Skip navigation

Tag Archives: Teacher unions

No Future

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 19th MARCH 2011

EVENTS

PANEL AND BOOK LAUNCH – “EDUCATING ELITES: CLASS PRIVILEGE AND EDUCATIONAL ADVANTAGE”

Wednesday, April 13th, 2011
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), room 5-250
252 Bloor St. West (St. George subway station), Toronto

10:00am – 11:45am (Panel)
11:45am – 1:00pm (Book Launch / Lunch Reception)

Panelists:

– Jane Kenway, Professor Monash University – “Elite Schools, Trans-national Capitals, and Global Elite Formations”
– Paul Tarc, Assistant Professor University of Western Ontario – “The Uses of International Education for (Becoming) Elites: The Case of the International Baccalaureate”
– Adam Howard, Associate Professor Colby College – “Shifting Landscapes: Elite Education in the New Economy”
– Rubén Gaztambide-Fernández, Assistant Professor CTL, OISE – “Notes on the Emergence and Significance of Elite Schooling as a Subject of Educational Research”

Chair : Kari Dehli, Professor SESE, OISE

Books by the panelists will be on sale from the Toronto Women’s Bookstore: http://www.womensbookstore.com

Co-sponsors: Ontario Institute for Studies in Education – Department of Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning; Department of Sociology and Equity Studies in Education; Comparative, International & Development Education Centre; Centre for Media and Culture in Education, Toronto Women’s Bookstore
+++++

COMMON THREAD COMMUNITY CHORUS OF TORONTO – BENEFIT CONCERT FOR MENNONITE NEW LIFE CENTRE & JUSTICIA FOR MIGRANT WORKERS

March 26
7:30 pm
St Simon’s Anglican Church, 525 Bloor Street East
Sherbourne subway station (Glen Road exit)

Tickets: Adults $20/advance – $25/door;  Students & Seniors $15/advance – $20/door; Children under 10 – free

http://www.commonthreadchorus.ca/sites/default/files/poster-spring-2011.jpg

– Mennonite New Life Centre: http://mnlct.org
– Justicia for Migrant Workers:  http://justicia4migrantworkers.org
– Proyecto Altiplano:  http://myspace.com/proyectoaltiplano/stream

Common Thread Chorus: http://www.commonthreadchorus.ca

For Tickets: 416-410-5022 or info@commonthreadchorus.ca
+++++

CU EXPO 2011 – COMMUNITY-UNIVERSITY PARTNERSHIPS: BRINGING GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES TO LOCAL ACTION

May 10-14, 2011
Waterloo Region, Ontario

CU Expo 2011 will showcase the exemplars in community-university partnerships worldwide, and explore and introduce creative ways of strengthening our local communities.

The conference is expected to draw over 800 people from Canada and around the world who are passionate about the power of community-university partnerships as a vehicle for social change. Students, community leaders, researchers, educators, funders, policy makers and others invested in community-building will be in attendance.

The CU Expo movement began in Canada as a response to individuals involved community-university partnerships needing a forum to share experiences, strategies and ideas. CU Expo 2011 will address the conference objectives, themes and streams through a variety of session offerings and opportunities for dialogue.

Learn more: http://www.cuexpo2011.ca/

+++++

BUILDING SOLIDARITY: CAMPUS LABOUR STRUGGLES AND THE STUDENT CONNECTION

A forum to discuss and unite worker and student struggles at U of T

March 31, 2011
6-9pm
Bahen Centre, University of Toronto
Room 2175 (40 St. George Street)

A brief overview of the working conditions at the University of Toronto shows that something is just not right: most contract faculty members have virtually no job security; largely racialized food-service workers are paid less than a living wage; post-doctoral fellows have zero input in the drafting of their contracts; female administrative staff members receive less pay than their male counterparts; and non-tenured professors fear termination for voicing opinions on contentious political issues.

Meanwhile, students at the U of T are also engaged in pitched battles to keep post-secondary education accessible and equitable. Campaigns to eliminate ever-increasing tuition fees, to defend equity-based programs under threat of extinction, to challenge autocratic room booking policies, and to overturn unrepresentative and unaccountable governing bodies are just some of the issues that they organize around everyday.

In short, there is a whole host of injustices that plague both workers and students on this campus. As a working group of the newly-formed University of Toronto General Assembly, Student-Worker Solidarity (SWS) seeks to challenge this state of affairs by bringing different campus workers together to speak with students about their issues, while also providing students with an opportunity to relay their concerns to workers.

