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Tag Archives: Student Movement

Ilana Verdansky

NEW RADICAL PHILOSOPHY WEBSITE

We’re delighted to announce the launch of the new website for Radical Philosophy. The address remains the same – http://www.radicalphilosophy.com – but as well as updating the way the website looks and works, we have added every single item from our back catalogue to the online archive, from the first Radical Philosophy published in Spring 1972 through to the very latest issue.

Subscribers continue to have full access to and unlimited downloads from the archive, including all articles, interviews and reviews now available from RP1 to the present. If you would like full access to the archive and the journal delivered direct to your door, please consider supporting Radical Philosophy by taking out an annual subscription from as little as £24 (full details of subscription rates and information on how to subscribe can be found at: http://www.radicalphilosophy.com/subscriptions

Our non-subscribing readers will enjoy free access to all the commentaries, obituaries, conference and news reports, plus highlights from back issues and new access to hundreds of items from the expanded archive. A new feature of the website will also allow non-subscribers to purchase and download pdfs of individual items from the archive at an affordable price of £3 for any article or interview and £2 for the reviews sections from recent issues.

Articles and interviews, from 1972-2011, include important work by some of the most seminal philosophical writers of the last 40 years, including: Alliez, Badiou, Balibar, Berardi, Bhabha, Bourdieu, Buck-Morss, Butler, Canguilhem, Cassin, Caygill, Connolly, Critchley, Derrida, Didi-Huberman, Feyerabend, Foucault, Groys, Hallward, Harootunian, Haug, Horkheimer, Koolhaas, Lacoue-Labarthe, Laplanche, Lazzarato, Le Doeuff, Macherey, Malabou, Negri, Osborne, Rancière, Segal, Sloterdijk, Sohn-Rethel, Soper, Spivak, Stengers, Virilio, Zizek, and many others.

When the first issue of Radical Philosophy was published in January 1972, it sought – in the wake of the rise of the New Left and the student movements of the 1960s – to challenge the institutional divisions that it saw as contributing to the impoverishment of contemporary philosophical practice: divisions that existed between academic departments, between teachers and their students, and between the university and society. “Our main aim,” the Editorial Collective declared, “is to free ourselves from the restricting institutions and orthodoxies of the academic world, and thereby to encourage important philosophical work to develop: Let a Hundred Flowers Blossom!” In the ensuing forty years much has changed about contemporary philosophy, in the UK and elsewhere.  But as testified by our recent dossiers on transdisciplinarity, our campaign reports on the revitalized student movement, and our regular philosophically-informed commentaries on contemporary social and political issues, those problematic disciplinary, pedagogical and social divisions continue to be challenged by those writing in Radical Philosophy.

To access our expanded archive, subscribe to the journal, check out selected content from our latest issue, or download the current free gift from our back catalogue – Jacques Rancière’s `On the Theory of Ideology’ (originally published in RP7, Spring 1974) – please visit us today: http://www.radicalphilosophy.com

The Radical Philosophy Editorial Collective

 

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Higher Education Crisis

UNMAKING THE PUBLIC UNIVERSITY

Chris Newfield author of the “Unmaking of the Public University” is speaking at Goldsmiths College, University of London, next Monday

Monday 7th March, 2011
5.00pm-7.00pm
Room 309, Richard Hoggart Builidng
Christopher Newfield “The Broken American Funding Model: Our Higher Education Problem, and Yours”

The talk will discuss the conventional wisdom about how American research universities are funded, and show that it is wrong. Although Americans disagree about whether the privatization of public universities is educationally and socially desirable, there is a general consensus that it is financially sound. This talk shows that privatization doesn’t make basic budgetary sense, and that one can argue against reduction of public funding on financial as well as educational and social grounds. It will also review recent U.S. activism and suggest ways in which a better higher education model might be starting to emerge.

