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The Island

DECOLONIZATION IN THE THIRD WORLD: CHALLENGES, HOPES AND LIMITATIONS

International Conference
Lucienne-Cnockaert Chair and the Department of History, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC (Canada)
17-18 November 2011

CALL FOR PAPERS
_______________

In Africa, Latin America and Asia, the end of European colonial domination is a period of particular interest as it leads, almost invariably, to a new era characterized by uncertainty and the unknown. Upon achieving independence, previously colonized countries are often confronted with unprecedented cultural, ideological and political upheaval. This is usually indicative of an effort to exorcise the country’s colonial heritage, to rebuild the nation, and to look for ways and means of renewing the culture and social and economic development. The management of independence in the new Third World countries deals not only with which ideological model is best for the development of the nation, but also with establishing proactive socio-cultural, educational and economic policies. These policies are meant to build or re-build societies and nation-states, and to re-establish national identity, as well as combat the inequality and economic under-development inherent to colonialism. However, it would seem that despite important changes and significant results, postcolonial policies must contend with a number of limitations due, in part, to the persistence of prior dependence, to the nature of the political regimes in place and to new forms of economic dependence.

In consideration of the fiftieth anniversary of the decolonization of several African countries, the Lucienne-Cnockaert Research Chair in Modern History of European and Africa will be holding a conference entitled “Decolonization in the Third World: Challenges, Hopes and Limitations” on 17-18 November 2011. This conference will be an opportunity to study the magnitude and complexity of the responsibilities and challenges, and the various administrative paths chosen by the post-colonial societies of Africa, Asia and Latin America.

The aim of this conference is first and foremost to examine the objectives and challenges of cultural, educational and economic reforms in the Third World after attaining independence. Researchers will be invited to examine the nature of interracial and inter-religious relations, as well as the role of minority groups and demographically diverse populations (women, youth, ethnic groups, descendents of colonizers, regional groups, etc.) in the process of identity-building and socio-economic development within the new nation-states. A critical evaluation of the various reforms undertaken in postcolonial societies will allow researchers to take note of their limitations and their success, however limited the latter may appear to be. Finally, particular attention will be given to the various types of relations established between Third World countries and the Western world as a whole, and with international organizations and institutions such as UNESCO, the UN, the IMF, the Francophonie and the Commonwealth.

We welcome conference proposals touching upon the following themes:
– Cultural and economic aspects of colonialism
– Discourses and intellectual trajectories of the leaders of  independence movements
– The meaning of national symbols: national anthems, mottos and flags
– The nature of the postcolonial State and the ideologies of independence
– Cultural policies established in order to restore a national identity
– Relationships between native populations and the descendents of colonizers
– Policies respecting women and/or minorities
– Studies of particular concepts or ideologies (pan-Africanism, pan-Asianism, non-alignment, post- colonialism, socialism, etc.)
– Management of regional, ethnic and religious diversity
– Economic planning and development
– Neo-colonialism and international relationships between North and South
– International relationships amongst the South
– Interventions of the IMF and the World Bank: challenges and results
– Memories of independence

Researchers, professors and students interested in participating in this conference are invited to send proposals approximately 300 words in length before 1st March 2011.

Registration fees for this conference are $150 CAD. Travel and accommodation expenses may be reimbursed depending on funding received from granting agencies.

Please send proposals along with a brief CV by email to Professor Patrick Dramé: patrick.drame@usherbrooke.ca
http://www.pages.usherbrooke.ca/lucienne-cnockaert/

The conference will take place at the Université de Sherbrooke on 17-18 November 2011. Papers and presentations may be in either French or English.

Program Committee:
Patrick DRAMÉ, History Departments, Université de Sherbrooke and Bishop’s University
Élikia M’BOKOLO, École des Hautes Études en Sciences sociales, Paris
Samir SAUL, History Department, Université de Montréal
Muriel GOMEZ-PEREZ, History Department, Université Laval
Magali DELEUZE, History Department, Royal Military College, Kingston
Ibrahima THIOUB, History Department, Université de Dakar
Christopher GOSCHA, History Department, Université du Québec à Montréal
Maurice DEMERS, History Department, Université de Sherbrooke
Jean-Bruno MUKANYA KANINDA-MUANA, History Department, Université de Montréal

Organizing Committee:
Patrick DRAMÉ, History Department, Université de Sherbrooke
Muriel GOMEZ-PEREZ, History Department, Université Laval
Magali DELEUZE, History Department, Royal Military College, Kingston
Pascal SCALLON-CHOUINARD, Ph.D. candidate, Université de Sherbrooke
Maxime LANDRY-VALLÉE, Graduate student, Université de Sherbrooke
Alexander MAJOR, Graduate student, Université de Sherbrooke