With this forum, SWS hopes to begin the conversation in order to create new ways of thinking about and participating in the struggles of those who make our University what it is.

Speakers will include members of the following:

– Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) Local 3902
– United Steelworkers (USW) Local 1998
– UniteHERE Local 75
– University of Toronto Faculty Association (UTFA)
– University of Toronto General Assembly (UTGA)

**Refreshments will be provided
**Email utgeneralassembly@gmail.com for more information
**This event is endorsed by OPIRG-Toronto

+++++

SOCIAL ECONOMY CENTRE LUNCHBOX SPEAKERS’ SERIES –  HOUSING ALTERNATIVES

Wednesday, March 23, 2011
Noon – 1:30 pm
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto
252 Bloor St. West, Toronto
Room 12-199

with Joe Deschênes Smith and Michael Shapcott

– Joe Deshchênes Smith will talk about investment process for new affordable housing, as well as attributes of the Home Ownership Initiative’s 2nd mortgage for low/modest income home-buyers.
– Michael Shapcott will discuss the social economy elements of the Precarious Housing report recently released by Affordable Housing and Social Innovation at the Wellesley Institute.

Moderator: David Hulchanski, Director, Centre for Urban and Community Studies, University of Toronto

Bring your lunch and a mug. Water, coffee and tea will be provided.

For more information, please contact Lisa White: secspeakerseries@gmail.com

This event will also be webcast live on the Internet.  Please see our website for detailed instructions: http://socialeconomy.utoronto.ca

+++++

PANEL – PAUL ROBESON: THE TALLEST TREE IN OUR FOREST

Wednesday, March 23
7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
East Common Room, Hart House
University of Toronto
7 Hart House Circle

Speakers:
– Ken Jeffers (City of Toronto Manager, Access and Diversity, Parks Forestry and Recreation)
– Norm Kelly (Writer and Playwright)
– Lee Lorch (Civil rights activist and York Professor Emeritus)
– Rathika Sitsabaiesan (Scarborough-Rouge River Federal NDP Candidate)

Sponsored by Centre for the Study of the United States

+++++

NEWS & VIEWS

UFCW CANADA RELEASE: WORKERS’ ACTION CENTRE LAUNCHES PROVINCIAL INITIATIVE – “UNDERCOVER STORIES ON WAGE THEFT”

Wage theft, in its various incarnations, is a workplace plague in Canada which is evident in a variety of communities. It is a particularly painful in immigrant communities. Many employers continuously abuse Employment Standards protections of these precarious workers as a means to simple but effectively improve profits.

On behalf of the 250,000 UFCW Canada members across Canada, we say NO to Wage Theft and YES to the much needed advocacy initiatives by the Workers’ Action Centre in Toronto. No worker deserves to get less than their fair wage. Every worker deserves to be heard.

We commend the Workers’ Action Centre on their initiative entitled “Undercover Stories on Wage Theft” and their advocacy in support for this initiative. We encourage you to take the time to support this important campaign.

To learn more: http://www.workersactioncentre.org

+++++

ALTERNATIVE FEDERAL BUDGET 2011 LAUNCHED – RETHINK, REBUILD, RENEW: A POST-RECESSION RECOVERY PLAN

From Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)

The Alternative Budget presents a comprehensive recovery plan designed to:

– get Canadians working in good jobs again;
– reduce record-high income inequality, strengthen Canada’s middle class, and improve supports for Canada’s poor and most vulnerable;
– protect public programs that all Canadians rely on — including public health care and public pensions;
– manage Canada’s debt-to-GDP ratio without vital public program cuts;
– get serious about reducing greenhouse gas emissions; and
– launch a multi-pronged initiative to expand high value-added production in key sectors.

Read more: http://www.policyalternatives.ca/afb2011

+++++

TEACHING ABOUT LABOR ISSUES AND THE WISCONSIN WORKER FIGHTBACK

From Rethinking Schools

According to labor historian Mark J. Naison, the movement of workers that began in Wisconsin and is now spreading to other states is “the most important labor struggle in the United States in the 21st century.”

The current uprising of workers in Wisconsin and other states presents a powerful opportunity to teach students about what the protests are about and why their teachers and neighbors are joining the struggle.  It’s an opportunity to critically examine issues, and to model for students’ responsible civic action and engagement in the political process.

As members of teacher unions, we have an additional responsibility, summarized by the late Howard Zinn in an interview published in Transforming Teacher Unions:

“If teacher unions want to be strong and well-supported, it’s essential that they not only be teacher unionists but teachers of unionism. We need to create a generation of students who support teachers and the movements of teachers for their rights.”

