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Red

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THE ROUGE FORUM – UPDATE 20 JULY 2009

 

A Message from Rich Gibson

Dear Friends

The Rouge Forum No Blood For Oil page is up and updated at: http://www.rougeforum.org .

Remember, nominations for the Rouge Forum Steering Committee can be made to Community Coordinator Adam Renner by August 15 (arenner@bellarmine.edu)

On the Capitalist Education for War and Inequality Front:

Obama to Schools: Change Tenure Laws or Else: The Ed Stim is Merit Pay:
http://gothamschools.org/2009/07/09/obama-official-to-new-york-change-your-tenure-law-or-else/comment-page-1/#comment-154665

UC System Demands 9% Tuition Hike and 8% Pay Cut While Class Size Booms:
http://www3.signonsandiego.com/stories/2009/jul/15/bn15uc-budget-cuts/?california

CSU Boss Wants 20% Tuition Hike: http://www.sacbee.com/topstories/story/2033136.html

Substance News carries the wrap up of the National Education Association Rep Assembly: http://www.substancenews.net

Linda Chavez, a top aide to the American Federation of Teachers’ Albert Shanker, testifies against Sotomayor:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/07/16/AR2009071603124.html

On “The Depression can only be a passing fancy” Front:

Paul Craig Roberts: “This should tell even the most dim witted patriot who “their” government represents.”
http://www.counterpunch.org/roberts07162009.html

Rolling Stone on Goldman Sachs and the Great American Bubble Machine: http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/story/28816321/the_great_american_bubble_machine/print #

Chart on the Waves of California Jobs Lost: http://www.sacbee.com/1232/rich_media/2022115.html

Reuters: Foreclosures Hit Record High: http://www.reuters.com/article/domesticNews/idUSTRE56F0XK20090716

The International War of the Rich on the Poor Front:
The Bushamagogue Assassination Schemes:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jeremy-scahill/the-democrats-selective-a_b_233708.html

Michael Klare’s Shocker: Iraq as the New Oil Pump
http://www.tomdispatch.com/post/175095

And the Resistance (bad example/good example) Front:

So Long EFCA: Union Bosses Can Deliver—nothing: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/17/business/17union.html

UK Public Worker Strikes Rise
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601087&sid=aw6B8IQyUQME

The many crises grow around us apace. Unemployment and foreclosures mean an eradicated tax base, meaning more demands for cuts on education and services, increased taxation of those who have a little,  more pr to crush hope in the sense that nothing can be done, more police activity to raise funds and tamp down resistance, and more spectacles. On the war front, more war—for oil, regional control, that is, profits, using the children of the poor to fight the children of the poor on behalf of the rich in their homelands.

What stops the madness? Understanding that the core issue of our time is the relationship of rising color-coded inequality to the potential of mass class-conscious resistance. That has been the project of the Rouge Forum, connection reason to power, for more than a decade. Please join us and help lead the fight-backs that will come.

Thanks to Bob, Al, Sean, Amber, Tony, Kino, Marisol, the Dean, Candace, Sally, Sheri, Barb and Ken (yes, that is right), Donna, Brian, Adam and Gina, Koli, Jesus, Ashwana, Bill, Joe, Dariah,  the Susans, and Ann.

Good luck to us, every one

Rich Gibson

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Academic Labor and Law

Special Section of Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor

 

Guest EditorJennifer Wingard

University of Houston

 

The historical connections between legislation, the courts, and the academy have been complex and multi-layered. This has been evident from early federal economic policies, such as the Morell Act and the GI Bill, through national and state legislation that protected student and faculty rights, such as the First Amendment and affirmative action clauses. These connections continue into our current moment of state and national efforts to define the work of the university, such as The Academic Bill of Rights and court cases regarding distance learning. The question, then, becomes whether and to what extent the impact of legislation and litigation reveals or masks the shifting mission of the academy. Have these shifts been primarily economic, with scarcities of funding leading many to want to legislate what is considered a university education, how it should be financed, and who should benefit from it? Are the shifts primarily ideological, with political interests working to change access, funding, and the intellectual project of higher education? Or are the shifts a combination of both political and economic influences? One thing does become clear from these discussions: at their core, the legal battles surrounding higher education are about the changing nature of the university –the use of managerial/corporate language; the desire to professionalize students rather than liberally educate them; the need to create transparent structures of evaluation for both students and faculty; and the attempt to define the types of knowledge produced and disseminated in the classroom. These are changes for which faculty, students, administrators, as well as citizens who feel they have a stake in higher education, seek legal redress. This special section of Workplace aims to explore the ways in which legislation and court cases impact the work of students, professors, contingent faculty, and graduate students in the university. Potential topics include but are not limited to:

 

Academic Freedom for students and/or faculty

* Horowitz’s Academic Bill of Rights

* Missouri’s Emily Booker Intellectual Diversity Act

* First Amendment court cases concerning faculty and student’s rights to freely express themselves in the classroom and on campuses

* Facebook/Myspace/Blog court cases

* Current legislative and budgetary “attacks” on area studies (i.e. Queer Studies in Georgia, Women’s Studies in Florida)

Affirmative Action

* The implementation of state and university diversity initiatives in the 1970s

* The current repeal of affirmative action law across the country

* Benefits, including Health Benefits, Domestic Partner Benefits

* How universities in states with same-sex marriage bans deal with domestic partner benefits

Collective Bargaining

* The recent rulings at NYU and Brown about the status of graduate students as employees

* State anti-unionization measures and how they impact contingent faculty

Copyright/Intellectual Property

* In Distance Learning

* In corporate sponsored science research

* In government sponsored research

Disability Rights and Higher Education

* How the ADA impacts the university

* Sexual Harassment and Consensual Relationships

* How diversity laws and sexual harassment policies impact the university

Tenure

* The Bennington Case

* Post 9/11 court cases

 

Contributions for Workplace should be 4000-6000 words in length and should conform to MLA style. If interested, please send an abstract via word attachment to Jennifer Wingard (jwingard@central.uh.edu) by Friday, May 22, 2009. Completed essays will be due via email by Monday, August 24, 2009.

 

E. Wayne Ross

Professor

Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy

University of British Columbia

2125 Main Mall

Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4

Canada

604-822-2830

wayne.ross@ubc.ca

 

http://www.ewayneross.net

 

Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor: http://www.workplace-gsc.com

Cultural Logic: http://eserver.org/clogic

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski