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Neoliberalism

Neoliberalism

THE GLOBALISATION LECTURES AT SOAS – NOW ONLINE

 

Women and the ‘Arab Spring’: Lessons from Iran?

Haideh Moghissi, Professor and Trudeau Fellow, Department of Equity Studies, York University, Toronto

6 March 2013

 

Is Islamism the Arab Destiny?

Aziz Al-Azmeh, CEU University Professor, School of Historical and Interdisciplinary Studies, Central European University, Budapest

6 February 2013

 

Which Democracy for a Multipolar World?

Chantal Mouffe, Professor of political theory and director of the Centre for the Study of Democracy at the University of Westminster

28 November 2012

 

Globalisation in Time: Between the Camera and the Clock

Marcus Verhagen, Art historian and critic, Sotheby’s Institute of Art and Goldsmiths College, University of London

31 October 2012

 

Men who Tiptoe into their Marital Bedrooms: The Novelist and Dictatorship

Hisham Matar

5 March 2012

 

Inclusion and Participation: a New Agenda for the Globalised Economy

Heiner Flassbeck (Director on Globalization and Development Strategies, UNCTAD)

1 February 2012

 

Corporate Takeovers, Internet Challenges: does journalism have a future?

Dr Serge Halimi (Director, Le Monde Diplomatique)

2 March 2011

 

Nobel Prize Winner Dr Shirin Ebadi on The Role of Women in Promoting Peace in the Middle East

Dr Shirin Ebadi (Winner of the Nobel Peace Prize in 2003)

2 February 2011

 

World Literature and World Languages

Tariq Ali (Novelist, Playwright and Historian; Editor – New Left Review)

1 December 2010

 

Peasant Struggles and Ecology in the Age of Globalisation

Hugo Blanco (Leader of the Peasant Confederation, Peru)

27 October 2010

 

Humanitarianism at the Risk of Imperialism

Dr Rony Brauman (1999 Nobel Peace Prize winner and Former President of Doctors without Borders (MSF, Paris))

3 March 2010

 

For a Green and Just Way out of the Global Crisis

Dr Susan George

20 January 2010

 

The American Empire in Light of the Global Crisis

Professor Alex Callinicos and Professor Leo Panitch

25 November 2009

 

Noam Chomsky: Crises and the Unipolar Moment

Professor Noam Chomsky

27 October 2009

 

The World’s Third Spaces: Neither Global Nor National?

Prof. Saskia Sassen – Lynd Professor Of Sociology And Member, The Committee On Global Thought, At Columbia University (New York)

25 February 2009

 

Beyond Neoliberal Globalisation And Us Hegemony: What Next?

Prof. Samir Amin – Director Of The Third World Forum (Dakar, Senegal)

26 November 2008

 

The Imperial Paradox: Ideologies of Empire

Prof. Ellen Meiksins Wood Professor Emerita of Political Science at York University (Toronto, Canada)

29 October 2008

 

Counter-Hegemonic Globalisation: Has the Movement Reached its Limits?

Professor Boaventura de Sousa Santos

22 April 2008

 

New Left Wing Governments in South America. Venezuela, Bolivia, Ecuador: A First Balance-Sheet

Dr Eric Toussaint (World Social Forum and Committee for the Abolition of Third World Debt)

25 February 2008

 

The Present Financial Crisis: How to Stop Globalisation from Eating Itself

Robert Wade, Professor of Political Economy and Development (LSE)

22 January 2008

 

First Published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/online-the-globalisation-lectures-at-soas-u.-of-london

 

**END**

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Marketisation of Higher Education

NATIONAL WALKOUT AGAINST FEES

WALKOUT OF YOUR SCHOOL, COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY NEXT WEDNESDAY, 24 NOVEMBER

Walkouts took place at hundreds of schools and colleges against the Iraq war in 2003, against ‘third world’ debt in 2005, and several colleges walked out against cuts in 2009-10.