Contact:
Pascal Scallon-Chouinard
Université de Sherbrooke
Email: Pascal.Scallon-Chouinard@USherbrooke.ca
Web: http://pages.usherbrooke.ca/lucienne-cnockaert/index.php?id=2

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Books

THIRD WORLD PROTEST – BOOK LAUNCH WITH RAHUL RAO

Book Launch – Third World Protest: Between Home and the World, by Rahul Rao

Date of event: 1st November 2010

Venue: Khalili Lecture Theatre, School of Oriental & African Studies, Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square, London WC1H 0XG

Speaker: Dr Rahul Rao

Chair: Dr Stephen Hopgood

Rahul Rao, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, discusses his new book /Third World Protest: Between Home and the World/.

If boundaries protect us from threats, how should we think about the boundaries of states in a world where threats to human rights emanate from both outside the state and the state itself? Arguing that attitudes towards boundaries are premised on assumptions about the locus of threats to vital interests, Rahul Rao probes beneath two major normative orientations towards boundaries – cosmopolitanism and nationalism – which structure thinking on questions of public policy and identity. Insofar as the Third World is concerned, hegemonic versions of both orientations are underpinned by simplistic imageries of threat. In the cosmopolitan gaze, political and economic crises in the Third World are attributed mainly to factors internal to the Third World state with the international playing the role of heroic saviour. In Third World nationalist imagery, the international is portrayed as a realm of neo-imperialist predation from which the domestic has to be secured. Both images capture widely held intuitions about the sources of threats to human rights, but each by itself provides a resolutely partial inventory of these threats. By juxtaposing critical accounts of both discourses, Rao argues that protest sensibilities in the current conjuncture must be critical of hegemonic variants of both cosmopolitanism and nationalism. The second half of the book illustrates what such a critique might look like. Journeying through the writings of James Joyce, Rabindranath Tagore, Edward Said, and Frantz Fanon, the activism of ‘anti-globalization’ protesters, and the dilemmas of queer activists, Rao demonstrates that important currents of Third World protest have long battled against both the international and the domestic, in a manner that combines nationalist and cosmopolitan sensibilities.

*Please note that the book will be available at the event at a 20% discount

— 
Lecturer in International Relations
Centre for Inter national Studies & Diplomacy
School of Oriental & African Studies
Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square
London WC1H 0XG
Tel: +44(0)20 7898 4534
http://goog_1113873052

Third World Protest:  Between Home and The World: http://ukcatalogue.oup.com/product/9780199560370.do

Available now through all good bookshops, or direct from Oxford University Press

END

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon

THE CULTURE INDUSTRY TODAY

The Culture Industry Today
Editor: Fabio Akcelrud Durão
Date Of Publication: Apr 2010
Isbn13: 978-1-4438-1955-8
Isbn: 1-4438-1955-7

Price UK Gbp: 34.99
Price US Usd: 52.99

http://www.c-s-p.org/Flyers/The-Culture-Industry-Today1-4438-1955-7.htm

The concept of culture industry leads a double life. On the one hand, it appears as transparent, being used widely and freely in reference to a branch of business; on the other, it is a notion belonging to a critical tradition that wants to preserve the tension resulting from the juxtaposition of these two words. Culture Industry Today is a contribution to the latter trend, which takes into account the current prevalence of the former.

By offering interpretations of the term in relation to philosophy, media, film, the Third World, the psyche and the culture of consumption, the book aims at showing the continued relevance of an expression whose muteness is the corroboration of its darkest content.

Fabio Akcelrud Durão is Professor of Literary Theory at the State University of Campinas (Unicamp). He is the author of Modernism and Coherence: Four Chapters of a Negative Aesthetics (2008), co-edited Modernist Group Dynamics: The Politics and Poetics of Friendship (2008) at Cambridge Scholars, and published several essays on modernism, the Frankfurt School and Brazilian critical theory.

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

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Globalization

 

DEVELOPMENT AND GLOBALIZATION: A MARXIAN ANALYSIS

A new book by David F Ruccio

 
    • Price: £29.99 £26.99
    • Binding/Format: Paperback
    • ISBN: 978-0-415-77226-6
    • Publish Date: 28th September 2010
    • Imprint: Routledge
    • Pages: 320 pages

Series: Economics as Social Theory

Details at: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415772266/

Since the mid-1980s, David F. Ruccio has been developing a new framework of Marxian class analysis and applying it to various issues in socialist planning, Third World development, and capitalist globalization. The aim of this collection is to show, through a series of concrete examples, how Marxian class analysis can be used to challenge existing modes of thought and to produce new insights about the problems of capitalist development and the possibilities of imagining and creating non-capitalist economies.