Introduced and chaired by Les Back

Christopher Newfield teaches American Studies in the English Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His current research focuses on higher education history, funding, and policy, culture and innovation, and the relation between culture and economics. Recent articles have appeared in the Chronicle of Higher Education, Academe, Le Monde Diplomatique, La Revue Internationale des Livres et des Idées, Radikal (Turkey), Social Text, Critical Inquiry, and South Atlantic Quarterly, and include “The Renewal of Student Movements, 2009-10,” “The View from 2020: How Universities Came Back,” “The End of the American Funding Model: What Comes Next? “Ending the Budget Wars: Funding the Humanities during a Crisis in Higher Education,” “Public Universities at Risk: 7 Damaging Myths,” “Science and Social Welfare,” “L’Université et la revanche des ‘Elites’ aux Etats-Unis,” “Why Public is Losing to Private in American Research,” and “Can American Studies Do Economics?” He is the author of The Emerson Effect: Individualism and Submission in America (University of Chicago Press, 1996), Ivy and Industry: Business and the Making of the American University, 1880-1980 (Duke University Press, 2003), and Unmaking the Public University: The Forty Year Assault on the Middle Class (Harvard University Press, 2008), chairs the Innovation Group at the NSF Center for Nanotechnology in Society, runs a blog on the current crisis in higher education, Rethinking the University (http://utotherescue.blogspot.com), blogs at the Huffington Post, and is working on a book called Lower Education: What to do about our Downsized Future.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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Jacob

COMMON | RESISTANCE | INDEPENDENCE | EXODUS

Common is a political inquiry journal that is born during the crisis, during the global tsunami. We have set this journal as a dispositive to investigate the present time in the framework of the economic crisis that we are experiencing, looking for some directions of political action, measuring a new temporality and discovering the mutations of behaviour and imagery.

The journal forces us or, as you prefer, facilitate us to think collectively about the phase; identifying the common feature of the time we are living in, looking for a sense that enables us to understand the contingency, using it as a effective compass for the political action.

The field of education, the process of impoverishment in terms of perspective and future for the young generation, are the research fields for the debut of Common. In the epoch of cognitive capitalism, in an apparent paradox, it seems that the governance of the productive forces passes through a sort of war on knowledge. Starting from inquiring the biggest student movement in Italy and Europe since 1968, this issue is an attempt to analyze the new political anthropology within the temporality of the movement, its discontinuity and challenges.

“In the background”, “In figura” and “Lines of flight” are the three main sections that compose Common. The methodology of inquiry, the themes treated in this issue, such as institutions, self-education and common, are dispositive to strengthen our resistance, to organize our independence, to defend our exodus.

Common |Resistance |Independence |Exodus

Editorial Collective:

Marco Bascetta / Claudia Bernardi / Francesco Brancaccio / Antonio Conti/ Alberto De Nicola / Paolo Do / Serena Fredda / Fabio Gianfrancesco / Augusto Illuminati / Federico Marini / Antonio Negri / Isabella Pinto / Francesco Raparelli / Judith Revel / Tania Rispoli / Benedetto Vecchi / Giuliana Visco

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Table of contents Zero issue

Editorial:  making inquiry within the crisis

// In the background

Toni Negri: Corruption, new accumulation, refeudalization
Antonio Conti: The crisis and the general intellect
Marco Bascetta: Reactionary philosophy
Alberto De Nicola: The triumph of the brain
Carlo Vercellone: Models of welfare and social services in the systemic crisis of the cognitive capitalism

// In figura

Isabella Pinto, Tania Rispoli: Who values whom? Merit and cooperative innovation
Ugo Mattei (interviewed by Francesco Brancaccio): The university beyond public and private
Marco Baravalle: The Wave in the factory of the culture
Bartleby: Experiments of self-education
Francesco Brancaccio: Self-education as prefiguration of an institution to come
Chiara Bastianoni, Vanessa Bilancetti, Serena Fredda, Tiziano Trobia (edited by): Medium waves
Luca Cafagna, Fabio Gianfrancesco, Giuliana Visco (edited by): The shape of water
Morgan Adamson: The financialization of student life
Claudia Bernardi, Paolo Do: Europe sauvage
Alberto De Nicola, Francesco Raparelli: After the backwash

// lines of flight

Serena Fredda, Viola Mordenti: Lexicon – difference
Girolamo De Michele: Festina lente
Infosex: becoming whore

Augusto Illuminati: About tyrant, corruption and more

Common: http://www.commonrivista.org

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MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Money Menace