Embrace this “teachable moment” and share with us in the comments what resources you are using, how you are using them, and how your students are responding.

Read more: http://rethinkingschools.org/news/WIProtestTeachingResources.shtml

+++++

BOOK – THE SPIRIT LEVEL: WHY GREATER EQUALITY MAKES SOCIETIES STRONGER

[The authors] Wilkinson and Pickett make an eloquent case that the income gap between a nation’s richest and poorest is the most powerful indicator of a functioning and healthy society. Amid the statistics that support their argument (increasing income disparity sees corresponding spikes in homicide, obesity, drug use, mental illness, anxiety, teenage pregnancies, high school dropouts—even incidents of playground bullying), the authors take an empathetic view of our ability to see beyond self-interest…There is evidence that the human brain—with its distinctively large neocortex—evolved the way it has because we were designed to be attentive to, depend on, and be depended on by others.

Ordering information: http://www.amazon.com/Spirit-Level-Equality-Societies-Stronger/dp/1608190366

Hear Wilkinson give a 1:34:42 speech on the subject of his book. The volume is okay after he’s introduced. The graphics he uses appear on your screen as he proceeds through the presentation.

http://www.fhs.sfu.ca/news/events/special-guest-speaker-dr.-richard-g.-wilkinson

+++++

MAYTREE FOUNDATION – THE “PILOT” FOR RECRUITING TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS FOR LOW-SKILLED JOBS SHOULD BE ABOLISHED

The latest Maytree discussion paper argues that the growth in the temporary foreign worker program is contrary to Canada’s social and economic interests. It suggests that those currently in Canada under the Pilot Project for Occupations Requiring Lower Levels of Formal Training should be granted permanent residence.

Read more: http://bit.ly/eVP7jX

+++++

NO FARE IS FAIR – A ROUNDTABLE WITH MEMBERS OF THE GREATER TORONTO WORKERS’ ASSEMBLY TRANSIT COMMITTEE

By Ali Mustafa, The Bullet

The Greater Toronto Workers’ Assembly (GTWA) is a promising new initiative aiming to build a united, non-sectarian, and militant anti-capitalist movement in the city among a diversity of rank-and-file labour unionists, grassroots community organizers, and youth alike. Since the GTWA’s inception in early 2010, mass public transit has emerged as one of the organization’s key political battlegrounds. In this in-depth roundtable discussion, members of the GTWA’s transit committee Jordy Cummings, Lisa Leinveer, Leo Panitch, Kamilla Pietrzyk, and Herman Rosenfeld explore both the opportunities and obstacles facing the campaign Towards a Free and Accessible TTC.

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/480.php

(END)
++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++

ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

NEW ISSUE OF ‘WORKPLACE: A JOURNAL FOR ACADEMIC LABOR’

Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor has just published its latest issue at: http://m1.cust.educ.ubc.ca/journal/index.php/workplace

We invite you to review the Table of Contents here and then visit our web site to review articles and items of interest.

We would like to thank Professor Howard Stevenson (University of Lincoln, UK) for his tremendous work as section editor for this issue.

Thanks for the continuing interest in our work.

Stephen Petrina
E. Wayne Ross
Co-Editors, Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor
University of British Columbia
wayne.ross@ubc.ca

Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor
No 17 (2010): Working In, and Against, the Neo-Liberal State: Global Perspectives on K-12 Teacher Unions
Table of Contents
http://m1.cust.educ.ubc.ca/journal/index.php/workplace/issue/view/8

Articles
——–

Working In, and Against, the Neo-Liberal State: Global Perspectives on K-12 Teacher Unions: Special Issue Introduction
Howard Stevenson

Terminating the Teaching Profession: Neoliberal Reform, Resistance and the Assault on Teachers in Chile
Jill Pinkney Pastrana

Social Justice Teacher Unionism in a Canadian Context: Linking Local and Global efforts
Cindy Rottman

Australian Education Unionism in the Age of Neoliberalism: Education as a Public Good, Not a Private Benefit
Jeff Garsed, John Williamson

“What’s Best for Kids” vs. Teacher Unions: How Teach For America Blames Teacher Unions for the Problems of Urban Schools
Heidi Katherine Pitzer

Gramsci, Embryonic Organic Intellectuals, and Scottish Teacher Learning Representatives: Alternatives to Neoliberal Approaches to Professional Development in the K-12 Sector
Alex Alexandrou