Organisers suggest: ‘Download national leaflet at anticuts.com, writing on the details of your local meet-up point, photocopy and hand it out. Use email, Facebook, texts, phone calls to advertise the time and place of your protest’

*****

Picket Nick Clegg in Camden

6pm, Tuesday 23 November, Kings Place Hall, 190 York Way, N1.

No tuition fees! No to Workfare!

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Economic Crisis

DEBT, THE IMF, AND THE WORLD BANK: SIXTY QUESTIONS, SIXTY ANSWERS

Debt, the IMF, and the World Bank: Sixty Questions, Sixty Answers
By Éric Toussaint and Damien Millet

Translated by Judith Abdel Gadir, Elizabeth Anne, Vicki Briault, Judith Harris, Brian Hunt, Christine Pagnoulle and Diren Valayden, with the collaboration of Francesca Denley, Virginie de Romanet and Stephanie Jacquemont

http://www.monthlyreview.org/books/sixtyquestions.php

ISBN: 978-1-58367-222-8
$17.95 paperback
368 pages
September 2010

Economics / Imperialism & War

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“This excellent handbook on the Washington-based international financial institutions and the debt mechanism by means of which the Global South is subjugated is not only an indispensable tool for pro-poor anti-debt activists, but also a very useful synthesis that can and should be used in classrooms.” —Gilbert Achcar, Professor of Development Studies School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London.

“Éric Toussaint is one of the brightest and most influential economists of his generation. He is the founder of the CADTM, and has gained a worldwide reputation for his exemplary struggle against the ‘odious debt’ strangling countless countries in the South.” —Jean Ziegler, former UN Special Rapporteur

Mainstream economists tell us that developing countries will replicate the economic achievements of the rich countries if they implement the correct “free-market” policies. But scholars and activists Toussaint and Millet demonstrate that this is patently false. Drawing on a wealth of detailed evidence, they explain how developed economies have systematically and deliberately exploited the less-developed economies by forcing them into unequal trade and political relationships. Integral to this arrangement are the international economic institutions ostensibly created to safeguard the stability of the global economy—the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank —and the imposition of massive foreign debt on poor countries. The authors explain in simple language, and ample use of graphics, the multiple contours of this exploitative system, its history, and how it continues to function in the present day.

Ultimately, Toussaint and Millet advocate cancellation of all foreign debt for developing countries and provide arguments from a number of perspectives—legal, economic, moral. Presented in an accessible and easily-referenced question and answer format, Debt, the IMF, and the World Bank is an essential tool for the global justice movement.

Éric Toussaint, a doctor in political science, is president of the Committee for the Abolition of Third World Debt, CADTM Belgium. He is author of A Diagnosis of Emerging Global Crisis and Alternatives, and The World Bank: A Critical Primer, among other books.

Damien Millet teaches mathematics and is spokesperson for CADTM France. He is the author of L’Afrique sans dette, and co-author with Éric Toussaint of Tsunami Aid or Debt Cancellation.

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Globalization

 

DEVELOPMENT AND GLOBALIZATION: A MARXIAN ANALYSIS

A new book by David F Ruccio

 
    • Price: £29.99 £26.99
    • Binding/Format: Paperback
    • ISBN: 978-0-415-77226-6
    • Publish Date: 28th September 2010
    • Imprint: Routledge
    • Pages: 320 pages

Series: Economics as Social Theory

Details at: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415772266/

Since the mid-1980s, David F. Ruccio has been developing a new framework of Marxian class analysis and applying it to various issues in socialist planning, Third World development, and capitalist globalization. The aim of this collection is to show, through a series of concrete examples, how Marxian class analysis can be used to challenge existing modes of thought and to produce new insights about the problems of capitalist development and the possibilities of imagining and creating non-capitalist economies.

The book consists of fifteen essays, plus an introductory chapter situating the author’s work in a larger intellectual and political context. The topics covered range from planning theory to the role of the state in the Nicaraguan Revolution, from radical theories of underdevelopment to the Third World debt crisis, and from a critical engagement with regulation theory to contemporary discussions of globalization and imperialism.