The book consists of fifteen essays, plus an introductory chapter situating the author’s work in a larger intellectual and political context. The topics covered range from planning theory to the role of the state in the Nicaraguan Revolution, from radical theories of underdevelopment to the Third World debt crisis, and from a critical engagement with regulation theory to contemporary discussions of globalization and imperialism.

Foreword Stephen Resnick and Richard Wolff

Introduction

1. Rethinking Planning, Globalization, and Development from a Marxian Perspective Planning

2. Essentialism and Socialist Economic Planning: A Methodological Critique of Optimal Planning Theory

3. Planning and Class in Transitional Societies

4. The State and Planning in Nicaragua 
5. Nicaragua: The State, Class, and Transition Development

6. Radical Theories of Development: Frank, the Modes of Production School, and Amin

7. The Costs of Austerity in Nicaragua: The Worker-Peasant Alliance, 1979-1987

8. When Failure Becomes Success: Class and the Debate over Stabilization and Adjustment

9. Power and Class: The Contribution of Radical Approaches to Debt and Development

10. Capitalism and Industrialization in the Third World: Recognizing the Costs and Imagining Alternatives

11. ‘After’ Development: Reimagining Economy and Class

12. Reading Harold: Class Analysis, Capital Accumulation, and the Role of the Intellectual in Globalization

13. Fordism on a World Scale: International Dimensions of Regulation

14. Class Beyond the Nation-State

15. Global Fragments: Subjectivity and Class Politics in Discourses of Globalization

16. Globalization and Imperialism

David F. Ruccio is Professor of Economics at the University of Notre Dame, USA and past editor of the journal Rethinking Marxism.

Observations and Comments on Development and Globalization: A Marxian Analysis

Development, and Globalization is anti-essentialist social theory at its very best. Whether re-reading socialist planning debates, economic and social development struggles in the global South, or capitalist and alter-capitalist theories of globalization, David Ruccio engages the contemporary conjuncture in fresh and exciting ways, demonstrating throughout the successes of the rethinking Marxism project and the immense potential and range of contemporary Marxian analysis. What Maurice Dobb did for twentieth-century critiques of socialist planning, capitalist development, and imperialist expansion, Ruccio redoubles for a new age of post-Communist and globalized political economy — John Pickles, Earl N. Phillips Distinguished Professor of International Studies and Chair of the Department of Geography, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and author of A History of Spaces: Cartographic Reason, Mapping, and the Geo-Coded World

David Ruccio is a central figure in the exciting and innovative “postmodern” school of Marxian thought. Through his own writing and his stewardship of the journal Rethinking Marxism he has contributed immensely to this tradition. In this collection, Ruccio draws together, sharpens, and extends central insights from that school of thought and applies them to debates over socialist planning, economic development, and globalization. The essays demonstrate the depth of Ruccio’s intellect and the range of his expertise, to be sure, while also conveying the power of the postmodern Marxian tradition in helping us to overcome the malaise that now affects much contemporary left scholarship about prospects for radical reform in the Global South. In Ruccio’s hands, Marxism emerges as a vibrant tradition that continues to generate new avenues of scholarship and practical politics in pursuit of a more just world. — George DeMartino, Josef Korbel School of International Studies, University of Denver and author of Global Economy, Global Justice: Theoretical and Policy Alternatives to Neoliberalism

Whether one agrees or not with the basic premises and analysis of this book, it will provide an intellectual challenge to everyone. Focusing on issues related to planning, development and globalization, particularly in Latin America, Ruccio questions the prevailing wisdom in circles of both the Right and the Left. His privileging of class analysis provides the unifying thread to the wide variety of themes covered in the sixteen chapters. In our post-crisis search for new economic thinking and alternatives for social transformation, Ruccio’s book comes at a perfect time to contribute to the debates. — Lourdes Beneria, Cornell University and author of Gender, Development, and Globalization: Economics as if All People Mattered

Pathbreaking in its originality and breathtaking in its coverage, the truly outstanding volume David Ruccio has delivered is indispensable in critiquing a variety of prevailing developmental paradigms. Rather than simplistically noting the ‘failures’ of capitalism, this book reveals how neoliberal development policies can be considered successful in terms of promoting the emergence and strengthening of capitalist class processes and the appropriation of surplus-value in Latin America and beyond. It is obligatory reading for scholars and students seeking to construct Marxian class analyses and to formulate alternatives to the world economy today. — Adam David Morton, University of Nottingham and author of Unravelling Gramsci: Hegemony and Passive Revolution in the Global Political Economy

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