Pedagogy of Liminality? The Case of Turkish Teachers’ Union Egitim-Sen
Duygun Gokturk

Book Reviews
——–

Review of Industrial Relations in Education: Transforming the School Workforce
Merryn Hutchings

A Portrait of Authenticity: A Review of Carl Mirra’s (2010) The Admirable Radical: Staughton Lynd and Cold War Dissent, 1945-1970. Kent, OH: Kent
University Press
Adam Renner

Review of Union Learning Representatives: Challenges and Opportunities
Becky Wright

Review of How the University Works: Higher Education and the Low-Wage Nation
Marisa Huerta

Review of Academic Repression: Reflections from the Academic-Industrial Complex
Leah Schweitzer

The Sociopathology of Everyday Business: A Review of The University Against Itself: The NYU Strike and the Future of the Academic Workplace
Jim Rovira

Review of The Rich World and the Impoverishment of Education: Diminishing Democracy, Equity and Workers’ Rights
Paul Orlowski

Technology and (Human) Rights: A Review of Human Rights in the Global Information Society
Stephen Petrina

Review of The Developing World and State Education: Neoliberal Depredation and Egalitarian Alternatives
Steven L. Strauss

Miscellany
——–
Connecting Teacher Unions and Teacher Union Research
AERA Teachers’ Work/Teacher Unions SIG

********************

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Working In, and Against, the Neo-Liberal State: Global Perspectives on K-12 Teacher Unions

 

Call for Papers

 

Special Issue for Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor

(http://www.workplac e-gsc.com)

 

The neo-liberal restructuring of national education systems is a global phenomenon and represents a major threat to the possibility of a democratic, public education committed to meeting the needs of working class and oppressed groups.  Teacher unions, across the world, despite all the attacks on them, represent perhaps the most formidable obstacle to neo-liberal restructuring.  Teachers remain highly unionized and although they have suffered many setbacks in recent years, their collective organizations generally remain robust.

 

Despite the significance and importance of teacher unions they remain largely under-researched.  Mainstream academic literature on school sector education policy often ignores teacher unions, even in cases where scholars are critical of the market orientation of neo-liberal reforms.  Two recent exceptions to this tradition are the contributions of Compton and Weiner (2008) and Stevenson et al (2007).  The strength of Compton and Weiner’s excellent volume is the breadth of international perspectives. However, individual chapters are largely short ‘vignettes’, and the aim is to offer fairly brief and readable accounts, rather than detailed and scholarly analysis.  Stevenson et al offer a series of traditional scholarly articles, although the emphasis is largely on the Anglophone nations (UK, North America, Australasia) , and the collection fails to capture the full breadth required of an international perspective.  In both cases, and quite understandably, these contributions were not able to take account of the seismic developments in the world capitalist economy since Autumn 08 in particular. These developments have significant implications for the future of neo-liberalism, for the development of education policy in nation states and for the policies and practices of teacher unions. There is now a strong case for an analysis of teacher unionism that is detailed, scholarly, international and able to take account of current developments.

 

This special section of Workplace will focus on the ways in which teacher unions in the K-12 sector are challenging the neo-liberal restructuring of school education systems in a range of global contexts.  Neo-liberalism’ s reach is global. Its impact on the restructuring of public education systems shares many common characteristics wherever it manifests itself.  That said, it also plays out differently in different national and local contexts.  This collection of papers will seek to assess how teacher unions are challenging the trajectory of neo-liberal reform in a number of different national contexts.  By drawing on contributors from all the major world continents it will seek to highlight the points of contact and departure in the apparently different ways in which teacher unions interface with the neo-liberal agenda. It will also ensure that analyses seek to reflect recent developments in the global capitalist economy, and the extent to which this represents threat or opportunity for organized teacher movements.

 

Compton, M. and Weiner, L. (2008) The Global Assault on Teachers, Teaching and their Unions, London: Palgrave.

 

Stevenson, H. et al (2007) Changes in Teachers’ Work and the Challengs Facing Teacher Unions. International Electronic Journal of Leadership for Learning. Volume 11. http://www.ucalgary .ca/~iejll/

 

Submissions

Contributions to Workplace should be 4000-6000 words in length and should conform to MLA style.  If you are interested, please submit an abstract via Word attachment to Howard Stevenson (hstevenson@lincoln. ac.uk) by 31st July 2009. Completed articles will be due via email on 28th December 2009.  All papers will be blind peer-reviewed.

 

 

E. Wayne Ross

http://www.ewaynero ss.net

wayne.ross@mac. com

 

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk