘values’ are produced, perpetuated and extracted in contemporary society and economies, in arts and culture. The sessions will invite a number of speakers and thinkers from a range of disciplines to share their thoughts and ideas on the subject of value. We will develop a particular focus on contemporary art, also inviting artists who address questions of value through, in and with their practice.

The Questions of Value events aim to explore the variety of modes of valorisation, through which certain objects, ways of living, emotions, and even human beings are rendered as ‘valuable’ while others are neglected as unwanted and disposable.  The series will review and assess some of the contemporary debates and theories in which the concept of ‘value’ is central, from economics and ethics to mathematics and semiotics. The seminars will encompass a wide range of subjects, including the semiotics of speculation and the economics of financial capitalism, as well as contemporary forms of appropriating and extracting value.

In the first session of the series – we are delighted to welcome Christophe Bruno, Neil Cummings, Open Music Archive, Toni Prug and Stevphen Shukaitis to Loughborough to discuss questions of value with a focus on – From Commons to Communomics: Resisting Privatization. Christophe Bruno will unveil the mechanisms that create and capture the value of symbols in semio-capitalism.  Neil Cummings will investigate the notion of abundance of the commons from a future perspective, imagining what kind of evaluative structures will evolve if the dogma of scarcity and economic restriction is abolished. Open Music Archive will present their project ‘Song division’, which resists the enclosures of public domain by copyright regimes and proprietary intellectual ownership.  Toni Prug will conceptualize communomics as based on an egalitarian theory of value, encompassing modes of measuring the utilitarian value of things and services without attaching a price tag to them. Stevphen Shukaitis will talk about the class composition of the metropolitan factory, locating the question of the commons in a contemporary urban context.

A New Series of Events at Loughborough University School of the Arts in conjunction with the Politicized Practice Group and Radar

To book please email: E.L.Nadin@lboro.ac.uk

Convened by: Corina Oprea and Kuba Szreder
http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/sota/research/groups/politicised/index.html
http://www.arts.lboro.ac.uk/radar/conversation/

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‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Philosophy

RADICAL PHILOSOPHY 161

May/June 2010 OUT NOW

Claudia Aradau, The Myth of Preparedness

Eric Alliez, What is – or What is Not – Contemporary French Philosophy, Today?

Stuart Elden, Reading Schmitt Geopolitically

Kolja Lindner, Marx’s Eurocentrism: Postcolonial Studies and Marx Scholarship

Lynne Segal, Feminism Did Not Fail

Andrew McGettigan on Brecht and Benjamin’s Chess Games

Toni Prug, Student Control in Croatia

Stuart White, Colin Ward, 1924-2010

Esther Leslie on The German Issue and Gudrun Ensslin’s Letters

Alex Callinicos on Cohen’s Why Not Socialism?

Chris Wilbert on Brett Buchanan’s Onto-Ethologies

Mark Fisher on Jim McGuigan’s Cool Capitalism

Antonio Venezia on Joe Sacco’s Footnotes in Gaza

Matthew Charles on Wizisla’s Walter Benjamin and Bertolt Brecht

Available £6 / $13 from all good booksellers, including Waterstones, Tate, LRB, ICA.

Subscribe online: http://www.radicalphilosophy.com

£30 for six issues (UK), £53 for twelve issues (UK)

Radical Philosophy Subs, Alliance Media, PO Box 2068, Bushey, WD23 3ZF

Email: tenalps@alliance-media.co.uk

Forthcoming highlights:

Stella Sandford on De Beauvoir’s Second Sex

David Cunningham on Wu Ming and the Historical Novel of Capitalism

John Kraniauskas on James Ellroy’s Underworld USA Trilogy

Peter Hitchcock on new books on the `World’