Foreword Stephen Resnick and Richard Wolff

Introduction

1. Rethinking Planning, Globalization, and Development from a Marxian Perspective Planning

2. Essentialism and Socialist Economic Planning: A Methodological Critique of Optimal Planning Theory

3. Planning and Class in Transitional Societies

4. The State and Planning in Nicaragua 
5. Nicaragua: The State, Class, and Transition Development

6. Radical Theories of Development: Frank, the Modes of Production School, and Amin

7. The Costs of Austerity in Nicaragua: The Worker-Peasant Alliance, 1979-1987

8. When Failure Becomes Success: Class and the Debate over Stabilization and Adjustment

9. Power and Class: The Contribution of Radical Approaches to Debt and Development

10. Capitalism and Industrialization in the Third World: Recognizing the Costs and Imagining Alternatives

11. ‘After’ Development: Reimagining Economy and Class

12. Reading Harold: Class Analysis, Capital Accumulation, and the Role of the Intellectual in Globalization

13. Fordism on a World Scale: International Dimensions of Regulation

14. Class Beyond the Nation-State

15. Global Fragments: Subjectivity and Class Politics in Discourses of Globalization

16. Globalization and Imperialism

David F. Ruccio is Professor of Economics at the University of Notre Dame, USA and past editor of the journal Rethinking Marxism.

Observations and Comments on Development and Globalization: A Marxian Analysis

Development, and Globalization is anti-essentialist social theory at its very best. Whether re-reading socialist planning debates, economic and social development struggles in the global South, or capitalist and alter-capitalist theories of globalization, David Ruccio engages the contemporary conjuncture in fresh and exciting ways, demonstrating throughout the successes of the rethinking Marxism project and the immense potential and range of contemporary Marxian analysis. What Maurice Dobb did for twentieth-century critiques of socialist planning, capitalist development, and imperialist expansion, Ruccio redoubles for a new age of post-Communist and globalized political economy — John Pickles, Earl N. Phillips Distinguished Professor of International Studies and Chair of the Department of Geography, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and author of A History of Spaces: Cartographic Reason, Mapping, and the Geo-Coded World

David Ruccio is a central figure in the exciting and innovative “postmodern” school of Marxian thought. Through his own writing and his stewardship of the journal Rethinking Marxism he has contributed immensely to this tradition. In this collection, Ruccio draws together, sharpens, and extends central insights from that school of thought and applies them to debates over socialist planning, economic development, and globalization. The essays demonstrate the depth of Ruccio’s intellect and the range of his expertise, to be sure, while also conveying the power of the postmodern Marxian tradition in helping us to overcome the malaise that now affects much contemporary left scholarship about prospects for radical reform in the Global South. In Ruccio’s hands, Marxism emerges as a vibrant tradition that continues to generate new avenues of scholarship and practical politics in pursuit of a more just world. — George DeMartino, Josef Korbel School of International Studies, University of Denver and author of Global Economy, Global Justice: Theoretical and Policy Alternatives to Neoliberalism

Whether one agrees or not with the basic premises and analysis of this book, it will provide an intellectual challenge to everyone. Focusing on issues related to planning, development and globalization, particularly in Latin America, Ruccio questions the prevailing wisdom in circles of both the Right and the Left. His privileging of class analysis provides the unifying thread to the wide variety of themes covered in the sixteen chapters. In our post-crisis search for new economic thinking and alternatives for social transformation, Ruccio’s book comes at a perfect time to contribute to the debates. — Lourdes Beneria, Cornell University and author of Gender, Development, and Globalization: Economics as if All People Mattered

Pathbreaking in its originality and breathtaking in its coverage, the truly outstanding volume David Ruccio has delivered is indispensable in critiquing a variety of prevailing developmental paradigms. Rather than simplistically noting the ‘failures’ of capitalism, this book reveals how neoliberal development policies can be considered successful in terms of promoting the emergence and strengthening of capitalist class processes and the appropriation of surplus-value in Latin America and beyond. It is obligatory reading for scholars and students seeking to construct Marxian class analyses and to formulate alternatives to the world economy today. — Adam David Morton, University of Nottingham and author of Unravelling Gramsci: Hegemony and Passive Revolution in the Global Political Economy

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