Michael Newman on Perry Anderson’s The New Old World

Owen Hatherley on Walter Benjamin and Architecture

Nina Power on Sara Ahmed’s The Promise of Happiness

Current and back issues now available exclusively to all subscribers online; soon to be available as searchable pdfs. Including articles, from 1972-2008, by Alliez, Badiou, Balibar, Bhabha, Bourdieu, Buck-Morss, Butler, Canguilhem, Cassin, Connolly, Critchley, Didi-Huberman, Feyerabend, Foucault, Groys, Hallward, Harootunian, Haug, Horkheimer, Lacoue-Labarthe, Laplanche, Lazzarato, Le Doeuff, Macherey, Malabou, Negri, Osborne, Ranciere, Robbins, Segal, Sloterdijk, Sohn-Rethel, Spivak, Stengers, Virilio, and many others.

SUBSCRIBE NOW!

Editorial Collective

http://www.radicalphilosophy.com  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Radical Politics

SERIES ON COMMU(O)NISM: OPEN PROCESS, THE ORGANIZATIONAL SPIRIT OF THE INTERNET MODEL

Abstract: The desires and the sources of emancipatory potential of the commons for the cooperative and egalitarian global togetherness, for a new communism born through the new generation of tools and organizational practices, have temporarily been appropriated and hi-jacked by capitalism under the Open Source and to an extent Creative Commons movements. Through and with the Open Process methods of the founding Internet communities, we can make a significant step towards claiming it back. Commu(o)nism, we could call it, is a new emerging form of communism hacked with open process and new commons. The small (o) in the middle stands for open.

Tuesday 16th March, 14-16.00hrs
Room WB117 (Whitehead building, opposite Ian Gulland)
Goldsmiths College, University of London

Gabriella Coleman

”Old and New Net Wars over Free Speech, Freedom and Secrecy, or How to Understand the Hacker and Lulz battle against the Church of Scientology”

Abstract: Why have geeks been compelled to protest the Church of Scientology vehemently for nearly two decades? This talk starts with this question to present a cultural history and political analysis of one of the oldest Internet wars, often referred to as “Internet vs Scientology.” During the 1990s, this war was waged largely on USENET (a large scale messaging board system), while in recent times it has taken the form of “Project Chanology.” This project is orchestrated by a loosely defined group called “Anonymous” who has led a series of online attacks and real world protests, often using a variety of media, against Scientology. I argue that to understand the significance of these battles and protests, we must examine how the two groups stand in a culturally antipodal relation to each other. Through this analysis of cultural inversion, I will consider how long-standing liberal ideals take cultural root in the context of these battles, use these two cases to reveal important political transformations in Internet/hacker culture between the mid 1990s and today and finally will map the tension between pleasure/freedom (the “lulz”) and moral good (“free speech”) found among Anonymous in terms of the tension between liberal freedom and romantic-Nietzschean freedom/pleasure.

Bios:

Gabriella Coleman

Trained as a Cultural Anthropologist, Gabriella Coleman is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Media, Culture and Communication at NYU. She researches and teaches on the politics of digital media with a focus on various genealogies of hacking, including Free and Open Source Software, the hacker ungrounded , phone phreaking, trolling, and cryptography/encryption. Between 2001-2003 she conducted ethnographic research on computer hackers primarily in San Francisco and the Netherlands, as well as on the largest free software project, Debian. She is completing a book manuscript “Coding Freedom: Hacker Pleasure and the Ethics of Free and Open Source Software” and is starting a new project on peer to peer patient activism on the Internet.

Toni Prug

Toni Prug is currently a PhD student at the School of Business and Management at Queen Mary College, University of London. With ten years of software and network engineering and hacking behind him, he is working on organizational forms, hacking existing practices, ideologies and state-forms. Along with working with academic journals on implementing aspects of open process cooperation, he is working on a book, “The Objects of Communism”. His work can be followed at http://hackthestate.org/.

Centre for Cultural Studies, Goldsmiths, University of London: http://www.gold.ac.uk/cultural-studies/

Location: http://www.gold.ac.uk/find-us/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski